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Virginia Historical Society Podcast

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Dolley Madison and the Politics of Gracious Hospitality by Kat Imhoff

Mar 28, 2018 00:51:12

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On March 8, Kat Imhoff delivered at Banner Lecture entitled "Dolley Madison and the Politics of Gracious Hospitality" at the Virginia Museum of History & Culture As America’s first First Lady, Dolley Madison was instrumental in creating a new Republican template for style, etiquette, and social interaction that defined Washington, D.C.’s social-political culture in the early nineteenth century. Kat Imhoff, President and CEO of the Montpelier Foundation, takes viewers on a journey that examines Dolley’s life and the ways she used hospitality to achieve the most important political ends. This lecture was cosponsored with James Madison's Montpelier.

“Haven of Safety”: The Kaiser’s Courteous Pirates in Hampton Roads by Gregory J. Hansard

Mar 22, 2018 00:53:18

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On March 22, 2018 , Gregory J. Hansard delivered Banner Lecture at the Virginia Museum of History & Culture entitled “‘Haven of Safety’: The Kaiser’s Courteous Pirates in Hampton Roads.” During World War I, two German surface raiders sought harbor to make repairs at Hampton Roads after sinking 25 merchant ships. British and French ships nearby kept them from leaving Newport News, so more than 800 German sailors took up residence at the Norfolk Navy Yard in Portsmouth, Virginia. They built their own miniature German village, visited family and friends, and attended social events in the community. Their presence made the shipyard a major tourist area before the United States entered the war. Historian Gregory J. Hansard presents the fascinating story of how Hampton Roads was a haven of safety for German sailors during World War I. Mr. Hansard teaches history and museum studies at John Tyler Community College. He previously worked at the Virginia Historical Society as Manager of Web and Digital Resources and as Assistant Editor of Publications. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Virginia, where he played varsity baseball, and a masters of arts in history from Virginia State University. He is the author of "German Sailors in Hampton Roads: A World War I Story at the Norfolk Navy Yard."

When Every Second Counted: A Reflection on the Race to Transplant the First Human Heart

Mar 14, 2018 01:18:30

Description:

Fifty years ago, cutting-edge science intersected with human drama and changed the course of medical history. The Medical College of Virginia in Richmond was situated squarely in the path of the race to the first successful human heart transplant. And now, it’s history. On March 14, 2018, at the Virginia Museum of History & Culture, a panel of VCU Health transplant surgeons discussed Donald McRae’s book, "Every Second Counts", which details the critical role that the late Dr. Richard Lower and the Medical College of Virginia played in the events leading up to the first human heart transplant in December 1967 and the first human heart transplant by Dr. Lower at MCV in May 1968. The panel highlighted innovations in human organ transplantation during the past 50 years. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS: Charles F. Bryan, Jr., Ph.D. — President & CEO Emeritus, Virginia Historical Society; member of MCV Foundation Board of Trustees MODERATOR: Peter F. Buckley, M.D. — Dean, VCU School of Medicine; Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs, VCU Health PANEL MEMBERS: Vigneshwar Kasirajan, M.D. — Stuart McGuire Professor and Department Chair, VCU Department of Surgery, VCU School of Medicine Marlon F. Levy, M.D. — David M. Hume Endowed Chair in Surgery, VCU School of Medicine; Professor and Chair, Division of Transplant Surgery; Director, Hume-Lee Transplant Center Keyur Shah, M.D. — Section Chief of Heart Failure, Medical Director of Mechanical Circulatory Support, Associate Professor, Division of Cardiology, VCU School of Medicine Daniel G. Tang, M.D. — Richard R. Lower, M.D. Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, Associate Professor of Surgery, VCU School of Medicine; Surgical Director, Cardiac Transplant and Mechanical Support This lecture was made possible by a generous grant from Virginia Sargeant Reynolds Foundation.

Lord Dunmore's War: Last Indian Conflict of the Colonial Era by Glenn F. Williams

Mar 11, 2018 01:02:08

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On February 1, 2018, Glenn F. Williams delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Lord Dunmore’s War: Last Indian Conflict of the Colonial Era.” This lecture explained the causes and conduct of the last Indian War that took place before the start of the American War for Independence. Set during what some would call the “Quiet Time,” many historians pay it little attention or misinterpret its historical significance. However, John Murray, fourth Earl of Dunmore, the last royal governor of Virginia, led the colony's soldiers “in his majesty’s service” in a defensive war that culminated in a successful offensive military expedition before the deepening colonial crisis spun out of control. Although the victorious Lord Dunmore returned to Williamsburg in triumph and at the height of his popularity in December 1774, before another year ended he would flee his capital and be vilified by Virginians. Dr. Glenn F. Williams is a Senior Historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History at Fort McNair, D.C. He is the author of several books, including Year of the Hangman: George Washington’s Campaign against the Iroquois; USS Constellation: A Short History of the Last All-Sail Warship Built by the U.S. Navy; and Dunmore’s War: The Last Conflict of America’s Colonial Era. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

Mark Twain, FFV? America’s Most Beloved Author and the Old Dominion by Alan Pell Crawford

