Department of War Studies

War Studies

The Department of War Studies, King's College London, focuses on promoting understanding of war, conflict and international security. The podcasts highlight the department's research and teaching activities. They also cover events the department organises
War Studies

Description

The Department of War Studies, King's College London, focuses on promoting understanding of war, conflict and international security. The podcasts highlight the department's research and teaching activities. They also cover events the department organises for its students and the public. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Categories

Education

Episodes

Podcast: student experience / report on 4chan and 'radicalisation'

Mar 25, 2020 00:25:19

Description:

We have a report on right-wing 'radicalisation' on platforms like 4chan with insights from our colleague Dr Thomas Colley. We also talk to Sanjana Balu, the department's student experience and outreach officer. Adam caught up with two students and asked them about adapting to study from home. Presented by Adam Beswick, Dr Peter Busch and Sally Horspool.

Podcast: War Studies 'at home'

Mar 24, 2020 00:23:31

Description:

We are talking to staff and students on how they are coping with the coronavirus crisis. Dr Amanda Chisholm also explains how 'virtual writing sprints' work.

Event: Reflections on the Birth of International Criminal Justice at the ICTY

Mar 6, 2020 00:33:51

Description:

William Fenrick, former military lawyer and legal adviser for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) reflects on his experience at varying stages of his career within the field of international criminal justice. This event took place at the Department of War Studies, King's College London and was entitled: 'Putting Law into War: Reflections on the Birth of International Criminal Justice at the ICTY.

Podcast: Free Speech, Religion and the United Nations - Heini i Skorini

Feb 28, 2020 00:20:30

Description:

In this edition of the War Studies podcast, Heini i Skorini from the University of the Faroe Islands in Denmark discusses the theme of his latest book. He investigates how the struggle to define the limits of free speech with regards to religion unfolds within the United Nations system. The publication gives a broad overview of the political struggle to interpret and define the meaning of human rights and freedom of expression.

Event: Brendan Simms - Hitler: A Global Biography

Feb 17, 2020 00:34:38

Description:

In this latest event recording, Professor Brendan Simms of the University of Cambridge discusses his new biography of Adolf Hitler, entitled Hitler: A Global Biography. He argues that contrary to past accounts, Hitler was driven by a desire to confront the United States and capitalism more broadly.

Podcast: The debate around realism, reflection on Stephen Walt's Talk

Feb 15, 2020 00:11:57

Description:

Two BA International Relations student from the Department of War Studies report on a talk given by Professor Stephen Walt. Professor Walt, one of the leading scholars of realism. For the full recording of Professor Walt's presentation visit: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/event-why-is-it-useful-to-think-like-a-realist?in=warstudies/sets/events

Podcast: Exhibition - Art, Conflict & Remembering: The Murals of the Bogside Artists

Feb 1, 2020 00:24:14

Description:

In this edition of the King's College Podcast, Dr. Rachel Kerr meets the artists who contributed to the exhibition entitled Art, Conflict & Remembering: The Murals of the Bogside Artists, held from 28 January to 30 February 2020 at The Exchange, Bush House. This powerful exhibition tells the story of the Troubles through the twelve large-scale murals of The People’s Gallery in Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Created and curated by King's College Visiting Research Fellow Dr. Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin, in close co-operation with the Bogside Artists, the exhibition draws attention to the non-sectarian Civil Rights movement in the late 1960s and raises awareness of the lasting effects of The Troubles on the day-to-day lives of ordinary people.

Event: Michael Newman - Transitional Justice: Contending with the Past

Jan 31, 2020 00:43:52

Description:

What should be done after the end of a repressive regime or a civil war? How can bitter divisions be resolved in a way that combines reconciliation with accountability? These are typical questions within the field of transitional justice, but each of them is complex and contested and discussed in a wide range of disciplines. Michael Newman draws on his new book, Transitional Justice: Contending with the Past, to explore some of the major debates and themes. Michael Newman is Emeritus Professor at London Metropolitan University, He has been teaching ‘War, Peace and World Order’, at NYU London since 2011. This talk is part of the War Crimes Spring Term Seminar Series at King's College London.

Event: Applying Insights from the UK-Ireland Split in 1921 to Post - Brexit UK-EU Relations

Jan 30, 2020 00:52:08

Description:

King's College London event recording from 22 January 2020 entitled: 'Applying Insights from the UK-Ireland split in 1921 to Post-Brexit UK-EU Relations.' Panellists included Dr. Bill Kissane (LSE), Prof. Mary Daly (Univ. College Dublin) and Brendan Simms (Univ. of Cambridge).

Event: Strategic and Tactical Slavery in War

Jan 17, 2020 00:38:38

Description:

Throughout history, conflict and war have created conditions in which enslavement thrives. In turn, slavery has featured centrally in many conflicts as both a strategic goal and a means of waging war. Professor Kevin Bales will present the findings to date of a major research project at the Rights Lab (University of Nottingham) exploring the links between slavery and war. This project seeks to map the connections between slavery and conflict, determining how incidences and patterns of enslavement vary depending on the forms of conflict, levels of intensity and duration, and the nature of the combatants and their objectives. This event was hosted by the Centre for Strand Strategy https://www.kcl.ac.uk/research/kcl-centre-for-grand-strategy

Event: From Timbuktu to The Hague

Jan 17, 2020 00:31:29

Description:

First event of the War Crimes Spring Term Seminar Series (https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/series/war-crimes-spring-term-seminar-series). Speaker: Professor Mark Drumbl - Class of 1975 Alumni Professor at Washington & Lee University, School of Law, where he also serves as Director of the Transnational Law Institute. He has held visiting appointments with a number of law faculties, including Oxford, Paris II (Pantheon-Assas), Trinity College, Dublin, Melbourne, Monash, and Ottawa. His scholarly interests include public international law, international criminal justice, and transnational legal process.

Event: Saki and Michael Dockrill Memorial Lecture - Diplomatic Intelligence

Jan 2, 2020 00:56:34

Description:

Dr John Ferris gave this year's Saki and Michael Dockrill Memorial Lecture on the nature of "diplomatic intelligence" and the question of how diplomatic historians have used it. This event took place on 28 November 2019 https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/saki-and-michael-dockrill-memorial-lecture-diplomatic-intelligence

Is Donald Trump’s war on terror all bluster?

Dec 19, 2019 00:19:15

Description:

For this episode of the War Studies podcast we spoke with Peter Neumann about his recent book 'Bluster: Donald Trump's War on Terror' About the book: Donald Trump promised to defeat terrorism, but there is no easy way to make sense of his war on terror. Is it a genuine strategic shift from previous administrations? Or is it all bluster, a way to score points with his base? Hamstrung by his administration’s weakness, Trump hasn’t actually changed much about counterterrorism. What is different is the ideological agenda—excessively militaristic and short-sighted. Foreign alliances have deteriorated, right-wing extremists feel emboldened, and the US no longer seems like a multi-cultural haven. So what is it all for? Peter R. Neumann argues that Trump’s war on terror looks strong and powerful in the short term, but will cause damage over time. Trump's self-serving approach has failed on its own terms, made the world less safe, and undermined the US’ greatest asset—the very idea of America. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1787381897/

PODCAST: Legal Investigations of War Crime - 6th episode of 'Experts' podcast series

Dec 14, 2019 00:17:13

Description:

Britain, the Iraq War and legal investigations of War Crimes: We talked about this with Dr Thomas Obel Hansen, Lecturer in Law at the University of Ulster after he gave a paper here in London in March 2019.

Podcast: Fake News and how they affect conflict - 5th episode of our 'Expert' podcast series

Nov 30, 2019 00:21:19

Description:

What is fake News? And how can it influence war and conflict? We talked about this with Dr Martin Moore, Senior Lecturer in Political Communication and Director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power at King’s College London. The interview was recorded in March 2019.

Podcast: 'Social Media and protests in China in 2011' - 4th episode of 'Expert' series

Nov 16, 2019 00:18:30

Description:

In episode 4 of our ‘Experts’ series, we explore the use of new and social media in the so-called ‘Jasmine Revolution’ protests in China in 2011 and talk to Professor Kerry Brown, the Director of King’s College’s Lau China Institute. The interview was recorded in March 2019.

Podcast: 30th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Nov 9, 2019 00:14:52

Description:

On 9 November 1989 the Berlin Wall was torn down by crowds from both East and West Germany, defining the end of an era not only for Germans but for the world. This week on the War Studies Podcast, we sit down with Dr Barbara Zanchetta, a Cold War historian in the War Studies Department, to discuss the significance of this anniversary. Event highlight: Africa Week at King's College London https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/series/africa-week-2019

Event: 'Always at War: British Public Narratives of War' -- new book by Thomas Colley

Nov 5, 2019 00:26:03

Description:

'Always at War: British Public Narratives about War' (2019 examines the stories told by a broad cross-section of British society about their country's past, present, and future role in war. Rather than perceiving distinct periods between war and peace, it reveals how British citizens see their nation as so frequently involved in conflict that they see the country as continuously at war. With tensions over Brexit increasing, it reveals the war stories that define British national identity, its relationship with Europe, and considers the place of war in Britain's future. Dr. Thomas Colley is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of War Studies. The event was organised by King's Centre for Strategic Communications.

Event: Engelsberg Applied History Annual Lecture with Margaret MacMillan

Nov 5, 2019 00:44:54

Description:

In her lecture titled 'History and International Relations', Prof. MacMillan will discuss how history is used and misused in policymaking. She will go on to examine how historical insight can generate ideas and gauge the possible outcomes of decisions and policies. This event was hosted by the Centre for Grand Strategy.

Podcast: ‘IS propaganda music’ — third episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

Nov 2, 2019 00:21:10

Description:

In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate how so-called ‘Islamic State’ uses music as propaganda. Our expert Charlie Winter is Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Charlie was recorded in March 2019.

Podcast: 'The Limits of Open Source Intelligence' - second episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

Oct 25, 2019 00:19:22

Description:

In the second episode of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate new media technology affect open source intelligence gathering and we ask what the (ethical) limitations should be. Our expert on this is Dr Huw Dylan who is a senior lecturer in the Department of War Studies. Like all podcasts in this series, this episode is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presenting this episode. The interview with Dr Dylan was recorded in March 2019.

Podcast: 'Lone Actor Terrorism' - the first episode of 'EXPERTS' podcast series.

Oct 19, 2019 00:21:16

Description:

In the first of our new podcast series called ‘experts’, we investigate how terrorist attacks by lone actors are framed in the media. Our expert on this is Dr Julia Pearce who is a lecturer in the Department of War Studies. Like all podcasts in this series, it is produced by Department of War Studies students who took the module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’. This module is convened by Dr Peter Busch who is also presented this episode. The interview with Dr Pearce was recorded in March 2019.

Podcast: Feminism, International Relations and Global Security - A Conversation with Cynthia Enloe

Oct 12, 2019 00:44:50

Description:

This episode brings into conversation Professor Cynthia Enloe, eminent feminist scholar and scholar on militarisation and global politics with Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer on Gender and Security at King's College London (KCL) and Dr Marsha Henry, Assistant Professor in the Gender Department at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Event: Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War

Oct 5, 2019 00:50:24

Description:

Listen to an event which took place in the summer of 2019 at King's College London for the launch of the book "Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War" Annette Idler, University of Oxford discussed the findings of her new book, Borderland Battles: Violence, Crime, and Governance at the Edges of Colombia’s War, published by Oxford University Press. Borderland Battles is based on extensive fieldwork: more than 600 interviews in and on the Colombia-Venezuela and Colombia-Ecuador border regions. Applying a "borderland lens" to security dynamics, her focus has been on the convergence of armed conflict and organised crime in these regions: how groups compete for territorial control, how they cooperate, and how they fill governance gaps by playing roles that states normally do. Dr. Idler’s work offers a more holistic and nuanced understanding of “people-centered security” than has been available so far. It has also given her detailed knowledge of the Colombia-Venezuela border zone, which is suffering important consequences of Venezuela’s crisis. This event was co-hosted by the Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LSE) and the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group (KCL). Discussant: Professor Gareth Jones, Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre, LSE, was Chair: Dr Kieran Mitton, War Studies, KCL. Speaker: Dr Annette Idler is the Director of Studies of the Changing Character of War Centre, Senior Research Fellow at Pembroke College, and at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Dr Idler’s work focuses on the interface of conflict, security, and transnational organised crime. She has published numerous articles in the field of conflict and organised crime, advises governments and international organisations on these subjects, and is a regular expert for internationally renowned media outlets. Dr Idler holds a doctorate from the Department of International Development and St Antony's College, University of Oxford, an MA in International Relations from King’s College London’s Department of War Studies, and a double BA in German-Spanish Studies/International Politics from Complutense University Madrid, Spain, and Regensburg University, Germany.

Event: #Metoo Shines a Bright Light on Genuine Security

Oct 3, 2019 01:27:35

Description:

Professor Cynthia Enloe, Research Professor in the Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, with affiliations with Women’s and Gender Studies and Political Science, all at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts talks about how #Metoo has impacted the ways in which global security is understood, experienced and practiced.

Podcast: Women in terrorism and counterterrorism since 2001

Sep 21, 2019 00:23:23

Description:

For decades women have been involved in terrorism, whether carrying out attacks or supporting organisations. They have been victims of terrorist acts, and many have also been involved in diverse aspects of security, including on the front lines with forces trying to reduce the threat from terrorism. The events of 9/11 triggered years of counter terrorist efforts by the USA and its global partners. However, Dr Joana Cook, Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, says women were not adequately considered in the counter terrorist strategies developed since the events of 9/11, and this has created a major gap in how we understand and respond to terrorism today.

Podcast: Global gangs and urban security

Sep 6, 2019 00:33:54

Description:

Dennis Rogers is an ethnographer who joined a Nicaraguan gang in the 1990s as part of his PhD research. Now based at the Geneva Graduate Institute, he spoke to War Studies Podcast about his experiences, from being initiated into a gang to seeing how drug distribution proved a good training for a just-in-time warm tortilla service. The podcast also features a discussion with Kieran Mitton of King's College London about his own work on gangs, including the challenges of achieving meaningful policy change.

Podcast: Nonreligion, secularity and security (Summer repeat)

Aug 15, 2019 00:17:28

Description:

Religion is an important factor to consider when examining many conflicts around the world, but what about nonreligion? Dr. Stacey Gutkowski, senior lecturer in the DWS and Co-Director of Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN) argues that in order to understand conflict, one needs to not only look at individual experiences but also at what religious and nonreligious resources individuals draw on to help inform their ethical understandings and perceptions of the world. Listen to the 2018 NSRN Annual Lecture, 'Secular Powers and Heretic Undercurrents', by Samuli Schielke which originally accompanied this interview here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/nonreligion-and-war-studies Dr Stacey Gutkowski is a Senior Lecturer in Conflict Studies and Deputy Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Divided Societies at King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s she was an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex; a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, Arizona State University; and a Research Associate with the Religion and Ethics in the Making of War and Peace Programme, University of Edinburgh.

Podcast: D-Day and the ordinary citizen soldier

Jul 29, 2019 00:15:37

Description:

In his first speech as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson once again invited comparisons with his political hero Winston Churchill, suggested that British 'pluck and nerve' were needed to deliver Brexit and mobilised Britain's ports, banks, factories and more on a quasi-war footing. In light of this, here is an interview recorded for the D-Day commemorations which provides a more rounded perspective of British history through a key episode of the Second World War. Dr Jonathan Fennell discusses the frailty and trauma of the British war experience, Churchill’s objections to the Normandy landings, and the importance not just of the great individuals, but of collective effort of millions of ordinary people in winning the war.

Podcast: Queer perspectives in security studies

Jul 13, 2019 00:25:00

Description:

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York City’s gay district, Greenwich Village on June 28, 1969. This event was monumental in the progression of queer rights being a part of human rights. 50 years on, progress has been made with same sex acts becoming legal and being accepted within most parts of society. However, when it comes to safety and security, very little research and data is in place to accurately represent and more importantly protect the queer community. Dr Jamie J. Hagen, Visiting Fellow of Centre for Women, Peace and Security at the London School of Economics and Politics joined King’s College London’s Senior Lecturer in Security Studies Dr Amanda Chisholm to discuss transgender rights and why we need to queer security studies.

Event: Stepchildren Of The Revolution: Gangs in Nicaragua & South Africa

Jul 5, 2019 01:06:54

Description:

Date of Recording: 04/07/2019 Description: This presentation will detail preliminary results of an ethnographic comparison of gang dynamics in Nicaragua and South Africa by Professor Dennis Rodgers (Graduate Institute, Geneva) and Professor Steffen Jensen (Aalborg University, Denmark), being carried out under the auspices of the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant-funded project “Gangs, Gangsters, and Ganglands: Towards a Global Comparative Ethnography” (GANGS). It draws on a systematized consideration of our respective individual trajectories of over 20 years of longitudinal ethnographic research in Nicaragua (by Rodgers) and South Africa (by Jensen), as well as the insights gleaned from the first of four joint cross-site research visits to Nicaragua and South Africa that are taking place in 2019 and 2020. The presentation explores both the nature of ethnographic comparison as well as the empirical similarities and differences noted between gang dynamics in the two contexts, and offers preliminary conceptual thoughts as to how to interpret these, both with respect to broader contextual factors as well as from the perspective of individual life histories. Speaker: Professor Dennis Rodgers (The Graduate Institute, Geneva) For more information on news and upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/security-studies

Podcast: Human Rights in China with Benedict Rogers

Jun 29, 2019 00:19:30

Description:

Date of Publication: 28/06/2019 Description: Today, the state of human rights in China appears to be at its worse since the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre. According to Human Rights Watch, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) continues to increase its hold over government bureaucracy and has subsumed state bodies in charge of religious, ethnic, and overseas Chinese affairs. Chinese authorities have also significantly increased repression and systematic abuse against religious groups, especially the Turkic Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, and have continued the arbitrary detention, torture, and enforced disappearance of dissenters and human rights defenders. Human rights abuses on China’s mainland are very concerning, especially when considering this state’s place in global politics and economic relations. China’s growing power in the international system makes it an exporter of human rights abuse and has allowed China to extend its reach to silence many of its critics across the globe. However, dissenters and human rights defenders in China’s free, autonomous territories such as Hong Kong are obviously the communities that are most at risk of falling victim to human rights abuse by mainland China. Earlier this month, we saw mass protests take place in Hong Kong in opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed mainland China to extradite individuals from Hong Kong to stand trial. This bill would have removed any protection that the people of Hong Kong had from mainland China’s arbitrary and inhumane criminal justice system. On 16 June, nearly 2 million protesters took to the streets in Hong Kong to express their concerns and resistance to being subject to mainland China’s criminal justice system and successfully pressured leadership to suspend the bill. In this edition of the War Studies Podcast, we asked Benedict Rogers, founder and chair of the human rights organization Hong Kong Watch, to tell us about the state of human rights in China and the recent protests in Hong Kong around the now suspended extradition bill. Interviewee bio: Benedict Rogers specialises in human rights in Asia. He is also co-founder and Chair of Hong Kong Watch. He is the author of six books, and a regular contributor to international media including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Guardian, the Diplomat, The Catholic Herald, and The Huffington Post. and has appeared regularly on the BBC, CNN, Sky News and Al-Jazeera. He is the author of The Darkest Moment: The Crackdown on Human Rights in China 2013-2016. Benedict is a frequent speaker in universities, schools and conferences around the world. He has testified at hearings in the British Parliament, the US Congress, the European Parliament and the Japanese Parliament. He has a BA in History and Politics from Royal Holloway, University of London, and an MA in China Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). Hong Kong Watch website: https://www.hongkongwatch.org/ War Studies Live Stream - China 30 Years After the Tiananmen Massacre (Ben Rogers): https://www.facebook.com/WarStudies/videos/783991868662508/

Podcast: Is nuclear energy the answer to the climate crisis?

Jun 15, 2019 00:39:59

Description:

The TV series Chernobyl has brought nuclear power back to the public's attention, at precisely the same time as concern about climate change is at record levels. Many see nuclear power as key to curbing carbon emissions and preventing climate change. but do we really have to accept its risks in order to get to a carbon free future? And do the nuclear capacity figures stack up? This week King’s College London brought academics and industry figures to discuss nuclear energy and climate security. On the podcast hear Dr Simon Chin-Yee, a researcher at King's, discuss his work on the global impacts of climate change and the choices we must make to mitigate further human costs. After that, Philippe Costs, Senior Advisor at the World Nuclear Association, makes the case for nuclear energy in a speech recorded on 13 June at King's College London.

Podcast: Military Virtues and Truth Tellers

Jun 1, 2019 00:31:41

Description:

Date of Publication: 01/06/2019 Description: In this week’s podcast, we are going to learn about a fascinating new book on Military Virtues and how military ethics training can improve decision making in the field. Then, we will change tracks to the domain of art and conflict to explore how art can add to analytical research methodologies used in international relations (IR) with the members of the Truth Tellers Pilot study, which seeks to examine the unspeakable aspects of the response to the 2017 Manchester Arena Attack through newly develop art-IR methodologies. Interviewees: Military Virtues https://www.howgatepublishing.com/product-page/militaryvirtues Professor David Whetham, Professor of Ethics and the Military Profession at the Defence Studies Department and Co-editor of Military Virtues. Learn more about Prof Whetham's work here: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/whetham-dr-david Truth Tellers Project https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/research/groups/arts/truthtellers/index Tom de Freston, artist and writer based in Oxford and member of the Truth Tellers Project. Mariah Whelan is a poet and academic based in The Centre for New Writing at The University of Manchester. Dr Pablo de Orellana, Lecturer in International Relations at the Department of War Studies. Dr Christiana Spens, Lecturer and Writer in the School of International Relations at the University of St. Andrews.

Event: Global Governance and Local Peace

May 16, 2019 00:45:43

Description:

Date of Recording: 14/05/2019 Description: Why do international peacebuilding organizations sometimes succeed and sometimes fail, even within the same country? Bridging the gaps between the peacekeeping, peacebuilding, and global governance scholarship, this book argues that international peacebuilding organizations repeatedly fail because they are accountable to global actors, not to local institutions or people. International peacebuilding organizations can succeed only when country-based staff bypass existing accountability structures and empower local stakeholders to hold their global organizations accountable for achieving local-level peacebuilding outcomes. In other words, the innovative, if seemingly wayward, actions of individual country-office staff are necessary to improve peacebuilding performance. Using in-depth studies of organizations operating in Burundi over a fifteen-year period, combined with fieldwork in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nepal, South Sudan, and Sudan, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of international relations, African studies, and peace and conflict studies as well as policymakers. Speaker Bio: Susanna P. Campbell is an Assistant Professor at American University’s School of International Service. Prof. Campbell’s research and teaching address war-to-peace transitions, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, international development and humanitarian aid, global governance, IO and INGO behaviour, and the micro-dynamics of civil war and peace. She uses mixed-method research designs and has conducted extensive fieldwork in conflict-affected countries, including Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nepal, Sudan, South Sudan, and Timor-Leste. She has received numerous grants for her research, including from the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the Swiss Network for International Studies, and the United States Institute of Peace. She is currently finishing her second book, Aiding Peace? Donor Behavior in Conflict-Affected Countries. She has also published peer-reviewed articles in International Studies Revi.

Podcast: Qatar and the weaponisation of narratives

May 12, 2019 00:26:37

Description:

In 2017 Qatar was subjected to a blockade by its neighbours, led by Saudi Arabia, which severely restricted its trading and transport links. Two years on the diplomatic crisis has not been resolved. In this podcast, Dr Andreas Krieg of the Defence Studies Department at King's College London discusses the blockade, in particular the ways that narratives were weaponised by Qatar's rivals to justify and build support for their actions both domestically and overseas. Qatar's reaction to this crisis is also discussed.

Event: Protecting the Mediterranean

May 10, 2019 00:39:23

Description:

Date of Recording: 25/04/2019 Description: Speaker: Michael Talbot, University of Greenwich When we think of the Ottoman Empire, we tend to think of them as a terrestrial empire. Yet as well as being ‘sultan of the two lands’, the Ottoman sovereign was also ‘ruler of the two seas’. In part, the relative lack of attention paid to Ottoman imperial discourses over water stems from a notion that, following key naval defeats in the 16th century, the Ottomans simply withdrew from the Mediterranean, leaving it to the mercy of foreign forces, old and new. This paper will argue that in the eighteenth century, the Ottoman state rejuvenated its approach to empire at sea, and instituted a number of new mechanisms to protect its subjects in the Eastern Mediterranean, often at the request of the inhabitants of its islands and coasts. Using sources from Ottoman, British, and French archives, this paper aims to demonstrate that the Ottoman state utilised a number of rhetorical, legal, and military measures to exert its authority in what it claimed as its territorial waters in the Mediterranean Sea. Michael Talbot is Senior Lecturer in the History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Middle East. His first book, British-Ottoman Relations, 1661-1807, examined the development of diplomatic practices between London and Istanbul in the 18th century, and he has researched (among other topics) the history of Ottoman maritoriality in the same period. Hosted by the Laughton Naval History Unit of the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War on behalf of the British Commission for Maritime History and the Society for Nautical Research

Event: Stalinism at War: A New History of the Soviet Second World War

May 3, 2019 00:43:07

Description:

Date of Recording: 28/04/2019 Description: 2020 will mark the 75th anniversary of Allied victory in World War II. While Russia will celebrate its greatest victory in style, outside the region the Soviet contribution to victory is still poorly understood. Meanwhile, other successor states of the Soviet Union have embraced a very different narrative of World War II. In Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, or Ukraine the Soviet Union in is seen as the aggressor rather than the victor, the perpetrator rather than the victim. In the centenary year, we can expect these conflicting memories to collide openly. This talk will provide a historical background to these current polemics, which are all dependent on simplifications of the complexity of the Soviet Second World War. In order to sketch this complexity, this talk locates the Soviet war in a long Second World War spanning from the outbreak of war in Asia in 1937 to the pacification of the Soviet western borderlands by 1949. It contextualises the Soviet diplomatic and military efforts in this period with its domestic history, that is, the social, political, and economic developments of Stalinist society. Speaker Bio: Prof Mark Edele is a historian of the Soviet Union and its successor states, in particular Russia. He is the inaugural Hansen Chair in History as well as an Australian Research Council Future Fellow. He was trained as a historian at the Universities of Erlangen, Tübingen, Moscow and Chicago. He is the author of Soviet Veterans of the Second World War (Oxford University Press 2008), Stalinist Society (Oxford University Press, 2011), and Stalin’s Defectors (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Podcast: Art, Wargaming & Balance of Power (Student Projects)

Apr 27, 2019 00:16:56

Description:

Date of Publication: 26/04/2019 Description: Across the School of Security Studies at KCL, students are given unique opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills that they learn throughout their courses by participating in research projects, conflict simulations, and even journalism. Students of Dr Peter Busch’s BA module ‘New Wars, New Media, New Journalism’ were tasked with producing 5min podcasts, covering events and guest lectures held within the School of Security Studies. In this podcast, we are going to listen to three outstanding student projects from Dr Busch’s BA module. You will hear from Eleanor Fishleigh on last year’s event ‘Art and Reconciliation: a conversation’, Cory Turner on the topic of wargaming in discussion with Prof Philip Sabin, and Robert Adderley on T.V. Paul’s book talk ‘Restraining Great Powers’. ____________________________________________ If you would like to learn more about the topics discussed here and about student opportunities within the School of Security Studies, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/security-studies

Event: Advancing the UK’s Analytical Tools to Address Strategic Competition and Modern Deterrence

Apr 19, 2019 00:41:40

Description:

Date of Recording: 02/04/2019 Description: Air Marshal Edward Stringer, the Director General of Joint Force Development and the Defence Academy, will kickstart the week with a public lecture, part of the WN’s inaugural wargaming lecture series. He will discuss the need for a reinvigorated wargaming effort in the UK and among NATO allies to support robust analysis and innovation in the context of the new strategic challenges facing the alliance. In this lecture he will discuss three sets of questions: 1. What new analytical requirements does the changing security environment present to the UK and its allies? What is the value of wargaming as part of the broader analytical toolkit in meeting these requirements? 2. What has the UK done to reinvigorate wargaming as a tool for strategic and operational analysis? 3. How should the current practice of wargaming adapt to meet the new policy requirements? What could the policy, professional wargaming and academic communities do to further the utility of wargaming? Professor Wyn Bowen, head of the School of Security Studies, will deliver welcome remarks. Ivanka Barzashka, founder and co-director of the Wargaming Network, will chair the lecture. ______________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Podcast: New Voices: cultural and moral dimensions of torture and mercenaries

Apr 13, 2019 00:24:31

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Date of Publication: 13/04/2019 Description: This podcast is part of the War Studies New Voices series which showcases emerging research from our PhD community. Emily Brown researches the ways in which torture and prisoner abuse narratives in American popular culture have helped to conceptualise the practice of judicial torture. Since the attacks on US soil on September 11th, 2001, it has become increasingly obvious that torture is considered acceptable in fictional representations of American counter-terror practices, even if only in extraordinary circumstances. What has been largely ignored, however, is the part popular culture has played in normalising the extraordinary into ordinary, everyday practice. The way in which we understand torture relies on how we consume popular culture, which presents torture as an unpleasant but unremarkable past occurrence that has been integrated into the ordinary. Helene Olsen studies the relationship between mercenaries and legitimacy. She looks at how mercenaries have been objected against and de-legitimised using specific speech-acts – moral objections – and how these seem to transcend historical settings. She explores the tension between the extensive use of mercenaries in warfare and the apparent moral opposition to their presences and actions and suggests that mercenaries are objected against and de-legitimised when they behave as disruptors of the ideal polity. In this edition, Emily Brown and Helene Olsen discuss areas where their research may overlap and diverge.

Event: Hybrid Conflicts and Information Warfare (Book Launch)

Apr 9, 2019 00:33:39

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Date of Recording: 04/04/2019 Description: Ofer Fridman and Vitaly Kabernik will present their new book Hybrid Conflicts and Information Warfare: New Labels, Old Politics. Chair: Prof. David Betz What is Hybrid Warfare? And what role does Information play in today’s conflicts? In the context of the technological/information revolution of the last two decades―which has greatly amplified the danger posed by nonmilitary means of political struggle―Hybrid Conflicts and Information Warfare addresses these questions from the perspectives of both Western and Russian experts. Incorporating both theory and contemporary realities, including the case of the Islamic State, the authors offer a unique dialogue on the nature of conflict in the second decade of the twenty-first century. Speaker Bios: Ofer Fridman is Director of Operations at the King's Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) and Lecturer at the Department of War Studies, King's College London. Vitaly Kabernik is Senior Expert at the Centre for Military-Political Research at Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) and Fellow Expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and PIR Centre.

Event: Pathways to Climate Security I

Apr 6, 2019 01:04:22

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Date of Recording: 01/04/2019 Description: Over the past decade, renewable energy has expanded at breakneck speed, surpassing all expectations. Installed capacity and production from all renewable sources have increased substantially across the globe and some 180 countries have renewable energy targets in one form or another. While few predicted such growth, the fundamental drivers that contributed to this momentum seem to always have been clear: energy security considerations following economic and supply crises, climate change and yes, generous subsidy schemes, particularly in OECD states. Yet, despite this monumental expansion – renewable energy accounted for 70% of net additions to global power capacity in 2017 – global carbon emissions still rose by some 1.5% in the same year. Germany, the oft-heralded poster-child for tackling climate change, has hardly made a dent in reducing its carbon emissions since the announcement of its Energiewende in 2011. Indeed, it is set to spectacularly miss its goals for reducing carbon emissions by the year 2020 despite having tens of billions of Euros annually to increase the share of its renewable energy in power production to currently 38%. Proponents of renewable energy argue that most of the focus up-to-date has been placed on the electricity sector with more needing to be done in the heating, cooling and transport sectors, which are lagging behind the power sector and yet constitute the bulk of global energy demand. Critics, on the other hand, assert that a more balanced approach is necessary to maximize carbon reductions, including a more efficient allocation of capital into other low-carbon energy sources and climate-mitigating technologies. In addition, they claim that there is an inconvenient truth when it comes to “green” solar and wind technologies: they require fossil fuels to build in the first place. Aluminum, steel, concrete, copper - all crucial substrates of PV and wind technologies - require fossil fuels (usually coal) to be burned for production. This energy talk will seek to clarify some of these questions and examine various scenarios regarding the current and future role of renewables in achieving climate security. Speakers: -Professor Dr. Friedbert Pflüger, Director, EUCERS, King’s College London -Mr. Felix Dane, Director UK & Ireland, Konrad Adenauer Foundation -Mr. Peter Mather, Group Regional President, Europe and Head of Country, UK BP -Mr. Thomas Krupke, CEO, Clere AG and former CEO of Solon SE -Dr Frank Umbach, Research Direction, EUCERS, King's College London

Event: European Navies and the Conduct of War

Mar 22, 2019 00:52:48

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Date of recording: 20 Mar 2019 Description: 'European Navies and the Conduct of War' considered the different contexts within which European navies operated over a period of 500 years culminating in World War Two, the greatest war ever fought at sea. Taking predominately continental point of view, the book moves away from the typically British-centric approach taken in naval history as it considers the role of European navies in the development of modern warfare, from its medieval origins to the large-scale, industrial, total war of the twentieth century. Along with the growth in navies as instruments of war, the book also explores the long rise of the political and popular appeal of navies, from the princes of late medieval Europe, to the enthusiastic crowds that greeted the modern fleets of the great powers, followed by their reassessment through the great trial by combat, firmly placing the development of modern navies into the broader history of the period. Speakers: Alan James is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of War Studies and a member of the Laughton Naval History Unit. He has written widely on France, and its navy, including The Navy and Government in Early Modern France, 1572-1661. Carlos Alfaro Zaforteza is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of War Studies. He is the author of a number of essays and articles on naval warfare and a member of the Strategic Leadership Project, a joint venture of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Madrid) and Instituto Espanol de Estudios Estategicos (Madrid). Malcolm Murfett is a Visiting Professor in the Department of War Studies and an Associate Editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He has written a number of books on British foreign and defence policy in Asia and is the author of Naval Warfare 1919-1945.