Mar 10, 2018 00:49:22

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On January 11, 2018, Alan Pell Crawford delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Mark Twain, FFV? America’s Most Beloved Author and the Old Dominion.” Reports of Mark Twain’s death were “greatly exaggerated” more than once. The more famous report was from when he was living in London in 1897. But it happened again a decade later when he had come to Virginia on yacht that was enshrouded in fog off Hampton Roads. The New York Times reported that the yacht sank and Twain had drowned. Twain’s response was characteristically amused—and amusing. He told the Times he planned to conduct an “exhaustive investigation of this report that I have been lost at sea. If there is any foundation to this report, I will at once apprise the anxious public.” Twain, who had come to Virginia for the Jamestown Exposition, had a special and—by historians, overlooked—relationship with the Old Dominion. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, aka Mark Twain, was proud of his Virginia roots. His father was John Marshall Clemens, “one of the F.F.V.’s of Virginie,” Twain’s daughter Susy wrote in her 1872 biography, Papa. This lecture will discuss Twain’s Virginia roots, which we should all take as much pride in as he did. Alan Pell Crawford is a former U.S. Senate speechwriter, congressional press secretary, and magazine editor. He has published essays on politics and history in numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Review, and The Weekly Standard. He has reviewed books on U.S. history, politics, and culture for The Wall Street Journal since 1993. He is the author of Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great Scandal of 18th Century America; Twilight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson; and How Not to Get Rich: The Financial Misadventures of Mark Twain.

Doing Their Bit: The Surprising Role of Virginians in the Great War by Lynn Rainville

Feb 21, 2018 00:54:20

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On February 22, 2018, Lynn Rainville delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Doing Their Bit: The Surprising Role of Virginians in the Great War.” In this illustrated lecture, Lynn Rainville revealed the crucial roles that Virginians played in the Great War. These individuals ranged from drafted soldiers to politicians (including Staunton native, Woodrow Wilson) and from locally born horses to their ferriers. These patriots also included female stenographers, African American doctors, domestic gardeners, National Guard troops, and army chaplains. Of these hundreds of thousands of volunteers, more than 3,600 lost their lives as a direct result of the war, impacting families throughout the state. And yet many of their sacrifices have been forgotten. Rainville concluded her talk with a study of statues erected in Virginia after the war to reveal a more complete story of service and sacrifice during the Great War. Dr. Lynn Rainville is a research professor in the humanities at Sweet Briar College and a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. She is the author of "Hidden History: African American Cemeteries in Central Virginia" and "Virginia and the Great War: Mobilization, Supply and Combat, 1914–1919."

Our Little Monitor: The Greatest Invention of the Civil War by Jonathan W. White

Jan 25, 2018 00:46:07

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On January 25, 2018, Jonathan W. White delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Our Little Monitor: The Greatest Invention of the Civil War.” On March 9, 1862, the USS Monitor met the CSS Virginia in battle in Hampton Roads, Virginia—the first time ironclad vessels would engage each other in combat. For four hours the two ships pummeled one another as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers and civilians watched from the shorelines. Although the battle ended in a draw, this engagement would change the very nature of naval warfare. The “wooden walls” of navies around the world suddenly appeared far more vulnerable to political and military leaders. At the same time, in the weeks after the battle of Hampton Roads, Americans developed their own ideas for improving the Monitor or for sinking the Virginia. This talk will discuss some of the inventions devised by terrified northerners as well as the legacy of the USS Monitor in American life and culture since its sinking on New Year’s Eve 1862. Dr. Jonathan W. White is associate professor of American Studies at Christopher Newport University and a senior fellow with CNU’s Center for American Studies. He is the author of several books, including Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln and Midnight in America: Darkness, Sleep, and Dreams during the Civil War, and coeditor (with Anna Gibson Holloway) of Our Little Monitor: The Greatest Invention of the Civil War.

Toxic Dust: The History and Legacy of Virginia’s Kepone Disaster by Gregory Wilson

Jan 2, 2018 00:55:50

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On October 5, 2017, Gregory Wilson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Toxic Dust: The History and Legacy of Virginia’s Kepone Disaster.” In July 1975, news broke about workers at Life Science Products Company in Hopewell poisoned while making the pesticide Kepone, the brand name of chlordecone. Further investigations showed Life Science had contracted with Allied Chemical, a larger firm with a plant in Hopewell, to make Kepone and that both companies dumped Kepone waste into the James River and its nearby tributaries. The events led to a number of significant events, including a fishing and harvesting ban that remained in various forms through the 1980s, new state and federal environmental regulations, and federal court cases that led to the creation of the Virginia Environmental Endowment in 1977. Forty years later, Kepone remains in the James River sediment but in much reduced levels. Still, traces of Kepone have been found in James River fish today. The complete toxic effects of Kepone are not fully known, but a major public health crisis appears to be unfolding in the French West Indies from continued chlordecone use on banana plants through the 1990s. Chlordecone’s toxic global legacy led the United Nations Environmental Program to call for an end to its use. The events surrounding Kepone left an important legacy that continues to affect people and the environment in Virginia and around the world. The Kepone story is a compelling reminder of the critical ongoing importance of government oversight in the protection of human health and the environment. Dr. Gregory Wilson is a professor of history at the University of Akron. He grew up in Newport News, Virginia, and remembers the Kepone tragedy from his youth. Dr. Wilson earned his Ph.D. from Ohio State University. He is the author of Above the Shots: An Oral History of the Kent State Shootings (with Craig Simpson), Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State (with Kevin F. Kern), and Communities Left Behind: The Area Redevelopment Administration, 1945–1965. This lecture is cosponsored by the Virginia Environmental Endowment as part of its 40th Anniversary.

Shockoe Hill Cemetery: A Richmond Landmark's History by Alyson Lindsey Taylor-White

Dec 31, 2017 00:48:03

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On December 7, 2017, Alyson Lindsey Taylor-White delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Shockoe Hill Cemetery: A Richmond Landmark's History.” In 1822, Richmond’s Common Council faced a grave dilemma, literally. The nation, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the capital city of Richmond were in the grips of a severe economic depression, one of the young nation’s first. It was not a good time for the city to invest in capital improvements, much less acquire real estate. And yet they felt they had no choice but to do just that. In particular, the city faced a desperate shortage of available private and church properties to inter the dead safely and in a sanitary method. The decision was made to create Richmond’s first necropolis that would be designed for the living as much as for the dead. Created on the cusp of the rural cemetery movement that would soon sweep the nation, Shockoe Hill Cemetery was laid out by city surveyor Richard Young in 1824 to have a pleasing, picturesque, park-like setting. Famous occupants include Chief Justice John Marshall, Union Spy Elizabeth Van Lew, Richmond’s first mayor Dr. William Foushee, as well as most of the people who Edgar Allan Poe loved (and some he did not) as he grew up in Richmond. Today, the nearly 200 year-old cemetery is one of the city’s loveliest landmarks, and yet it remains one of the least often visited. Alyson Lindsey Taylor-White was the editor of the Virginia Review magazine for twenty-five years and is currently an adjunct instructor at the University of Richmond. She has written for the Dictionary of Virginia Biography and is a regular contributor to the blog The Shockoe Examiner, where she writes about her favorite subject, the richly textured history of Richmond. She also leads educational tours of local historic sites in Richmond and in nearby Petersburg.

Richmond’s Gilded Age: The Grit Behind the Glitz by Brian Burns

Nov 2, 2017 00:46:46

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On November 2, 2017, Brian Burns delivered a Banner Lecture at the Virginia Historical Society entitled “Richmond’s Gilded Age: The Grit Behind the Glitz.” In the aftermath of the Civil War, Richmond entered the Gilded Age seeking bright prospects while struggling with its own past. During a labor convention in conservative Richmond, white supremacists prepared to enforce segregation at gunpoint. Progressives attempted to gain political power by unveiling a wondrous new marvel: Richmond’s first electric streetcar. Handsome lawyer Thomas J. Cluverius was accused of murdering a pregnant woman and dumping her body in the city reservoir, sparking Richmond’s trial of the century. And after Jefferson Davis’s death in 1889, elites launched an arduous monument-building campaign. Author Brian Burns takes us on a romp through the River City as it headed toward a new century. Brian Burns recently published his third book, Gilded Age Richmond: Gaiety, Greed and Lost Cause Mania. His previous titles include Lewis Ginter: Richmond’s Gilded Age Icon and Curiosities of the Confederate Capital: Untold Richmond Stories of the Spectacular, Tragic, and Bizarre.

Stonewall Jackson’s Little Sorrel by Sharon B. Smith

Sep 14, 2017 00:53:57

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On September 14, 2017, Sharon B. Smith delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Stonewall Jackson's Little Sorrel.” During the Civil War and throughout the rest of the nineteenth century there was no star that shone brighter than that of a small red horse who was known as Stonewall Jackson’s Little Sorrel. Robert E. Lee’s Traveller eventually became more familiar but was mostly famous for his looks. Not so with Little Sorrel. Early in the war he became known as a horse of great personality and charm, an eccentric animal with an intriguing background. Like Traveller, his enduring fame was due initially to the prominence of his owner and the uncanny similarities between the two of them. The little red horse long survived Jackson and developed a following of his own. In fact, he lived longer than almost all horses who survived the Civil War as well as many thousands of human veterans. His death in 1886 drew attention worthy of a deceased general, his mounted remains have been admired by hundreds of thousands of people since 1887, and the final burial of his bones in 1997 was the occasion for an event that could only be described as a funeral, and a well-attended one at that. Stonewall Jackson’s Little Sorrel is the story of that horse. Sharon B. Smith was a reporter, interviewer, and anchor of televised horse sports on ESPN, NBC, and Sportschannel Los Angeles during the 1980s and 1990s. She wrote, produced, and anchored ESPN’s “Down the Stretch,” a weekly half hour racing news program. She is the author of seven books including, Pocket Guide to Betting on Horses (1999), Connecticut’s Civil War (2009), The Best There Ever Was: Dan Patch and the Dawn of the American Century (2012), and Stonewall Jackson’s Little Sorrel: An Unlikely Hero of the Civil War (2016).

Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty by Jon Kukla

Aug 23, 2017 01:08:00

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On August 24, 2017, 2017, Jon Kukla delivered a Banner Lecture at the Virginia Historical Society entitled “Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty.” Patrick Henry is remembered today mostly for one line from one speech that he made: “Give me liberty or give me death.” This is a shame because he was one of the leading patriots of the Revolutionary era, Virginia’s first governor after independence, a powerful voice in the early republic, and a great orator and statesman who played such a crucial role in shaping the course of Revolutionary Virginia’s history. In Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty, Jon Kukla, who has been studying Henry for years and has even lived on one of his former plantations, restores Patrick Henry to the front rank of American Revolutionary patriots. Jon Kukla has served as director of historical research and publishing at the Library of Virginia, curator and then director of the Historic New Orleans Collection, and as director of Red Hill, The Patrick Henry National Memorial in Charlotte County. He is the author of A Wilderness So Immense: The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America, Mr. Jefferson’s Women, and Patrick Henry: Champion of Liberty.