Event: 'Spying for Wellington' - Dr Huw Davies

Mar 19, 2019 00:41:40

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Date of Recording: 19 Feb 2019 Description: Book Launch 'Spying for Wellington: British Military Intelligence in the Peninsular War' - Dr Huw Davies Intelligence is often a critical factor in a successful military campaign. This was certainly the case for Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, in the Peninsular War. In this book, author Huw J. Davies offers the first full account of the scope, complexity, and importance of Wellington's intelligence department, describing a highly organized, multifaceted series of networks of agents and spies throughout Spain and Portugal--an organization that is at once a microcosm of British intelligence at the time and a sophisticated forebear to intelligence developments in the twentieth century. Spying for Wellington shows us an organization that was, in effect, two parallel networks: one made up of Foreign Office agents "run" by British ambassadors in Spain and Portugal, the other comprising military spies controlled by Wellington himself. The network of agents supplied strategic intelligence, giving the British army advance warning of the arrival, destinations, and likely intentions of French reinforcements. The military network supplied operational intelligence, which confirmed the accuracy of the strategic intelligence and provided greater detail on the strengths, arms, and morale of the French forces. Davies reveals how, by integrating these two forms of intelligence, Wellington was able to develop an extremely accurate and reliable estimate of French movements and intentions not only in his own theater of operations but also in other theaters across the Iberian Peninsula. The reliability and accuracy of this intelligence, as Davies demonstrates, was central to Wellington's decision-making and, ultimately, to his overall success against the French. Correcting past, incomplete accounts, this is the definitive book on Wellington's use of intelligence. As such, it contributes to a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of Wellington at war and of his place in the history of British military intelligence. Speaker bio: Dr Huw J Davies is a Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies, and has been a member of the department since March 2005. He is currently Deputy Dean of Academic Studies (Education) and the Academic Course Director for the Advanced Command and Staff Course. Dr Davies gained his PhD from the University of Exeter in 2006, and, in addition to numerous articles on Napoleonic military history, his first book, entitled Wellington’s Wars: The Making of a Military Genius, was published by Yale University Press in 2012. His area of research focuses on the activities of the British Army between 1750 and 1850. As a result, he has conducted research in the United States, India, Pakistan and Australia, as well as in archives in Europe. Dr Davies has also held fellowships at the University of Michigan, the Huntington Library in California and at Yale University.

Podcast: Building Stability (CSD Conference)

Mar 16, 2019 00:22:30

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Date of Publication: 16 March 2019 Description: What is the future of security and development in an uncertain world? On the 7th and 8th of March, students from KCL’s Conflict Security and Development (CSD) MA course in the Dept. of War Studies and students from the International Development Department in the School of Global Affairs held the 2019 student-led CSD titled ‘Building Stability: Security and Development futures in an uncertain world’ to address this very question. For this conference, students brought together rich and diverse panels of practitioners and experts from government, academia, and the private sector to address many topics and key debates around the future of security and development in fragile states, ranging from private investment and resilience building to the functionality of multilateral organisations and the role of state actors. In this edition of the War Studies podcasts we are going to hear from CSD MA candidate and conference co-chair Andrea Naranjo and the CSD programme director Prof Mats Berdal about this year’s student-led conference. ______________________________ For more information and news on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Event: In a Time of Monsters: Travels Through a Middle East in Revolt

Mar 13, 2019 00:34:44

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Date of Recording: 25 Feb 2019 Description: Returning to the UK in September 2010 after serving in Iraq as the political adviser to the top American general, Emma Sky felt no sense of homecoming. She soon found herself back in the Middle East, traveling through a region in revolt. In A Time of Monsters bears witness to the demands of young people for dignity and justice during the Arab Spring; the inability of sclerotic regimes to reform; the descent of Syria into civil war; the rise of the Islamic State; and the flight of refugees to Europe. With deep empathy for its people and an extensive understanding of the Middle East, Sky makes a complex region more comprehensible. A great storyteller and observational writer, Sky also reveals the ties that bind the Middle East to the West and how blowback from our interventions in the region contributed to the British vote to leave the European Union and to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States. Speaker Bio: Emma Sky is a Senior Fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute. She worked in the Middle East for twenty years and was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for services in Iraq. she is the author of the critically acclaimed The Unravelling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

Podcast: Extralegal Groups with Dr Christine Cheng

Mar 2, 2019 00:36:33

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Date of Publication: 2/03/2019 Description: What are Extralegal groups in the context of post-conflict societies? How can trade play a role in state building? And how do we define a ‘good’ state? These are just a few questions we discussed with Dr Christine Cheng, Lecturer in the DWS and author of the recent book, Extralegal groups in post-conflict Liberia: How trade makes the state’. In her latest book, Dr Cheng writes, ‘Where the state is weak and political authority is contested, where rule of law is corrupted and government distrust runs deep, extralegal groups can provide order and dispute resolution, forming the basic kernel of the state.’ Drawing on fieldwork and socio-historical analysis, Dr. Cheng explains how extralegal groups were incentivized to provide basic forms of governance as they attempted to form a stable commercial environment during Liberia’s transition from war to peace. Her recent book has highlighted many important questions around state formation and how the West should approach post-conflict societies. Bio: Christine Cheng is Lecturer in War Studies at King’s College London. Her research on post-conflict transitions sits at the intersection of international relations and comparative politics (with a focus on the politics of West Africa). Dr Cheng is the co-editor of Corruption and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding: Selling the Peace? (with Dominik Zaum). Her forthcoming book on Extralegal Groups (Oxford University Press) explores how ex-combatants affected statebuilding processes after the end of civil war in Liberia. It will be published by Oxford University Press. Christine is the Course Director for the MA in Conflict, Security, and Development (CSD), and she is affiliated with King's Centre for Politics, Philosophy, and Law, and King's Gender Studies. Christine holds a DPhil from Oxford (Nuffield College) and an MPA from Princeton University (Woodrow Wilson School). Previously, she was the Bennett Boskey Fellow in Politics at Exeter College, University of Oxford. In 2009, she was the Cadieux-Léger Fellow at Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Christine has an undergraduate degree in systems design engineering (BASc) from the University of Waterloo. She has worked for the UN Commission on Human Security, the World Bank's Gender Group, Environment Canada, and the Wildlife Conservation Society. She is a commentator on international affairs for a variety of media outlets including the BBC, the Wall Street Journal, al Jazeera, Radio France International, and Real Clear World. Christine serves as the faculty advisor for the CSD Annual Conference, as well as the student-run Strife blog and journal. She blogs at christinescottcheng.wordpress.com and tweets @cheng_christine. Extralegal groups: https://christinescottcheng.wordpress.com/extralegal-groups/ ________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: United Nations Peace Operations in a Changing Global Order

Feb 26, 2019 00:57:15

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Descritpion: Over the past 70 years, more than one million troops from more than 110 nations have participated in 70 UN peacekeeping missions. It is a remarkable achievement, but at a time when multilateral institutions are increasingly asked to justify their relevance, the future of peace operations is less certain. The global order is changing and this uncertainty has profound implications on the world’s biggest international organisation and its flagship activity. This roundtable generates a discussion about UN approaches to peace by analysing challenges and opportunities that the UN is facing in the changing global order. Participants will collectively grapple with the following dilemmas: How is the rebalancing of relations between states of the global North and the global South impacting UN decision making? How is the rise of regional organisations as providers of peace impacting the primacy of UN peace operations? How have violent extremism and fundamentalist non-state actors changed the nature of international responses and what does this mean for previously advanced longer-term approaches to conflict resolution? How are demands from non-state actors for greater emphasis on human security impacting the UN’s credibility, and is the UN even able to prioritise people-centered approaches over state-centered ones? Speaker bios: Mats Berdal is Professor of Security and Development in the Department of War Studies and Director of the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group (CSDRG) at King’s College London. Between 2000 and 2003 he was the Director of Studies at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). From 2015 to 2016, Berdal served on the Norwegian Commission of Inquiry on Afghanistan set up to evaluate Norway’s military, humanitarian, and civilian involvement in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2014. Cedric de Coning is a Senior Research Fellow with the Peace, Conflict and Development Research Group at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), where he also co-convenes the NUPI Center on UN and Global Governance. He is also a Senior Advisor for the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD) and he has served in various advisory positions in the African Union and United Nations, including to the High Representative of the African Union Peace Fund, the head of the AU’s Peace Support Operations Division, and on the UN Secretary-General’s Peacebuilding Fund Advisory Group. He holds a PhD in Applied Ethics from the Department of Philosophy at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. Ian Martin was the Executive Director of Security Council Report in New York from 2015 to 2018. He served as a member of the High Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) appointed by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, which reported in June 2015. He has headed United Nations missions in several countries, most recently as Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General for Libya and head of the UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) 2011-12. His previous senior UN appointments include Head of the Headquarters Board of Inquiry into certain incidents in the Gaza Strip; Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal; Special Envoy for Timor-Leste. Mateja Peter is Lecturer at University of St. Andrews, where she co-directs the Centre for Global Constitutionalism. She is also Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI). Peter obtained her PhD from Cambridge University and subsequently held post-doctoral positions at research institutes in Washington, Berlin and Oslo. Her recent peer-reviewed articles appear in Third World Quarterly, Global Governance, and Cambridge Review of International Affairs. Peter works at the intersection of international relations and law, researching on global governance and international organisations, peace operations and peacebuilding.

Event: Current legal developments in the field of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Feb 22, 2019 00:50:04

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Date of Recording: 21/02/2019 Description: Genocide and crimes against humanity are the quintessential international crimes. Our understandings of these terms continue to evolve, the result of judicial and political initiatives. Recent developments in international case law and ongoing work to develop a crimes against humanity convention will be reviewed. Speaker bio: Professor William A. Schabas is a professor of international law at Middlesex University in London. He is also professor of international human law and human rights at Leiden University, emeritus professor of human rights law at the National University of Ireland Galway and honorary chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, invited visiting scholar at the Paris School of International Affairs (Sciences Politiques), honorary professor at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing, visiting fellow of Kellogg College of the University of Oxford, visiting fellow of Northumbria University, and professeur associé at the Université du Québec à Montréal. ____________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/security-studies

Podcast: Drawing from Nuclear History to Understand Today's Challenges

Feb 16, 2019 00:39:34

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Date of publication: 12/02/2019 Description: Researchers and students of war and global security often look to the past to better understand developments in the present. So, how might the history of Nuclear weapons help us understand today’s security challenges?   The advent of nuclear weapons caused a significant shift in the perceived cost of war between great powers due to the sheer power of nuclear arsenals. In turn, the unacceptable risk and danger of nuclear war necessitated the establishment of many international treaties that seek to prevent the use, proliferation and spread of nuclear weapons, along with providing a route to eventual disarmament. Many of the multilateral and bilateral treaties developed during the Cold War era, such as the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which currently has 190 state parties with North Korea’s withdrawal, and the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty between Russia and the US, which has recently been suspended by both parties, are still at the centre of many salient debates and international security challenges today. The relevance of these treaties in contemporary debate is one reason why the history of nuclear weapons and related treaties is important for understanding and contextualising contemporary issues.   Recognising the relevance of nuclear history, the Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) brought together a panel of its experts in the DWS to discuss what we can draw from the history of weapons to help us understand contemporary security challenges. After this panel on the 25 Jan, we had the opportunity to speak to three of the panellists, Drs Nicola Leveringhaus, Hassan El Bahtimy, and Daniel Salisbury, about their research and the panel’s overarching theme. But first I caught the panel’s chair and Head of the School of Security Studies, Prof Wyn Bowen, for a brief interview. We asked Prof Bowen to explain what CSSS’s aim was in bringing this panel on Nuclear History together. Bio: - Prof Wyn Bown is Head of School for the School of Security Studies at King's College London, comprising the Defence Studies Department (DSD) and the Department of War Studies. He is also Co-Director of the Centre for Science & Security Studies (CSSS) at King’s. A list of Prof Wyn Bowen's academic publications can be found here:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/person.aspx?id=2948654e-fe79-4fce-a1c7-64682a0579c0 - Dr Nicola Leveringhaus joined the Department as a Lecturer in War Studies in September 2016. She specialises in the International Relations of Asia, with a focus on China and the security of that region as it relates to nuclear weapons. Dr Leveringhaus is affiliated to the Asian Security & Warfare Research Group and the Centre for Science and Security Studies and the Centre for Grand Strategy in the Department of War Studies. A list of Dr. Leveringhaus's academic publications can be found here: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/person.aspx?id=f180d264-8c59-46f8-b57f-5159888bfb63 - Dr Hassan Elbahtimy is a Lecturer in Science and Security at the War Studies Department. I hold a PhD and MA in Science and Security from the War Studies Department, a Diplôme d'Université - (D.U.) in International Nuclear Law from the University of Montpellier, and M.B.B.Ch (Medicine) Cairo University. A list of Dr. Elbahtimy's academic publications can be found here: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/hassan.elbahtimy.html - Daniel Salisbury is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) within the Department of War Studies. Daniel joined CSSS in July 2018 from the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs where he was a Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow. A list of Dr Salisbury's academic publications can be found here: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/person.aspx?id=18bb282b-e599-4b95-8389-1d23d6f6a2be

Event: Exploding the misconceptions of Belt and Road and Britain’s possible place post Brexit

Feb 8, 2019 00:58:42

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Date of Recording: 23/01/2019 Description: One of the world’s most ambitious investment and infrastructure development projects, the Belt and Road Initiative is a Chinese government strategy to connect overland and maritime routes across Asia, Africa and Europe. Projected to cost more than US$1tr and involving investments and projects in over seventy states, it is a statement of China’s strategic ambition and growing global role. In his keynote address for the Centre for Defence Studies at King’s College London, Professor Andrew Macleod addresses misconceptions about the Belt and Road Initiative, and places in this broader international context the current debates about Britain’s place in the world after Brexit. Professor Macleod will explore topics including: - The rebalancing of the geopolitical landscape - understanding China’s view of the world and how Belt and Road fits into this mindset; - A closer look at the land and maritime routes being developed; Economic, security and humanitarian implications; and, - How can the Commonwealth best capitalise on the opportunities created by Belt and Road? Bio: Andrew Macleod is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Defence Studies in the School of Security Studies at King’s College London. Professor Macleod is also Vice Chancellor’s distinguished Fellow at Deakin University and a Senior Visiting Lecturer at Tasmania University Law School. At Kings, he contributes to counter-extremism thinking and previously he led the ‘Beyond Shared Value Commission’ looking at ways to measure, in financial terms, external risks to corporations. Professor Macleod’s humanitarian activities included time as Chief of Operations of the UN Emergency Coordination Centre in Pakistan, where he negotiated a complex series of relationships that saw the Pakistan military, international NGOs, UN agencies, US military, UK military and non-state militant groups all playing a role in delivering a successful operation without casualties or conflict. And at the International Committee of the Red Cross, he served in the Balkans and Rwanda during the 1990s. He set up and ran Law of Armed Conflict training with military units in Rwanda and former Yugoslavia that resulted in a measurable decrease in civilian casualties. Amongst other activities in his diverse and international portfolio, Professor MacLeod is the co-founder of Brexit Advisory Services, the Non-Executive Chairman of British based Griffin Law, a Non-Executive Director at New York-based Cornerstone Capital, and an Advisory Board member of International Lawyers for Africa. ______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Podcast: Bird Protection and Study Society of Serbia (2018 Marjan-Marsh Award)

Feb 1, 2019 00:10:42

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Date of Publication: 02/02/2019 Description: In November 2018 The Marjan-Marsh Prize awarded by the Department of War Studies in partnership with the Marsh Christian Trust was presented to Milan Ruzic, President of the Bird Protection and Study Society of Serbia (BPSSS). This award is given annually to someone who has made an invaluable contribution to an area where conflict and conservation overlap. The Marsh Christian Trust was started in 1981 by businessman Brian Marsh to honour ‘unsung heroes’; since then the portfolio of awards has grown to over 70 across a wide spectrum that includes conservation, arts, heritage and social welfare. After the 1990’s Balkan wars, many of the paramilitary groupings morphed into criminal syndicates running everything from guns, humans, drugs, illegal cigarettes and more. A lesser known stream of illegal activity is the trade in wild birds, which are plentiful in the Balkans due to its location as a major fly-way between Africa and Europe. The trade is fuelled mainly in two ways: dead birds for human consumption, delivered throughout Europe, and a thriving shooting/hunting trade focused on quail and doves when hundreds can be shot in a day. All of this occurs despite a raft of international laws either forbidding this trade or restricting the shooting to certain periods. Milan Ruzic from the Bird Protection and Study Society of Serbia received this award in recognition of his work to stop this illegal trade. He is the first European recipient of the Marjan Marsh award for conservation. During his visit to King’s to receive the award Milan was asked about the aims of BPSSS and about the risks that he and his colleagues face. Previous recipients include; (2012): John Kahekwa: from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Founder of the Pole Pole Foundation (POPOF) in Bukavu, in eastern DRC, the foundation works in the Kahusi-Biega National Park, home of the Graurer’s or Eastern Lowland gorilla, by providing sustainable development in an area that has known terrible bloodshed. (2013): Dr Sonali Ghosh: from India. Awarded for her work on the Manas Project which works to protect the biodiversity in the much contested Manas eco-region in the Himalayas, focusing on the conservation of the Bengal tiger. (2017): ‘Community Wildlife Ambassadors’: from South Sudan, Western Equatoria region. While the world’s youngest country grapples with legacies of conflict, famine and atrocity wildlife plays a crucial role as the National Parks and Game Reserves provide ‘islands’ of stability and security. ____________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: Assurance and Deterrence Within an Alliance Framework: Brig. J.J. Quincy Adams (Keynote)

Jan 26, 2019 00:24:35

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Date of Recording: 18/01/2019 Description: On Day 2 the keynote address of the 'Assurance and Deterrence Within an Alliance Framework' symposium was given by Brigadier General Jasper De Quincy Adams, Director of Comprehensive Crisis and Operations Management Centre, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe NATO (SACEUR). He completed three tours in Iraq (Op TELICs 5, 8 and 11). Subsequently, he was posted to the UK's Permanent Joint Force Headquarters (PJHQ) before deploying to Afghanistan (Op HERRICK 10 and 11) as the mentor to the Helmand Provincial Chief of Police, establishing the Police Mentoring Advisory Group. His recent work at the UK Ministry of Defence in Army Resources and Plans, a short spell as the Task Force Ukraine Team leader at SHAPE and two years as a Special Advisor to the Chairman of the NATO Military Committee. _________________________________ Follow the link to learn more about this symposium: www.kcl.ac.uk/news/news-article.…-a429-8d6c5f469d4b

Event: Assurance and Deterrence Within an Alliance Framework: Kori Schake (Keynote)

Jan 26, 2019 00:31:38

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Date of Recording: 17/01/2019 Description: The keynote address on Day 1 of the 'Assurance and Deterrence Within an Alliance Framework' symposium was given by Dr Kori Schake, Deputy Director-General, International Institute for Strategic Studies. Dr Schake oversees the Institute’s world-class research programme and acts as a driving force behind initiatives to enhance the Institute's work and profile. She has worked with both the military and civilian staffs of the Pentagon, in the White House at the National Security Council, and at the US State Department as Deputy Head of Policy Planning. __________________________________ Follow the link to learn more about this symposium: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/news/news-article.aspx?id=8c966762-2fa3-4dd3-a429-8d6c5f469d4b

Event: Restraining Great Powers (Book Launch)

Jan 24, 2019 01:02:08

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Date of Recording: 16/01/2019 Description: At the end of the Cold War, the United States emerged as the world’s most powerful state, and then used that power to initiate wars against smaller countries in the Middle East and South Asia. According to balance‑of‑power theory—the bedrock of realism in international relations—other states should have joined together militarily to counterbalance the U.S.’s rising power. Yet they did not. Nor have they united to oppose Chinese aggression in the South China Sea or Russian offensives along its Western border. This does not mean balance‑of‑power politics is dead, argues renowned international relations scholar T.V. Paul, but that it has taken a different form. Rather than employ familiar strategies such as active military alliances and arms buildups, leading powers have engaged in “soft balancing,” which seeks to restrain threatening powers through the use of international institutions, informal alignments, and economic sanctions. Paul places the evolution of balancing behavior in historical perspective from the post-Napoleonic era to today’s globalized world. “Both critics and proponents of the role of the balance of power in international politics treat it as depending on military instruments. The signal accomplishment of T. V. Paul’s book is to show that there is a much larger set of tools that states can employ to restrain troublemakers.”—Robert Jervis, author of How Statesmen Think "In this sophisticated and sweeping historical survey, T.V. Paul shows how modern states have pursued various types of balancing behavior—short of war—to constrain potential hegemonic powers. Restraining Great Powers is a tour de force that should be carefully read and reflected on by scholars and practitioners alike."—David Shambaugh, George Washington University Biography: T. V. Paul is the James McGill Professor of International Relations at McGill University. He has authored or edited eighteen books, including The Warrior State and The Tradition of Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons. He served as president of the International Studies Association (ISA) during 2016–2017. Paul lives in Montreal, Canada. Dr. Walter Ladwig is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations at King’s College London. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies and a Non-Resident Fellow of the Center for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania. His book, The Forgotten Front: Patron-Client Relationships in Counterinsurgency was published with Cambridge University Press. Hillary Briffa is currently reading for a doctorate in War Studies at King’s College London, querying whether small states can have a Grand Strategy. She currently teaches second-year undergraduates on the module ‘Grand Strategy and the Foundations of the Anglo-American Strategic Tradition.’

Event: Developing an Academic Discipline of Wargaming

Jan 21, 2019 00:49:23

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Date of Recording: 16/01/2019 Description: While a renaissance in wargaming is currently underway across the political, military, educational, and commercial sectors, there is no academic discipline dedicated to the study and practice of wargaming. While wargame design, research and execution is advancing, a lack of integration limits the impact of these innovative activities. And although the body of scholarly work on wargaming is growing, it has yet to be drawn together to develop best-practice guidance for research and teaching. In this public lecture, Dr Yuna Wong (RAND) discusses how we can build an integrated, globally-recognised academic field in which knowledge about wargaming may be produced, preserved, and transmitted. She addresses the questions: Why do we need an academic discipline of wargaming? What concrete steps can we take in the short and medium terms to establish such a discipline? What obstacles might we face in this endeavour? _______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies or follow us on Twitter @warstudies.

Podcast: From the Trial of the Kaiser to the ICC

Jan 19, 2019 00:37:37

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Date of Publication: 19/01/2019 Description: We are going to kick off 2019 by exploring the development of international criminal law and justice, starting from the year 1919. Following the end of the First World War, the Allied nations of Britain, France and Italy agreed to try the former German Emperor Kaiser Wilhelm II before an international criminal tribunal, while the US stood largely opposed to such an unprecedented trial. During the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, International lawyers converged to debate on the development and application of international criminal justice for the first time and recommended that the Kaiser should be tried for war crimes. In order to break an impasse in negotiations between the US and the other Allied nations on the trial of the Kaiser, US President Woodrow Wilson would relent, agreeing to try the Kaiser for what he termed as a 'supreme offence against international morality'. This would become a part of the official wording Article 227 of the Treaty of Versailles, which called for the Kaiser’s trial. However, with the Kaiser successfully obtaining asylum in the Netherlands and the subsequent refusal of the Dutch to hand him over, the trial would never take place. Despite the Allied powers’ failed attempt to prosecute the Kaiser, this moment in history bears a special significance for the development of international criminal law and justice and marks the beginning of many salient legal debates present today, particularly those around the prosecution of a head of state. To help us further explore the importance of this moment to the development of international criminal law and Justice, Kirk Allen had the opportunity to speak with renowned international legal expert Prof William Schabas about his recent book, ‘The Trial of the Kaiser’. Also, following our interview with Prof Schabas, we will hear from one of the DWS’ own international legal experts, Dr Rachel Kerr, who focuses on international law, war crimes, and transitional justice. In our interview, we will discuss the development of international criminal law and justice since the Treaty of Versailles and discuss some of the successes and shortcomings of today's international legal institutions such the International Criminal Court (ICC). Bios: - Prof William A. Schabas, has been called 'the world expert on the law of genocide and international law.' He is Professor of international law at Middlesex University in London, Professor of International Law and Human Rights at Leiden University, distinguished visiting faculty at Sciences Po in Paris, and honorary chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights. He is the author of more than twenty books in the fields of human rights and international criminal law. He drafted the 2010 and 2015 United Nations quinquennial reports on the death penalty and was a member of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Professor Schabas is an Officer of the Order of Canada and a member of the Royal Irish Academy since 2007. Publications: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=kiCThLQAAAAJ&hl=en 'The Trial of the Kaiser' - https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-trial-of-the-kaiser-9780198833857?cc=gb&lang=en& - Dr Rachel Kerr is a Reader in International Relations and Contemporary War in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. She joined the Department as a Lecturer in 2003, teaching on War Studies Online programmes, having previously worked in academic publishing for Polity Press. Dr. Kerr holds a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds and an MA and PhD in War Studies from King’s College London. Dr. Kerr co-directs the War Crimes Research Group. She also co-chair the BISA International Law and Politics Working Group and the London Transitional Justice Network. Publications: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=8CXWqx0AAAAJ&hl=en

Event: The Military and Nigerian Politics

Jan 12, 2019 00:45:54

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Date of Recording: 19/10/18 Description: Why and how do military governments surrender power to elected civilian governments? The nineteen years since Nigeria emerged from military rule and transitioned to democracy in May 1999 is the longest era of civilian rule in its history. After the military governed Nigeria for 29 of the previous 33 years, 1999 ended a long-standing pattern of failed attempts by military governments to cede power to civilians. However, the transition to civilian rule was not unconditional. Military governments often extract a “price” or concessions in exchange for departing from government. They may acquire economic, political, and other interests that they are reluctant to relinquish when military rule ends. The military ostensibly withdrew from government but maintained influence over its successors by confining them within militarily imposed boundaries. Former military rulers have governed Nigeria for 11 of the 19 years since 1999 (including the current president). Many prior studies in this area focused on external macro factors that cause military withdrawal from governance (such as pressure from external actors like the EU, USA, and UN, and the ‘snowballing’ effects of democratisation in other countries). A distinguishing feature of Nigeria’s transition from military to civilian rule was that the military itself initiated the transition and prepared the way for its own replacement. Why did it do so? Prolonged military rule corroded military professionalism and created intra-military cleavages, injected ethno-regional and political controversies into the military, increased the risk of military coups, and caused premature attrition from the officer corps. Thus pressure for an end to military rule ironically emerged from within the military. Extrication from governance was a decision of military self-interest to give the military space to restore professional norms, while simultaneously preserving influence over its successors, and insulating the military from transformational reforms. Bio: John Ubani Jr is a PhD student in the War Studies department. He is a "lawyer by day and a PhD student at night"! He is researching Nigeria’s 1999 transition from military rule to democracy, and the factors that influence military governments to surrender power to elected civilian governments. John is a corporate lawyer. He has an LLB law degree from University College London, a postgraduate degree in law from the College of Law, London, and a Masters degree in African Studies (with distinction) from SOAS.

Event: 'Art and Power' by Valentin Inzko

Dec 17, 2018 00:34:33

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Date of Recording: 29/11/2018 Description: To mark the end of the Art & Reconciliation event series, the project team held a symposium where project participants, artists, practitioners and academics will explore the key themes of the project. This symposium started with a keynote lecture by Dr Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, on 'Art and Power'. Bio: Dr Valentin Inzko is an Austrian diplomat currently serving as the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, a role which he assumed in 2009. Between 2009 and 2011 he served also as the European Union Special Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina. ______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: Old Wine in New Bottles? Cooperation in Central Asia compared with the 1990s

Dec 14, 2018 00:55:34

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Date of Recording: 05/12/2018 Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the independent republics of Central Asia have constantly tried to create a form of regional order that would preserve their sovereignty while enacting purposeful and pragmatic cooperation over economic, security, and political issues. In the mid-1990s and early 2000s, discourses of ‘brotherhood’ and of ‘century-old ties’ underpinned the creation of several regional organisations were created to serve cooperation and integration, leading scholars and analysts to speculate of a potential ‘Central Asian bloc’ within the post-Soviet space. Yet, these organisations faded away and were dismantled in the light of very limited results and tangible outputs. In the words of many analysts, regionalism ‘failed’. In fact, from the mid-2000s onward, relations between the Central Asian states have been strained and rather cold, despite the avoidance and the absence of outright conflict. With the death of Uzbekistan’s first president Islam Karimov in 2016 and the subsequent ascension to power of Shavkat Mirziyoyev, regional cooperation and Central Asian diplomacy seem to have been rebooted and have received new lymph. Enthusiastic commentaries on the chance of a ‘return of Central Asia’ are now back to the fore once again, and parallels with the 1990s are being drawn. Yet, one may ask: to what extent are international, regional, and local political conditions allowing for such parallels? What is old, and what is new, in the current Central Asian regional order? And finally, how is this order going to develop? Bio: Dr Costa Buranelli has a PhD from the Dept of War Studies, King's and is now a lecturer in the Dept of International Relations at the University of St Andrew's. His research looks at how norms, rules and institutions within international society are localized, understood and practiced in different regional contexts. Dr Buranelli's research has been published in Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Global Discourse, and the Journal of Eurasian studies. He has conducted fieldwork in Central Asia, and in particular Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. __________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: Police Militarisation and the War on Crime in South Africa

Dec 11, 2018 00:42:49

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Date of Recording: 22/11/2018 Description: Join Guy Lamb, Director of the Safety and Violence Initiative (University of Cape Town), discusses his latest research on the globally pressing issue of police militarisation and the ‘war on crime’, drawing on the experiences of South Africa. Speaker bio: Guy Lamb is the Director of the Safety and Violence Initiative (SaVI) at the University of Cape Town (UCT), a post he has held since October 2012. He also convenes postgraduate courses in the Departments of Political Studies and Public Law at UCT. Prior to this he was the Programme Head of the Arms Management Programme at the Institute for Security Studies and served on the UN Security Council Panel of Experts on Liberia. His most recent publications include “Police Militarization and the ‘War on Crime’ in South Africa”, Journal of Southern African Studies Vol. 44, No. 5, October 2018, and “Massacres and the Reform of the Police: South Africa Past and Present”, South African Crime Quarterly, 63, March 2018. ________________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: The Art and Science of Wargaming (KCL Wargaming Network Inaugural Lecture)

Dec 7, 2018 00:52:07

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Date of Recording: 07/12/2018 Description: Dr Peter Perla, 'The Art and Science of Wargaming to Innovate and Educate in an Era of Strategic Competition' What can we know about pressing security challenges through wargaming? How do we know? To mark the establishment of a new Wargaming Network, the School of Security Studies is launching a public lecture series on wargaming. The lectures will examine fundamental challenges for adapting wargaming theory and practice to usefully address contemporary security problems facing the UK and its NATO allies. The UK and its NATO allies have revived their interest in wargaming as a tool for strategic, operational and technological innovation in a new strategic environment marked by the return of major power competition. While the value of wargaming as a method for learning and teaching is well-accepted, its value as a rigorous academic method of inquiry is still largely contested. Dr Perla will re-examine the fundamental theoretical debate of whether wargaming should be considered an art or a science in the context of the changed security environment. The aim of the talk is to bring wargaming theory and practice to a new multi-disciplinary epistemological ground that would enable its useful contribution to advancing knowledge, informing policy and furthering education.

Podcast: What is the Significance of Russia's 'Military Revival'?

Dec 7, 2018 00:34:39

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Date of Publication: 07/12/2018 Description: The capabilities and the efficiency displayed by Russia’s military during its annexation of Crimea in 2014 and its subsequent air campaign over Syria not only surprised the world but also signalled that Russia was once again a significant military actor. This evidence of an apparent Russian military revival, among other recent events, has increased tensions between Russia and its neighbors as well as NATO and has led many to highlight Russia’s latest military advancements and operations as a major turning point in the post-Cold War era. However, Dr Bettina Renz, associate professor at the University of Nottingham and author of the recent book, ‘Russia’s Military Revival’, argues that although Russia’s recent actions have created serious concerns, this so-called ‘military revival’ may not appear to be as significant of a turning point when put into historical context. So, what is the significance of Russia’s ‘military revival’? On the 16th of November, the DWS and Dr. Natasha Kuhrt, lecturer in the Dept. and co-convener of the Departmental Research Group on Russian and Eurasian Security, hosted Dr. Bettina Renz for a talk on her recent book. But, before this talk, Natasha and Kirk Allen had the opportunity to discuss the significance of Russia’s military revival and its potential threat with our guest lecturer. You can access the recording of Bettina Renz's talk by following this link: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/event-russias-military-revival _______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: The Parachute Regiment and the Falklands War(Sir Michael Howard Centre Lecture 2018)

Dec 6, 2018 00:51:13

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Date of Recording: 03/12/2018 Description: The Parachute Regiment played a prominent role in the 1982 Falklands conflict. They fought iconic battles at Goose Green, Mount Longdon and Wireless Ridge, and won both the war’s Victoria Crosses. Combat in the Falklands transformed the Paras’ reputation in the public mind, and moved them away from the legacies of their involvement in Northern Ireland. This lecture examines this elite unit of the British Army before, during and after the Falklands war; and in so doing, offers a window into Britain’s changing society in the 1970s and the 1980s. Who were the men who chose to join the ranks of a Regiment like the Paras in the 1970s? How did they experience combat in the Falklands? And what did it mean, for them, their families, and for Britain, after they returned home? Bio: Helen Parr teaches at Keele University. She has previously written on Britain’s relations with Europe. This lecture marks the publication of her book, Our Boys: The Story of a Paratrooper (Allen Lane, 2018).