The Extremes of Virginia: Two Commonwealths, Separated and Unequal by August Wallmeyer

Aug 16, 2017 01:00:51

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On August 3, 2017, at noon, August Wallmeyer delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “The Extremes of Virginia: Two Commonwealths, Separated and Unequal.” August Wallmeyer brings his unique perspectives on public policy issues in Virginia to bear on three “rural, poor, and largely unknown” areas of Virginia: Southwest, Southside, and the Eastern Shore. With his forty plus years involvement with the Virginia General Assembly, Wallmeyer dissects conditions in the “extremes of Virginia” and offers his thoughts on practical steps to improve economic, social, and cultural conditions for the 10 percent of Virginians living there. He will graphically assemble a portrait of a Virginia largely unknown to those living in the commonwealth’s wealthier and more prosperous urban corridor.August Wallmeyer is a former radio and television news reporter, government speechwriter, and energy trade association lobbyist. He is the author of The Extremes of Virginia. The father of three, he now lives in Goochland County with his wife of thirty-three years, Kathy.Can't make it to the Banner Lecture? Watch it live on the VHS Facebook page starting at 12:00 EST. Tell your friends to tune in and don't forget to say hello and tell us where you are watching from in the comments section during broadcast.

Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture - "Jamestown, the Truth Revealed," by William M. Kelso

Jul 21, 2017 00:54:53

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On July 19 at 5:30 p.m., Dr. William M. Kelso delivered the Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture entitled “Jamestown, the Truth Revealed.” What was life really like for the band of adventurers who first set foot on the banks of the James River in 1607? Important as the accomplishments of these men and women were, the written records pertaining to them are scarce, ambiguous, and often conflicting. And those curious about the birthplace of the United States have had little to turn to except dramatic and often highly fictionalized reports. In Jamestown, the Truth Revealed, William Kelso takes us literally to the soil where the Jamestown colony began, unearthing footprints of a series of structures, beginning with the James Fort, to reveal fascinating evidence of the lives and deaths of the first settlers, of their endeavors and struggles, and new insight into their relationships with the Virginia Indians. He offers up a lively account, framed around a narrative of the archaeological team's exciting discoveries. William M. Kelso is the Director of Archaeology for Jamestown Rediscovery at Historic Jamestowne. He holds a Masters Degree in Early American History from the College of William and Mary, a Ph.D. from Emory University, and he has been awarded an honorary degree of chivalry from Queen Elizabeth II: Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). He is the author and coauthor of several books, including Jamestown, the Buried Truth; Jamestown Rediscovery, 1994–2004; Kingsmill Plantation, 1619–1800: Archaeology of Country Life in Colonial Virginia; Archaeology at Monticello; and Jamestown, the Truth Revealed.

The Dooleys of Richmond by Mary Lynn Bayliss

Jul 21, 2017 00:56:23

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On July 13, 2017, Mary Lynn Bayliss will delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “The Dooleys of Richmond: Two Generations of an Irish Immigrant Family in the Old and New South.” Two weeks after their wedding in Alexandria, Virginia, Irish Immigrants John and Sarah Dooley were at home in Richmond when John’s first advertisement for his hat manufacturing business appeared in a Richmond newspaper. Five years later, when John had become one of Richmond’s prominent residents, their second son, James Henry Dooley, destined to become a lawyer and one of the city’s great philanthropists, was born. The story of his family and their devotion to the city and the South, The Dooleys of Richmond sheds new light on the experience of Irish immigrants in the urban South before, during and after the Civil War. James Henry Dooley served three terms in the Virginia House of Delegates before becoming a key figure in the development of the industries and infrastructure of the New South. Maymont, the Gilded Age estate he and his wife created and left to the city of Richmond as a museum and park, is only one of their many gifts to the city. Dr. Mary Lynn Bayliss has published articles in Virginia Cavalcade, The Richmond Quarterly, the Richmond Times-Dispatch, the Dictionary of Virginia Biography, and Encyclopedia Virginia. She is the author of The Dooleys of Richmond: Two Generations of an Irish Immigrant Family in the Old and New South. This lecture is cosponsored with Friends of Hollywood Cemetery.

The Paradox of Robert Edward Lee by David Cox

Jun 17, 2017 00:46:28

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On June 1, 2017, at noon, David Cox delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Paradox of Robert Edward Lee." Robert E. Lee remains as controversial today as he was in his own era, in part because of the contradictions he embodied. A critic of slavery and secession, he fought for the cause that embodied each. He was the only man ever offered the command of armies that opposed each other. Deemed one of the greatest of military minds, his side still lost. Then, he became one of the chief proponents of reconciliation, yet he held serious reservations pertaining to race and reconstruction. In his book, The Religious Life of Robert E. Lee (March 2017), David Cox explores how Lee’s faith influenced his views and his actions. In this lecture, he will examine how Lee’s religious convictions guided two of his most important, if paradoxical, decisions: to resign his commission and side with Virginia in 1861, then to accept the presidency of Washington College in Lexington as a means of promoting the reconciliation he hoped to foster after the war. This latter decision in particular seemed to frame his sometimes paradoxical approach to controversies that arose in his later years. David Cox, a visiting professor of history at Southern Virginia University, teaches American and religious history. An Episcopal priest, he lives in Lexington, where, from 1987 to 2000, he was rector of R. E. Lee Memorial Church.