Event: Russia's Military Revival

Nov 30, 2018 00:41:16

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Date of Recording: 26/11/2018 Organised by the War Studies Department and the Russian and Eurasian Security Research Group. Description: "Russian annexation of Crimea and the subsequent air campaign over Syria took the world by surprise. The capabilities and efficiency of Moscow’s armed forces during both operations signalled to the world that Russia was back in business as a significant military actor on the international stage. Whilst the West must adjust to the reality of a modernised and increasingly powerful Russian military, Dr Renz argues that the renaissance of Russian military might and its implications for the balance of global power can only be fully understood within a wider historical context. Assessing developments in Russian Great Power thinking, military capabilities, Russian strategic thought and views on the use of force throughout the post-Soviet era, this talk will show that rather than signifying a sudden Russian military resurgence, recent developments are consistent with longstanding trends in Russian military strategy and foreign policy." Bio: Dr Bettina Renz is Senior Lecturer in International Security at the University of Nottingham’s School of Politics and International Relations. Following an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship at Birmingham, she lectured in Defence Studies for King’s 3College London (Royal Air Force College) before being appointed to her current post in 2007. Her main area of expertise is contemporary Russian security and defence policy with a particular interest in post-Soviet reforms of the military and security sector. Her book, 'Russia's Military Revival' was published by Polity Press in 2018. ______________________________ A podcast with Bettina Renz and Natasha Kuhrt will be released next Friday (7 December 2018) ______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WARSTUDIES.

Event: From Meanings-in-Use to Useful Meanings:the Case of Responsibility to Rebuild in Libya

Nov 30, 2018 00:34:06

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Date of Recording: 12/11/2018 Description: What counts as ethical behaviour in the aftermath of military intervention carried out under the ‘responsibility to protect’ (R2P) principle? This question has become topical in light of the events in Libya, following the 2011 protection intervention. Rather than heralding a new, peaceful Libya, the country has been divided by armed militias and the fighting has escalated into a full-blown civil war. The Libyan experience not only foregrounds the importance of an often overlooked norm in the R2P framework, the responsibility to rebuild (R2R), but it also calls for a more pragmatist assessment of what ought to be done, and what is achievable, after protection interventions. This event is part of the Conflict, Security, and Development Speakers Series. Please see our CSD Facebook page for details on future events. Bio Outi Donovan is a Senior Research Fellow in the School of Politics and International Studies at University of Leeds. Her research interests are in responsibility to protect and rebuild, ethnic conflicts and identity politics and her monograph on statebuilding in Bosnia, The Contentious Politics of Statebuilding, was published last year by Routledge. Her current research project, funded by the ESRC, examines the rebuilding element of the responsibility to protect principle. Chair: Christine Cheng, War Studies ________________________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WARSTUDIES

Event: Women's Participation In Peace Negotiations and Durability of Peace

Nov 29, 2018 00:34:39

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Date of Recording: 29/10/2018 Description: There is an emerging consensus that women’s participation in peace negotiations contributes to the quality and durability of peace after civil war. However, to date, this proposition has remained empirically untested. Moreover, how women’s participation may contribute to durable peace has not been systematically explored. Our research demonstrates a robust correlation between peace agreements signed by female delegates and durable peace. We further find that agreements signed by women show a significantly higher number of peace agreement provisions aimed at political reform, and higher implementation rates for provisions. We argue that linkages between women signatories and women civil society groups explain the observed positive impact of women’s direct participation in peace negotiations. Collaboration and knowledge building among diverse women groups contributes to better content of peace agreements and higher implementation rates of agreement provisions. Our findings support the assumption that women’s participation in peace negotiations increases the durability and the quality of peace." Bio: Dr. Jana Krause is an Assistant Professor in Security/Conflict in the Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam. Her research focuses on political violence and international security, with interests in communal conflicts and civil wars; non-violence and civilian protection; post-conflict peace building and social resilience; and gender and security. She has conducted extensive field research on these issues in Indonesia and Nigeria. Previously, Dr Krause was a Visiting Research Fellow with the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group in the Department of War Studies at King's College London (2013-2016), and the lead researcher and co-investigator of a research project on gender, conflict and peacebuilding at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva (2014-2016). __________________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WARSTUDIES.

Event: Seapower States

Nov 28, 2018 00:51:15

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Date of Recording: 21/11/2018 Description: Andrew Lambert, author of The Challenge: Britain Against America in the Naval War of 1812—winner of the prestigious Anderson Medal—turns his attention to Athens, Carthage, Venice, the Dutch Republic, and Britain, examining how their identities as “seapowers” informed their actions and enabled them to achieve success disproportionate to their size. Lambert demonstrates how creating maritime identities made these states more dynamic, open, and inclusive than their lumbering continental rivals. Only when they forgot this aspect of their identity did these nations begin to decline. Recognizing that the United States and China are modern naval powers—rather than seapowers—is essential to understanding current affairs, as well as the long-term trends in world history. This volume is a highly original “big think” analysis of five states whose success—and eventual failure—is a subject of enduring interest, by a scholar at the top of his game. Andrew Lambert is Laughton Professor of Naval History at King’s College, London, and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. ____________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WARSTUDIES

Podcast: Nonreligion and War Studies

Nov 23, 2018 01:08:26

Description:

Date of Publication: 23/11/2018 Description: It is clear that religion is an important factor to consider when examining many conflicts around the world, but what about nonreligion? Last July, Dr. Stacey Gutkowski, senior lecturer in the DWS and Co-Director of Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN), convened the annual NSRN conference, ‘World views in Worldview’, at KCL. This conference sought to drive further dialogue between scholars of critical religious, secular and nonreligion studies and showcase rich, empirical fieldwork from case studies across the world. In brining nonreligion and secular studies to the DWS, Dr Gutkowski argues that in order to understand conflict, one needs to not only look at individual experiences but also at what religious and nonreligious resources individuals draw on to help inform their ethical understandings and perceptions of the world. In this special edition of the War Studies Podcast, Dr. Gutkowski will introduce us to the NSRN, draw fascinating linkages between the studies of nonreligion and conflict that are highlighted in her research and lead us into the 2018 NSRN Annual Lecture, 'Secular Powers and Heretic Undercurrents', by Samuli Schielke, which will follow directly after our interview. Bio: - Dr Stacey Gutkowski is a Senior Lecturer in Conflict Studies and Deputy Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Divided Societies at King’s College London. Prior to joining King’s she was an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex; a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, Arizona State University; and a Research Associate with the Religion and Ethics in the Making of War and Peace Programme, University of Edinburgh. - Samuli Schielke is a Research Fellow at the Zentrum Moderner Orient in Berlin. His research interests include Islam, festive culture, subjectivity and morality, and migration and aspiration in Egypt. ______________________________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Event: Problems of Peacemaking: The Experience of the First World War

Nov 16, 2018 00:45:22

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Date of Recording: 29 Oct 2018 Description: Liddell Hart himself said that war was always a matter of doing evil in the hopes that good may come of it. This talk will explore the good that he and others hoped they might be able to forge from the evils of 1914-1918. It will focus largely on the new role of the United States, examining America's newly-found power, its attempt to base the peace on principles rather than diplomatic dealing, and its fundamental lack of understanding of the problems the war had unleashed. It will end with a case study on America's surprising and long-forgotten role in the Syria crisis of 1919. Biography: Michael S Neiberg is Chair of War Studies at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania where he teaches history, strategy, and international relations to American and international security professionals. His published work specialises on the First and Second World Wars in a global context. The Wall Street Journal named his Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I one of the five best books ever written about that war. In October 2016 Oxford University Press published his Path to War, a history of American responses to the Great War in Europe, 1914-1917 and in July 2017 Oxford published his Concise History of the Treaty of Versailles. This year he was awarded the Médaille d'Or du Rayonnement Culturel from Renaissance Française, an organisation founded by French President Raymond Poincaré in 1915 to keep French culture alive during the First World War.

Podcast: Commemoration and Impact of the Great War

Nov 9, 2018 00:18:27

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Date of Publication: 09/11/2018 Description: The impact of the First World War can be observed throughout history and is even felt today as we commemorate the sacrifices made during this devastating war. In light of the end of the First World War Centenary, Kirk Allen met up with Drs. Aimee Fox and Nick Lloyd from the School of Security Studies' Defence Studies Department to discuss the importance of commemoration and the FWW's influence on the future of warfare. Additionally, this podcasts includes a short interview with William Philpot, Professor of the History of Warfare in the Department of War Studies, on the significance of the ending of the FWW and the lessons we can reasonably draw. __________________ After listening to this podcast, check out one of our past event recordings on the complexities of the First World War: http://bit.ly/2un6EFG __________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WarStudies.

Event: Three Admirals on The Indo-Pacific in the Age of Competition

Nov 2, 2018 01:18:37

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Date of Recording: 15/10/2018 Description: Three recently retired top military leaders debate key security issues from North Korean brinkmanship to Cross Strait relations and China's rise as a maritime power. Speakers: - Admiral Chen Yeong-Kang, former Chief of Staff of the Republic of China's Navy and former President of the National Defence University - Admiral Tomohasi Takei, International Fellow with the US Naval War College and former Chief of Staff of the Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force - Admiral Scott Swift, MIT Center for International Studies Robert E. Wilhelm Fellow and former Commander of the US Pacific Fleet Chair: - Alessio Patalano, Reader in East Asian Warfare & Security at the Department of War Studies ________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at KCL.AC.UK/WarStudies or follow us on Twitter.

Podcast: Learning and Teaching Gender In War and Militarism

Oct 26, 2018 00:35:19

Description:

Date of publication: 26/10/2018 Description: Since the year 2000, the UN Security Council has adopted 8 resolutions which make up what is known as the Women, Peace, and Security Agenda. These resolutions work to promote gender equality and strengthen women’s rights, protections, and participation in mending conflict-torn societies. The first of these historic UNSC resolutions, 1325, provides a political framework that outlines how women and gender perspectives are crucial for negotiating sustainable peace, planning refugee camps, implementing peacekeeping operations, and recovering conflict-torn societies. The advent of the Women, Peace, and Security Agenda has been followed by a growing emphasis on the need to ‘mainstream’ gender into the institutions that govern and practice war and conflict management. Additionally, universities are seen to be increasingly incorporating more feminist teaching, courses and programmes on gender and Int’l relations in response to student demand. As the need for gender education and perspectives are increasingly emphasized and understood in the realm of conflict and security, how are military and academic institutions following through on the need to diversify training and teaching practices? To help us delve into this question, we are first going to hear from Dr. Hannah Partis-Jennings, Lecturer at Loughborough University, and Dr. Katharine Wright, Lecturer at Newcastle University, who I interviewed the day before they co-convened a BISA Gendering IR Working Group workshop at KCL titled, Training, Teaching and Learning Gender in War and Militarism. Then, to conclude this podcast, we are going to welcome Dr. Amanda Chisolm who is a new Senior Lecturer and the Diversity and Inclusion lead in the School of Security Studies at KCL for a discussion on the importance of teaching and learning on gender in the context of Security Studies. _________________________ This podcast was produced by Kirk Allen.

Event: Hacking the Bomb

Oct 19, 2018 00:49:02

Description:

Date of recording: 17/10/2018 Abstract: Are nuclear arsenals safe from cyber-attack? Could terrorists launch a nuclear weapon through hacking? Are we standing at the edge of a major technological challenge to global nuclear order? These are among the many pressing security questions addressed in Andrew Futter's ground-breaking study of the cyber threat to nuclear weapons. Hacking the Bomb provides the first ever comprehensive assessment of this worrying and little-understood strategic development, and it explains how myriad new cyber challenges will impact the way that the world thinks about and manages the ultimate weapon. The book cuts through the hype surrounding the cyber phenomenon and provides a framework through which to understand and proactively address the implications of the emerging cyber-nuclear nexus. It does this by tracing the cyber challenge right across the nuclear weapons enterprise, explains the important differences between types of cyber threats, and unpacks how cyber capabilities will impact strategic thinking, nuclear balances, deterrence thinking, and crisis management. The book makes the case for restraint in the cyber realm when it comes to nuclear weapons given the considerable risks of commingling weapons of mass disruption with weapons of mass destruction, and argues against establishing a dangerous norm of "hacking the bomb." Biography: Andrew Futter is an associate professor and Director of Research in the School of History, Politics, and International Relations at the University of Leicester. He is the author of The Politics of Nuclear Weapons and Ballistic Missile Defence and US National Security Policy, the editor of The United Kingdom and the Future of Nuclear Weapons, and co-editor of Reassessing the Revolution in Military Affairs. ____________________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Event: Should the US withdraw from the Middle East?

Oct 10, 2018 00:38:08

Description:

Date of recording: 24/09/2018 Description: On the 24th of September, the Department of War Studies and the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group welcomed Jeff Colgan, Associate Professor at Brown University, for his talk titled, 'Should the US withdraw from the Middle East.' According to Prof. Colgan, ‘over the past 25 years, US foreign policy outcomes in the Middle East have gone from more or less acceptable to downright awful.’ Arguably, the most notable US foreign policy failure in the region was the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, but to this day, US success in the Middle East is further challenged by complex conflicts, including those in Afghanistan and Syria, and is also impacted by the presence of terrorist organizations within Middle Eastern states faced with instability. Due to undesirable and costly outcomes in the past, many in Washington DC have contemplated whether the US should withdraw from the Middle East. However, if the US were to withdraw, this decision could not only impact US national interests but also have security consequences for the Middle East. Bio: Jeff Colgan is the Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and Watson Institute for Public and International Affairs at Brown University. His research focuses on international order, especially as related to energy and the environment. His book, Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War, was published in 2013 by Cambridge University Press. He has published work in International Organization, Foreign Affairs, World Politics, International Security and elsewhere. He also occasionally blogs at the Monkey Cage and Foreign Affairs. On Twitter, he is @JeffDColgan. Prof. Colgan previously taught at the School of International Service of American University 2010-2014, and was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC in 2012-13. He completed his Ph.D. at Princeton University, and was a Canada-US Fulbright Scholar at UC Berkeley, where he earned a Master’s in Public Policy. Prof. Colgan has worked with the World Bank, McKinsey & Company, and The Brattle Group. ______________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Podcast: Should The US Withdraw From The Middle East?

Oct 5, 2018 00:21:04

Description:

Date of Publication: 05/10/2018 Description: According to Jeff Colgan, Associate Prof at Brown University, ‘over the past 25 years, US foreign policy outcomes in the Middle East have gone from more or less acceptable to downright awful.’ Arguably, the most notable US foreign policy failure in the region was the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, but to this day, US success in the Middle East is further challenged by complex conflicts, including those in Afghanistan and Syria, and is also impacted by the presence of terrorist organizations within Middle Eastern states faced with instability. Due to undesirable and costly outcomes in the past, many in Washington DC have contemplated whether the US should withdraw from the Middle East. However, if the US were to withdraw, this decision could not only impact US national interests but also have security consequences for the Middle East. On the 24th of September, the Department of War Studies and the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group welcomed Prof Colgan for his talk titled, Should the US Withdraw from the Middle East. But, before his talk, I met up with Prof Colgan and Dr Stacey Gutkowski, Senior Lecturer in the Dept of War Studies, for a general discussion on the headlining question posed by Jeff’s talk. Let’s hear what they had to say. ____________________ A recording of Jeff Colgan's talk at KCL will be available soon! ____________________ This podcast was produced by Kirk Allen.

Event: Cross-Domain Deterrence: Politics by Many Means

Sep 28, 2018 00:51:54

Description:

Date of Recording: 24/09/2018 Centre for Science & Security Studies Event co-hosted with Swansea University’s International Studies, Conflict and Security Research Group Abstract The concept of cross-domain deterrence (CDD) emerged in the late 2000s as American defense policymakers perceived increasing threats to data networks and satellite systems, in particular from China and Russia. What, if anything, does the notion of CDD add to the venerable concept of deterrence? The Pentagon describes five warfighting domains—land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace—but any means of signaling and influence might differ from others with respect to their utility for political bargaining. CDD can be understood as the use of threats of one type, or some combination of different types, to dissuade a target from taking actions of another type that would change the status quo. CDD is not a new historical phenomenon—deterrence has always involved choices across unlike instruments—but it has become newly salient. As technological innovation expands the portfolio of options available for deterrence, trade-offs across technological means and political ends become more complex. We infer hypotheses about how different warfighting domains affect the conduct of military operations and thus, indirectly, political trade-offs in strategic bargaining. This work builds on Jon R. Lindsay and Erik Gartzke, eds., Cross-Domain Deterrence: Strategy in an Era of Complexity (Oxford University Press, Forthcoming). Biography Jon R. Lindsay is Assistant Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. His research examines the relationship between technology and international security. His publications include China and Cybersecurity: Espionage, Strategy, and Politics in the Digital Domain (Oxford University Press, 2015) with Tai Ming Cheung and Derek Reveron, and Cross-Domain Deterrence: Strategy in an Era of Complexity (Oxford University Press, 2019) with Erik Gartzke. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. in Computer Science and B.S. in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University. He has also served in the U.S. Navy with operational assignments in Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Podcast: Wargaming Today

Sep 21, 2018 00:37:20

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Date of publication: 21/09/2018 Description: On 4-6 Sept, the Connections UK wargaming conference, hosted by King’s College London, once again succeeded in bringing together wargaming users, practitioners and academics "to advance and sustain the art, science and application of wargaming." In light of this event, we are once again going to talk wargaming. Despite how it sounds, Wargaming is not necessarily a leisure activity. Although war games are interesting and thrilling to play, many of these games are played in order to simulate and model armed conflict without the actual use of force. Through these wargames practitioners in the armed forces and academics alike often seek to better understand the dynamics of past and even future conflicts. In this edition of the War Studies Podcast, we are going hear from three of this year’s Connections UK organisers and participants broadly about wargaming in the academic and professional contexts as well as wargame design. Interviewees: - Prof Philip Sabin, Prof of Strategic Studies - Jim Wallman, Director of Stone, Paper, Scissors - Anna Nettleship, Former Arabic Linguist in the US Military and War Studies MA Student Featured recording; - Prof Wyn Bowen, Head of the School of Security Studies ________________________________________ This podcast was produced by Kirk Allen.

Inaugural Lecture: Prof 'Funmi Olonisakin

Sep 14, 2018 01:06:34

Description:

Description: Leadership & 'Conversation' in Dialogue: Securing Peace in the Unromantic Context Stable peace continues to elude societies grappling with cycles of violent conflict and general insecurity. About half of the situations where the United Nations has intervened to bring about peace have experienced violent relapse. Liberal peacebuilding has only delivered mixed results. Yet a suitable alternative is yet to emerge. This lecture will argue for new thinking and approach to building peace that places “Leadership” and “Conversation” at its core. These seemingly simple, every day buzzwords mean something profound and transforming in the hardheaded context of recurring violence. Conversation becomes the compass for leadership and the barometer for peace. This compels a shift in emphasis away from an idealized approach to the harsh realities of conflict-torn societies. Bio: Professor ’Funmi Olonisakin is Vice-President and Vice-Principal International and Professor of Security, Leadership & Development at King’s College London. She is also founding Director of the African Leadership Centre (ALC), which aims to build the next generation of African scholars and analysts generating cutting-edge knowledge for conflict, security and development in Africa. Prior to this, she was Programme Director of the ALC King’s College London MSc programmes on Security, Leadership and Society and MSc Leadership and Development as well as the Postgraduate Research Programme on Leadership Studies with Reference to Security and Development. _________________________________ For more information on news and upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Event: The Future of Relations between Russia and The West

Aug 3, 2018 01:16:11

Description:

Date of recording: 04/07/2018 Summary: Experts in both Russia and the West agree that the level of contemporary misunderstanding of actions, intentions and aims in the relations between Russia and the West might lead to irreversible miscalculations and responses that will increase the chances of an undesirable escalation, significantly endangering global security. In other words, the increasing popularisation of understandings based on mutual mistrust and emotional responses might lead to devastating mistakes in decision-making processes on either side. King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) and the Gerda Henkel Foundation, in association with European Leadership Network (ELN), Centre of Military and Political Studies at Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) and the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism – The Hague (ICCT), are pleased to invite you to explore the influence of trust and emotions on the future of the relations between Russia and the West. Speakers: Introduction: - Wyn Bowen, Head of the School of Security Studies Keynote: - Prof Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies Panel: - Dr Neville Bolt, Director of the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) - Prof Simon Koschut, Visiting Professor in International Relations and European Integration at the Otto Suhr Institute at the Freie Universität Berlin - Prof Mikhail Mironyuk, Associate Professor at the National Research University Higher School of Economics - Prof Andre Pavlov, Professor at Saint Petersburg State University and the chair of Strategic and Arms Control Studies Master’s Program. - Nicholas Wheeler, Professor of International Relations and Director of the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation, and Security at the University of Birmingham

Podcast: The Art-IR Nexus

Jul 20, 2018 00:33:09

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Date of publication: 20/07/2018 Description: On the 30th of June, Dr Pablo de Orellana of the Dept. of War Studies and Dr. Laurie Benson of the Dept. of Politics and International Studies at SOAS convened on a workshop titled, "War for Presence: Conflict and Identity at the Art-IR Nexus." This one-day workshop sought to open space for new dialogue between International Relations (IR) scholars, Art Historians, and cultural practitioners working on issues of art and conflict. The core objective was to understand and map what constitutes the shared space between art and IR, its tensions, and the concepts and methods necessary for productive interdisciplinary engagements. In the run-up to this fascinating workshop, Kirk Allen had the chance to speak with Drs. Pablo de Orellana and Laurie Benson broadly about the workshop and the relationship between Art and IR. ____________________ Follow the links below to learn more about our interviewees and their research: Dr. Pablo de Orellana (KCL): https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/teachingfellows/deorellana.aspx Dr. Laurie Benson (SOAS): https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff123817.php ___________________ Remember, for more news and information on our events and workshops, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies.

Event: Conquer We Must: Writing About Britain In Two World Wars

Jul 13, 2018 00:37:36

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Date of recording: 10/07/2018 Description: Prof. Robin Prior - This talk is based upon a book I have been commissioned to write by Yale University Press on the military history of Britain in two world wars. The book will have two main themes: the conduct of military operations, and the role of the civilian and military leadership in the inception and control of those operations. A vital aspect of the book is to reappraise issues of contention in the scholarly literature by returning to and making new use of original documentation. By examining the manner in which popular debate has, on occasion, diverged away from the primary documents in this manner, I will shed new light on issues such as the Asquith’s War Council’s role in the conduct of military operations, Lloyd George’s relations with the military, Plumer’s conduct of operations at Third Ypres, the Admiralty and Convoy (FWW), and Churchill and the bomber offensive (SWW). Another theme for discussion will be the difficulty of the task. There is a mountain of secondary literature to survey and many mountain chains of primary source material. I want to talk about how I am approaching this task and to utter a general plea for help about other approaches that I might adopt. I will conclude with some general remarks about fighting a war in a modern democracy. Bio: Professor Robin Prior is a renowned Military Historian, currently working as a Visiting Research Fellow in the History Department of The University of Adelaide, Australia. He has written/co-written several distinct works, including The Somme, Gallipoli: The End of the Myth, Passchendaele: The Untold Story and When Britain Saved the West: The Story of 1940. _____________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit the following websites: Security Studies: kcl.ac.uk/security War Studies: kcl.ac.uk/warstudies Defence Studies: kcl.ac.uk/defencestudies

Podcast: Studying with The Centre for Science and Security Studies

Jul 6, 2018 00:16:46

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Date of publication: 06/07/2018 Description: The School of Security Studies at King's is not only home to the Depts of War Studies and Defense Studies, but it is also home to multiple research and teaching centres, one of which is the focus of today's podcast. The Centre for Science and Security Studies, or CSSS, is a multi-disciplinary research and teaching group that brings together scientific experts with specialists in politics, international relations and history across the Departments of War Studies and Defence Studies. Like many of the centre's that help form the School of Security Studies, CSSS plays a crucial role in teaching, particularly on MA courses. Three unique MA programs are run within CSSS: these include the MAs in Science and Security, Non-Proliferation and International Security, and Arms Control and International Security. Through these specialized courses, students have the opportunity to engage with technical and theoretical aspects of their respective areas of study, as well as gain practical experience engaging in policy debate and diplomacy through simulations. On the 12th of June, I caught Drs. Susan Martin and Hassan Elbahtimy for a quick discussion about the Centre's MA courses just before they headed off to lead this year's annual CSSS MA Simulation. ________________ This podcast was produced by Kirk Allen.

Event: Understanding Complex Conflicts: The First World War

Jun 29, 2018 01:14:26

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Date of recording: 13/06/2018 Description: On the 13th of June, the School of Security Studies hosted its annual Understanding Complex Conflicts research conference, which showcased some of the research currently underway in the Departments of War Studies and Defence Studies. As the centenary of the First World War is nearing a close, the first panel of this research conference was dedicated to the exploration of the complexities of the Great War. This panel covered topics such as military innovation and politics in the British Army and the resolution and commemoration of the First World War. Let's listen in on this fascinating panel, starting with an introduction of our panelists by panel chair and Director of the First World War Centenary Cultural Programme, Jenny Waldman. _____________________ Panel: The First World War Chair: Jenny Waldman, Director of the First World War Centenary Cultural Programme. Panelists: Aimee Fox: ‘Military Innovation and the Politics of Command in the British Army, 1914-1918’. Bill Philpott: A Complex Security Challenge: Resolving the First World War Helen McCartney: ‘Commemoration and the First World War in Britain’. _______________ Remember, for more news and information about our upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies.

Prof Andrew Lambert, 'The Development Of Maritime Strategy, 1914 - 1916

Jun 26, 2018 00:30:25

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Professor Andrew Lambert discusses elements of the Battle of Jutland to mark the Centenary of the battle. Including the development of the UK's maritime strategy in the build up the battle and during the first few years of World War one. This paper was delivered in 2016 to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland, it was held at JSC Shrivenham in conjunction with a First World War research group. Professor Lambert is the chair of the Laughton Unit for Naval History in the Department of War Studies.

Dr John Brooks, The Battle Of Jutland 'An unpalatable result'

Jun 26, 2018 00:30:25

Description:

Alumni PhD researcher of the Laughton unit, Dr John Brooks discusses elements of the Battle of Jutland to mark the centenary of the Battle. It was held at JSC Shrivenham in conjunction with a First World War research group in 2016.

“The Battle Of Jutland 31st May – 1st June 1916” By Professor Andrew Lambert

Jun 25, 2018 01:20:09

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“The Battle of Jutland 31st May – 1st June 1916” By Professor Andrew Lambert. Hosted by the First World War Research Group.

Occasional Laughton Paper 2017: Studying Naval History Matters to the Modern Navy, James W.E. Smith

Jun 25, 2018 00:17:35

Description:

Laughton Occasional Paper, James W.E. Smith details discussions points over the challenges naval historians faced post 1945 when attempting to communicate the value of the study of history when considering future defence policy and maritime strategy. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Maritime Seminars 2017-2018: Australia and India at Sea: Contemporary Security, Helen Sellers

Jun 25, 2018 00:25:51

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Kings Maritime Seminar Series 2017-2018. Helen Sellers presents on the topic of 'Australia and India at Sea: The Contemporary Security implications of Two Maritime Histories from ancient to modern times.'. The seminar took place on the 7th December 2017 in the Department of War Studies, Kings College London.

Occasional Laughton Paper: The Navy & War Studies

Jun 25, 2018 00:41:40

Description:

Professor Andrew Lambert and Professor Eric Grove discuss the development of discipline of naval history and its relationship with military history, Kings College London and War Studies.

Podcast: Leadership & 'Conversation' in Dialogue: Securing Peace in the Unromantic Context

Jun 22, 2018 00:30:13

Description:

Date of publication: 22/06/2018 Description: On the 9th of July, Prof. 'Funmi Olonisakin will give her inaugural lecture on "Leadership and 'Conversation' in Dialogue: Securing Peace in the Unromantic Context." This lecture will argue for new thinking and approaches to building peace that places “Leadership” and “Conversation” at its core. These seemingly simple, every day buzzwords mean something profound and transforming in the hardheaded context of recurring violence. Conversation can become a compass for leadership and a barometer for peace. In turn, this compels a shift in emphasis away from an idealized approach to the harsh realities of conflict-torn societies. In the run-up to Prof. 'Funmi Olonisakin's inaugural lecture, Bisi Olulode had the opportunity to interview 'Funmi about what she will be discussing on the 9th of July. _________________________ Bio: ’Funmi Olonisakin is Vice-President/ Vice-Principal (International) and Professor of Security, Leadership & Development at the African Leadership Centre (ALC) in the School of Global Affairs at King’s College London. She established and acted as the founding director of the ALC, which aims to build the next generation of African scholars and analysts generating cutting-edge knowledge for conflict, security and development in Africa. ______________________ For more news and information on our upcoming events, please visit www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events

Event: The New Era of Counterforce

Jun 15, 2018 00:50:54

Description:

Date of recording: 30/05/2018 Summary: Nuclear deterrence rests on the survivability of nuclear arsenals. For much of the nuclear age, “counterforce” disarming attacks—those aimed at eliminating an opponent’s nuclear forces—were nearly impossible because of the ability of potential victims to hide and protect their weapons. Technological developments, however, are eroding this foundation of nuclear deterrence. Advances rooted in the computer revolution have made nuclear forces around the world considerably more vulnerable. Specifically, two key approaches that countries have relied on to ensure arsenal survivability since the dawn of the nuclear age—hardening and concealment—have been undercut by leaps in weapons accuracy and a revolution in remote sensing. Various methods, evidence, and models demonstrate the emergence of new possibilities for counterforce disarming strikes. In short, the task of securing nuclear arsenals against attack is far more difficult than it was in the past. The new era of counterforce challenges the basis for confidence in contemporary deterrence stability raises critical issues for national and international security policy and sheds light on one of the enduring theoretical puzzles of the nuclear era: why international security competition has endured in the shadow of the nuclear revolution. Speaker: Keir A. Lieber is Director of the Center for Security Studies and Security Studies Program at Georgetown University and Associate Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. He also holds a joint appointment with the Department of Government. Lieber’s research and teaching interests include nuclear weapons, strategy, and deterrence; the causes of war; U.S. foreign and national security policy; and international relations theory.

Podcast: Elite Bargains And Political Deals with Christine Cheng

Jun 8, 2018 00:39:51

Description:

Date of publication: 08/06/2018 Description: This week we are going to hear from Dr Christine Cheng, lecturer in the Dept of War Studies, about the "Elite Bargains and Political Deals Project". This project was initiated by the UK Stabilisation Unit to look into political deal-making in societies affected by armed conflict and instability. As a reminder, the UK Stabilization Unit is the cross-governmental unit tasked with supporting UK government efforts to address instability overseas. In collaboration with the Stabilization Unit, Christine and two academics from SOAS produced a report based on the findings of the Elite Bargains and Political Deals Project. Their report breaks down the findings of 21 case-studies, commissioned by the Stabilisation Unit and written by country experts, in order to explore the relationship between elite bargains, the dynamics of armed conflict, and the effects of external interventions. In doing so, this report calls into question the use of traditional, internationally backed peace processes to stabilize armed conflicts and calls for a greater consideration of internal power dynamics in establishing sustainable agreements.

Inaugural Lecture: Professor John Bew

Jun 1, 2018 00:52:47

Description:

22/05/2018 The Pursuit of World Order in Anglo-American Statecraft Description: The pursuit of world order has been an almost ever-present feature of Western — more specifically, American and British — statecraft for over a century. It is embedded in a discourse about international affairs that can be traced back to the late 19th century, when Britain became increasingly conscious of the fragility of its empire, and the United States began to recognise the full extent of its potential power. Since that time, “world order” has been used as shorthand for a vast range of potential scenarios: from a unified “world state,” governed by a single supranational institution (envisaged by H.G. Wells), to a balance of power between different civilisational blocs (an idea more commonly associated with Henry Kissinger). Either way, the historical record suggests that one’s view of world order is inseparable from one’s worldview. It reveals the beholder’s hope for how the world should or could be, rather than simply how it is. Viewed over the long-term, as Professor Bew will argue, the yearning for world order has provided a sense of higher purpose and an explanatory spine to the story of American and British foreign policy. Find out more about the speaker, Professor John Bew, Department of War Studies (School of Security Studies): https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/professors/bew.aspx ____________________________ For information on our upcoming events, please visit www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events or follow @warstudies on Twitter.

Podcast: Security Studies and Understanding Complex Conflicts

May 25, 2018 00:29:32

Description:

Description: In this edition of the War Studies podcast, you will first hear from Prof. Wyn Bowen, Head of the School of Security Studies at King's College London, about the purposes and aims of the School, as well as the Understanding Complex Conflict research event. On 13 June, the Understanding Complex Conflict event will consist of two panels, each respectively dedicated to the First World War and the conflict in Syria. In the second segment of this podcast, you will hear from several of our academics from both the Defense and War Studies Departments who will be presenting their research at the Understanding Complex Conflict event. Interviewees: Professor Wyn Bowen, Head, School of Security Studies Helen McCartney: ‘Commemoration and the First World War in Britain’. Bill Philpott: 'A Complex Security Challenge: Resolving the First World War'. David Whetham: 'Choosing sides: exploring the ethics of alliances and third party support in Syria' Reinoud Leenders: ‘With Friends like These: Iran and the outsourcing of state violence in the Syrian war’ ____________________________ Event details: Understanding Complex Conflicts 13 June, 1:00pm | Strand | RSVP: bit.ly/2IJfXZQ As the seven-year war in Syria continues, and the centenary of the First World War approaches a close, the School of Security Studies, King’s College London, invites you to hear from our academics about the complexities of the two conflicts. Whether you are a current or prospective student at King’s, from Whitehall, the media or the wider public, this event will expand your knowledge and understanding of two of the most complex conflicts in history. The event will comprise panels on the First World War and the Syria conflict addressing a range of topics from military innovation, ethics, the use of chemical weapons and commemoration, to the impact of social media, the outsourcing of violence, and war’s end. The event will also encompass a concurrent and more broadly focused poster session on understanding the complexities of conflict and security.

Event: Pageantry and Diplomacy in the late-Henrician Navy

May 18, 2018 00:55:54

Description:

Recorded: 10/05/2018 Speaker: Benjamin W. D. Redding, University of Warwick Abstract: Between the 20th and 30th of August 1546, Claude d’Annebault, Admiral of France, visited London as an honorary ambassador following the signing of the Treaty of Ardres. After a major French naval invasion attempt in the previous year, it was appropriate that d’Annebault’s entrance via the Thames was planned to include a ceremonial presentation of England’s naval resources. Bio: Dr Redding defended his doctoral thesis at the University of Warwick in March 2017. The project assessed the relationship between navy and state in the early modern period and argued that naval advances should always be considered within their broader international context. His article ‘English Naval Expansion under the French Threat, 1556-64’ was published in November 2016 in the International Journal of Maritime History. Current research interests include the role of visual culture in early modern naval developments and a reassessment of the fall of Calais in January 1558. ____________________________________ This event is being hosted by the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War. ____________________________________ Upcoming events: "An incomparable influence upon every shore: Conceptions of naval power and world order on the eve of the Great War" On the eve of WWI, what alliances formed between France, Britain, and the United States? Between 1890 and 1914, strategic thinkers and policy makers in Britain, France, and the US engaged in debates over the prospect of war, the role of maritime power, and the maintenance of peace. These arguments explored the importance of co-operation in the international system and produced rudimentary ideas about collective security. Join Louis Halewood, DPhil student at Merton College, for his lecture on the conception of naval power and world order between 1890 and 1914. His lecture will take place on 24 May at 5:15 pm on KCL's Strand Campus. "The New Era of Counterforce" Nuclear deterrence rests on the survivability of nuclear arsenals. For much of the nuclear age, “counterforce” disarming attacks—those aimed at eliminating an opponent’s nuclear forces—were nearly impossible because of the ability of potential victims to hide and protect their weapons. Technological developments, however, are eroding this foundation of nuclear deterrence. Join Keir Lieber, Director for the Center for Science and Security Studies at Georgetown University, for this discussion on the 31 of May at 12:30 pm on KCL's Strand Campus. "Wargaming Future Conflict between NATO and Russia" On the 31 of May at 3:30 pm on KCL's Strand Campus, The Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London will present the results of two unclassified strategic gaming events held at the UK Defence Academy in May 2017 and February 2018. These games, originally intended to examine missile defense and nuclear risks, pose urgent analytical and policy questions about deterrence and defense in a new era of major power strategic competition. For a full listing of our upcoming events please visit www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events or check out the War Studies Twitter page.

Podcast: Cyber Conflict with Brandon Valeriano and Tim Stevens

May 11, 2018 00:29:17

Description:

Description Cyber operations are becoming increasingly important in contemporary statecraft, as they provide new means through which states may threaten or act against one another. The cases of Estonia, Saudi Aradia, Iran, and the 2016 US Presidential elections demonstrate that cyber operations can be used to compromise critical infrastructure, damage economies, undermine democracy, and can even amount to formal state conflict. However, according to Dr. Brandon Valeriano, "cyberconflict", defined as the use of computational means for malicious or destructive purposes in order to influence diplomatic or military interactions, has not necessarily opened a door to new conflicts in the international system. His research also provides that cyberconflict is neither as frequent or damaging as other forms of conflict. How does cyberconflict fit into the continuation of international rivalries and conflicts today? In this edition of the War Studies Podcast, we are going to dive into the domain of Cyberconflict with Dr. Brandon Valeriano, the Donald Ben Chair of Armed Politics at the Marine Corps University, and Dr. Tim Stevens, Lecturer in Global Security in the Dept. of War Studies and Convenor of the Cyber Security Research Group. If you are interested in learning more about this topic, check out our recording of Dr. Brandon Valeriano's lecture, "Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion."

Event: Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion

May 4, 2018 00:52:14

Description:

Speaker: Dr Brandon Valeriano, Donald Bren Chair of Armed Politics, Marine Corps University Chair: Dr Tim Stevens, Lecturer in Global Security and Convenor, Cyber Security Research Group Description: Dr Valeriano will discuss the development of strategy in the cyber domain, particularly the coercive potential of cyber operations, which are neither as novel nor as effective as often claimed. His research suggests that cyber operations usually fail to produce political concessions. When states achieve strategic outcomes through cyber means, these operations occur alongside traditional coercive instruments like diplomacy, sanctions and military threats. This suggests that foreign policy and diplomacy aimed at countering strategic cyber threats needs to take proper account of the coercive aspects of cyber operations, rather than being developed in a strategic vacuum. Biography: Brandon Valeriano is the Donald Bren Chair of Armed Politics at the Marine Corps University. He has published widely on cybersecurity and statecraft, including Cyber War versus Cyber Reality (2015) and Cyber Strategy (2018), both with Oxford University Press. Dr. Valeriano is Cyber Security Senior Fellow at the Niskanen Center and Senior (Non-resident) Fellow at the Atlantic Council. ____________________ Hosted by the Cyber Security Research Group.

Event: Protecting China's Interests with Senior Colonel Zhou Bo

Apr 27, 2018 01:06:32

Description:

Event recorded on 12/04/2018 Senior Colonel Zhou Bo is a Senior Colonel in the Chinese PLA and Director of the Center for Security Cooperation at the Office for International Military Cooperation in China’s Ministry of National Defence. Currently, his responsibility is multilateral cooperation which includes peacekeeping, counter-piracy, counter-terrorism and various security-related institutions in the Asia-Pacific. He spoke on the subject of ‘Protecting China’s Interests, Shouldering International Obligations: The Current and Future Role of the Chinese Armed Forces.’ Upcoming events: Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion 2 May 2018, 17:00 to 18:30 Pageantry and Representation in the late-Henrician Navy 10 May 2018, 17:15 to 19:00 Inaugural Lecture: Professor John Bew 22 May 2018, 18:00 to 21:00 Wargaming Future Conflict between NATO and Russia 31 May 2018, 15:30 to 17:30 Understanding Complex Conflicts 13 June 2018, 13:00 to 18:30 Follow this link to access all of our upcoming events and RSVP: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/index.aspx

Event: The Eritrean National Service: Servitude For The Common Good and the Youth Exodus

Apr 13, 2018 00:50:51

Description:

Event recording from 27/03/2018. The Eritrean National Service: Servitude For The Common Good and the Youth Exodus - Book Launch by Professor Gaim Kibrea. Summary: The Eritrean National Service (ENS) lies at the core of the post-independence state, not only supplying its military, but affecting every aspect of the country's economy, its social services, its public sector and its politics. Over half the workforce are forcibly enrolled into it by the government, driving the country's youth to escape national service by seeking employment and asylum elsewhere. Yet how did the ENS, which began during the 1961-91 liberation struggle as part of the idea of the "common good" - in which individual interests were sacrificed in pursuit of the grand scheme of independence and the country's development - degenerate into forced labour and a modern form of slavery? And why, when Eritrea no longer faces existential threat, does the government continue to demand such service from its citizens? Biographies: Speaker: Gaim Kibreab is Professor of Research and Director of Refugee Studies, School of Law and Social Science, London South Bank University. He is the author of Eritrea: A dream deferred (James Currey, 2009) and People on the edge of the horn (James Currey, 1996).He earned a PhD degree from Uppsala University, Sweden, Faculty of Social Sciences/Institute of Economic History. Discussant: John Campbell has worked extensively overseas in various research teaching and development capacities and He has have undertaken consultancies in development for international organization. Prof Campbell has also been directly involved in development projects and programs, particularly in Ethiopia, where he devised and managed a major slum-upgrading project in Addis Ababa. Chair: Dr Flavia Gasbarr

Event: The Origins of International Counterterrorism - Book Launch by Dr Aviva Guttman

Apr 6, 2018 00:48:44

Description:

Event recording from 08/03/2018. The European continent was struck by a wave of international terrorism for the first time in the 1970s, and governments had to develop concerted responses and policies to counter the threat. In The Origins of International Counterterrorism, Aviva Guttmann analyses this inter-governmental process from Switzerland’s perspective. Swiss authorities played a surprisingly important role in shaping international counterterrorism cooperation, especially on the secret intelligence level. In this lecture, Aviva Guttmann presents her main research findings and conclusions of the book. Her talk is followed by a comment given by Dr Marco Wyss (Lancaster University). The event will be of interest to anyone interested in issues pertaining to counterterrorism, crisis management, multilateral diplomacy, and intelligence cooperation and to anyone seeking new insight into the Global Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the role of neutrals in this context. Biography: Aviva Guttmann, Ph.D. (2016), is a Research Fellow and Teaching Associate in Intelligence and International Security at King’s College London, Department of War Studies. Her research is financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF). She has been a visiting scholar at the Johns Hopkins University – SAIS Europe. She was educated at the University of Basel (B.A. Hons philosophy) and at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva (M.A. international history), Sciences Po in Paris, and the London School of Economics and Political Sciences (LSE). She was awarded a Ph.D. in contemporary history by the University of Bern (Switzerland). During the last year of her Ph.D., Aviva was a doctoral visiting fellow at the Handa Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence (CSTPV) at the University of St. Andrews (Scotland). The event was chaired by Professor Michael S. Goodman (King’s College London).

Podcast: Assessing the Future Challenges for the UK's Ministry of Defence

Mar 29, 2018 00:08:12

Description:

On the 20th March 2018, Stephen Lovegrove, Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Defence, addressed the 27th meeting of King’s College London’s Strand Group. Speaking on the topic of ‘Future Challenges for the Ministry of Defence’, the Permanent Secretary discussed issues relating to deterrence, technology, personnel and value for money. We spoke to event attendees James Silverman, an MA student in the Department of War Studies, Deborah Haynes, the Defence Editor at The Times, and Professor Wyn Bowen, the Head of the School of Security Studies at King's College London. The secretary's speech + Q&A is also available in the War Studies podcast feed, SoundCloud, and YouTube. SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/2J3yRYP YouTube: bit.ly/2pNe5DK. For more information about the event, visit bit.ly/2E1KpI9. A copy of the speech can be downloaded here: bit.ly/2pO3lWy. This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Event: Future Challenges for the UK's Ministry of Defence

Mar 29, 2018 01:13:23

Description:

Event recording from 20/03/2018 Stephen Lovegrove, UK's Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Defence, addressed the 27th meeting of King’s College London’s Strand Group. Speaking on the topic of ‘Future Challenges for the Ministry of Defence’, the Permanent Secretary discussed issues relating to deterrence, technology, personnel and value for money. The event was organised in partnership the Centre for Defence Studies and sponsored by DXC Technology. The secretary's speech + Q&A is also available on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2pNe5DK. For more information about the event, visit http://bit.ly/2E1KpI9. A copy of the speech can be downloaded here: http://bit.ly/2pO3lWy.

Event: Prince Harry Challenges Public Misconceptions About Mental Health Among Veterans

Mar 23, 2018 00:12:25

Description:

Prince Harry delivered a keynote speech at the annual Veterans’ Mental Health Conference held at King’s College London, on Thursday, March 15th. The event was organised by the King’s Centre for Military Health Research supported by the Forces in Mind Trust. It brings together leading academics, researchers, medical professionals and charities to discuss the key issues in military mental health. This year's event took place under the theme ‘From Enlistment to Retirement'. His Royal Highness spoke about the progress that has been made by the sector in the past year. For more information, visit bit.ly/2FNXkPA.

Student Insight on the Impact of Secrecy on the Intelligence World

Mar 16, 2018 00:04:55

Description:

War Studies student, Isabella Gardner, interviews Professor Michael Goodman after his inaugural lecture on January 30, 2018, on "The Joint Intelligence Committee and Surprise Attack: Lessons from History". Professor Goodman considers the evolution of the Joint Intelligence Committee’s role as Britain’s watchdog, focussing primarily on the Cold War period. Professor Michael S. Goodman is Professor of ‘Intelligence and International Affairs’ in the Department of War Studies, King's College London and Visiting Professor at the Norwegian Defence Intelligence School. He has published widely in the field of intelligence history, including most recently The Official History of the Joint Intelligence Committee, Volume I: From the Approach of the Second World War to the Suez Crisis (Routledge, 2015), which was chosen as one of The Spectator’s books of the year. He is series editor for ‘Intelligence, Surveillance and Secret Warfare’ for Edinburgh University Press; and is a member of the editorial boards for five journals. He has recently finished a secondment to the Cabinet Office, where he has been the Official Historian of the Joint Intelligence Committee: Volume II will be published in 2018. He is a lifelong West Ham fan and season ticket holder, as his choice of powerpoint slides will demonstrate.

Podcast: Women in War

Mar 7, 2018 00:44:19

Description:

The theme of this year's International Women’s Day is 'Strength of a Woman: Press for Progress'. Across the world, women are making positive and empowered progress every day. All progress, however small or ordinary it may seem, is one more positive step towards reaching gender equality. In this podcast, we will be exploring the advent of female engagement teams in military situations with Major Nicki Bass, women as perpetrators of terrorist activities and the work of women in counterterrorism since 9/11 with Dr Joana Cook, and the growing importance of the study of gender relations in the military with Dr Andrea Ellner. Major Nicki Bass Nicki Bass served for 17 years in the British Army with the Adjutant General’s Corps (Educational and Training Services), retiring in September 2017 at the rank of Major. During her career, she undertook a variety of roles including managing the Army’s operational language capability and responsibility for all military education provision in the northeast of England. She also deployed on several operational tours including Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan. Dr Joana Cook Joana Cook recently received her PhD in the Department of War Studies and is a Senior Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR). She is also a junior researcher with the Canadian Network for the Study of Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS), and a former a Research Affiliate with Public Safety Canada's Kanishka program. Her work focuses on women in security practices, extremism, terrorism and counter-terrorism in Yemen, Canada, the US and UK. She has presented her research to senior security audiences from a number of countries. Dr Andrea Ellner Dr Ellner joined the Department as a Lecturer in Defence Studies in September 2007. Prior to this she lectured for nearly ten years on International Security Studies and related subjects at the University of Reading, where she also led the Graduate Institute of Political and International Studies for three years. In 2006/7 she served on the Committee of the University Association of Contemporary European Studies (UACES). This podcast was produced by Bisi Olulode and edited by Ivan Seifert. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON BLASTS FROM THE PAST: ANACHRONISMS IN SECURITY STUDIES How can we conceptualise and approach anachronistic thinking in International Relations and Security Studies? What are the consequences of using present concepts to review the past and past theories to understand the present? 14th March 2018 (17:00-19:00) | Bush House NE, Room 1.03 |Strand Campus 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2oWzk5E IS IT GAME OVER IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA? Massive new artificial islands, a huge leap in naval and paramilitary capabilities and relentless pressure on neighbouring states - is China swallowing the South China Sea? Meanwhile, the US Navy suffers mishaps and scandal and promised increases in capabilities are years or decades away. Is this the moment at which the United States cedes a portion of the globe to a rising power? Or are we about to enter a period of dangerous instability as existing powers try to defend the international order? 15th March 2018 (17:00-19:00)|S0.12 Strand Campus 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2oWzk5E THE BLACK SEA WAR OF 1914-17 THROUGH BRITISH EYES The Black Sea War focussing on the modernisation of the Ottoman navy by 1914 up to the Russian amphibious landings on the North Anatolian coast in 1916 presented by Dr Toby Ewin. 15th March 2018 (17:15-19:00) | War Studies meeting room (K6.07) 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2tjprok THE DOUBLE GAME: THE DEMISE OF AMERICA'S FIRST MISSILE DEFENCE SYSTEM AND THE RISE OF STRATEGIC ARMS LIMITATION The Centre for Grand Strategy will host James Cameron of the Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) in São Paulo, Brazil 15th March 2018 (18:00-19:30)|Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2Fo9T4a

Event: “The Lion and the Eagle” – Saki Ruth Dockrill Memorial Lecture 2018

Mar 7, 2018 00:37:25

Description:

Throughout modern history, British and American rivalry has gone hand in hand with common interests. In this book Kathleen Burk examines the different kinds of power the two empires have projected, and the means they have used to do it. What the two empires have shared is a mixture of pragmatism, ruthless commercial drive, a self-righteous foreign policy and plenty of naked aggression. These have been aimed against each other more than once; yet their underlying alliance against common enemies has been historically unique and a defining force throughout the twentieth century. This is a global and epic history of the rise and fall of empires. It ranges from America's futile attempts to conquer Canada to her success in opening up Japan but rapid loss of leadership to Britain; from Britain's success in forcing open China to her loss of the Middle East to the US; and from the American conquest of the Philippines to her destruction of the British Empire. The Pax Americana replaced the Pax Britannica, but now the American world order is fading, threatening Britain's belief in her own world role. Speaker: Kathleen Burk is Professor Emerita of Modern and Contemporary History at University College London. Her general field is international history, concentrating especially on politics, diplomacy and finance. Kathleen specialises in the twentieth century, although publishes on earlier periods as well. Her primary area of research is Anglo-American relations, on which she has published three books and a number of articles, but she has also written on the history of merchant banks, and on international history generally. Furthermore, Kathleen writes on wine and its history, on which she has published a book and a number of articles.' Her newest book, 'The Lion and the Eagle: The Interaction of the British and American Empires, 1783-1972', will be published next June.' This lecture is given annually in memory of Professor Saki Ruth Dockrill, who first came to the Department of War Studies in 1983 as a research student supervised by successive Heads of Department, Wolf Mendl and Lawrence Freedman. She went to Yale University as a John M. Olin Fellow in 1988-89 before returning to the Department as a MacArthur Fellow and then in 1992 as a lecturer in war studies; promotion to senior lecturer followed in 1997 and then appointment to a personal chair as Professor of Contemporary History and International Security in 2003. Professor Dockrill was a leading international historian, with four substantial, well researched books to her credit and five edited or co-edited. One of her best books was a study of the defence policy of Harold Wilson's two Labour Governments, 1964-70, and she made a notable contribution to the revival of Wilson's reputation as Prime Minister that had begun in the early 1990s.

Event: Fake News - A Roadmap

Mar 2, 2018 00:32:26

Description:

Event recording from 28/02/2018 Since 2015 NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence has developed a successful and long-lasting partnership with the King's Centre for Strategic Communications(KCSC) at King's College London. Based on this rewarding experience, the KCSC and the NATO StratCom COE have been developing new ways to put their cooperation into practice. The book “Fake News: A Roadmap’ is one of them. In this project, a group young talented students from the Strategic Communications Masters at King’s College London were encouraged to try and bring some clarity to the ongoing discussion on fake news. Introductory remarks by Dr Neville Bolt, Director of the KCSC and Jānis Sārts, Director of the NATO StratComms COE. Discussion with Jente Althuis and Leonie Haiden (editors of the book "Fake News: A Roadmap"), moderated by Alex Aiken, Executive Director, UK Government Communications. The book's authors are Iona Allan, Jente Althuis, Alexander Averin, Giulia Conci, Sarah Dooley, Erin Duffy, Douglas Gray, Leonie Haiden, Mitchell Ilbury, Natalia Kantovich, Chelsea McManus, Celeste Michaud, Emma Moore, Kierat Ranautta-Sambhi, and Siri Strand. Subscribe to the KCSC newsletter to get a free copy of the book 'Fake News: A Roadmap': http://kcsc.link/signup Learn more about the MA Strategic Communications here - https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/strategic-communications-ma-pg-cert-pg-dip.aspx Learn more about the NATO StratCom COE: https://www.stratcomcoe.org/ Event recording produced by Ivan Seifert.

Podcast: Perspectives on Nationalism and the Trump Presidency

Feb 24, 2018 00:38:36

Description:

In this week’s episode, we explore ideas around nationalism, identity politics, and what the Trump presidency means for the world. We spoke to Dr Pablo de Orellana, Filimon Nomikos, and Dr Charlie Laderman. ** Dr Pablo de Orellana, Fellow of the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, says that 2018 is the year we need to start breaking down the identity-related divisions that nationalism relies upon. We spoke to Dr de Orellana and Filimon Nomikos about the student-led initiative identityhunters.org and the film “Nationalism: tales of love, fear and hatred”, written by Dr Pablo de Orellana and directed by Fernanda Marin. To find out more about Dr de Orellana’s project on nationalism, visit http://bit.ly/2FprU2K. To find out more about the student-led initiative, visit https://identityhunters.org/. ** Dr Charlie Laderman is a lecturer in International History in the Department of War Studies. Together with Professor Brendan Simms, he co-authored the book “Donald Trump: The Making of a World View”. This book sketches out the worldview that Trump brings to the Oval Office, assembling the sources so that readers can also form their own view of it. And while Trump has shown remarkable consistency over time, there have been some major policy shifts over the years. To find out more about Dr Charlie Laderman’s work, visit https://www.charlieladerman.com/. ** This week’s podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert. ** UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING’S COLLEGE LONDON LOUIS IX AND THE BATTLE OF TAILLEBOURG (1242). 27th February | 17:15-19:00 | S8.08 Level 8 Strand Building Did Louis IX Read Vegetius? New Perspectives on the Battle of Taillebourg (1242) 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2Frt127 WAR STUDIES MASTERCLASS ON STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS 28th February | 18:30-20:00 | Safra Lecture Theatre This lecture will examine the strategic importance of information. As a reporter who has covered conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, Deborah will talk about what it is like to report in a warzone when ground truth can be hard to obtain. 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2EWxqwb THE CURIOUS CASE OF THE 'STEAM YACHT' CAROLINE: AN INCIDENT FROM THE RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR IN 1904 1st March | 17:15-19:00 | War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) 1903 - a steam ship commission, a Paris-based Irish businessman and sea escape across international waters to Russia. How did the steam yacht "Caroline" built in Yarrow become a bit player in the Russo-Japanese War? 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2HFp2jb

Event: The Forgotten Front: Patron-Client Relationships in Counterinsurgency

Feb 17, 2018 00:28:05

Description:

Event recording from 22/11/2017 In conversation with Deborah Haynes, defence correspondent for The Times, Dr Walter C. Ladwig III discusses the challenges of intervening in internal conflicts and how the United States can best exert influence over a government it is supporting in counterinsurgency to change their policies. Summary: Why has it been so difficult for the United States to effectively assist countries like Iraq and Afghanistan in counterterrorism and counterinsurgency? That's the question Walter Ladwig asks in his new book, The Forgotten Front: Patron-Client Relationships in Counterinsurgency (Cambridge University Press 2017), which analyzes the often-fraught political relationship between the U.S. government and a local regime it is attempting to advise and support in its conflict against terrorist and insurgent groups. Although a patron and its client are often presumed to be partners in such an endeavour, in this study of American interventions in the Philippines, Vietnam, and El Salvador during the Cold War, Ladwig details the stark differences of preferences and priorities that can exist between them. This often means the U.S. must give as much attention to modifying the behaviour of its local partner as it does to counter the insurgents. Author: Walter C. Ladwig III a Lecturer in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London and an Associate Fellow in Asian Security at the Royal United Services Institution (RUSI) in London. Specializing in U.S. foreign policy and internal conflicts, his scholarly work has been published in several journals including International Security, the Journal of Strategic Studies, and Asian Survey, among others. He has commented on international affairs for the Washington Post, the Financial Times, and the BBC and his opinion pieces have appeared in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Walter received a B.A. from the University of Southern California, an M.P.A. from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Oxford. Discussant: Deborah Haynes is the Defence Editor of the Times. She has covered the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, as well as defence and security issues in the UK. She won the 2008 Amnesty International award for newspaper journalism and the inaugural Tony Bevins Prize for investigative journalism for her series on the plight of Iraqi interpreters in the Times that led the UK government to offer hundreds of former Iraqi employees compensation or asylum. Deborah was educated at Cardiff University and Surugadai University in Japan and was named a Doctor of Science honoris causa by the University of Salford.

Event: Rumour and the Second World War by Professor Jo Fox

Feb 9, 2018 01:01:49

Description:

Event recording from 06/02/2018: Sir Michael Howard Centre Annual Lecture Sharks in the Channel and Lions on the Loose: Rumour and the Second World War by Professor Jo Fox Belligerent nations during the Second World War went to considerable lengths to trace, document, and contain rumours. Propaganda campaigns were launched, elaborate mechanisms for recording the spread of rumours established, and rumour-mongers prosecuted and publicly vilified. Rumour-mongering was universally denounced as a pathological, destructive condition that threatened the war effort. This lecture will argue that, on the contrary, rumour is an inherently human behaviour and that studying rumour offers the historian an insight into complex human behaviours, motivations, and mentalities at times of crisis. Biography Jo Fox is Professor of Modern History at Durham University and, from January 2018, will be the Director of the Institute of Historical Research, University of London. She specializes in the history of propaganda in the 20th century, Her publications include Film Propaganda in Britain and Nazi Germany: World War II Cinema (2007) and Justifying War: Propaganda, Politics and the Modern Age (with David Welch, 2012). Her present research focuses on rumour in the First and Second World Wars. Link to Professor Jo Fox' examination on BBC Radio 4 of the Nazis' attempts to appeal to Scottish nationalist feeling through broadcasts: http://bbc.in/2G0D258. For more information about upcoming events at King's College London, visit http://bit.ly/2EdTCyd.

Podcast: Art & Reconciliation

Feb 3, 2018 00:23:03

Description:

Here at the Department of War Studies, we are particularly concerned with contemporary and historical security challenges – all kinds of war, terrorism and more. What these security challenges have in common is that at the heart of each is some aspect of conflict. So, it is not surprising that international organisations and governments have invested billions of dollars in funding projects in post-conflict settings. These projects are supposed to help war-torn and divided societies to reconcile. But what is reconciliation? How can it be achieved and measured? And what role do art projects play in the process of so-called ‘reconciliation’? In this podcast, we hear from Dr Milena Michalski and Professor James Gow, discussing the Art & Reconciliation project. This is a pioneering, multi-disciplinary research initiative, funded by the AHRC, which brings together King’s College London, University of the Arts London and the London School of Economics, in order to explore these issues. To find out more about the Art & Reconciliation project, visit www.artreconciliation.org and for more on Milena Michalski’s work see: www.milenamichalski.com. To find out more about the artists discussed in the podcast, please visit the links below: - Alketa Khafa Mripa is a conceptual artist; she created ‘Thinking of You’, in which she filled a football stadium in Kosovo with dresses to remember victims of war rape. See: www.tracesproject.org/alketa-xhafa-mripa/. - Gunther Herbst is a painter who works with ideas around memory, memorialisation and monuments in South Africa. See: www.guntherherbst.com. - Emma Elliott is a sculptor, and her work ‘Reconciliation’ relates to the Holocaust, whilst also referencing the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. See: emmaelliott.com/work. This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert and Bisi Olulode. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON SHARKS IN THE CHANNEL AND LIONS ON THE LOOSE: RUMOUR AND THE SECOND WORLD WAR Rumour-mongering was universally denounced as a pathological, destructive condition that threatened the war effort. Professor Jo Fox will argue that, on the contrary, rumour is an inherently human behaviour and that studying rumour offers the historian an insight into complex human behaviours, motivations, and mentalities at times of crisis. 🗓Feb 6, 2018 ⏰ 5.30 PM📍Strand Campus 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2GxmcMm NEW ARCHITECTURE OF UN PEACEKEEPING AND PEACE BUILDING OPERATIONS How do you make peacekeeping work in environments where no peace existed to begin with? Lieutenant-General (Retd) Floriano Peixoto will discuss attempts to make peace operations a more effective tool for tackling today's complex security challenges. 🗓Feb 6, 2018 ⏰ 6.30 PM📍Somerset House East Wing 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2nBHpfC HISTORY AND STATECRAFT Why is it important to include an understanding of history in the making of statecraft? History enables leaders to assess past experiences and learn from ill-conceived policies. Yet, according to Professor Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou and Professor Jussi Hanhimäki, history is, to a large extent, neglected by policymakers.   🗓Feb 7, 2018 ⏰ 1.30 PM📍Strand Campus 👉RSVP: http://bit.ly/2GD5GdU

Podcast: King’s Engaged in Africa – A Conversation with Professor 'Funmi Olonisakin

Jan 20, 2018 00:24:18

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In this podcast, we are bringing you an exclusive interview with Professor 'Funmi Olonisakin. Professor Olonisakin shares her vision for King's College London and assesses the college's impact on the African continent. Also, Professor Olonisakin comments on US President Trump’s alleged comment describing African countries with an offensive word. 'Funmi Olonisakin is a Professor of Security, Leadership & Development at King’s College London. She is also founding Director of the African Leadership Centre (ALC), which aims to develop the next generation of African scholars, analysts, and leaders. She recently has taken on a new role at King’s College London as the Vice-President and Vice-Principal International. This podcast was produced by Bisi Olulode and Ivan Seifert. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KINGS COLLEGE LONDON PEACEKEEPER OR PERPETRATOR? CSDRG EVENT While the UN peacekeepers are drafted in to monitor the peace who monitors them? What happens when abuses have to be dealt with? Join Professor Rosa Freedman and Sarah Blakemore for a lunchtime seminar. 🗓Jan 22, 2018 ⏰ 12.30 PM 📍Waterloo Campus 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2qZtsgb KING'S ENGAGED IN AFRICA 2018 - SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT How does academic research and practice at King's College London impact the African continent, and vice versa? What kinds of collaborative partnerships and community engagements are undertaken by King's researchers and their African counterparts? What are the emerging research issues that academics are engaging with on the continent, and where does King's play a role? 🗓 Jan 24-25, 2018 ⏰ All Day📍Strand Campus 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2yP2WYT HUMANS OF CALAIS: SEMINAR & GUIDED VIEW A seminar and guided view of the 'Humans of Calais' photographic exhibition, led by researchers from the King's College London Migration Research Group. The exhibition is open to all King's staff and students from Monday - Friday until 26 January. 🗓 Jan 26, 2018 ⏰ 1 PM📍Bush House 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2BfFguE "RICOCHET" BY SIMON NORFOLK What’s wrong with pretty war cemeteries and cenotaphs and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? Photographer Simon Norfolk argues, quite a lot. Join us for a lecture on the politics of remembrance after WW1. 🗓 Jan 29, 2018 ⏰ 6.30 PM 📍Strand Campus 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2FrmSCp

Event: Sea of Contradiction - Black Seafarers in the Royal Navy

Jan 13, 2018 00:57:05

Description:

Event recording from 09/11/2017 While Britain was becoming the largest trafficker in human lives across the Atlantic, the Royal Navy was simultaneously the world's largest employer of free African labour. This talk seeks to establish the origins, status and significance of this workforce and how their experiences aboard ship and ashore contributed to Black revolutionary thought across the Atlantic World and to the beginnings of multi-ethnic communities across the British Isles. Speaker S. I. Martin was born in Bedford and has worked as a journalist for The Voice and Bulletin. He is the author of a novel, Incomparable World (1996), which tells the story of three black exiles living in 18th-century London; and a non-fiction title, Britain's Slave Trade (1999), published to accompany a television series screened on Channel 4.In 2007 his children's novel, Jupiter Williams, was published. It tells the tale of a boy who lives in the African Academy in Clapham, London, in 1800. His latest book is Jupiter Amidships (2009). S. I. Martin has curated archive-based exhibitions and projects for numerous organisations including the National Gallery, English Heritage, the National Maritime Museum, the Imperial War Museum, and the Black Cultural Archives amongst many others. This seminar series was hosted by the ‘Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War’, King’s College London, and organised by the British Commission for Maritime History (www.maritimehistory.org.uk) in association with the Society for Nautical Research UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON FEMALE ENGAGEMENT IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS All-female military units are known as Team Lioness and Female Engagement Teams (FETs). Did the British Armed Forces implement the FET model successfully in Afghanistan? 🗓Jan 17, 2018 ⏰ 6.00 PM 📍Strand Campus 👉 RSVP: bit.ly/2jwkYas KING'S ENGAGED IN AFRICA: SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT Organised by the Africa Research Group (War Studies, KCL) and the African Leadership Centre (KCL), King’s Engaged in Africa showcases the work of King’s College London researchers actively engaged in and with the African continent, and draws on perspectives from the wider African research community. The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Security and Development’ broadly defined. 🗓 Jan 24-25, 2018 ⏰ All Day📍Strand Campus 👉 RSVP: http://bit.ly/2yP2WYT

Event: The Clash of The New World Orders

Dec 16, 2017 00:44:43

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Event recording from 4/12/2017; introductory remarks by Dr Natasha Kuhrt. Professor Sakwa explores how the tension between Russia and the Atlantic community mirrored a fundamental realignment of the international system from the late 1980s onwards. He provides a new analysis of the end of the Cold War and the subsequent failure to create a comprehensive and inclusive peace order in Europe. The end of the Cold War did not create a sustainable peace system. Instead, for a quarter of a century a 'cold peace' reflected the tension between cooperative and competitive behaviour. None of the fundamental problems of European security were resolved, and tensions accumulated. Speaker biography: Richard Sakwa is Professor of Russian and European Politics at the University of Kent. Prof. Sakwa is an Associate Fellow of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Russian, European and Eurasian Studies (CREES) at the University of Birmingham and since September 2002 a member of Academy of Learned Societies for the Social Sciences. His latest book, 'Russia Against the Rest: The Post-Cold War Crisis of World Order' is published October 2017 with Cambridge University Press. This event was a Russian and Eurasian Security Seminar in association with the King's Russia Institute.