Feuding Founders: Battling and Backstabbing in Early America by Paul Aron

May 13, 2017 00:43:28

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On May 11, 2017, at noon, Paul Aron delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Feuding Founders: Battling and Backstabbing in Early America.” “Thirteen clocks were made to strike together,” John Adams wrote in 1818, recalling how the thirteen colonies united to seize their independence. Adams knew this had been a tentative and tenuous unity. During and after the Revolution, the founders were not only debating but also smearing, screaming, spitting, and occasionally shooting at each other—their politics every bit as polarized as our own. Yet despite these feuds—and even to some extent because of them—the founders (in contrast to today’s politicians) managed to find ways to build a nation. Paul Aron is director of publications for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He is the author of Founding Feuds: The Rivalries, Clashes, and Conflicts that Forged a Nation, Why the Turkey Didn’t Fly, and We Hold These Truths . . . and Other Words That Made America. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

Dreams of War and Peace: How Americans Experienced the Civil War in their Sleep by Jonathan W. White

May 10, 2017 00:54:27

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On April 27, 2017, Jonathan W. White delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Dreams of War and Peace: How Americans Experienced the Civil War in their Sleep.” The Civil War placed new and unique strains on nineteenth-century Americans, and their nightly visions reflected those hardships. Sometimes the war intruded on people’s slumber, vividly bringing to life the horrors of the conflict. For others, nighttime was an escape from the hard realities of life and death in wartime. In this talk, Jonathan W. White will explore what dreams meant to Civil War-era Americans, and how their dreams reveal that generation’s deepest longings—their hopes and fears, desires and struggles, and guilt and shame. When Americans recorded their dreams in their diaries, letters and memoirs, they sought to make sense of the changing world around them, and to cope with the confusion, despair, and loneliness of life amid the turmoil of a war the likes of which they had never imagined. Dr. Jonathan W. White is associate professor of American Studies at Christopher Newport University. He is the author of several books, including Midnight in America: Darkness, Sleep, and Dreams during the Civil War (2017).

The Best Rebel Reminiscence: Edward Porter Alexander’s by Gary W. Gallagher

Apr 26, 2017 00:54:13

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On April 7, 2017 at noon, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “The Best Rebel Reminiscence: Edward Porter Alexander's Fighting for the Confederacy.” Edward Porter Alexander’s Military Memoirs of a Confederate: A Critical Narrative (1907) and Fighting for the Confederacy: The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander (1989) stand unchallenged as the most analytical, dispassionate, and influential books of their genre. Alexander wrote from a singular perspective as one who had served on the staffs of Robert E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, and P. G. T. Beauregard before beginning a career in the artillery that soon revealed him to be the most gifted gunner in the Confederacy. Literally present from Manassas to Appomattox, Alexander participated in all the great battles of the Western Theater as well as fighting in Tennessee in late 1863. This lecture will assess Alexander’s two books, highlighting the process by which he crafted them and the degree to which they influenced subsequent generations of historians and other writers. Dr. Gary W. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia and the author and editor of many books and articles, including Cold Harbor to the Crater: The End of the Overland Campaign and Fighting for the Confederacy: The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander. This lecture is cosponsored with The Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair and the Virginia Antiquarian Booksellers Association (VABA).

All Falling Faiths: Reflections on the Promise and Failure of the 1960s by J. Harvie Wilkinson III

Apr 1, 2017 01:10:23

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All Falling Faiths: Reflections on the Promise and Failure of the 1960s by J. Harvie Wilkinson III Duration: (01:10:23) On March 29, Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “All Falling Faiths: Reflections on the Promise and Failure of the 1960s.” All Falling Faiths is a personal memoir of growing up and coming of age in the 1950s and 60s. Much of it describes my boyhood and adolescence in Richmond during those two decades and what life was like, both good and bad, back then. Only a personal journey can help us recognize both the mistakes and accomplishments of our youth and the need for future generations to find the common ground that too often eluded us back then. Each chapter in my book discusses a different fallen faith. My own view is that the 1960s inflicted enormous damage on America –- damage that helps to explain the terribly torn and fractured country that we have today. Those who take a positive view of the 1960s, however, have strong points to make as well; that decade helped make us a country for all Americans, not just some. My hope in this book is that those who rend a garment may yet help to mend it. By understanding all we lost in the 1960s, we may yet find a brighter way. J. Harvie Wilkinson III is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. President Reagan appointed him to that court in August of 1984, and he was the Fourth Circuit’s chief judge from 1996–2003. He is the author of several books, including Harry Byrd and the Changing Face of Virginia Politics 1945–1966; One Nation Indivisible: How Ethnic Separatism Threatens America; Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Right to Self-Governance; and, most recently, All Falling Faiths: Reflections on the Promise and Failure of the 1960s. Judge Wilkinson lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. He and his wife Lossie have two children, Nelson and Porter.

A Saga of the New South: Race, Law, and Public Debt in Virginia by Brent Tarter

Mar 28, 2017 00:47:34

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On March 16, Brent Tarter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “A Saga of the New South: Race, Law, and Public Debt in Virginia.” A Saga of the New South treats the political and legal controversies Virginia’s antebellum public debt created in post–Civil War Virginia. The debt controversy fundamentally altered the political landscape of Virginia twice. It created the conditions under which the Readjuster Party, a biracial coalition of radical reformers, seized control of the state government in 1879; then it gave rise to a counterrevolution that led the elitist Democratic Party to eighty years of dominance over the state’s politics and government. The Readjusters successfully refinanced the public debt and increased spending for the new public school system, but the debt controversy generated a long train of legal disputes. Through an in-depth analysis of the political and legal controversies about public debt, race, and education, A Saga of the New South sheds new light on the many obstacles reformers faced in Virginia and elsewhere in the South during the decades after the Civil War. Brent Tarter is a founding editor of the Library of Virginia’s Dictionary of Virginia Biography and a cofounder of the annual Virginia Forum. He is the author of several books, including The Grandees of Government: The Origins and Persistence of Undemocratic Politics in Virginia, Daydreams and Nightmares: A Virginia Family Faces Secession and War, and A Saga of the New South: Race, Law, and Public Debt in Virginia.

Lonely Colonist Seeks Wife by Marcia Zug

Mar 7, 2017 01:02:26

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On March 2, Marcia Zug delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Lonely Colonist Seeks Wife: Rediscovering the History of America’s First Mail-Order Brides.” Today, mail-order brides are usually assumed to be desperate and exploited women. However, the history of the Jamestown mail-order brides casts doubt on this belief. Life in the early American colonies was difficult, but one of the biggest threats was actually the absence of marriageable women. As a result, marital immigration was seen as crucial to the Virginia colony’s success. Potential female immigrants were wooed with numerous financial and legal incentives and these benefits made mail-order marriage an attractive option for some seventeenth century women. Interestingly, modern mail-order marriages may not be so different. Four centuries later, many things have changed, but mail-order marriages continue to offer women the possibility of a better future. Marcia Zug is an associate professor of law at the University of South Carolina. She is the author of Buying a Bride: An Engaging History of Mail-Order Marriage.

Airship ROMA: A Forgotten Tragedy by Nancy E. Sheppard

Mar 3, 2017 00:55:04

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On February 9, Nancy E. Sheppard delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Airship ROMA: A Forgotten Tragedy.” In March 1921, Maj. John G. Thornell and his crew were detailed to Italy to procure a new experimental airship for the U.S. Army Air Service. Stationed at Langley Field in Hampton, the ROMA never lived up to expectations despite being heralded as the future of military innovation. Tragically, it crashed on February 21, 1922, in Norfolk, Virginia, claiming the lives of most of the men aboard. Author Nancy E. Sheppard will reveal details and never before published imagery of the forgotten tragedy of one of the last great airships and those who sacrificed for the promise of a new era in aviation. Nancy E. Sheppard, a writer and historian of her native Hampton Roads, Virginia, is the author of The Airship ROMA Disaster in Hampton Roads.

Six Encounters with Lincoln: A President Confronts Democracy and Its Demons

Mar 3, 2017 01:03:04

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On February 22, Beverly Louise Brown delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Six Encounters with Lincoln: A President Confronts Democracy and Its Demons, A New Book by the Award-Winning Historian Elizabeth Brown Pryor,” celebrating the publication of her late sister’s book. Six Encounters with Lincoln: A President Confronts Democracy and Its DemonsIn this eye-opening book, Six Encounters with Lincoln: A President Confronts Democracy and Its Demons, Elizabeth Brown Pryor examines six striking and mostly unknown encounters that Abraham Lincoln had with his constituents. It is a collection of intriguing stories about a man who himself prized story-telling, and taken together they reveal his character and opinions in unexpected ways, illustrating his difficulties in managing a republic and creating a presidency. We observe him standing gracelessly mute at his first review of the U.S. Army on the eve of the Civil War. Later we find him swearing profusely at a young solider on the White House portico. He alternately pontificates or talks pigeon English to Native American chiefs, and he simply avoids most interactions with prominent women. In the last days of the war we find Lincoln visiting Richmond, where he meets an old Confederate with a menacing stick in his hand named Duff Green, who challenges his plans for the reconstruction of the nation. What this book shows most clearly is that greatness was not simply laid on Lincoln’s shoulders like a mantle but was won in fits and starts. Elizabeth Brown Pryor was tragically killed in Richmond in April 2015, just after completing the manuscript of Six Encounters with Lincoln. Her sister Beverly Louise Brown, a noted art historian, saw the book through publication and will talk about her sister, the book, and the perils and delights in finishing another author’s work. This lecture will celebrate the book’s publication by Viking in February 2017.

Historic Disasters of Richmond by Walter S. Griggs, Jr.

Jan 20, 2017 00:50:43

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On January 18 at 5:30 p.m., Walter S. Griggs, Jr. delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Historic Disasters of Richmond.” Richmond has had its share of man-made and natural calamities throughout its illustrious history. In 1811, fire destroyed the Richmond Theatre on Broad Street, tragically claiming seventy-two lives in one of the worst urban disasters in American history. As Union forces approached Richmond in the final months of the Civil War, Confederate troops ignited the city in flames, leaving scars still visible today. The international Spanish flu epidemic did not spare the city in the early twentieth century. The worst airplane crash in Virginia history occurred near Byrd Airport in 1961. Local author Walter S. Griggs, Jr., tells these stories and more as he traces the harrowing history of Richmond’s most famous disasters. Dr. Walter Griggs Jr. is an emeritus professor at Virginia Commonwealth University. He has written numerous books on a variety of historical subjects, including The Collapse of Richmond’s Church Hill Tunnel; The Hidden History of Richmond; World War II in Richmond, Virginia; and Historic Disasters of Richmond.