Podcast: The US-UK Special Relationship

Dec 9, 2017 00:24:09

Description:

What made the transition of hegemonic power from British to American dominance uniquely cooperative and nonviolent? In this podcast, Dr Kori Schake analyses the so-called “special relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom. One of her main argument is that the transition of hegemonic power between the United Kingdom and the United States was peaceful primarily because both countries shared similar domestic ideologies. But how will this special relationship continue under the Trump administration? Dr Kori Schake is a distinguished research fellow at the Hoover Institute. She is the editor, with Jim Mattis, of the book Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military. She teaches "Thinking About War" at Stanford University, is a contributing editor at the Atlantic, and also writes for War on the Rocks and Foreign Policy. The KCL Centre for Grand Strategy hosted a public lecture by Dr. Kori Schake on the subject of her most recent book, Safe Passage: The Transition from British to American Hegemony (Harvard University Press). Dr Schake's lecture was live-streamed and can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2AwLg3v This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON COMPETING MEMORIES: TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION IN SIERRA LEONE AND PERU 12th December | 18:30-19:30 | Bush House 8th Floor North Side RSVP: http://bit.ly/2kET2Et Dr Rebekka Friedman brings her unique perspective to the challenges of transitional justice in post-conflict societies. How do the peoples of nations begin healing after tremendous trauma and loss? FEMALE ENGAGEMENT IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 17th January | 18:00-19:30 | War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) RSVP: http://bit.ly/2jwkYas Our panel will discuss the creation and evolution of FETs as well as examine how these programmes have shaped the role of women in the military. Our panellists will also explore models of female engagement in hostile environments and the future of military leadership. Register here. KING'S ENGAGED IN AFRICA: SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT RSVP: http://bit.ly/2yP2WYT Organised by the Africa Research Group (War Studies, KCL) and the African Leadership Centre (KCL), King’s Engaged in Africa showcases the work of King’s College London researchers actively engaged in and with the African continent, and draws on perspectives from the wider African research community. The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Security and Development’ broadly defined. For more information about upcoming events in the Department of War Studies at King's College London, visit: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/index.aspx

Podcast: Peaceful Coexistence – Understanding Russia and the West

Nov 27, 2017 00:23:03

Description:

How has Russia's revolution in 1917 impacted the West? Can Russia and the West coexist peacefully? In this week's episode, we are bringing you an interview with Professor Alexander Sergunin from the St. Petersburg State University and a keynote address by Dr Samuel Greene from the King's Russia Institute at the conference "1917 to 2017: Russia’s unfinished revolution?”. Professor Sergunin examines how the ‘peaceful coexistence’ concept has impacted Russia's foreign policy since 1917 and how it continues to be applicable to the currently tense relationship between Russia and NATO. Dr Samuel Greene reflects on the dichotomy between Russia and the West. Dr Greene is the director of the King's Russia Institute and the conference was organised by Dr Natasha Kuhrt, funded by the British International Studies Association Working Group on Russian and Eurasian Security, of which she is co-convenor, and hosted by the Department of War Studies. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING’S COLLEGE LONDON (DE)VILIFICATION OF THE FARC AND THE LINGUISTIC CEASE-FIRE 27th November 2017 (12:30-14:00) FWB (Franklin Wilkins Building), FWB 1.10 Registration: http://bit.ly/2zK1IQD Villains need to be de-villainised for talking to begin; this is a cornerstone of negotiation literature. But what happens when villains are proscribed, or listed as a terrorist organisation? CSSS SEMINAR: MULTILATERAL ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT: IS IT WORTH ALL THE EFFORT? 28th November 2017 (18:00-20:00) Strand Campus, War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Registration URL: https://goo.gl/forms/FvYuRoJqDEMpCCfN2 Achieving multilateral instruments of arms control and disarmament requires sustained diplomatic effort and a great deal of patience. PROFESSIONAL USE OF WARGAMING WITHIN DEFENCE 30th November 2017 (13:00-15:00 Strand Campus, War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2hIDriN This will be an open guest session of Professor Sabin's MA option in Conflict Simulation. Two guest speakers will address different aspects of professional use of wargaming within defence. This week’s podcast was produced Ivan Seifert.

Event: Harsh Lessons: Iraq, Afghanistan and The Changing Character of War

Nov 23, 2017 00:38:15

Description:

Event recording from 11/10/2017 Brigadier (Retired) Ben Barry examines the military evolution of the US-led interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq, and their implications for the future character of war. Speaker biography: Brigadier (Retired) Ben Barry, OBE is the IISS (International Institue for Strategic Studies) expert on the higher management of defence, military strategy, operations and tactics, military innovation and adaptation, modern warfare and land warfare in particular. Chair: Professor David Betz, Departmentof War Studies, KCL Launched in the wake of 9/11, the US-led interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq forced painful transformations in Western militaries. As successful regime-change operations gave way to prolonged insurgencies, these forces confronted wars whose character rapidly developed in unanticipated directions. The US and its allies repeatedly failed to align national ends, ways and means to achieve stabilisation, reconstruction and political progress in Afghanistan and Iraq, before rediscovering counter-insurgency principles established in previous conflicts. The lessons of the wars are likely to continue shaping Western states’ approach to intervention and warfare for years to come.

Podcast: Remembering World War One: An Artistic Perspective

Nov 11, 2017 00:24:36

Description:

In this week’s episode, we are bringing you interviews with Professor Vivienne Jabri and Amanda Faber, founder of the Soldiers and Arts Academy, talking about the interface between arts and academia and how the arts can support war veterans. If you would like to watch the live-streamed video of the Remember Dance performance, you can find it here: http://bit.ly/2AjjVAK. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING’S COLLEGE LONDON THE MARJAN MARSH LECTURE 14th November 2017 (18:00-20:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2xCU4BY Join Adrian Garside to learn about the interface between politicised violence and natural resources in South Sudan's ongoing civil war. (DE)VILIFICATION OF THE FARC AND THE LINGUISTIC CEASE-FIRE 27th November 2017 (12:30-14:00) FWB (Franklin Wilkins Building), FWB 1.10 Registration: http://bit.ly/2zK1IQD Villains need to be de-villainised for talking to begin; this is a cornerstone of negotiation literature. But what happens when villains are proscribed, or listed as a terrorist organisation? CSSS SEMINAR: MULTILATERAL ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT: IS IT WORTH ALL THE EFFORT? 28th November 2017 (18:00-20:00) Strand Campus, War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Registration URL: https://goo.gl/forms/FvYuRoJqDEMpCCfN2 Achieving multilateral instruments of arms control and disarmament requires sustained diplomatic effort and a great deal of patience. This podcast was produced by Jayne Peake and Ivan Seifert.

Event: Soldiers In Revolt: Army Mutinies in Africa

Nov 3, 2017 00:52:32

Description:

Event recording from 16/10/2017 Dr Maggie Dwyer discusses her research and forthcoming book 'Soldiers in Revolt'. The book examines the understudied phenomenon of military mutinies in Africa. Through interviews with former mutineers in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, and The Gambia, it provides a unique and intimate perspective on those who take the risky decision to revolt. This view from the lower ranks is key to comprehending the internal struggles that can threaten a military’s ability to function effectively. Maggie Dwyer’s detailed accounts of specific revolts are complemented by an original dataset of West African mutinies covering more than fifty years, allowing for the identification of trends. Her book shows the complex ways mutineers often formulate and interpret their grievances against a backdrop of domestic and global politics. Just as mutineers have been influenced by the political landscape, so too have they shaped it. Mutinies have challenged political and military leaders, spurred social unrest, led to civilian casualties, threatened peacekeeping efforts and, in extreme cases, resulted in international interventions. Soldiers in Revolt offers a better understanding of West African mutinies and mutinies in general, valuable not only for military studies but for anyone interested in the complex dynamics of African states. Speaker Profile Dr Maggie Dwyer is a Research Fellow at the Centre of African Studies at University of Edinburgh. She is currently the lead researcher for two projects: ‘Social Media and Security in Africa’ (ESRC/DFID funded) and ‘Modern Soldiering in Africa’ (Gerda Henkel Foundation funded). Her monograph, Soldiers in Revolt: Army Mutinies in Africa, is available in fall 2017 with Hurst Publishers. This talk was part of the CSD Research Group Monday seminar series and was hosted by the Africa Research Group. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2zfxyDo.

Podcast: Influencing the World

Oct 28, 2017 00:20:00

Description:

In this week's episode, we ask how digital transformation has changed the sphere of influence in global politics. We hear from Emily Kasriel from the BBC World Service, from Dr Nicholas Michelsen, and Dr Neville Bolt, both from the King's Centre for Strategic Communications at the Department of War Studies. This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON ANGLO-AMERICAN RELATIONS AND WORLD ORDER 2nd November 2017 (17:30-19:00) War Studies Meeting Room Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2xR85kr Kathleen Burk, the author of the forthcoming book, 'The Lion and the Eagle: the Interaction of the British and American Empires 1783-1972', will be speaking on the comparative power, and the ability to project that power, of the two empires from the War of 1812 to the beginning of the Second World War. VIOLENT EXTREMISM IN CENTRAL ASIA 2nd November 2017 (18:00-19:30) Room K3.11 King's College London Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2imPNAy This talk will discuss recent developments in Central Asia regarding the development of violent extremism, which is on the rise and how local governments are trying to tackle the problem. ORDERING THE SECURITY ARENA - PEACE AND CONFLICT IN WORLD'S MOST FRAGILE STATES 6th November 2017 (12:30-14:00) Franklin Wilkins Building 1.10 Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2iERKbJ CSDRG seminar - Is security the outcome of complementary cohabitation of different forms of ordering, while insecurity arises when actors compete over who can order the arena and how.

Event: The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame

Oct 27, 2017 00:59:04

Description:

Event recording from 26/10/2017 Book launch: The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame Written by Ian Campbell Published by Hurst & Co Speaker: Ian Campbell Discussant: David Styan, Birkbeck College, University of London. Chair: Dr Flavia Gasbarri, Lecturer - King's College London In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of members of the urban resistance to the Italian military invasion and occupation of Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenceless residents of the city. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In this richly illustrated and ground-breaking work backed up by meticulous research, Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He also exposes the hitherto little-known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Speaker biography: Ian Campbell is a Development Economist, Historian, Environmentalist and Cultural Heritage consultant, Ian Campbell divides his time between Addis Ababa and Nairobi. He has been conducting research and writing on the ancient empire of Ethiopia since 1988. He has authored many scholarly papers on various aspects of Ethiopian cultural history from the medieval period to modern times, covering subjects as diverse as medieval saints, architecture, Orthodox iconography and traditional drinking vessels. In recent years his focus has been on the Italian military occupation of Ethiopia (1936-41). Tracking down survivors of the occupation over more than two decades has culminated in a trilogy reconstructing in detail life and death in occupied Ethiopia, the world's first sovereign state to fall victim to Fascist invasion. The first of the trilogy is, The Plot to Kill Graziani (Addis Ababa University Press, 2010), which reveals the complex web of urban resistance and intrigue behind the attack on Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani in February 1937 that triggered the massacre of Addis Ababa. The second is The Massacre of Debre Libanos (Addis Ababa University Press, 2014), revealing for the first time the truth about one of the world's greatest ever slaughter of Christian clergy and pilgrims, in May 1937. This book is the subject of the documentary ‘Debre Libanos' made by the Catholic Church television channel tv2000, and screened several times on Italian television in 2016 and 2017. Rounding off the trilogy is The Addis Ababa Massacre (Hurst, London & OUP, New York, 2017). For more information, visit https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/The-Addis-Ababa-Massacre-by-Ian-Campbell.aspx

Podcast: Prof Sir Lawrence Freedman on "The Future of War: A History"

Oct 14, 2017 00:37:06

Description:

Questions about the future of war are a regular feature of political debate, strategic analysis, and popular fiction. Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defence? How might peace be preserved or conflict resolved? Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman is Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King's College London. He addresses these questions in his new book "The Future of War: A History". In this podcast, we are bringing you an exclusive interview with Professor Freedman talking about why studying wars and predicting future wars is so difficult. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON: SOLDIERS IN REVOLT: ARMY MUTINIES IN AFRICA Dr Maggie Dwyer (Edinburgh) discusses her original research and new book 'Soldiers in Revolt' on the understudied phenomenon of military mutinies in Africa. 16th October 2017 (12:30-14:00) Franklin Wilkins Building 1.10 Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2f3zGmV RESISTANCE TO THE IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL: RUSSIAN, CHINESE, AND EUROPEAN POWER CLASHES WITH A NEW US ADMINISTRATION Dr Moritz Pieper provides an overview of the role of Russia and China in the negotiations leading up to the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. He then assesses the survivability of the Iran deal in light of current shifts in US foreign policy. 16th October 2017 (18:15-19:30) Bush House Lecture Theatre Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2xncjOT This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Podcast: Blitzed! Drugs in Nazi Germany

Sep 30, 2017 00:38:35

Description:

Was Hitler a drug addict? Were his troops fighting whilst high on crystal meth? In this podcast, Norman Ohler discusses his provocative new book on the use of drugs in Nazi Germany. This podcast features an exclusive event recording from 31/5/2017 with Norman Ohler in conversation with Dr Kieran Mitton and a follow up interview where the author talks about his personal background and inspirations for writing 'Blitzed! Drugs in Nazi Germany'. Norman Ohler was born in Zweibrücken in 1970. He is the author of three novels, 'Die Quotenmaschine'(the world's first hypertext novel), 'Mitte und Stadt des Goldes' as well as two novellas. He was co-writer of the script for Wim Wenders' film 'Palermo Shooting'. He researched 'Blitzed! Drugs in Nazi Germany' in numerous archives across Germany and the United States. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON: CSSS SEMINAR: RIPPED FROM THE HEADLINES: APPLYING "NEW TOOLS" TO TODAY'S TOUGHEST NON-PROLIFERATION CASES Jessica Varnum (CNS) and Ian Stewart (Project Alpha, KCL) will discuss current open-source tools being used in today's toughest non-proliferation cases. 3rd October 2017 (18:00-20:00) Room 2.01/2.02 Floor 2 Bush House King's College London Strand Campus 30 Aldwych London WC2B 4BG (Across the road from Strand Campus) RSVP: https://goo.gl/forms/U7CIxYJEUw8VJi9r2 THE FUTURE OF WAR - BOOK LAUNCH Professor Lawrence Freedman's account is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, that puts current strategic thinking into a stimulating historical perspective. 4th October 2017 (18:30-21:00) 30 Aldwych, 8th Floor North Side Bush House, London, WC2B 4BG RSVP: bit.ly/2wj9wWX A NEW EURASIAN GEOPOLITICS? VIEWS FROM JAPAN What is Japan's policy towards Russia? Professor Masuo from Kyushu Univeristy and Professor Iwashita from Hokkaido University will be sharing their insights on this issue. 9th October 2017 (17:15-19:15) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) RSVP: bit.ly/2sU6jsq INFLUENCING THE WORLD, LISTENING TO THE WORLD: THE EMERGENCE OF THE PUBLIC VOICE How wars and major international issues are presented and discussed - What information can be trusted? Which news counts? Which voices do we listen to? 10th October 2017 (18:00-19:00) 30 Aldwych, Bush House Arcade (Strand Campus) RSVP: https://emergenceofthepublicvoice.eventbrite.co.uk This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert and Bisi Olulode.

Podcast: Using Wargaming to Avoid Real-World Conflict

Sep 15, 2017 00:24:20

Description:

What is a wargame? Who should be playing wargames and why? How can simulating real-world events help to avoid real-world conflicts? In this podcast, we are bringing you five exclusive interviews with organisers and participants of this year's Connections UK conference. The interviewees are Major Tom Mouat, Professor Philip Sabin, Patrick Kwasi Brobbey, Dr Anja van der Hulst, and Commander Matt Payne. The Connections UK is a conference dedicated to wargaming. This conference was hosted by the School of Security Studies and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory. For more information about the conference, visit http://www.professionalwargaming.co.uk/ or read this BBC article https://goo.gl/iUYhyA. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON: THE FUTURE OF WAR - BOOK LAUNCH 4th October 2017 (18:30-21:00) 30 Aldwych, 8th Floor North Side Bush House, London, WC2B 4BG RSVP: http://bit.ly/2wj9wWX Professor Lawrence Freedman's account is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, that puts current strategic thinking into a stimulating historical perspective. A NEW EURASIAN GEOPOLITICS? VIEWS FROM JAPAN 9th October 2017 (17:15-19:15) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) RSVP: http://bit.ly/2sU6jsq What is Japan's policy towards Russia? Professor Masuo from Kyushu Univeristy and Professor Iwashita from Hokkaido University will be sharing their insights on this issue. INFLUENCING THE WORLD, LISTENING TO THE WORLD: THE EMERGENCE OF THE PUBLIC VOICE 10th October 2017 (18:00-19:00) 30 Aldwych, Bush House Arcade (Strand Campus) RSVP: https://emergenceofthepublicvoice.eventbrite.co.uk How wars and major international issues are presented and discussed - What information can be trusted? Which news counts? Which voices do we listen to? This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Event: The Politics of Force in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Sep 7, 2017 00:42:03

Description:

Event recording from 28/06/2017 THE POLITICS OF FORCE IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE UN'S STRATEGIES FOR NEUTRALIZING ARMED GROUPS Speaker: Adam Day, Senior Researcher at the UN University and formerly Senior Political Advisor with MONUSCO in the Democratic Republic of Congo This talk examined the current security dynamics in eastern DRC, looking in particular at the armed groups which are the priority targets for MONUSCO’s neutralization mandate. Based on his recent experience as the Senior Political Adviser to MONUSCO, Adam Day described the strategies MONUSCO is implementing to address the threats posed by these armed groups, some of the unintended consequences of the use of force, and implications for the UN’s broader mandates to protect civilians and stabilize conflict-affected areas. Biography: Adam Day joined as Senior Policy Adviser in the UNU Centre for Policy Research in January 2017. Prior to UNU, he served for a decade in the UN, focused on peace operations, political engagement in conflict settings, mediation and protection of civilians. He served as Senior Political Adviser to MONUSCO (DRC), in the UN Special Coordinator’s Office for Lebanon, in the front offices of both UNMIS (Khartoum) and UNAMID (Darfur), and was a political officer in both the Department of Political Affairs and the Department of Peacekeeping Operations in New York. Prior to the UN, Mr Day worked in Human Rights Watch’s Justice Program, for the Open Society Justice Initiative in Cambodia, and supported the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. An attorney and former member of the New York Bar Association, Mr Day was an international litigator in New York, where he also worked pro bono for the Center for Constitutional Rights on behalf of Guantanamo detainees in their suits against former US officials for torture.

Podcast: Responding to Extreme Events

Jun 27, 2017 00:19:33

Description:

In this week’s episode, we explore how the public and governments respond to extreme events. We’re bringing you two exclusive interviews with two of our own experts from the Department of War Studies. Dr Julia Pearce is a social psychologist in the Department of War Studies and an expert on risk communication. Her research interests include risk perception, risk and crisis communication, public health behaviour, social identity, social representations and moral panic. Dr David Parker is a postdoctoral research associate in the department and he works also in the delivery of the Prevent strategy in a few London boroughs. His research, as part of the EU funded PRIME project, is focused on communication measures to prevent, interdict and mitigate lone actor extremist events in Europe. Upcoming events: THE POLITICS OF FORCE IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE UN'S STRATEGIES FOR NEUTRALIZING ARMED GROUPS Adam Day, Senior Researcher at the UN University, will examine the current security dynamics in eastern DRC, looking in particular at the armed groups which are the priority targets for MONUSCO’s neutralisation mandate. Location: War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) When: 28/06/2017 (17:00-18:30) Contact: Mats Berdal mats.berdal@kcl.ac.uk Registration URL: bit.ly/2srsSHZ JAPAN'S SECURITY POLICY IN AFRICA: THE DAWN OF A STRATEGIC APPROACH? What kind of role is Japan playing in security in Africa? How is this role in Japan strategic core interests? Celine Pajon seeks to explain Japan's involvement. Location: SW1.13 Somerset House East Wing Category: Conference/Seminar When: 30/06/2017 (16:00-17:00) RSVP to: eline.storeide@kcl.ac.uk Registration URL: bit.ly/2tajTbA For more information, visit kcl.ac.uk/warstudies. This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Event: Strategic Leadership at Normandy: Lessons on Intellectual Courage

Jun 17, 2017 01:13:31

Description:

Event recording from 09/05/2017 STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AT NORMANDY: LESSONS ON INTELLECTUAL COURAGE This event will build upon Christopher Kolenda's research on strategic leadership in Iraq and Afghanistan for his doctoral dissertation. Chris will examine the role of intellectual courage during the Normandy campaign and draw lessons for today's leaders in academia, non-profit, business, military and government sectors. Chris is the senior military Fellow at King’s College in London, England, where he teaches strategy in contemporary conflicts to graduate students. He remains in engaged on national security strategy and issues as a Senior Fellow at the Center for New American Security and the Center for Global Policy, and a member of the Board of Advisors for the Truman National Security Project. Chris Kolenda's leadership in combat is featured in New York Times Bestsellers, "The Outpost" by Jake Tapper and "Stones into Schools" by Greg Mortenson as well as articles in The Wall Street Journal, the Economist, and The Washington Post. Chris led over 1,000 American and Afghan soldiers in the highly dangerous Kunar and Nuristan provinces. He became the only American commander who persuaded a major insurgent group to stop fighting and eventually join the government. Since then Chris served as senior advisor in Afghanistan to Generals McChrystal, Petraeus, and Dunford, and in Washington, D.C. to Undersecretaries of Defense Michèle Flournoy and James Miller. He was decorated by Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel with the Department’s highest civilian medal for his work on strategy.

Podcast: The Issue of Radicalisation

Jun 12, 2017 00:06:50

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In light of the recent attacks in the UK, Dr Shiraz Maher and Dr Nina Musgrave comment on the issues of radicalisation and counterterrorism. Dr Maher is a lecturer in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London and Deputy Director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence. Dr Nina Musgrave acts as Assistant Director at the Centre for Defence Studies. She is also the course tutor for the MA module on National Security in the Department of War Studies.

Professor Joseph Nye: “I’m much more worried about the rise of Trump than the rise of China”

Jun 10, 2017 00:50:51

Description:

Event recording from 6th of June 2017 Inaugural Annual Lecture with Guest Speaker Professor Joseph Nye, with introduction by Dr Neville Bolt, Director of the King's Centre for Strategic Communications. Joseph S. Nye Jr., University Distinguished Service Professor, and former Dean of the Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

Dr Patricia Lewis: How to Think About the Future of Peace

Jun 9, 2017 00:56:05

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Event recording from 19th of May 2017 Dr Patricia M Lewis is the Research Director, International Security at Chatham House. Her former posts include Deputy Director and Scientist-in-Residence at the Center for Non-proliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies; Director of UNIDIR; and Director of VERTIC in London. Dr Lewis served on the 2004-6 WMD Commission chaired by Dr Hans Blix; the 2010-2011 Advisory Panel on Future Priorities of the OPCW chaired by Ambassador Rolf Ekeus; and was an adviser to the 2008-10 International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament (ICNND) chaired by Gareth Evans and Yoriko Kawaguchi. She holds a BSc (Hons) in physics from Manchester University and a PhD in nuclear physics from the Birmingham University. She is a dual national of the UK and Ireland. Dr Lewis is the recipient of the American Physical Society’s 2009 Joseph A Burton Forum Award recognizing 'outstanding contributions to the public understanding or resolution of issues involving the interface of physics and society'.

Sir Lawrence Freedman: How to Think About the Future of War

Jun 9, 2017 01:07:50

Description:

Event recording from 18th of May 2017 Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman has been Professor of War Studies at King's College London since 1982, and Vice-Principal since 2003. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King's he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995. He was awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1996 and was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997. He was awarded the KCMG (Knight Commander of St Michael and St George) in 2003. He was appointed in June 2009 to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War.

Podcast: PhD Conference

Jun 2, 2017 00:09:17

Description:

In this week’s episode, we’re bringing you exclusive interviews with participants at this year’s School of Security Studies PhD Conference. The two day conference was intended to provide an opportunity for PhD students from KCL’s War Studies and Defence Studies Departments to present on their current research and hear about the work of their peers, in a rigorous but friendly academic environment. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON WAR ZONE FREELANCE EXHIBITION LAUNCH In the lead up to the War Zone Freelance exhibition 2017 Anne Alling and Osie Greenway will be discussing the photos displayed around the Department of War Studies, the context and their forthcoming exhibition on the battle for Mosul. 5th June 2017 (18:00-19:30) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2rMsWyy Joshua Geltzer, an alumni of our department, was a member of President Obama’s National Security Council staff. His task was to ensure that the US used force abroad, e.g. drone strikes or commando raids, lawfully. He will give an assessment of President Trump’s failure to justify the use of force, followed by Q&A. DIGITAL ECOSYSTEMS OF REFUGEE MOBILITY How do datafied and digital relations emerge both between refugees and humanitarian organisations? Between non-state and state actors involved in the digital ecosystems? How do they transform refugees existence? Representatives from King's Centre for Digital Culture, Department of Digital Humanities and the Department of War Studies explore the social and political consequences of these developments. 8th June 2017 (09:30-17:00) Anatomy Museum (6th Floor)King's Building Strand Campus BOOK LAUNCH - ENEMIES KNOWN AND UNKNOWN McDonald's book lays bare the legal and political consequences of Washington's pursuit of militarised counterterrorism in the post-9/11 era. 21st June 2017 (18:30-20:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Podcast: Rebel Law

May 19, 2017 00:19:13

Description:

In this week’s episode, we’re bringing you an interview with War Studies alumnus Dr Frank Ledwidge. Dr Ledwidge is currently a lecturer at the Royal Air Force College Cranwell and author of three books. His latest book is called ‘Rebel Law: Insurgents, Courts and Justice in Modern Conflict’. In this interview, Dr. Ledwidge reflects on his time at King’s College London, his career, and his latest book ‘Rebel Law’ and argues that dispute resolution is part of any society. UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF WAR STUDIES THE CUTTING OUT OF THE FRENCH CORVETTE Speaker Sim Comfort - Britain feared invasion but how could the French invade if they couldn't even protect their own ships in their own harbours? The Cutting out of La Chevrette at Brest, 21 July 1801 remains one of the greatest small ship actions of all time. The action is detailed in the painting of that name by de Loutherbourg, which has secrets not before revealed! 25th May 2017 (17:15-19:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Registration URL: bit.ly/2p3Y9OE BLITZED: DRUGS IN NAZI GERMANY Was Hitler an addict? Were his troops fighting whilst high on crystal meth? Join author Norman Ohler for discussion of his provocative new book on the use of drugs in Nazi Germany. While drugs cannot on their own explain the events of the Second World War or its outcome, Ohler shows, they change our understanding of it. Blitzed forms a crucial missing piece of the story." 31st May 2017 (12:30-14:00) Council Room (K2.29) Strand Campus GLOBALISATION, IDENTITY AND WAR In an ever more globalised world, how are changing identities influencing the world of conflict? Organised by Project for the study of 21st Century (PS21) Speakers include Mary Kaldor, Theo Farrell, Patrick Bury and Ziya Merel. 31st May 2017 (18:00-19:30) S-2.08 Strand Building Strand Campus This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Event: Passchendaele - A New History

May 18, 2017 00:37:41

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Event recording from 04/05/2017 PASSCHENDAELE - A NEW HISTORY Speaker: Dr Nick Lloyd Chair: Professor Bill Philpott Hosted by the Sir Michael Howard Centre The Sir Michael Howard Centre: smhc@kcl.ac.uk Between July and November 1917, in a small corner of Belgium, more than 500,000 men were killed or maimed, gassed or drowned - and many of the bodies were never found. The Ypres offensive represents the modern impression of the First World War: splintered trees, water-filled craters, muddy shell-holes. The climax was one of the worst battles of both world wars: Passchendaele. The village fell eventually, only for the whole offensive to be called off. But, as Nick Lloyd shows, notably through previously unexamined German documents, it put the Allies nearer to a major turning point in the war than we have ever imagined. Dr Nick Lloyd FRHistS is Reader in Military & Imperial History at King's College London, based at the Joint Services Command & Staff College in Shrivenham, Wiltshire. He is the author of three books: Loos 1915 (2006); The Amritsar Massacre: The Untold Story of One Fateful Day (2011); and Hundred Days: The End of the Great War (2013). He lives with his family in Cheltenham.

Student Insight on War & Japan Concert

May 9, 2017 00:07:05

Description:

Two of our undergraduate students, Mariam Japaridze and Celia Pannetier report on the recent classical concert, War & Japan: A musical journey. Interspersed with excerpts of music, they comment on the relevance of the repertoire, interview the musicians and explain why the Department of War Studies is engaging with the arts. This podcast formed part of their module on New media, new wars and new journalism within their International Relations BA Programme convened by Dr. Peter Busch. The event was hosted by the King’s Japan Programme and the Arts and Conflict Hub.

Podcast: Studying Art and War

May 5, 2017 00:15:00

Description:

In this week’s episode, we’re bringing you a special feature with Dr Lola Frost speaking about the value of studying art in war studies. According to her, studying art is important in war studies because art can convey knowledge in a way that is not accessible to the social sciences. Dr Frost is an artist and a visiting research fellow in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. Her career as an artist spans nearly four decades working and exhibiting in South Africa and in the UK. Currently, she is teaching a 20-credit MA module on Art and War at the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. For more information about Dr Frost, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/lolafrost/index.aspx. UPCOMING EVENTS STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AT NORMANDY: LESSONS ON INTELLECTUAL COURAGE Location: Anatomy Museum (6th Floor) King's Building Strand Campus Category: Conference/Seminar When: 09/05/2017 (16:00-18:00) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2p4IKeo This event will build upon Christopher Kolenda's research on strategic leadership in Iraq and Afghanistan for his doctoral dissertation. Chris will examine the role of intellectual courage during the Normandy campaign and draw lessons for today's leaders in academia, non-profit, business, military and government sectors.  A MOST DISAGREEABLE PROBLEM: THE ROYAL NAVY AND KRIEGSMARINE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS Location: War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Category: Lecture When: 11/05/2017 (17:15-19:00) Registration URL http://bit.ly/2oIFTbd Speaker: Dr Marcus Faulkner, Senior Teaching Fellow in the Department of War Studies PROF NIALL BARR INAUGURAL LECTURE 'THE PRACTICE OF MILITARY HISTORY' Location: Defence Studies Department, Joint Services Command and Staff College Category: Lecture When: 09/05/2017 (17:45-19:00) Please contact our Events Officer, Danni MacDivitt by e-mail at dmacdivitt.jscsc@da.mod.uk or danielle.macdivitt@kcl.ac.uk to indicate your intentions. *Dress code is Lounge suits and female equivalent* Professor Niall Barr is Professor of Military History in the Defence Studies Department. Educated at the University of St Andrews, he has previously taught at St Andrews and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. He joined the Staff College in 2000, where he teaches on a wide range of military courses, including the Higher Command and Staff Course, and conducts numerous battlefield tours and staff rides. His main research interest concerns the Anglo-American alliance in the Second World War, but he also has an enduring interest in the Scottish military tradition. His current research project concerns the role and importance of food in war. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/dsd/events/eventrecords/NiallBarrIL.aspx. This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert and Mané Grigoryan.