The Private Jefferson: "Most Blessed of the Patriarchs" by Peter Onuf

Jan 7, 2017 01:00:35

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On January 5 at noon, Peter Onuf delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “The Private Jefferson: 'Most Blessed of the Patriarchs.'” "Most Blessed of the Patriarchs": Tracing Jefferson's philosophical development from youth to old age, historian Peter Onuf explores what he calls the "empire" of Jefferson's imagination—an expansive state of mind born of his origins in a slave society, his intellectual influences, and the vaulting ambition that propelled him into public life as a modern avatar of the Enlightenment who, at the same time, likened himself to a figure of old—"the most blessed of the patriarchs." Indeed, Jefferson saw himself as a "patriarch," not just to his country and mountain-like home at Monticello but also to his family, the white half that he loved so publicly, as well as to the black side that he claimed to love, a contradiction of extraordinary historical magnitude. Peter Onuf, Thomas Jefferson Professor of History Emeritus and Senior Research Scholar at Monticello, is the author of “The State of the World: Thomas Jefferson’s Political Vision,” in the exhibition catalogue, The Private Jefferson: Perspectives from the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the coauthor with Annette Gordon-Reed of “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination. He is also a co-host (the “18th Century Guy”) of the popular public radio program and podcast BackStory with the American History Guys.

Documents and Drawings: "The Private Jefferson" Examined by Susan R. Stein

Dec 13, 2016 01:11:35

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On December 10, Susan R. Stein delivered a Banner Lecture called “Documents and Drawings: 'The Private Jefferson' Examined.” Thomas Jefferson devoted himself to building the new American nation as well as Monticello, his plantation home. At Monticello, he managed his sizable farms, designed the house and its surrounding landscape, and selected art and furnishings. This talk will discuss how the extensive Coolidge Collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society has influenced the understanding of Jefferson and the ongoing restoration and interpretation of Monticello. The key drawings and records of The Private Jefferson exhibition—from Jefferson’s first elevation of Monticello, the Declaration of Independence, and catalog of books to his designs for curtains and a plow—demonstrate the range of his actions and interests. Susan R. Stein, the Richard Gilder Senior Curator and Vice President of Museum Programs at Monticello, is the author of The Worlds of Thomas Jefferson at Monticello (1993). She has been involved in the presentation and interpretation of Jefferson and Monticello since 1986.

Horns, Masks, and Women's Dress: How the First Klan Used Costume to Build Domestic Terrorism

Dec 10, 2016 01:17:10

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On December 8 at noon, Elaine Frantz Parsons delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Horns, Masks, and Women's Dress: How the First Klan Used Costume to Build Domestic Terrorism.” One hundred and fifty years ago, the Ku-Klux Klan became the first broad-based domestic terrorist movement in the United States. Although there was nothing new about white violence against black southerners, the Ku-Klux Klan reworked violence in a way that would fit a modern post-slavery nation. It sought to disempower and control rural blacks not only directly through violence but also by using bizarre costume and performance to create a climate of terror that could be spread both by word of mouth and through the powerful national newspaper network. Most “Ku-Klux” did not wear white uniforms like the Klan of the 1920s. Their varied costumes featured animal horns, fake facial hair, polka dots and reflective metals, blackface, and, often, women’s dress. Those who made and wore these costumes intended to define a new basis of southern white authority and to force freedpeople and their allies to acknowledge it. Elaine Frantz Parsons is an associate professor of history at Duquesne University and the author of Manhood Lost: Fallen Drunkards and Redeeming Women in the Nineteenth-Century United States and Ku-Klux: The Birth of the Klan during Reconstruction.

Thomas Jefferson, Revered and Reviled by Robert M. S. McDonald

Dec 3, 2016 01:17:10

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On December 1, Robert M. S. McDonald delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Thomas Jefferson, Revered and Reviled.” Of all the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson stood out as the most controversial and confounding. Loved and hated, revered and reviled, during his lifetime he served as a lightning rod for dispute. Few major figures in American history provoked such a polarization of public opinion. While Jefferson’s supporters organized festivals in his honor where they praised him in speeches and songs, his detractors portrayed him as a dilettante and demagogue, double-faced and dangerously radical, an atheist hostile to Christianity. Characterizing his beliefs as un-American, they tarred him with the extremism of the French Revolution. Yet his allies cheered his contributions to the American Revolution, unmasking him as the now formerly anonymous author of the words that had helped to define America in the Declaration of Independence. Jefferson’s bifurcated image took shape both as a product of his own creation and in response to factors beyond his control. In the first fifty years of independence, Americans’ views of Jefferson revealed much about their conflicting views of the purpose and promise of America. Robert M. S. McDonald is a professor of history at the United States Military Academy. He is the author and editor of several books on Jefferson, including Thomas Jefferson’s Military Academy: Founding West Point (2004), Light and Liberty: Thomas Jefferson and the Power of Knowledge (2012), and Confounding Father: Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time (2016).

Revolt and Repression: Reconsidering the Nat Turner Slave Revolt by Patrick Breen

Nov 12, 2016 01:00:36

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On November 10, 2016, Patrick H. Breen delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Revolt and Repression: Reconsidering the Nat Turner Slave Revolt.” On August 21, 1831, seven men launched what would come to be known as the Nat Turner Revolt. The rebels swept through Southampton Country recruiting slaves to their rank and killing nearly five dozen whites, more than had ever been killed in any slave revolt in history of the United States. Within two days, whites reestablished control over Southampton County. Examining the terrible choices faced by slaves and also the deep disagreements among whites about how to respond to the rebels, this lecture will discuss new ways of thinking about Nat Turner, his revolt, Southampton County, and even American slavery itself. Patrick H. Breen is the author of The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt. He is an associate professor of history at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island.