Podcast: Risk and Terror

Apr 21, 2017 00:20:41

Description:

In this week’s episode, we explore how the public should understand and respond to risk. Dr Brooke Rogers explains how risk is understood from a practitioners point of view and how the public’s understanding may differ. In addition, Dr Rogers elaborates on the rationale behind public transport campaigns, such as ‘Run! Hide! Tell!’ and ‘See it! Say it! Sorted.’, and how these campaigns contribute to protecting public spaces. Dr Brooke Rogers is a Reader in Risk and Terror in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London and co-directer of the MA programme in Terrorism, Security and Society. She is a social psychologist interested in risk and crisis communication, perceptions of risk, and health outcomes in response to extreme event. The majority of her projects investigate public and practitioner responses to chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) terrorist incidents (i.e. Home Office, PIRATE, CIE Toolkit, PRACTICE and Deloitte). UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING’S COLLEGE LONDON THE WAR IS IN THE MOUNTAINS Judith Matloff teaches conflict reporting at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and has been writing about international affairs for 30 years. In her lecture, she explores why, despite being home to only ten percent of the world’s population, mountains are host to a strikingly disproportionate share of its conflicts. Location: Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus When: 27/04/2017 (18:00-19:30) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2nfdqtf http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/The-War-is-in-the-Mountains.aspx PASSCHENDAELE - A NEW HISTORY Between July and November 1917, in a small corner of Belgium, more than 500,000 men were killed or maimed, gassed or drowned - and many of the bodies were never found. The Ypres offensive represents the modern impression of the First World War: splintered trees, water-filled craters and muddy shell-holes. The climax was one of the worst battles of both world wars: Passchendaele. The village fell eventually, only for the whole offensive to be called off. But, as Nick Lloyd shows, notably through previously unexamined German documents, it put the Allies nearer to a major turning point in the war than we have ever imagined. Location: War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) When: 04/05/2017 (17:30-19:00) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2nDPjI1 http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Passchendaele-A-New-History-Book-Launch.aspx CHOCOLATE OF PEACE Join us for a screening and discussion of 'Chocolate of Peace (Cacao Defying Violence)' with producer and co-director, Gwen Burnye-at. Chocolate of Peace depicts the Colombian Peace Community of San José de Apartadó’s experiences of resistance, via a journey through their processes of organic chocolate production. Location: Anatomy Lecture Theatre (K.6.29) Strand Campus When: 04/05/2017 (18:30-20:00) http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Chocolate-of-Peace.aspx This podcast was produced by Ivan Seifert.

Event: State Of Rebellion - Violence And Intervention In The Central African Republic

Apr 12, 2017 00:44:53

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Event recording from 10/04/2017 STATE OF REBELLION: VIOLENCE AND INTERVENTION IN THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Speaker: Louisa Lombard, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Yale. Chair: Dr Kieran Mitton, War Studies, KCL. A joint event of the Africa Research Group and the 'Approaches to Understanding Violence Seminar Series' of the Conflict, Security & Development Research Group. Join Professor Louisa Lombard as she discusses her new book 'State of Rebellion: Violence and Intervention in the Central African Republic', drawing on extensive fieldwork to challenge conventional wisdom about the causes of CAR's violent conflict. About the book: In 2012, a wave of violence swept through the Central African Republic as Seleka rebels clashed with anti-Balaka militias. In the face of seemingly senseless bloodshed, journalists, politicians, and scholars struggled to account for the conflict’s origins. In this first comprehensive account of the violence, Louisa Lombard argues that the conflict was more than a straightforward religious clash between Christians and Muslims. Instead, she traces the roots of the conflict to fears of spiritual insecurity and a social breakdown that drove inter-communal violence. Placing the uprising within its broader social, cultural, and historical context, Lombard reveals the complicated roles played by marginalized rural youths, local political leaders, and the global community in sustaining the conflict, and she offers an urgent corrective to our perceptions of this little-understood country, making a compelling case for international leaders to rethink their approach to resolving the conflict. Reviews: “This valuable, indeed important, study helps us make sense of a little-known but strategically important African country. Those who wish to know Africa today need to know this book.” - Paul Richards, author of No Peace, No War: An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts “If you want to understand why the CAR seems a perpetual work in regress, then Lombard’s book is a must-read. Her new perspectives illuminate a neglected recess of globalization.” - Stephen W. Smith, Duke University “With a stunning combination of conceptual clarity and vivid ethnography, Louisa Lombard’s book challenges conventional wisdom on the roots of violence in the CAR. A must-read for anyone wanting to engage with current debates on peace-building and state-building initiatives.” - Marielle Debos, author of Living by the Gun in Chad “In this stimulating and provocative book, Lombard proposes a new approach to peacekeeping, peace enforcement, and humanitarian action that rests upon a politics of redistribution and acknowledgement of the social dignity of fighters lacking a state.” - Jean-François Bayart, Graduate Institute Geneva “Provides a magisterial reading of the role of violence in the making of the CAR. Authoritative, nuanced, and empirically rich, Lombard offers a new and compelling lens through which so-called state failure and post-conflict transitions can be understood.” - Michael Watts, University of California, Berkeley For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/lombard.aspx.

Event: Learned From The Russian Hack: The New Era of Political Warfare

Mar 27, 2017 00:46:10

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Event recording from 14/03/2017 LEARNED FROM THE RUSSIAN HACK: THE NEW ERA OF POLITICAL WARFARE Speaker: Dr Brandon Valeriano, Cardiff University. Brandon Valeriano (Ph.D. Vanderbilt University) has published dozens of articles and book chapters in such outlets as the Journal of Politics, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Peace Research, and International Studies Review. His two most recent books are Cyber War versus Cyber Reality at Oxford University Press (2015) and Russian Coercive Diplomacy at Palgrave (2015) with two Foreign Affairs pieces summarizing the works entitled “The Coming Cyberpeace” and “Paper Tiger Putin.” Ongoing research explores cyber coercion, external threats and video games, and arms races and arms control in cyberspace. Dr. Valeriano has written opinion and popular media pieces for such outlets as Washington Post, Slate, Foreign Affairs, Business Insider, and War on the Rocks. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Learned-from-the-Russian-Hack-The-New-Era-of-Political-Warfare.aspx

Podcast special: The Attack in Westminster

Mar 25, 2017 00:08:48

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On Wednesday 22 March an attack was carried out on Westminster Bridge and the Houses of Parliament where five people have died, including a police officer and the attacker. John Gearson, Professor for National Security Studies at King's College London shares his assessment about Wednesday’s event.

Podcast: Lord Ricketts on the Practice of National Security

Mar 24, 2017 00:13:41

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Joining us this week: This years inaugural lecture on the Practice of National security was run by Lord Peter Ricketts who spoke about the establishment of the UK National Security Council in 2010, as well as his appointment as the first National Security Advisor and the emergence of a national security approach in the United Kingdom. Professor of National Security Studies, and Director of the Centre for Defence Studies in the Department of War Studies at King's College London. From 2002 to 2007 he was seconded to the House of Commons where I acted as the principal defence policy adviser to the Defence Select Committee and as a Parliamentary Clerk to the Constitutional Affairs Select Committee. He has currently undertaken a new role as Interim Vice Dean (International). Upcoming Events: STATE OF REBELLION: VIOLENCE AND INTERVENTION IN THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Join Professor Louisa Lombard, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Yale, as she discusses her new book 'State of Rebellion: Violence and Intervention in the Central African Republic', drawing on extensive fieldwork to challenge conventional wisdom about the causes of CAR's violent conflict. Location: War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) When: 10/04/2017 (18:00-19:30) STATHIS KALVYAS - THE IMPACT OF REVOLUTIONARY ACTORS IN CIVIL WARS: THE MARXIST PARADOX Research on civil wars has neglected a key dimension of political identity, revolution, choosing to focus primarily on the distinction between ethnic and non-ethnic actors and wars. Professor Stathis Kalvyas from Yale University corrects this error by examining the impact of revolutionary socialist (RS) or Marxist-inspired rebels. To attend this event, please register at http://bit.ly/2o0Amvh. Location: Edmond J Safra Lecture Theatre (Strand Campus) When: 20/04/2017 (18:30-20:00) Registration URL http://bit.ly/2o0Amvh THE WAR IS IN THE MOUNTAINS Judith Matloff teaches conflict reporting at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and has been writing about international affairs for 30 years. In her lecture, she explores why, despite being home to only ten percent of the world’s population, mountains are host to a strikingly disproportionate share of its conflicts. Location: Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus When: 27/04/2017 (18:00-19:30) Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2nfdqtf For more information visit www.kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Podcast: International Women's Day

Mar 9, 2017 00:23:40

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Will you #BeBoldForChange on International Women's Day 2017 and beyond by taking groundbreaking action that truly drives the greatest change for women? Joining us this week: In the first interview, we speak to Dr Brooke Rogers, the first psychologist at the Department of War Studies and chair of the Behavioural Science Expert Group for the Cabinet, with main research areas focussing on resilience, protecting crowded spaces and behavioural science. In the following interviews, we speak to members of Women in War and International Politics (WWIP): Ashley Pratt, Madison Estes and Farhana Akthar talking to us about their own experiences. Upcoming Events: Energy and Climate Policy between the Trump Presidency and Paris Agreement EUCERS/KAS Energy Talks 2017 7th of March 2017, 14.00 - 16.30 with a lunch upon arrival, River Room Speakers: Professor Dr Friedbert Pflüger, Director, EUCERS, King’s College London, Hans-Hartwig Blomeier, Director London Office, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung 14.20 Julian Popov, former Minister of Environment of Bulgaria, Fellow at the European Climate Foundation, Bernice Lee OBE, Executive Director, Hoffmann Centre on the Sustainable Resource Economy, Senior Fellow, Energy, Environment and Resources, The Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House Jonathan Gaventa, Director, E3G Dr Frank Umbach, Research Director, EUCERS, King’s College London, Daniel Scholten, Assistant Professor, CRNI Managing Editor, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology AFGHAN STUDIES GROUP 9th March 2017 (18:00-19:30) 3rd Floor Franklin Wilkins Building, Room 3.52 “The Defiant Border: The Afghan-Pakistan Borderlands” by Elizabeth Leake. "The Defiant Border" explores why the Afghan-Pakistan borderlands have remained largely independent of state controls from the colonial period into the 21st century. This book looks at local Pashtun tribes' modes for evading first British colonial, then Pakistani, governance; the ongoing border dispute between Pakistan and Afghanistan; and continuing interest in the region from Indian, US, British, and Soviet actors. LEARNED FROM THE RUSSIAN HACK: THE NEW ERA OF POLITICAL WARFARE 14th March 2017 (17:00-18:30) Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus Dr Brandon Valeriano, Cardiff University will discuss ongoing research exploring cyber coercion, external threats and video games, and arms races and arms control in cyberspace. Dr. Valeriano has written opinion and popular media pieces for such outlets as Washington Post, Slate, Foreign Affairs, Business Insider, and War on the Rock. His two most recent books are Cyber War versus Cyber Reality at Oxford University Press (2015) and Russian Coercive Diplomacy at Palgrave (2015) THE PRACTICE OF NATIONAL SECURITY – INAUGRAL LECTURE OF LORD PETER RICKETTS GCMG GCVO, Visiting Professor at the Centre for Defence Studies Wednesday 15th March 2017, 18.30-20.30, Edmund J Safra. Strand Campus. RSVP here Lord Ricketts will reflect on the establishment of the UK National Security Council in 2010, as well as his appointment as the first National Security Advisor and the emergence of a national security approach in the United Kingdom. Tracing how the British Government has coordinated the different strands of its overseas policy from the Committee of Imperial Defence onwards, he will set out why he believes the creation of the National Security Council was a constitutional innovation that deserves to last, and will detail how it operated in its first years while he was the National Security Adviser. For more information, visit kcl.ac.uk/warstudies/events.

Event: Where do Violent Norms Come From? Organisation, Power, and Space in Civil War

Mar 6, 2017 01:10:44

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Event recording from 13/02/2017 Speaker: Dr Zoe Marks, Chancellor’s Fellow (Lecturer), Centre of African Studies and Co-Director, Global Development Academy, University of Edinburgh. Chair: Dr Kieran Mitton, CSDRG, War Studies, King's College London. Abstract: Guerrilla war requires careful coordination between rebel groups and the local population. Yet, many groups fighting for liberation and power to the people instead attack and oppress the people. In this paper, I demonstrate that the conceptual divide between violence and governance is partly an artefact of the data we have had available, and disguises the close relationship between coercion and authority in civil war. Using what has become the paradigmatic case for brutal anticivilian violence – the Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone – I trace the processes by which violent norms and institutions were created within the rebel group and evolved over time. The analysis achieves two things. First, it shows that rationalist theories of individual ‘opportunism’ have limited explanatory value unless tied to the policies, power structures, and processes of the organization itself. I explain the relationship between violent norms and behavior through a framework of sociological institutionalism. Second, I examine the link between violence, governance, and military strategy, the latter of which has often been obscured in recent studies of civil war. Incorporating strategic choices made at the organizational level helps explain change over time in patterns of violence. Speaker Profile: Zoe Marks is a Chancellor’s Fellow and Lecturer in the Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh, where she is Director of the MSc in African Studies. Her research focuses on conflict and civil war, armed groups, gender relations, and post-conflict development. Her work examines the internal dynamics of rebellion and the post-conflict trajectories of ex-combatants. Her gender-related research focuses on sexual violence, the role of women in armed groups, female power brokers, and understanding victimhood and survival in social context. She is lead author and co-investigator on the ESRC-DFID Poverty Alleviation Research project 'Poverty and Conflict', which tracks social capital and economic survival during and after war through surveys, social network analysis, and qualitative research in DR Congo, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Dr Marks is also leading two projects under the DFID-funded Political Settlements Research Programme: one on the inclusion of armed actors in post-conflict political settlements; and one on women's peace activism in conflict contexts. Dr Marks received her DPhil in Politics from the University of Oxford and MSc in African Studies (also from Oxford); she holds a BA in Government and African American Studies from Georgetown University. Her work has appeared in African Affairs, Civil Wars, the Journal of Modern African Studies, and edited volumes; she is on the editorial board for Critical African Studies. The 'Approaches to Understanding Violence Seminar Series' is a programme of multidisciplinary lectures and events on the subject of violence, part of a CSDRG project led by Dr Kieran Mitton. Find out more here: www.kcl.ac.uk/csd. To sign-up to our mailing list simply send a blank email to: csdrg-join@kcl.ac.uk For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/marks.aspx.

Event: The Geopolitics Of American Empire: A View From The 1940s

Mar 3, 2017 00:38:58

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Event recording from 07/02/2017 at King's College London. The Geopolitics of American Empire: A view from the 1940s Speaker: Dr Or Rosenboim, University of Cambridge Did visions of empire shape the rise of the United States to world power? In this presentation, Or Rosenboim discusses the history of Geopolitics in the United States and sheds light on two main figures in the field: Owen Lattimore and Nicholas J. Spykman. In the 1940s, both promoted the study of Geopolitics as central to international relations in the age of the end of empire. The paper shows how they employed geopolitical concepts to promote opposed versions of world order, in which the United States helps eradicate imperialism, or replaces Europe as the leading world empire. Or Rosenboim’s research is set in the intersection of International Relations and History. Her published work examines the history of international thought in the twentieth century, especially around the history of geopolitics, cosmopolitanism, federalism and democracy theory in Britain and the United States. She is also interested in the relationship between intellectual history and international theory. Recently, she has been writing on Italian international and geopolitical thought in the twentieth century. Her book, The emergence of globalism: Competing Visions of World Order in Britain and the United States, 1939-1950, will be published by Princeton University Press in 2017. The book is based on her doctoral research, that was awarded the Lisa Smirl prize for best dissertation (Department of Politics, Cambridge University) and co-awarded the Raymond Aron Prize 2014. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/rosenboim.aspx.

Podcast: Music, War, and Propaganda

Feb 24, 2017 00:34:04

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In this podcast, we’re bringing you two exclusive interviews. In the first interview (0-16:37), Lisa Ueda and Daniele Rinaldo, both prize-winning solo musicians, talk about where their passion for music began and elaborated on how they believe the wars of the 20th century have influenced composers in France and Japan. As a duo, they have toured the world and performed in some of the most prestigious locations. On March 4th, they are going to perform a special repertoire at the East Asian Expressions of War event at King’s College London. To attend the event, please register here: bit.ly/2kwkxLa In the second interview (16:37-32:00), Professor Nicholas O'Shaughnessy talks about some of the topics which he will cover during the Saki Ruth Dockrill Memorial Lecture on February 28th. This lecture is an attempt to define the global crisis in terms of a renaissance in the use and abuse of propaganda. It argues that such an understanding helps illuminate the world stage, from the empowerment of Al Qaeda / ISIS to the rise of populism in such as the Philippines, to the renaissance of Russia as an imperial power and a new focus in China on nationalism and charismatic leader imagery. To attend the event, please register here: bit.ly/2jQMPD7 Upcoming Events: SAKI RUTH DOCKRILL MEMORIAL LECTURE - PROPAGANDA AND THE CRISIS OF THE GLOBAL ORDER 28th February 2017 (18:00-19:30) The Great Hall Strand Campus Professor Nick O'Shaughnessy, Visiting Professor in the Department of War Studies and newly established King's Centre for Strategic Communications will be giving the annual Saki Dockrill Lecture. Registration URL: bit.ly/2jQMPD7 A TALE OF TWO NAVIES: GEOPOLITICS, TECHNOLOGY AND STRATEGY IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY AND THE ROYAL NAVY, 1960 - 2015 1st March 2017 (17:30-19:30) Chapters King's Building Strand Campus In A Tale of Two Navies: Geopoltics, technology and strategy in the United States Navy and the Royal Navy, 1960 - 2015, Anthony Wells presents a history and analysis of the unique and enduring relationship between the United States Navy and the Royal Navy. "UNRAVELLING THE KASHMIR KNOT" - AN UNCONVENTIONAL TAKE ON THE KASHMIR ISSUE 1st March 2017 (18:00-19:30) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) This book focuses on the 'Kashmir Knot' and relies primarily on British archives to show that the issue was the end product of Britain's ruthless policies to satisfy its geo-political, defence and strategic interests in the Indian subcontinent. CSD CONFERENCE 2017 03/03/2017 (08:15-18:30)The Great Hall Strand Campus The Conflict, Security and Development Conference 2017 is an annual student-led initiative with aims to bring policy attention to an emergent development topic in international affairs. For our fourth annual conference, we are excited to announce we will be addressing the topic of ‘Crossing Borders: Technology and Migration in an Interconnected World’. http://www.csdconference2017.co.uk/ WAR AND JAPAN - A MUSICAL JOURNEY 4th March 2017 (19:30-21:00) The College Chapel Strand Campus How does war shape societies beyond the boundaries of the battlefield? What are the expressions of war in the contemporary world? Musicians; Lisa Ueda (violin) & Daniele Rinaldo (piano) engage with these questions by exploring how war has contributed to shape contemporary Japan through a musical journey. The repertoire -including pieces by Messiaen, Stravinsky and Debussy- seeks to explore the relationship between Japanese and European musical aesthetics that consolidated in the first half of the 20th century. Registration URL: bit.ly/2kwkxLa For more information, visit kcl.ac.uk/warstudies/events.

Podcast: MA in Arms Control & Security Studies

Feb 11, 2017 00:11:00

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Professor Wyn Bowen the new head for the school of Security studies at King’s College talks about what the new school is about. Joined by Dr Heather Williams who talks about the new Masters degree in Arms Control, a joint programme between war studies and defence studies and the first MA programme in the new school of Security studies. Events: Where Do Violent Norms Come From? Organisation, Power and Space in Civil War 13th February 2017 (12:30-14:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) Dr Zoe Marks, University of Edinburgh, presents her original fieldwork-based research on violence, armed groups and civil wars. Andrew O'Shaughnessy: The Men Who Lost America 13th February 2017 (18:30-19:30) Great Hall King's Building Strand Campus The loss of America was a stunning and unexpected defeat for the powerful British Empire. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders must have been to blame, but were they? Information Warfare in the 21st Century 14th February 2017 (17:30-20:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) The topic is a wide one - intended to accommodate various perspectives and case studies about how information is perceived at a time of political hostility between Russia and the West. The discussion will be followed by a Q&A session. RCIR Book launch - The International in Security, Security in the International 16th February 2017 (17:00-19:00) Research Centre in International Relations Book Launch 'The International in Security, Security in the International' by Pinar Bilgin. WAR AND JAPAN - A MUSICAL JOURNEY LocationThe College Chapel Strand CampusCategoryCulture, Performance/ConcertWhen04/03/2017 (19:30-21:00) For more information visit: www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/w…sical-journey.aspx

Podcast: The Informational Dimension of Hybrid Warfare

Jan 28, 2017 00:15:28

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In this episode, we're bringing you an exclusive interview with Dr Neville Bolt, director of the King's Centre for Strategic Communications. Dr Bolt discusses the informational dimension of hybrid warfare. Many scholars argue that the absence of war does not necessarily equate to peace. Therefore, they call this lucid state between war and peace ‘hybrid warfare’. But how useful is this term ‘hybrid warfare’ and how are Western and Eastern perspectives different when it comes to defining and interpreting this term? For more information about the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC), visit http://kingscsc.co.uk. Interested in pursuing an MA in Strategic Communications? Visit bit.ly/2CYzxP7 to learn more about this programme. In January 2017, the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) hosted an international conference to discuss the informational dimension of hybrid warfare. Panelists from the International Centre for Counter Terrorism (ICCT, The Hague), the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), and the KCSC, exchanged their academic perspectives on this heated topic. You can listen to the entire recording of this conference here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/sets/kcsc-conference For more information about The Department of War Studies and upcoming events, visit www.kcl.ac.uk/warstudies/events.

Event: The Death Of The ICC? The Politics Of International Justice In Africa

Jan 26, 2017 01:07:42

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Event recording from 23/1/2016 Speaker: Dr. Phil Clark, Reader in Comparative and International Politics, SOAS. Chair: Dr Domitilla Sagramoso Part of the Conflict Security & Development Seminar Series Biography Dr. Phil Clark is a Reader in Comparative and International Politics at SOAS. He specialises in conflict and post-conflict issues in Africa, with a particular focus on transitional justice, peacebuilding and reconciliation. His last book was The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice without Lawyers (CUP) and his next book, Distant Justice: The Impact of the International Criminal Court on African Politics (CUP), will be out in the middle of 2017. Before joining SOAS, Phil was a research fellow at the University of Oxford and co-founder of Oxford Transitional Justice Research. He holds a DPhil in Politics from the University of Oxford, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/the-death-of-the-ICC-.aspx

Event: The First Victory

Jan 25, 2017 00:51:11

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Event recording from 19/1/2017 Andrew Stewart introduces his new book The First Victory: The Second World War and the East Africa Campaign, a riveting account of the long-overlooked achievement of British-led forces who, against all odds, scored the first major Allied victory of the Second World War. His latest book, The First Victory: The Second World War and the East Africa Campaign, examines one of the war’s great, but almost entirely overlooked, military campaigns. When the first shots were fired in the summer of 1940 along the Sudanese and Kenyan borders there was a great deal of interest across the British Empire in this expansion of the war into a hitherto largely ignored region. With France close to collapse the “Italian jackal”, Benito Mussolini, had launched a treacherous assault on those imperial territories in Africa which bordered his own. This was the same Duce who only a few years before had been ‘accommodated’ despite his clear war of aggression, the crimes carried out by his military forces in Ethiopia – of which there were many – being overlooked in the fanciful hope of maintaining an already largely illusionary balance of power and European stability. As the ‘Finest Hour’ developed and Britain and its imperial allies stood firm in their determination to defy and irritate their continental European adversary, opportunities to highlight any semblance of military success were welcomed in London by politicians and the public alike. Andrew Stewart is reader in conflict and diplomacy, Defence Studies Department, King’s College London, and co-director of the King’s Second World War Research Group. He has previously published four books on the Second World War. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Dr.-Andrew-Stewart-The-First-Victory.aspx

Event: American Primacy World War Two

Jan 23, 2017 00:45:55

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Event recording from 25/10/2016 Dr Stephen Wertheim King’s College, University of Cambridge The author Dr. Stephen Wertheim is a Junior Research Fellow at King’s College and the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge. Last year he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Woodrow Wilson School and the Center for Human Values, Princeton University. He specializes in U.S. foreign relations and international ideas and institutions, emphasizing concepts of politics and law since the nineteenth century. Stephen received a Ph.D. in History with distinction from Columbia University in 2015. He is currently revising his first book, entitled Tomorrow, the World: The Birth of U.S. Global Supremacy in World War II, which will appear with Harvard University Press. He has also published scholarly articles in Diplomatic History, Journal of Global History, Journal of Genocide Research, and Presidential Studies Quarterly, in addition to writing for The Nation and other journalistic venues. The paper When, exactly, did U.S. officials and intellectuals decide that their country should become the world’s supreme political and military power and assume responsibility for enforcing international order? Scholars have neglected this question, assuming supremacy to be a longstanding, gradually realized goal. Yet for most of American history policymakers rejected armed supremacy as imperialistic. Committed to “internationalism,” they believed peaceful intercourse would replace power politics. Such internationalism had to die in order for U.S. world leadership to be born — as it was early in World War II, before the Pearl Harbor attack. This talk outlines the emergence of a will to lead the world within postwar-planning networks in the government, foundations, and universities, especially in the Council on Foreign Relations. When Hitler conquered France, he swept away the old order and discredited the internationalist project. Now peaceful intercourse, far from transcending armed force, seemed paradoxically to depend upon armed force to undergird it. It was thus out of the death of internationalism, as they understood it, that American officials and intellectuals first decided that the United States should become the preeminent political-military power after the war. Convinced that world organization had failed, American planners conceived of U.S. global leadership as the preferable, and mutually exclusive, alternative. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/American-Primacy-World-War-Two.aspx

Podcast: War Studies Society

Jan 17, 2017 00:13:51

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The WSS is an independent organisation accredited by the KCLSU that is open to current students, alumni or anyone with an interest in subjects related to War Studies; history, international relations, security, conflict, government and foreign policy. The WSS Society is the academic / social group that runs alongside the War Studies Department, with attendance open to any and all staff and students of the subjects the Department teaches. In addition to striving to create a lively community for our international body of students, we also hold various academic and social events throughout the year. Join the society for free at www.kclsu.org/organisation/WarStudies/ Find us on Twitter at twitter.com/WarStudiesSoc Upcoming Events : 'Jacky' Fisher at the 1899 Hague Conference: A Reassessment Thursday 12 January, 17.15-18.30, Pyramid Room K4U.04 (King's Building) Speaker: Dr Alan M. Anderson (King's) Registration and more information The selection and role of then-Vice Admiral Sir John A (‘Jacky’) Fisher as technical naval delegate for Great Britain at the 1899 Hague Conference has been largely misunderstood and mischaracterized. This lecture presents a corrected and more nuanced analysis of Fisher’s appointment, role, and positions taken at the Conference. Dr Andrew Stewart: The First Victory Thursday 19 January, 18.00-19.30, K6.07 More information At this event, Dr Andrew Stewart introduces his new book The First Victory: The Second World War and the East Africa Campaign, a riveting account of the long-overlooked achievement of British-led forces who, against all odds, scored the first major Allied victory of the Second World War. Dr Igor Sutyagin: The Russian ground troops' new combat capabilities (tactics and hardware) 24th January 2017 (18:00-19:30) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) More information Where do US-Russian relations stand today? Dr Igor Sutyagin will present research on the current status of strategic armaments developments, nuclear arms control, anti-ballistic missile defence systems in the arsenals of the Superpowers. Colin Marsden and Stephen Ho: Professional Use of Wargaming Thursday January 26, 1300 to 1415 War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Colin Marsden and Stephen Ho from the UK´s Defence Science & Technology Laboratory will talk about the various wargames created and sponsored by DSTL, and about related career prospects within this organisation. No need to book. For more information visit kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: Vietnam War

Dec 19, 2016 00:40:07

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Event recording from 14/12/2016 Speaker: Dr. Andrew Gawthorpe Abstract The Vietnam War was not only a war, but also a contest between rival nation-building visions. The Vietnamese Communist movement's bottom-up mobilization was pitted against America's attempt to help their South Vietnamese ally build a nation-state from the top down. Many narratives stress the military aspects of the conflict after American involvement began in earnest in 1965, but this misses the fact that the U.S. nation-building effort in wartime South Vietnam was the largest and most ambitious ever in American history. This seminar explores the course of U.S. nation building strategy in the later years of the war, showing how it ultimately failed - and what this means for contemporary and future nation-building efforts. Biography Andrew Gawthorpe is Lecturer in Contemporary Military History and Security Studies at Leiden University in the Netherlands. He was previously a research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School, a teaching fellow in the Defence Studies Department of King’s College London, and a civil servant in the Cabinet Office. His book on U.S. nation-building efforts in wartime South Vietnam is forthcoming from Cornell University Press. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Vietnam-War.aspx

Event: Hitler's Soldiers

Dec 19, 2016 00:39:15

Description:

Event recording from 30/11/2016 Speaker: Ben H. Shepherd Abstract This paper will examine the front-line fighting performance of the German army of the Second World War, during the period in which it won its greatest victories – from the outbreak of war in September 1939 to the Germans’ defeat before Moscow in December 1941. In doing so, it will highlight the unevenness of the army’s fighting performance at the operational and tactical levels, as well as its lack of strategic grasp. It will also demonstrate how reliant the army was upon the substandard quality of its opponents. The aim of the paper is not to subject the German army’s fighting performance to a crude hatchet job, but rather to present a considerably more nuanced picture than popular perceptions allow. The paper will also examine the links between the army’s military failings and its moral failings during this period, as it increasingly subscribed to ruthless Nazi ideology and became ever more complicit, or directly active in, an array of crimes on the front line as well as in the occupied rear. Biography Ben H. Shepherd is a reader in History at Glasgow Caledonian University. He has written extensively on German counterinsurgency during the Second World War, and has co-edited two volumes on guerrilla warfare and counterinsurgency across Axis-occupied Europe. His most recent single-authored book, Hitler’s Soldiers: The German Army in the Third Reich (Yale University Press, 2016) is a major, general work examining the army’s military performance, relations with the Nazi regime, and involvement in occupation and war crimes. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Hitlers-Soldiers.aspx

Event: Guerillas And Gorillas

Dec 17, 2016 00:49:05

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GUERRILLAS & GORILLAS: CONSERVATION IN THE WARZONES OF EASTERN DRC Speaker: John Kahekwa Hosted by the Marjan Centre for the Study of War & the Non Human Sphere On a rare visit to the United Kingdom, world famous gorilla conservationist John Kahekwa will discuss the unique series of issues that conflict presents to conservation, having been born and worked all his life in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Biography For many years John has been tracking the Eastern Lowland Gorillas in the Kahuzi-Biega National Park that endured some of the worst violence during the widespread conflicts that scarred the region for many years. In the 1990's, the gorilla population at Kahuzi-Biega National Park was placed at around 600; however a new estimate places the population at less than 300. John was the Kahuzi-Biega park’s chief tracker between 1983-2003 during which time he escorted a number of well-known figures who included Bill and Melinda Gates, as well as appearing in the film, ‘Gorillas in the Mist’, about the late gorilla conservationist, Dian Fossey, which was filmed in the park. From his observations about the human impact on gorillas John decided that the key to their protection was to develop an approach that would involve the local community sharing in the benefits of protecting natural resources of an area whose people face challenging social and economic issues. A life-changing moment occurred when John arrested the same poacher for the tenth time inside the park; an exasperated John asked the man why he kept poaching. ‘It's simple, there aren't any jobs’, to which John replied: ‘if you had a job would you stay out of the park’? The poacher replied: ‘yes I would’. In 1992 John set up his own charity, the PolePole Foundation, devoted to bringing the interests of Kahuzi-Biega and those of the local community together (PolePole means ‘slowly-slowly’ in Kiswahili). He started with jobs: John persuaded the 47 worst poachers in the area to retrain as woodcarvers, and persuaded a Japanese donor to fund the planting of 10,000 young trees to provide the wood. Since then John has achieved considerable success, reaping the benefits of staying put while the brutal regional conflicts raged round him and to date the PolePole Foundation has: - planted over 1.5 million trees around the park. - run both a primary and secondary school. - developed income generating projects for former poachers and widows of rangers killed while protecting the gorillas. - developed scientific study link with Kyoto University.

Podcast: Casualty Recording Post-Chilcot

Dec 17, 2016 00:16:10

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The UK launch of the first-ever set of international standards for recording casualties for use in the field and as a resource for conflict analysts (published 23 November 2016). These Standards have been developed by UK-based NGO Every Casualty over a three-year period with the intensive involvement of casualty recording organisations around the world, and of major end users such as the ICC, UNOCHA, and ICRC. The publication of these standards is particularly timely in light of the Chilcot Report into the Iraq War which highlights the failure of the UK government properly to acknowledge and account for Iraqi casualties, and calls on the UK government to make every reasonable effort to identify and to understand the likely and actual effects of its military actions on civilians. Dr Rachel Kerr from the Department of War studies interviewed Co-Directors of Every Casualty Worldwide, and Co-founders of Iraq Body Count Hamit Dardagan and John Sloboda. For more information, visit http://www.everycasualty.org/

Podcast: Thinking Historically - A Guide For Strategy and Statecraft

Nov 29, 2016 00:18:04

Description:

There is a renewed interest in exploring how history and historians might contribute to the policymaking process. The core aim of the Grand Strategy Programme is knowledge transfer: to bring more historical and strategic expertise to statecraft, diplomacy and foreign policy. This podcast features an interview with Professor John Bew. He is a Professor in History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King’s College London and he is leading the Grand Strategy Programme. For more information about Professor John Bew, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/professors/bew.aspx. UPCOMING EVENTS AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON: CASUALTY RECORDING POST-CHILCOT 8th December 2016 (17:30-19:00) Weston Room Maughan Library Join the War Crimes Research Group for a panel discussion of the UK launch of the first-ever set of international standards for recording casualties for use in the field and as a resource for conflict analysts (published 23 November 2016). Registration URL http://bit.ly/2fQBLo4 NEW FRONTIERS IN WAR, TECHNOLOGY, ETHICS AND THE LAW 30th November 2016 (10:00-14:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) The aim of this BISA workshop is to provide a forum for discussion and presentation of research on issues related to the application of innovations in science and technology to the conduct of war, and their legal and ethical implications. GENDER & SRI LANKA, 30th November 2016 (12:00-13:00) Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor Strand Campus Dr Rebekka Friedman will focus on her research on the reintegration of female combatants in war-affected regions of Northern Sri Lanka. 2017 WAR WITH RUSSIA 30th November 2016 (18:00-19:30) Arthur & Paula Lucas Lecture Theatre (S-2.18) Does NATO's have the knowledge, capability and military hardware necessary to match Russia's ever-improving conventional capability? General Sir Richard Shirreff, former Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe discusses his explosive new book with Professor David Betz HITLERS SOLDIERS 30th November 2016 (18:00-19:30) War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) Ben H. Shepherd will examine the front-line fighting performance of the German army of the Second World War, during the period in which it won its greatest victories – from the outbreak of war in September 1939 to the Germans' defeat before Moscow in December 1941. For more information about upcoming events, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/index.aspx.

Podcast: Humans of Calais

Nov 23, 2016 00:19:22

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Humans of Calais Photo Exhibition shows the daily life in the refugee camp in Calais. This project aims to give migrants a voice in order to understand their experiences from their own perspective. You can visit the exhibition at the War Studies Meeting Room until the end of December. This podcast features exclusive interviews with the creators of the Humans of Calais Photo Exhibition. We interviewed recent MA graduates, Signe Sofie Hansen and Layla Mohseni, and War Studies lecturer Dr Leonie Ansems de Vries. Upcoming Events: THE ORIGINS OF ISIS: THE COLLAPSE OF NATIONS AND REVOLUTION IN THE MIDDLE EAST 23rd November 2016 (17:00-18:30) K6.07 War Studies Meeting Room Book launch of The Origins of ISIS Revolution by Simon Mabon, Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Lancaster and Stephen Royle, Research Fellow at the Richardson Institute, Lancaster University. THE BLEEDING HEART OF AFRICA: CENTRAL AFRICA'S ELEPHANTS & MARJAN-MARSH AWARD 23rd November 2016 (18:00-20:00) Pyramid Room ( K4U.04) 4th floor This year's Marjan-Marsh Award will be presented at a double presentation and award ceremony titled 'The Bleeding Heart of Africa: Central Africa's Elephants'. This year Keith Somerville, a leading expert with a broad overview of 'blood ivory', will be joined by conservation practitioner and former French army officer, Stephane Crayne to explore the Central African ivory poaching crisis and receive the 2016 Marjan-Marsh Award. EUROPEAN GLOBAL SECURITY STRATEGY & THE EASTERN REGION: MORE CHALLENGES AND FEWER OPPORTUNITIES? 24th November 2016 (17:30-19:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) Professor Elena Korosteleva from the Jean Monnet Chair of European Politics , University of Kent will talk on bringing "the political" back in the eastern region. For more information visit kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

Event: Ukraine - A Frontline Perspective of The War in The East

Nov 21, 2016 00:33:45

Description:

Event recording from 7/11/2016 Speaker: Dr Samir Puri , Department of War Studies , KCL. Chair: Dr Domitilla Sagramoso, CSDRG, Department of War Studies, KCL. This event was part of the CSD MA Monday Seminar Series, hosted by the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group. Dr Samir Puri reflects on the conflict resolution and human security challenges presented by the war in east Ukraine. Immediately before becoming a Lecturer in War Studies, Dr Puri spent one year (2014-2015) with the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission in Ukraine. He recently returned to Ukraine to author a report on the human security situation in parts of the Donetsk region. He will speak about the state of the ceasefire in the east, and will examine the local dynamics of the conflict from an on-the-ground perspective. Although the Ukraine conflict has slipped from international media headlines, fighting still persists. For as long as a resolution to the war remains elusive, the impact on the people of the region remains significant. Having worked in government, academia and think tanks, Dr Puri's capabilities extend across theory and practise in international security affairs. He spent six years working for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (2009-15). His assignments included counter-terrorism strategy and policy support to a number of peace processes. In 2014-15 he was seconded to the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission in eastern Ukraine. His duties involved patrolling in the field, and reporting on ceasefire violations and weapons withdrawals in line with the Minsk process. His book, Fighting and Negotiating with Armed Groups, has been published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) as part of its Adelphi series. His first book, Pakistan’s War on Terrorism, was published by Routledge. For more information about the event, visit https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Ukraine-A-Frontline-Perspective-of-the-War-in-the-East.aspx.

Podcast: Brexit - What It Means for European Security and Defence

Nov 12, 2016 00:15:01

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The British vote to leave the European Union has caused one of the most profound strategic shifts in recent European history. Although the majority of attention is paid to trade and migration issues, Brexit will also have major repercussions for European security and defence. But how this cooperation will look like after Brexit is still a matter of speculation and requires thorough public debates. The new School of Security Studies at King’s College London wants to contribute to these debates by bringing together leading scholars and policy analysts to address the most fundamental questions raised by Brexit in the field of security and defence. This podcast examines Brexit within a wider context, one that establishes pre-existing trends and dynamics in European security and defence affairs. For more information about upcoming events, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/index.aspx.

Event: Thinking the Unthinkable: Brexit? Trump? Migration? Russia? Why Leaders Have Lost The Plot

Nov 9, 2016 00:49:18

Description:

Event recording from 8/11/2016 Speaker: Nik Gowing, Visiting Professor at King’s College London, Department of War Studies, and Nanyang Technological University Singapore Chair: Professor Mats Berdal, Director of CSDRG, War Studies, King's College London. Abstract: 'Thinking the Unthinkable: Brexit? Trump? Migration? Russia? Why leaders have lost the plot on multiple issues.' 'Why are leaders so out of step with those they represent, or who buy products from them ? A proliferation of ‘unthinkable’ events over the last two years starting with the Russian seizure of Crimea, the 60% crash in oil prices and Europe’s migration crises, has revealed a new fragility at the highest levels of corporate and public service leadership. What are the reasons? After the unexpected result of the Brexit referendum, many question the capacity and readiness of leading executives, public servants and politicians to think unthinkables before they happen. The old assumptions and norms underpinning decision-making can no longer assume to be fit for purpose. In a world where low growth seems to be the only certainty, many confess to being overwhelmed as they struggle to find new bearings. Nik Gowing, Visiting Professor at King’s College London, Department of War Studies, and Nanyang Technological University Singapore presents new research evidence from the past two years on why the top levels in government and corporates fail to anticipate then manage crises. Using evidence collated from 2000 pages of transcripts from several hundred interviews before the Brexit vote and the political impact of Trump, Nik Gowing reveals why leaders struggle to identify then adapt to the new, fast changing and ill-defined normal. Many confess privately to being unsighted and scared. The conformity which got them to the top disqualifies them from accepting the scale of new realities. And most remain in denial. The findings of 'Thinking the Unthinkable' offer somber finding for current leaders and those who aspire to succeed them. An interim summary and analysis of the new evidence is available at www.thinkunthinkable.org' For more information, visit https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/Thinking-the-Unthinkable-Brexit-Trump-Migration-Russia-Why-Leaders-Have-Lost-the-Plot.aspx

Event: Elections in Georgia - The road ahead

Nov 9, 2016 01:25:53

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Event recording from 1/11/2016 "Elections in Georgia - The road ahead". On the 8th of October Georgians went to the polls to elect a new parliament. This was the first electoral challenge of the 'Georgian Dream' which has had rather unimpressive results over the past four years. Speaker - Dr Thomas de Waal is a non-resident senior associate with Carnegie Europe, specializing in Eastern Europe and the Caucasus region. From 2010-2015 he worked for the Carnegie Endowment in Washington DC. He is the author of numerous publications about the region. His most recent book is Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide (Oxford University Press, 2015). He is also the author of the authoritative book on the Nagorny Karabakh conflict, Black Garden: Armenia and Azerbaijan Through Peace and War (NYU Press, second edition 2013) and of The Caucasus: An Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2010). De Waal has worked extensively as a journalist and writer in the Caucasus and Black Sea region and in Russia, for the BBC, The Times and other outlets. He studied Russian and Modern Greek at Oxford University. Speaker - Maximilian Hess is a political risk analyst based in London, specialising in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Max's work on the region has been featured in a number of publications, including the Telegraph and The Moscow Times. He earned his BA from Franklin & Marshall College, Pennsylvania, and an MA from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. His interests include the Georgian language, separatist movements, and European and Eurasian international relations. Speaker - Elene Melikishvili is a PhD candidate at the Department of War Studies, KCL. Her research focuses on the states and conflicts in the South Caucasus. Her research interests include international relations, foreign policy, development and social empowerment. Elene hold an MA in International Relations from Webster University and she worked in the Parliament of Georgia, the Ministry of Justice and for different non-governmental organisations in Georgia and the UK.

Event: Taming the Imperial Imagination

Nov 5, 2016 00:31:53

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Event recording from 19/10/2016: TAMING THE IMPERIAL IMAGINATION: COLONIAL KNOWLEDGE, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, AND THE ANGLO-AFGHAN ENCOUNTER, 1808-1878 Dr Bayly wrote his doctoral thesis in King's War Studies. He has recently written a book with the same title of the talk based on his doctoral thesis. Dr Bayly was the founder of King's Afghan Studies Group and is a postdoctoral fellow at LSE. He is returning to present his book to the Afghan Studies Group in conversation with Dr Avinash Paliwal. Dr Paliwal recently completed his doctorate at King's and took over the Afghan Studies Group from Dr Bayly. Taming the Imperial Imagination (Cambridge University Press) marks a novel intervention into the debate on empire and international relations, and offers a new perspective on nineteenth-century Anglo- Afghan relations. Martin J. Bayly shows how, throughout the nineteenth century, the British Empire in India sought to understand and control its peripheries through the use of colonial knowledge. Addressing the fundamental question of what Afghanistan itself meant to the British at the time, he draws on extensive archival research to show how knowledge of Afghanistan was built, refined and warped by an evolving colonial state. This knowledge informed policy choices and cast Afghanistan in a separate legal and normative universe. Beginning with the disorganized exploits of nineteenth-century explorers and ending with the cold strategic logic of the militarized ‘scientific frontier’, this book tracks the nineteenth-century origins of contemporary policy ‘expertise’ and the forms of knowledge that inform interventions in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere today. Dr Martin J Bayly is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the International Relations Department at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He holds a PhD in International Relations from the Department of War Studies, King's College London, an MPhil in International Relations from Oxford University, and a BA with First Class Honours in Politics from the University of Newcastle Upon-Tyne. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/eventsrecords/bayly-asg.aspx

Podcast: Fighting and Negotiating with Armed Groups

Oct 29, 2016 00:21:12

Description:

This podcast features an exclusive interview with Dr Samir Puri discussing his new book launch "Fighting and Negotiating with Armed Groups: The Difficulty of Securing Strategic Outcomes”. Dr Samir Puri is a Lecturer in the Department of War Studies. He spent six years working for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (2009-15) where his assignments included counter-terrorism strategy and policy support to a number of peace processes. In 2014-15 he was seconded to the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission in eastern Ukraine. His book, “Fighting and Negotiating with Armed Groups”, has been published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) as part of its Adelphi series. It follows his first book, Pakistan’s War on Terrorism, was published by Routledge, and numerous publications from his tenure as a Defence Analyst at RAND (2006-09)." For more information about Dr Samir Puri, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/people/lecturers/puri.aspx. For more information about upcoming events, visit www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/

Podcast: Traces of War Exhibition

Oct 23, 2016 00:26:07

Description:

This podcast features exclusive interviews with the Traces of War artists Jananne Al-Ani, Baptist Coelho and Shaun Gladwell. Traces of War, reimagines war beyond its exceptionality, locating it in spaces where it would be least expected. At the same time, the art works reveal the sheer power of the everyday, as life itself and in its most ordinary makes its presence felt in the most dangerous locations of war. Artists from Goya to Dix variously and differently reveal the horrors of war and its imprint upon the body and the body politic, as if we might easily contrast the peace of the everyday with the destructive exceptionalism of war. However, the everyday also has a capacity to make its imprint on war, and this is shown most strongly in, for example, Mona Hatoum’s steel installation, Grater Divide (2002), where an everyday object, such as a kitchen utensil, acquires a menacing, frightening presence. For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/traces/about.aspx Upcoming events: - A NEW PEACEKEEPING & PEACEBUILDING ARCHITECTURE? 24th October 2016 (12:30-14:00) in the War Studies Meeting Room (K. 6.07) - NATIONAL IDENTIFICATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 24th October 2016 (18:00-19:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) - THE ORIGINS AND DYNAMICS OF GENOCIDE: POLITICAL VIOLENCE IN GUATEMALA 25th October 2016 (18:00-19:30) Weston Room Maughan Library - THE INDIA-PAKISTAN WARS AND THE CONTEMPORARY RELEVANCE OF HISTORY 27th October 2016 (17:30-19:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) - WOMEN IN WAR AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS MOVIE NIGHT 27th October 2016 (19:00-21:00) War Studies Meeting Room (K6.07) Don’t forget to take some yummy snacks! For more information, visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/events/

Event: What Works in Reducing Community Violence: An Evidence-Informed Approach

Oct 8, 2016 01:04:24

Description:

Speaker: Thomas Abt, Senior Research Fellow & Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard University & Instituto Igarapé. Chair: Dr Kieran Mitton, CSDRG, War Studies, King's College London. Thomas Abt discussed his recent report, "What Works in Reducing Community Violence: A Meta-Review and Field Study for the Northern Triangle." The report was commissioned by USAID and examines 43 reviews covering over 1,400 individual studies in order to offer recommendations on the most effective strategies to reduce community violence in Central America and beyond. Speaker Profile Thomas Abt is a Senior Research Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Igarapé Institutee who has held senior positions in the Obama and Cuomo administrations, where he worked to improve public safety and reduce crime. Both in the United States and globally, Thomas teaches, studies, and writes on the use of evidence-informed approaches to reducing gun, gang, and youth violence, among other topics. He also serves as an Advisory Board Member to the Police Executive Programme at the University of Cambridge. Before joining Harvard, Thomas served as Deputy Secretary for Public Safety to Governor Andrew Cuomo in New York, where he oversaw all criminal justice and homeland security agencies, including the Divisions of Corrections and Community Supervision, Criminal Justice Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Services, and the State Police. During his tenure, Thomas led the development of New York’s GIVE (Gun-Involved Violence Elimination) Initiative, which employs evidence-informed, data-driven approaches to reduce violence. He also established the Research Roundtable on Criminal Justice, a statewide criminal justice community connecting research with policy. Before his work in New York, Thomas served as Chief of Staff to the Office of Justice Programs at the US Department of Justice, where he worked with the nation’s principal criminal justice grant-making and research agencies to integrate evidence, policy, and practice. He played a lead role in establishing the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, a network of federal agencies and local communities working together to reduce youth and gang violence. Thomas was also founding member of the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative, a place-based development effort that was recognized by HKS as one of the Top 25 Innovations in Government for 2013. This event was arranged in partnership with the King's Brazil Institute and Instituto Igarapé, Rio de Janeiro. The 'Approaches to Understanding Violence Seminar Series' is a programme of multidisciplinary lectures and events on the subject of violence, part of a CSDRG project led by Dr Kieran Mitton. Find out more here: www.kcl.ac.uk/csd Thomas Abt's full report can be downloaded here: https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/USAID-2016-What-Works-in-Reducing-Community-Violence-Final-Report.pdf

Event: When rules rule: A Normative Approach to Maritime Disputes

Oct 8, 2016 00:33:43

Description:

Dr Alessio Patalano, Senior Lecturer, War Studies in conversation with Dan "Fig" Leaf Lt. Gen (Rtd) U.S. Air Force on Thursday 22nd September 2016 at 6pm in War Studies Meeting Room K6.07, 6th Floor, King’s Building This conversation is a recording between Dan “Fig” Leaf, Lt. General (Rtd) U.S. Air Force and Dr Alessio Patalano, Senior Lecturer. Lt. Gen Leaf became the Director, Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (DKI APCSS) in January 2012. Prior to APCSS, he worked in the defense industry as vice president of full spectrum initiatives at Northrop Grumman Information Systems. Formerly the Deputy Commander of U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), Lt. Gen. Leaf retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2008 after more than 33 years of service. Other assignments during his Air Force career included Vice Commander of Air Force Space Command, Air Force Director of Operational Requirements, and multiple commands at squadron, group and wing levels. He was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2009 through 2011. Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Leaf was a command pilot with more than 3,600 flight hours, including F-15 and F-16 combat missions. His decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. Further biography information can be found at http://apcss.org/about-2/leadership/apcss-director-leaf/

Individualisation of War / Writing About Violence

May 15, 2016 00:32:22

Description:

Interview with Professor Jennifer Welsh who is chair of International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research fellow at Somerville College at the University of Oxford. She was previously a professor of international relations at the university of oxford and co-director of oxford institute for ethics, law and armed conflict. Professor Welsh is an author, co author and editor of several books and articles on international relations in particular on the notion of the evolution of the the responsibility to protect in international society. Interview with Roger Mac Ginty who is a Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Manchester. The interview discuses the problem of writing dispassionately about violence, calling it conflict instead, treating conflict studies as a science and how this effects the policy making sphere. Professor Jennifer Welsh Annual War Studies Lecture ‘The Individualisation of War’: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/war-studies-annual-lecture-professor-welsh-on-the-individualisation-of-war Professor Roger Mac Ginty ‘How Should We Write About Violence’: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/how-should-we-write-about-violence

Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge

Apr 16, 2016 00:21:31

Description:

Last week a a team of students from King's College London won The Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge. The challenge is an attempt to bridge the gap between the technical part of cybersecurity with cyber-policy. The competition occurs in three stages. 1. Competitors receive an initial situation report, and are given two weeks to write a 5-page brief of a response for European leaders. They are tasked to make a 10-min presentation and 10-min Q&A with top level judges (from private and public sector) on the first day of competition. 2. The situation develops in severity and complexity, and 15/31 teams have 12 hours to respond to a new situation report. 3. Only 4/31 teams that are remaining move into the Final Round, where teams must come up with a response to a new development in less than 15 minutes. They have 10 min to present and 10 more mins to answer questions. Sponsored by the Atlantic Council and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy, this competition is the largest of its kind outside of the United States. Winners received a 1000 euro prize, free job interviews at F-Secure anywhere in the world, and several free vouchers for anti-virus, encryption software and cybersecurity databases. Presented by Xenia Zubova With Jackson Webster and Yuji Develle DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Airwars Project / Russian Air Strikes in Syria

Apr 10, 2016 00:19:58

Description:

Investigative journalist Chris Woods discusses the work of Airwars, a transparency group dedicated to tracking and archiving the international air war against Islamic State and other groups. Airwars has compiled an archive of reports of military action and civilian casualty reports in Iraq and Syria from 2014 to date from open sources. Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Commonwealth Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma

Apr 1, 2016 00:33:20

Description:

After having served two terms as the Commonwealth Secretary-General, his excellency Kamalesh Sharma will be remembered for modernising the organisation, fostering crucial links with the G20, as well as providing vital capabilities to small states within the Commonwealth. Mr Sharma discusses his legacy, the Queen, human rights, radicalism and Brexit, as well as what more needs to be achieved. Presented by Xenia Zubova DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

The BBC, Hate Propaganda & War Reporting

Mar 12, 2016 00:44:52

Description:

Keith Somerville talks about the BBC, hate propaganda and objectivity in the media. Professor Somerville was a career journalist with the BBC World Service and BBC News for three decades, specialising in Africa, Keith writes and lectures on African affairs and is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. He is the author of several books, including 'Radio Propaganda and the Broadcasting of Hatred' Presented by Xenia Zubova DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London. Click here to listen to Professor Somerville's lecture: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/africas-long-road-since-independence-the-many-histories-of-a-continent?in=warstudies/sets/events

Big Data in Peace and Conflict

Mar 5, 2016 00:24:31

Description:

Last month Dr David Hammond from the Institute for Economics and Peace taught a module at the War Studies Department titled 'Peace, Conflict, Quantitative Research and Big Data'. He answers the question of whether the world is becoming more violent, talks about how an average person can make sense of 'big data' to become a 'good data citizen' and whether data can be used to predict conflict. Presented by Xenia Zubova DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

China's New Approach to Africa / Apple vs. FBI

Feb 27, 2016 00:39:10

Description:

In this week's War Studies Podcast, Professor Ian Taylor from St Andrew's shares his views on China's 'New Normal' relationship with Africa. We also have Dr. Jack McDonald from War Studies discuss the ongoing Apple v FBI case. Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Interview with Professor Richard Ned Lebow

Feb 20, 2016 00:17:03

Description:

This week, we have an interview with Professor Richard Ned Lebow, who recently celebrated 50 years of teaching International Relations. We talk to him about what he's found interesting in his 50 years of teaching, the joys of teaching, and an interesting encounter with a certain Soviet statesman. Ned Lebow's remarks on his 50 years can be listened to here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/professor-richard-ned-lebow-a-celebration-of-50-years-in-ir?in=warstudies/sets/events Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray, who also provide details of next weeks' events in lieu of Jayne Peake. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

EU and Hamas Drag Performance / Role of Diplomacy in a Changing International Order

Feb 12, 2016 00:34:32

Description:

This week on the War Studies podcast, we have two interviews: one with Dr Catherine Charrett from the University of Chicester on her solo performance of "Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels" in the War Studies department, and also with Professor Michael L'Estrange, Professor of National Security at Australian National University and also Australia's former High Commissioner to the United Kingdom from 2005-2009. Professor Michael L'Estrange full lecture - https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/the-role-of-diplomacy-in-a-changing-international-order?in=warstudies/sets/events Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova, who also provide details of the events on next week in lieu of Jayne Peake. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Defence Corruption Across Africa and the Undermining of Security

Feb 5, 2016 00:23:25

Description:

In this weeks’ War Studies Podcast, Bradley Murray speaks to Hiruy Gossaye from Transparency International about their recent index outlining corruption in the defence industries across Africa. The event that this interview was based on was co-hosted by the Africa Research Group, African Leadership Centre and Transparency International UK (Defence and Security Progamme). Hiruy Gossaye is the project officer for Transparency International’s Defence and Security programme, which has recently released a report entitled ‘The Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index’, which looks at the levels of corruption in the defence industries of African states. We spoke to him about the difficulty writing this report, the findings of it including the impact of international arms exports on corruption in the continent, as well as the implications of the index as well. Jayne Peake provides details of next weeks’ events. The Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index can be found here: http://government.defenceindex.org/ The Panel Discussion on Defence Corruption Across Africa can be listened to here: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/destabilising-defence-how-corruption-undermines-security-across-africa DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola Since the Civil War

Jan 29, 2016 00:16:11

Description:

In this Weeks War Studies Podcast Xenia Zubova interviews Ricardo Soares de Oliveira about on the subject of his latest publication, 'Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola Since the Civil War'. The author is an Associate Professor in Comparative Politics (African Politics) at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. His research interests include African politics (particularly West and Central Africa), the geopolitics of energy and international political economy, especially in the fields of natural resource extraction, state decay and post-conflict reconstruction. He is the author of Oil and Politics in the Gulf of Guinea (2007), co-editor of China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (with Chris Alden and Daniel Large, 2008) and The New Protectorates: International Tutelage and the Making of Liberal States (with James Mayall, 2011). His latest book is Magnificent and Beggar Land: Angola Since the Civil War (2015). Soares de Oliveira has worked in the field of governance and the extractive industries for the World Bank, the European Commission, Catholic Relief Services, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI), Oxfam, and the French Ministry of Defence, among others. About Magnificent and Beggar Land: Magnificent and Beggar Land is a powerful account of fast-changing dynamics in Angola, an important African state that is a key exporter of oil and diamonds and a growing power on the continent. Based on three years of research and extensive first-hand knowledge of Angola, it documents the rise of a major economy and its insertion in the international system since it emerged in 2002 from one of Africa’s longest and deadliest civil wars. Jayne Peake provides next weeks events and discusses plans for a new initiative titled 'Arts and Conflict'. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dealing with Painful History and Building Sustainable Peace in North East Asia

Jan 23, 2016 00:15:54

Description:

In this weeks War Studies podcast Bradley Murray speaks to Prof Kevin Clements about sustainable peace in North East Asia. Professor Clements is the Foundation Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies and Director of the New Zealand National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (NCPACS) at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, and Secretary General of the International Peace Research Association. He was previously the Secretary General of the NGO International Alert, and the Director of the Quaker UN Office in Geneva. His career has combined academic analysis and practice in the areas of peacebuilding and conflict transformation. He has written or edited 7 books and over 150 chapters /articles on conflict transformation, peacebuilding, preventive diplomacy and development with a specific focus on the Asia Pacific region. Listen to the talk he gave at the War Studies Department https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/dealing-with-painful-history-building-sustainable-peace-in-northeast-asia DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Strategy and Security in Cyberspace

Dec 5, 2015 00:18:27

Description:

This week, we interview Dr. Michael Sulmeyer who recently concluded several years in the Office of the Secretary of Defence, serving most recently as the Director for Plans and Operations for Cyber Policy. He is currently Belfer Center's Cyber Security Project director at the Harvard Kennedy School and he also happens to be a War Studies Alumnus. In April of this year the United State Department of Defence released a strategy to guide the development of its cyber forces and to strengthen its cyber defences. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Western Sahara & Egypt after the Arab Spring

Nov 28, 2015 00:32:35

Description:

This week's podcast features Pablo de Orellana, who is a teaching fellow at the Department of War Studies. His research focuses on issues of identity in diplomatic communication, including the role of representation in the diplomacy of the First Vietnam War and the Western Sahara conflict. In this week's podcast we focused on Pablo's second case study - the Western Sahara conflict. On November 17th, Dr Solava Ibrahim from the Institute for Development Policy and Management at the University of Manchester, came to the War Studies Department to give a talk titled 'Frustrated Youth and Failed Democracy: The Dynamics of Wellbeing, Aspirations and the Politics in Egypt'. In this week's podcast, she discusses the findings of her research and her academic plans for the future. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray. Pablo de Orellana's talk 'War, Exile and the First Arab Spring: Western Sahara 1975-2015' https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/war-exile-and-the-first-arab-spring-western-sahara-1975-2015?in=warstudies/sets/events DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Interview with Ramesh Thakur on R2P / US Civil-Military Relations and Multilateral Intervention

Nov 21, 2015 00:31:20

Description:

On November 9th 2015, Stife Journal and the US Foreign Policy Research Group hosted Dr. Stefano Recchia of Cambridge University to discuss his new book, “Reassuring the Reluctant Warriors: U.S. Civil-Military Relations and Multilateral Intervention” Dr. Recchia draws on declassified documents and about one hundred interviews with civilian and military leaders to illuminate little-known aspects of U.S. decision making in the run-up to those interventions. We spoke to him about his findings from researching the book, such as how military leaders in the US play a restraining role in decisions to intervene abroad, and I also asked about how he found researching the book with the generous access he had to officials. On November 12th 2015, Professor Ramesh Thakur came into King’s College London to give a talk on the evolution of humanitarian intervention into Responsibility to Protect, which was hosted by the Conflict, Security and Development Group. Ramesh Thakur is Professor in the Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University, and He also was Vice Rector and Senior Vice Rector of the United Nations University from 1998 to 2007. He was one of the principal authors of R2P, and with this in mind we asked him about the recent violence occurring in Burundi, the blockade of intervention in the United Nations Security Council, and the rise of peace operations since 2000. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Narendra Modi's UK Visit/Transitional Justice in Sierra Leone

Nov 14, 2015 00:26:22

Description:

On Friday 6th November, a panel discussion was held at King’s by the Africa Research Group centring on the recent publication of Evaluating Transitional Justice: Accountability and Peacebuilding in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone. With large contributions from War Studies academics, this book is the first major study to evaluate the transitional justice programme in Sierra Leone, and the authors examine how the Special Court, Truth and Reconciliation Commission, alongside local justice initiatives and reparations programme interacted. In this week's podcast We spoke to Wayne Jordash QC, one of the contributors to the book and former member of the Defence Team at the Special Court for Sierra Leone. We spoke to him about the issues that faced the special court and the TRC, the advances in jurisprudence that came from the case, and the overall significance of the case. We also spoke to Dr Rudra Chaudhuri of the War Studies Department and the India Institute at King's about Prime Minister Modi's official visit to the UK. We spoke about what the visit means for both of the countries and what to expect from their future relations. Dr Chaudhuri's BBC article: Why the UK visit is designed to dazzle Modi http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-34773770 Dr Chaudhuri's on NDTV: http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/agenda/15-billion-deals-wembley-welcome-lunch-with-the-queen/390510 Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Iran after the Nuclear Deal/UK Defence Acquisition

Nov 7, 2015 00:25:04

Description:

This week, we talk to Bernard Jenkin MP who visited the War Studies Department on November 2nd to discuss his latest publication 'Defence Acquisition for the 21st Century'. This is followed by an Interview with McArthur Fellow and phD student Dina Esfandiary, where we discuss anti-American sentiment in Iran and opposition to the Iran nuclear deal from both sides, as well as what effect the deal had on Iran's relationship with other countries in the region. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Xenia Zubova and Bradley Murray. Bernard Jenkin MP talk - Defence Acquisition in the 21st Century: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/defence-acquisition-for-the-twenty-first-century?in=warstudies/sets/events Dina Esfandiarys talk - Iran's Regional Policy after the Nuclear Deal: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/irans-regional-policy-after-the-nuclear-deal?in=warstudies/sets/events DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Iran's Regional Policy After the Nuclear Deal

Nov 4, 2015 00:14:37

Description:

On November 3rd, Dina Esfandiary, a MacArthur Fellow at the Centre for Science and Security Studies at King’s College London gave a talk on what implications the Iran Deal has on other countries in the region. Dina Esfandriary was a Research Associate in the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament programme of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London from October 2009. Before she joined IISS, she worked at a Disarmament NGO in Geneva, Switzerland. Her research focuses on security, relations between states and non-proliferation in the Middle East, including Iran and Syria’s WMD programmes. Dina has published widely, including in the Atlantic, The Telegraph, the Washington Post, the National Interest, Arms Control Today, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, International Affairs, and Survival (the IISS’ journal). Dina is currently a PhD student in the War Studies department at King’s College London and she holds Masters Degrees from Kings College London and the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva. The talk was hosted by Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) and chaired by Dr Mathew Moran, Senior Lecturer in International Security. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Reading Week Special/Talking to War Studies Society President

Oct 31, 2015 00:18:21

Description:

In this week's War Studies Podcast recorded on the 30th of October, we spoke to War Studies Society President, Adam Holub about the events that they have planned for November and how you can get more involved with the society. This week's podcast is presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Communicating Research To Policy Makers / Modern Mercenaries: Private Military Contractors

Oct 24, 2015 00:20:51

Description:

This week, we begin by talking to John Tesh, who came into the department on Monday 19th October. John Tesh CBE, former deputy director and head of the capabilities team in the Civil Contingencies Secretariat in the UK Cabinet Office spoke on communicating research in a way that can enhance policy impact. His areas of expertise are national risk assessment and resilience strategy, subjects on which he led as a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office from 2006 to 2012, and on which he continues to consult as well to the OECD High Level Risk Forum. Later on, we speak to Sean McFate, who came into the department to discuss his new book, ‘The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order’Sean McFate is a Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council, a think tank in Washington DC. He is also an associate professor at the National Defense University and teaches national security strategy at Georgetown University. Previously, he was a paratrooper in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division and then a private military contractor in Africa. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events, and also the recent collaboration with IWM who we are hosting a series of workshops with in the coming weeks. Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

UN Peace Operations / Interview with Dr Samir Puri

Oct 17, 2015 00:26:21

Description:

This week, we begin by talking to Hilde F. Johnson, who came into the department on Monday 12th, October to hold two talks on UN Peace Operations. In 2014, Hilde completed her three year tenure as Special Representative of the Secretary General (SRSG) and Head of the UN Mission in South Sudan. Hilde F. Johnson also served most recently as Member of the UN Secretary General’s High Level Panel for the Review of UN Peace Operations. Later on, we speak to Dr Samir Puri, who has joined the War Studies Department as a lecturer in International Relations. He has come back to the Department after having done a Masters in War Studies in 2004. He recently returned from a year as part of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission in Eastern Ukraine. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Debating Drones / Syrian Refugee Crisis

Oct 9, 2015 00:36:26

Description:

On March 5th Strife and the Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) hosted a debate with award-winning author and investigative journalist Chris Woods, and Dr. Jack McDonald of King's College London. Chris Woods talks about the significance of a drone strike that killed two UK citizens, and its legal and international repercussions. Followed by Dr Carol Boomer, a teaching fellow at King's College London and author of 'Rejecting Refugees: Asylum in the US and the UK in the 21st Century', talking about international law regarding asylum seekers, anti-immigration sentiment in the UK and the future of the current refugee crisis. Jayne Peake talk about new week's events. Presented by Bradley Murray and Xenia Zubova. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Interview with Dr Peter Busch / Understanding Atrocity in the Sierra Leone Civil War

Oct 2, 2015 00:27:05

Description:

This week, our first segment is with Dr Peter Busch, Senior Lecturer in the Department of War Studies, and also the creator of the War Studies Podcast. Peter will be leaving will be on sabbatical leave from the Department this year, and Xenia Zubova spoke to him to find out his research plans for the coming year. Our second segment is with Dr Kieran Mitton, also from the Department of War Studies. Kieran spoke to Bradley Murray about his new book 'Rebels in a Rotten State: Understanding Atrocity in the Sierra Leone Civil War’, and among other things discussed his fieldwork in the country, the thematic overview of the book, and the impact of focusing on atrocity in the conflict. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Bradley Murray, and Xenia Zubova, both students in the Department of War Studies. The two publications Dr Peter Busch mention are below: ‘Terrorism and the Intuitive Journalistic Narrative’, Defence Review (Hungary), Volume 143, special issue 2015: http://bit.ly/1VlX2Qm ‘The “Vietnam Legion”: West German Psychological Warfare against East German Propaganda in the 1960s, Journal of Cold War Studies (Harvard), Vol 16, No. 3, 2014: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/cws/summary/v016/16.3.busch.html Dr Kieran Mitton’s book is available at http://www.hurstpublishers.com/book/understanding-atrocity-in-the-sierra-leone-civil-war/ and http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rebels-Rotten-State-Understanding-Atrocity/dp/1849044236 DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Boko Haram in Nigeria / The Future of War

Sep 26, 2015 00:17:03

Description:

The first topic is on Boko Haram in Nigeria, where BA student Bradley Murray interviews Virginia Comolli, who came into the department on Monday 21st September to discuss the findings of her new book. Professor Christopher Coker from the London School of Economics talks about the future of war and its implications, in time for a longer talk he is going to give on the 29th of September at King's College London, hosted by KCL Future Society. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Bradley Murray, and Xenia Zubova, both students in the Department of War Studies. To hear the full lecture given by Virginia on Boko Haram, go to the 'Events' section here on the War Studies Soundcloud. For more information on "The Future of War" event with Christopher Coker, more information is available on KCL Future Society's Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/873213112765900/ DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Heroin Addiction in Tajikistan / Cultural Legacies of WWI

Aug 14, 2015 00:25:35

Description:

War Studies alumna Malgorzata Skowronska returned to the Department at the end of March to screen her documentary ‘Narkomen’. The documentary exposes the problem of heroin addiction in Tajikistan through the personal stories of Mirzo and Mamadkhon, two drug users from the small village of Porshniev in the Gorno-Badakhshan region. She spoke about the issue of heroin addiction and the challenges she faced in making the documentary. In May, the Arts & Humanities Research Institute at King’s, in conjunction with the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at the University of North Carolina, staged an international conference on the Cultural Legacies of World War I. MA student Hilary Hurd spoke to Professor Max Saunders about the conference. Professor Saunders is primarily a literary critic, specialising in the 19th and 20th centuries, and especially in turn-of-the-century and Modernist fiction, criticism, and poetry. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz and Bradley Murray. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Model United Nations / Business for Peace

Mar 27, 2015 00:23:18

Description:

The KCL UN Association sent a delegation to the recent Model UN event in Seoul, South Korea -- and even won two prizes. We talked to BA students Yuji Develle and Jackson Webster about their experience. Dr Jolyon Ford is with the Global Economic Governance Programme at the University of Oxford, and an Associate Fellow at Chatham House. He came to the War Studies Department to talk about his book ‘Regulating Business for Peace’, published in February by Cambridge University Press. Jayne Peake talks about next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch and Charlie de Rivaz DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dr Jo Ford - Regulating Business for Peace

Mar 26, 2015 00:35:44

Description:

Dr Jolyon Ford is with the Global Economic Governance Programme at the University of Oxford, and an Associate Fellow at Chatham House. His research focuses on the regulation of investor and business activity in fragile and conflict-affected states, options for fostering responsible and conflict-sensitive business practices, and public policy on the private sector's role in meeting development goals. His blog is Private Sector - Public World. Until the end of 2013 he headed the sub-Saharan Africa practice for Oxford Analytica. On 24 March 2015 Dr Ford came to the War Studies Department to talk about some of the themes in his book ‘Regulating Business for Peace’, published in February by Cambridge University Press. Examining ways in which the UN peace architecture has engaged with the private sector, Dr Ford explored the nature of post-conflict transitional regulation and governance. The talk was hosted by the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group, and was chaired by Dr Christine Cheng. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway / Soldier-led Adaptation in Iraq and Vietnam

Mar 20, 2015 00:21:49

Description:

Åsne Seierstad is an award-winning Norwegian journalist and writer known for her work as a war correspondent and as the author of the international bestseller, 'The Bookseller of Kabul’. She discusses her new book, ‘One of Us’ (Little, Brown/Virago), about Anders Breivik and the massacre in Norway. Dr Nina Kollars, Assistant Professor of Government at Franklin & Marshall College, talks to MA student Hilary Hurd about soldier-led adaptation in Iraq and Vietnam. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dr Nico Prucha - The Use of the Internet by Islamic State in Syria

Mar 19, 2015 00:39:18

Description:

Dr Nico Prucha is the new VOX-Pol Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) in the Department of War Studies at King’s. His work focuses on analysing and deciphering primary Arabic-language jihadist propaganda content on- and offline. Prior to this, Nico worked as a doctoral candidate for the Department of Near Eastern Studies at the University of Vienna. He is the author of ‘The Voice of Jihad: "Sawt al- Jihad": al- Qaeda's first online magazine’ (in German) and the forthcoming ‘Online Territories of Terror - How Jihadist Movements Project Influence and Conduct Warfare on the Internet and Why it Matters Offline’. On 17 March 2015, Dr Prucha delivered a talk entitled ‘The Use of the Internet by Islamic State in Syria’. The event was chaired by Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, Head of Research and Information at ICSR. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this recording are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Sarah Chayes - Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security

Mar 17, 2015 00:48:58

Description:

Sarah Chayes is a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. A former reporter, Chayes covered the fall of the Taliban for National Public Radio. She then opted to leave journalism and remain in Afghanistan to contribute to the reconstruction of the country. During a decade living in Afghanistan, Sarah advised two commanders of the international troops in-country and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She is also author of ‘The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban’ (2006) and a contributing writer for the Los Angeles Times. Her articles have appeared in the Washington Post and Foreign Policy, among other publications. On 10 March 2015, Sarah came to the Department of War Studies to present her new book ‘Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security’ (Norton), which argues that corruption is the common thread that ties together the world’s contemporary international security crises. The event was chaired by Dr Christine Cheng and hosted by the Conflict, Security and Development Research Group. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

UK and Mass Surveillance / Bodies of Violence

Mar 14, 2015 00:23:51

Description:

Dr Médéric Martin-Mazé, Research Associate in the Department of War Studies, gives an assessment of the new report by the Intelligence & Security Committee of the British Parliament on mass surveillance. Dr Lauren Wilcox, Deputy Director of the Cambridge University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies, talks about her new book: Bodies of Violence: Theorizing Embodied Subjects in International Relations (OUP 2015). Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dr Nina Kollars - War’s Horizon: Soldier-led Adaptation in Iraq and Vietnam

Mar 12, 2015 00:39:15

Description:

Nina Kollars is Assistant Professor of Government at Franklin & Marshall College. Dr. Kollars' research investigates the processes by which individuals and groups innovate and adapt when in high-stakes contexts with inadequate resources.  Other work explores the institutional and social structures that facilitate innovation in both military and civilian contexts, including warfare and cybersecurity. On 3 March 2015, Dr Kollars came to the Department of War Studies to deliver a talk entitled ‘War’s Horizon: Soldier-led Adaptation in Iraq and Vietnam’. Professor Theo Farrell, Head of the Department, commented on the talk. The Chair was Professor Joe Maiolo, and the event was hosted by the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Åsne Seierstad - One of Us: the story of Anders Breivik and the massacre in Norway

Mar 10, 2015 00:53:40

Description:

Åsne Seierstad is an award-winning Norwegian journalist and writer known for her work as a war correspondent. She is the author of the international bestseller, 'The Bookseller of Kabul', which sold over two million copies, as well as 'One Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal', and 'Angel of Grozny: Inside Chechnya'. On 4 March 2015, Åsne came to the War Studies department to discuss her new book, ‘One of Us’ (published by Little, Brown/Virago), about Anders Breivik and his massacre of 77 Norwegians, mostly children, in Norway, July 2011. The event was hosted by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), and chaired by Shiraz Maher. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Barack Obama & American Power / CSD 2015 conference

Mar 6, 2015 00:27:17

Description:

Inderjeet Parmar, Professor in International Politics at City University London, talks about ‘Barack Obama and American Power’. Professor Parmar is the author of several books on US foreign policy, including “Barack Obama and the Myth of a Post-racial America” (2013) and “Foundations of the American Century” (2012). Next week is the Conflict, Security and Development Conference 2015. Bilal Bag, an MA student here in the Department of War Studies and a member of the organising committee for CSD 2015, tells us about the conference: ‘Post-2015 Development Challenges in Conflict Zones’. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz (current MA student in Conflict, Security and Development). To hear the full lecture given by Professor Inderjeet Parmar on ‘Barack Obama and American Power’ go to the 'Events' section here on the War Studies Soundcloud. For more information about the CSD 2015 conference, go to the website: https://csd2015.wordpress.com DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Professor Inderjeet Parmar - Barack Obama and American Power

Mar 5, 2015 00:38:11

Description:

Inderjeet Parmar is Professor in International Politics at City University London. He has authored seven book on US policy, including “Barack Obama and the Myth of a Post-racial America” (2013) and “Foundations of the American Century” (2012). He is currently serving as President of the British International Studies Association (BISA). On 4 March 2015 Professor Parmar was the keynote speaker at the inaugural Strife / United States Foreign Policy Research Group conference, entitled ‘A world in flux? Analysis and prospects for the US in global security‘. Strife is a student-led, dual-format publication, based out of the Department of War Studies at King’s. It comprises a blog as well as a peer-reviewed academic journal, published biannually. The thematic focus is ‘conflict’ in all shapes, forms and senses of the word. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dr Srinath Raghavan - The Economic Consequences of the War: India, 1939-45

Mar 4, 2015 01:08:25

Description:

Dr Srinath Raghavan is Senior Research Fellow at King's India Institute. He took his MA and PhD from the Department of War Studies, King's College London. He is the author of 'War and Peace in Modern India: A Strategic History of the Nehru Years'(2010) and '1971: A Global History of the Creation of Bangladesh' (2013). On 25 February 2015 he gave a talk examining the economic impact of the Second World War on India. It was hosted by the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War and the the King's India Institute, and chaired by Professor David Edgerton. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

War & Peace in the CAR / International Relations Today blog

Feb 27, 2015 00:27:00

Description:

Sarah Covington, lead analyst on the Central African Republic for the Country Risk Team at IHS, and Albert Caramés, associate researcher at the Groupe de Rechercheet Information pour la Paix (GRIP), discuss War and Peace in the Central African Republic. Undergraduate students in the Department of War Studies, Millie Radovic and Adam Holub, talk about their new blog, International Relations Today. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz (current MA student in Conflict, Security and Development). To hear the full lecture given by Sarah and Albert on the CAR go to the 'Events' section here on the War Studies Soundcloud. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

The Limits of Security - Sir John Sawers, 2015 Annual Lecture

Feb 24, 2015 01:10:35

Description:

The Department of War Studies was delighted to host Sir John Sawers, former Chief of MI6 and Visiting Professor in the Department of War Studies, at the 2015 Annual Lecture, held on 16 February. Addressing a packed lecture theatre, Sir John offered a rare insight into decades of service for the British diplomatic and intelligence services, and the ongoing battle for ‘shared value and order’ in an increasingly unstable global landscape. Sir John Sawers is Chairman and Partner of Macro Advisory Partners. Sir John joins Macro Advisory Partners after completing his five-year tenure as Chief of the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) in November 2014. Prior to joining SIS he was the UK’s Permanent Representative (Ambassador) to the United Nations (2007-2009), Political Director of the Foreign Office (2003-2007), Special Representative in Iraq (2003), Ambassador to Cairo (2001-2003) and Foreign Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister (1999-2001). Sir John’s other positions have included Principal Private Secretary to the Foreign Secretary and postings in Washington, Pretoria, Damascus and Sana'a. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

War & Peace in the Central African Republic - Sarah Covington & Albert Carames

Feb 23, 2015 00:27:48

Description:

Sarah Covington is the lead analyst on the Central African Republic for the Country Risk Team at IHS Country Risk, a specialist intelligence unit that forecasts political and violent risks worldwide. Albert Caramés is an associate researcher at the Groupe de Rechercheet Information pour la Paix (GRIP). He has worked for for the United Nations and for Médecins Sans Frontières in their head offices as well as on location in Côte d’Ivoire, Congo-Brazzaville and the Central African Republic. On 18 February Sarah and Albert came to the Department of War Studies to give a talk about ‘War & Peace in the Central African Republic'. The event was hosted by the Africa Research Group. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Ukraine crisis / Responsibility to Protect

Feb 20, 2015 00:16:59

Description:

Dr Natasha Kuhrt, Lecturer in the department, gives an assessment of the Ukraine ceasefire deal. Professor Richard Caplan (University of Oxford) talks to MA student Charlie de Rivaz about the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Cumberland Lodge Special: Biometrics/ICT Rwanda/Nixon & Iran

Feb 13, 2015 00:16:49

Description:

Doctoral candidates presented their preliminary findings at the department's postgraduate research conference at Cumberland Lodge in Great Windsor Park. We talked to three students: Sarah Soliman (supervised by Dr John Stone) works on how the US military uses Biometrics. Henry Redwood (supervised by Dr Rachel Kerr and Professor James Gow)works on the International Criminal Tribunal in Rwanda. Reyhaneh Noshiravani (supervised by Professor Michael Kerr)studies US – Iranian relations in the Nixon era. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Professor Richard Caplan - Responsibility to Protect: Old Wine in New Bottles?

Feb 9, 2015 00:22:42

Description:

Richard Caplan is Professor of International Relations at the University of Oxford. He has also been a Specialist-Advisor to the Select Committee on Foreign Affairs in the UK House of Commons; a Research Associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), Editor of World Policy Journal, and New York Director of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR). On 9 February 2015 Professor Caplan came to the Department of War Studies to give a talk on ‘Responsibility to Protect: Old Wine in New Bottles?’. The event was part of the CSD Seminar series. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Dr Annette Idler - Fragile Alliances among Colombian Violent Non-state Actors

Feb 6, 2015 00:28:58

Description:

Dr Annette Idler teaches at the University of Oxford and is also a Research Associate at the Graduate Institute Geneva’s Centre on Conflict, Development and Peace-building, as well as a Research Fellow on peace communities in Colombia’s borderlands with the University FLACSO, Ecuador. Annette has recently completed her doctoral thesis at the Department of International Development at St. Antony's College, Oxford. As part of her research she conducted extensive fieldwork in Colombia’s crisis-affected borderlands. On 19 January 2015 she came to the Department of War Studies at King’s to give a talk on ‘Violence, Fear or Uncertainty? Fragile Alliances among Colombian Violent Non-state Actors - Rebels, Paramilitaries and Drug traffickers’. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Comparing different forms of political violence / Colombia's non-state armed actors

Feb 6, 2015 00:19:01

Description:

Keith Krause, Professor at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, talks about complex processes and difficult comparisons between different kinds of political violence. Dr Annette Idler, tutor at the University of Oxford, talks about fragile alliances among Colombian violent non-state actors. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz (current MA student in Conflict, Security and Development). To hear the full lectures given by Professor Krause and Dr Idler go to the 'Events' section. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Professor Keith Krause - From War to Political Violence: Complex Processes and Difficult Comparisons

Feb 6, 2015 00:48:13

Description:

Keith Krause is Professor at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, Director of its Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP), and Programme Director of the Small Arms Survey, an internationally-recognised research centre NGO he founded in 2001. On 3 February 2015 Professor Krause came to the Department of War Studies to deliver a talk on ‘From War to Political Violence: Complex Processes and Difficult Comparisons’. The talk was hosted by Professor Mats Berdal. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

James Gray MP & Mark Lomas QC: Who takes Britain to war?

Feb 5, 2015 00:36:24

Description:

On 29 August 2013, the House of Commons voted against the prospect of UK military action against the Assad regime in Syria. The decision helped shape the Western approach to the Syrian crisis and marked a significant moment in British politics; raising important new questions about the constitutional basis for ‘who decides’ when Britain goes to war. On 20 January 2015 Professor John Gearson chaired a public talk by James Gray MP and Mark Lomas QC on these and other issues raised in their major new book: 'Who Takes Britain To War?' (The History Press, 2014). James Gray has been MP for North Wiltshire since 1997. A former Shadow Defence Minister (who resigned over Iraq), he is a member of the House of Commons Defence Select Committee, Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group for the Armed Forces and the Armed Forces Parliamentary Trust. Mark Lomas was called to the Bar at the Middle Temple in 1997 and took silk in 2003. He practiced for thirty-two years at the Common Law and Commercial Bar, specialising in professional negligence and insurance matters. The event was hosted by the Centre for Defence Studies. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

War Studies Research Seminar: Mistakes and Misunderstandings in IR

Jan 31, 2015 00:14:04

Description:

Dr Christine Cheng, Lecturer in International Relations, co-convenes the War Studies Research seminars. She talks about the idea behind it. Professor Mervyn Frost discusses his current book project (with Dr Sylvia Lechner) on mistakes and misunderstanding in International Relations. Jayne Peake speaks about next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.​

Who takes Britain to war?

Jan 24, 2015 00:15:54

Description:

James Gray MP and Mark Lomas QC discuss questions about the constitutional basis for ‘who decides’ when Britain goes to war. They published a new book on this issue: Who Takes Britain To War? (The History Press, 2014) Jayne Peake and Dr Peter Busch speak next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Charlie Hebdo attacks and French counter-terrorism

Jan 16, 2015 00:12:46

Description:

Dr Frank Foley, Lecturer in International Relations in the Department of War Studies, gives his views on French counter-terrorism and the attacks in Paris last week. Dr Foley is the author of 'Countering Terrorism in Britain and France', which was published by CUP in 2013: http://amzn.to/1zn8kxN You can also read his article in the Daily Telegraph on this: http://bit.ly/1C7gidT Jayne Peake provides information on next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Franklin expedition: myths, archeology & Canadian identity

Dec 13, 2014 00:21:49

Description:

Our naval historian Professor Andrew Lambert talks about what it means to the Canadian government to have located one of the Franklin expedition's ships in the Arctic. Dr Jörg Spieker, Lecturer in International Relations, joined the department at the beginning of the academic year. He tells us more about his research and teaching. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Pakistani perspectives on Afghanistan

Dec 5, 2014 00:15:40

Description:

Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa, Charles Wallace Fellow at St. Antony's, Oxford University, talks about the Pakistan military and strategic depth in Afghanistan. Lt. General (R) Asad Durrani, former Director General of the Inter-Services Intelligence (1990) and former DG Military Intelligence (1988) of Pakistan, talks about Afghanistan post 2014 from a Pakistani perspective. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz (current MA student in Contemporary Security and Development) DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Peacebuilding in Bosnia / Visual media & International War Crimes

Nov 29, 2014 00:20:05

Description:

Vahidin Omanovic, co-founder and executive director of the Center for Peacebuilding in Sanski Most, Bosnia-Herzegovina talks about working on peace building at the grassroots level. Dr Rachel Kerr, Senior Lecturer in the Department of War Studies, talks about the role of visual media in the adjudication of international war crimes. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Charlie de Rivaz (current MA student in Contemporary Security and Development) DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

UN humanitarian operations / BA International Relations

Nov 22, 2014 00:21:25

Description:

Current student Ville Majamaa talks about his experience studying on our BA International Relations programme. Dr Martin Barber is interview by MA student Charlie de Rivaz about his new book 'Blinded by Humanity: Inside the UN's Humanitarian Operations'. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

British Intelligence: the JIB and the JIC

Nov 15, 2014 00:13:37

Description:

The department’s Dr Michael Goodman, Reader in Intelligence and International Affairs and Dr Huw Dylan, Lecturer in Intelligence Studies and International Security talk about their new books: H Dylan, Defence Intelligence and the Cold War: Britain’s Joint Intelligence Bureau, 1945-64. Oxford University Press 2014. M Goodman: The Official History of the Joint Intelligence Committee. Volume I: From Approach of the Second World War to the Suez Crisis. Routledge 2014. Jayne Peake provides information about next week’s events here in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Marjan Centre / Hong Kong War Crimes Trials

Nov 8, 2014 00:23:43

Description:

Professor Michael Rainsborough talks about the Marjan Centre for the Study of Conflict and Conservation and the Marsh-Marjan award. Dr Suzannah Linton, Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public and International in Heidelberg, shares her research on the Hong Kong War crimes trials with us. Jayne Peake has more on next week's events. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Ebola Crisis

Nov 1, 2014 00:13:10

Description:

Dr Kieran Mitton is Lecturer in International Relations in the Department. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in Sierra Leone for a study of reintegration in the past. Kieran is especially interested in violence characterised as ‘irrational’ and the role played by the emotions of disgust and shame. He has many contacts in West Africa and he is of course following the ebola crisis closely. He talks about the reasons for the current crisis, the most important problems and also the long-term repercussions. Jayne Peake talks to MA student Charlie de Rivaz about next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Phil Clark on Transitional Justice / Pinar Bilgin on Security in the International

Oct 25, 2014 00:20:05

Description:

Dr Phil Clark, Reader in International and Comparative Politics at SOAS, University of London, talks about his latest project community-based approaches to transitional justice & peace-building in Africa's Great Lakes. Dr Pinar Bilgin, Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at Bilkent University, Ankara, shares her views on 'The International in Security, Security in the International', which is the title of her new book that will come out next year. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Events website. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Brown Moses on Open Source Intelligence / Dr Christine Fair on Pakistan's army

Oct 18, 2014 00:28:41

Description:

Eliot Higgins, known by his online pseudonym Brown Moses, talks to MA graduate Gus Constantinou about his open source intelligence methods that he used in analysing recent events like the 2013 attacks in Syria. We also have a conversation between our Head of Department Professor Theo Farrell and Dr C Christine Fair of Georgetown University about her new book 'Fighting to Win: the Pakistani Army's Way of War' (Oxford University Press 2014). Jayne Peake and our new media intern and MA student Charlie de Rivaz talk about next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

'Taking Risks' with our artist in residence

Oct 11, 2014 00:10:34

Description:

Dr Lola Frost is the Department's first artist in residence. She talks about her exhibition 'Taking Risks', which opened this week and can be visited until 25 October (Somerset House, East Wing, level -2). Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

Attrition: Philpott on the First World War

Oct 3, 2014 00:12:29

Description:

In the first of the 2014/15 series of podcasts, William Philpott, Professor of the History of Warfare in the department, talks about his new book: War of Attrition: Fighting the First World War (Overlook 2014) Jayne Peake tells us more about next week's events. More on our events web page. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in these podcasts are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Russia & Crimea: past & present

Mar 28, 2014 00:14:17

Description:

Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History in the department, gives his perspective of the Crimean crisis. Dr Alan James and current student Rachel Blackman talk about the department's MA History of Warfare. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts Anatol Lieven on crisis in Ukraine

Mar 14, 2014 00:13:03

Description:

Anatol Lieven, Professor of International Relations in the department, gives his views on the crisis in Ukraine and its international implications. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Russia's understanding of war

Mar 7, 2014 00:16:26

Description:

Recorded 7 March 2014: Against the background of the crisis in the Ukraine, Oscar Jonsson, doctoral student in the department, discusses Russia's way of warfare. In our series 'Where are they now?' we hear from our alumnus Adrian Johnson who is now the Director of Publications and Research Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI). Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. You can also watch (or listen to) some of our previous events on our YouTube channel. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: King's of War Relaunched

Feb 28, 2014 00:18:25

Description:

Dr Thomas Rid, Reader in the Department, talks about the relaunch of the King's of War blog. Our MA student Sudhir Selvaraj talks to Professor Hilton Root, currently vising professor in the Department of Political Economy, about his new book 'Dynamic About Nations'. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. You can also watch (or listen to) some of our previous events on our YouTube channel. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Cumberland Lodge: Post-colonial subject, PTSD, Reintegration of soldiers

Feb 21, 2014 00:21:37

Description:

The Department of War Studies held its annual postgraduate research student conference at Cumberland Lodge this week. We talked to three of our students after they presented her early findings and ideas. Laurie Benson: Creative expression, conflict and identity between post-colonial France and Algeria Stefan Schilling: Beyond the Trauma Count(s) - A Comparative Analysis of Post Traumatic Stress in Soldiers from Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom Alison Brettle: Social Networks, Informal Mechanisms and the Reintegration of Ex-Combatants. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. You can also watch (or listen to) some of our previous events on our YouTube channel. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: India and the US

Feb 14, 2014 00:13:12

Description:

Why will the US and India never form an alliance? Dr Rudra Chaudhuri, Lecturer in South East Asian Security and Strategic Affairs in the department, explains when he talks about his new book 'Forged in Crisis: India and the United States since 1947'. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. You can also watch (or listen to) some of our previous events on our YouTube channel. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Refugees in Eastern Sudan / India's nuclear policy

Feb 7, 2014 00:27:17

Description:

Dr Helen Thiollet, Sciences Po Paris, talks about Eritrean refugee camps in Eastern Sudan. Her research challenges the view that refugees in camps are just victims who are trapped in their situation and have not agency. Dr Gaurav Kampani, researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, investigates the question if India’s nuclear posture and use philosophy is undergoing radical transformation. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. You can also watch (or listen to) some of our previous event on our YouTube channel. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Hobbs on Nuclear security education / Urban on UK & media

Jan 31, 2014 00:19:01

Description:

Dr Christopher Hobbs, Deputy Director for Knowledge Transfer at the department's Centre for Science and Security Studies talks about his work on nuclear security education. BBC Newsnight's diplomatic and defence editor Mark Urban gave this year's War Studies lecture. We have a clip here in which he discusses his experience of covering the Iraq war. His lecture on War and the British media is available in full on our YouTube Channel. MA students Luciana Tellez and Hillary Briffa talk about the 2014 Conflict, Security and Development Conference on 'Organised Crime in Conflict Zones'. We also have details of next week's events. Presented by Jayne Peake DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Leenders on Syria Talks / Omand on electronic surveillance

Jan 24, 2014 00:19:08

Description:

Dr Reinoud Leenders, Reader in International Politics and Middle East Studies in the department, discusses the prospects of the negotiations on Syria that started in Switzerland this week. Sir David Omand, visiting professor in the department, talks about electronic surveillance. Sir David took part in a panel discussion on the topic organised by the RCIR, which should be available on our YouTube channel soon. The other panelist were Professor Didier Bigo, Ben Emmerson QC and it was chaired by Professor Vivienne Jabri. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Preparing for CBRN Terrorism

Jan 17, 2014 00:11:19

Description:

Dr Kristian Krieger, Research Associate in the Department, is one of a team of researchers that is headed by Dr Brooke Rogers. They work on EU funded project PRACTICE. Kristian talks about the early results of an exercise they did in Birmingham a few week's ago. You can also watch this interview (plus photos of the exercise) on the War Studies YouTube channel: http://youtu.be/G-2ObG739h0 Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Peacebuilding / Threats to infrastructure

Dec 13, 2013 00:25:36

Description:

Dr Sarah von Billerbeck, new Lecturer in International Relations in the department, talks about her research on UN peacebuilding in Sub-Saharan Africa. You can follow her on twitter: @SVBillerbeck Dr Alexander Feteke, Professor of Risk and Crisis Management at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, who took part in a panel on the dangers of terror attacks organised by EUCERS, talks about threats to infrastructure and social media and crisis management. Dr Alessio Patalano, Lecturer in War Studies, comments on China's new Defence Indentification Zone. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: US drone strikes in pakistan

Dec 6, 2013 00:20:51

Description:

Mustafa Qadri, Head of Research for Pakistan at Amnesty International, discusses Amnesty's new report on US drone strikes. Mr Qadri was invited to King's by the Afghanistan Studies Research Group. You can find the report ' "Will I be next?" US Drone Strikes in Pakistan' here. In our series 'Where are they now?' former MA student Barney Henderson, now with the Daily Telegraph, talks about his experience at King's. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Moran on Iran Deal / Salter on Methods in Security Studies

Nov 29, 2013 00:22:23

Description:

Dr Matthew Moran, Deputy Director for Research Development at the Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) in the Department comments on the interim agreement on Iran's nuclear programme. Professor Mark B. Salter of the University of Ottawa compares methods in critical security studies. He was invited to speak to the Department by the Research Centre in International Relations (RCIR). Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Martyrdom or Suicide?

Nov 22, 2013 00:18:52

Description:

Professor Karin M. Fierke of the University of St. Andrews talks about her new book on Political Self-Sacrifice. She was invited to King's by the department's Research Centre in International Relations. Karin Fierke's book: Political Self-Sacrifice: Agency, Body and Emotion in International Relations (CUP, 2012). And: 'Where are they now?" Richard King, MA International Peace and Security, talks about his job at Concordis International. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: PRISM, TEMPORA, ENDGAME

Nov 15, 2013 00:23:05

Description:

Elmar Theveßen, Deputy Editor and Head of News and Current Affairs of German public television ZDF talks to MA student Jonathan Noy about Prism, the NSA and US intelligence in the wake of the Snowden leaks. Elmar spoke at a meeting of the Study Group on Intelligence at RUSI. Elmar Theveßen has also authored five books: Schläfer mitten unter uns (2002), Die Bush-Bilanz (2004), Terroralarm (2005), Al-Quaida: Wissen, was stimmt (2009), and Nine Eleven: Der Tag, der die Welt veränderte (2011). Jonathan Noy also talked to Dr Adam Svendson who is an intelligence and defence strategist, educator, researcher, and Associate Consultant at the Copenhagen Institute for Futures Studies, Denmark (www.cifs.dk). His publications include the books: 'Intelligence Cooperation and the War on Terror: Anglo-American Security Relations after 9/11' (Routledge, 2010), 'Understanding the Globalization of Intelligence', and 'The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation: Fashioning Method Out of Mayhem', both (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). And: 'Where are they now?" Jenny Tobias, MA Conflict, Security and Development (2012), talks about her job at the International Committee of the Red Cross. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Terror Attacks on Energy Infrastructure

Nov 8, 2013 00:18:09

Description:

The department’s European Centre for Energy and Resource Security (EUCERS) organised a roundtable that discussed if terror attacks on energy infrastructure were a growing threat. One of the participants, Jennifer Giroux works with the Risk and Resilience Team at the Center for Security Studies at the ETH in Zurich talked to our MA student Sudhir Selvaraj afterwards. Also in the podcast: Part 1 of our new series "Where are they now?" Jules Norton Selzer (MA International Relations 2010) talks about his job at Edelman UK. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Conventional Prompt Global Strike Programme

Nov 1, 2013 00:10:18

Description:

Conventional Prompt Global Strikes Programme Dr James Acton, former lecturer in the Department of War Studies, is now a senior associate in the Nuclear Policy Programme at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington DC. The Department's Centre for Science and Security invited him to give a talk on the US Conventional Prompt Global Strike programme. Afterwards MA student Sudhir Selvaraj spoke to James. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Cyberwar and Peace

Oct 25, 2013 00:18:49

Description:

Dr Thomas Rid, Reader in the Department of War Studies, talks about his new Foreign Affairs article 'Cyberwar and Peace'. More about Dr Rid here. You can follow Dr Rid on twitter: @RidT Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Politics of Life and (In)visibility

Oct 18, 2013 00:12:11

Description:

Dr Leonie Ansems de Fries, new Lecturer in International Relations in the Department, talks about her research on the politics of life and also about her latest project 'The Politics of (In)visibility: Refugees in Malaysia'. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Transitional Justice in Sierra Leone and Peru

Oct 11, 2013 00:17:10

Description:

Transitional Justice in Sierra Leone and Peru Dr Rebekka Friedman, new Lecturer in International Peace and Security, discusses her research on transitional justice and peace-building in Sierra Leone and Peru. Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Countering Terrorism in Britain and France

Oct 4, 2013 00:17:36

Description:

Dr Frank Foley, new Lecturer in International Relations in the Department, talks about his book Countering Terrorism in Britain and France: Institutions, Norms and the Shadows of the Past (Cambridge University Press 2013). Jayne Peake provides details of next week's events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.

2013/14 podcasts: Theo Farrell - New Head of Dep

Sep 25, 2013 00:16:32

Description:

In the first podcast of the new academic year we talk to Professor Theo Farrell, the new Head of the Department of War Studies. Topics include research, teaching and what lies ahead for the department in the coming weeks, months and years. You can follow him on Twitter: @warprof Jayne Peak provides details of upcoming events. Presented by Dr Peter Busch DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions contained in this podcast are those of the individual speakers. They do not represent the opinions of the Department of War Studies or King's College London.