On the Back Roads Again: More People, Places, and Pie Around Virginia by Bob Brown and Bill Lohmann

Nov 12, 2016 00:50:10

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On October 20 at noon, Bob Brown and Bill Lohmann delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “On the Back Roads Again: More People, Places, and Pie Around Virginia.” Head out on the back roads of Virginia again with Richmond Times-Dispatch senior photographer Bob Brown and columnist Bill Lohmann as they encounter memorable characters, explore charming places, and search for their next piece of pie in their new book, On the Back Roads Again: More People, Places, and Pie from Around Virginia. Featuring Brown’s award-winning photographs and Lohmann’s good-humored commentary, this lecture will lead us on a casual journey to many of the places that make Virginia unique. Bob Brown, a Rockbridge County native, joined the Richmond Times-Dispatch photo staff in 1968 after working in television for the previous 10 years. Bill Lohmann, an award-winning columnist and a Richmond native, has worked for the Times-Dispatch and, previously, the Richmond News Leader since 1988. He also has reported for United Press International in Richmond, Orlando, and Atlanta, and he began his career as a sports writer for the Charlottesville Daily Progress.

Race, Reconstruction, and Memory in Postwar Richmond by Michael D. Gorman

Nov 12, 2016 01:00:34

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On October 12 at 5:30 p.m., Michael D. Gorman delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “‘A Manner Which Would Not Have Been Permitted Towards Slaves’: Race, Reconstruction, and Memory in Postwar Richmond.” The Civil War in Virginia may have ended at Appomattox, but for those affected by war, additional intense times lay ahead. How did the people of Richmond cope with the sudden influx of paroled prisoners, the presence of northern occupation forces, a devastated city, and the overwhelming refugee crisis that came in the form of thousands of newly emancipated slaves? This lecture explores Reconstruction at the symbolic center of rebellion through a detailed analysis of newly available sources, highlighting how little attention has been given to the actual events and practical realities of Reconstruction. Richmond’s rebuilding was replete with racial violence and white resistance, quite at odds with what is popularly believed about Reconstruction in Virginia. Michael D. Gorman is a National Park Service historian and author of “A Conqueror or a Peacemaker? Abraham Lincoln in Richmond,” in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography (vol. 123, no. 1 [2015]). He is widely known as an expert on Civil War Richmond. This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park and is free and open to the public.

The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler’s U-Boats by William Geroux

Oct 21, 2016 01:00:44

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On October 6 at noon, William Geroux will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled “The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler’s U-Boats.” In his book, The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler’s U-Boats, author William Geroux uses the experiences of merchant mariners from Mathews County, Virginia, to tell the largely forgotten story of the heroics and sacrifices of the U.S. Merchant Marine in World War II. Mathews, a rural outpost on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, had been a cradle of merchant sea captains and mariners since before the American Revolution. When America entered World War II in December 1941, Mathews mariners were scattered on ships throughout the war zones, and they became prime targets for German U-boats trying to choke off the Allied supply line. Mathews mariners faced U-boats in the North and South Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, the Mediterranean, and Indian Ocean, and even the icy Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle. Some died terrible deaths. Others survived torpedo explosions, flaming oil slicks, storms, shark attacks, and harrowing lifeboat odysseys—only to ship out again as soon as they’d returned to safety. Nearly every family in Mathews County had a personal stake in the U-boat war, and none had a greater stake than the family of Capt. Jesse and Henrietta Hodges and their seven sons, who would experience the war in all its horrors and triumphs. William Geroux was a newspaper reporter for more than thirty years, mostly with the Richmond Times-Dispatch. He also has worked for Maersk, one of the world's largest commercial shipping companies. He is the author of The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler's U-Boats.

The Paradoxical Emancipator: Abraham Lincoln and the Other Thirteenth Amendment

Sep 24, 2016 01:02:23

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On September 22 at noon, Daniel W. Crofts delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Paradoxical Emancipator: Abraham Lincoln and the Other Thirteenth Amendment." When Abraham Lincoln spoke so memorably at Gettysburg about “a nation conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal,” he was looking more toward a hoped-for future rather than accurately describing the American past. The slave system before the Civil War was deeply rooted, protected by the Constitution, and it spread rapidly. Even those Americans who disliked it felt powerless to do anything about slavery in the states where it already existed. They would instead try to stop its expansion. Without doubt, Lincoln abhorred slavery and looked forward to its “ultimate extinction.” Yet he hardly expected anything to happen soon. And he repeatedly vowed that he never would interfere with slavery in the slave states. During his first inaugural address, delivered on March 4, 1861, Lincoln even agreed to accept a constitutional amendment that would have barred Congress from legislating against slavery. Had it been ratified by the states, the other thirteenth amendment would have been the polar opposite to the real Thirteenth Amendment—enacted four years and one war later. Daniel W. Crofts is a professor of history at The College of New Jersey. He is the author of Reluctant Confederates: Upper South Unionists in the Secession Crisis; A Secession Crisis Enigma: William Henry Hurlbert and “The Diary of a Public Man”; and Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union. (Introduction Andrew Talkov)

The Well-Dressed Hobo: The Many Wondrous Adventures of a Man Who Loves Trains by Rush Loving Jr.

Sep 16, 2016 00:55:14

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On September 8 at noon, Rush Loving Jr., delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Well-Dressed Hobo: The Many Wondrous Adventures of a Man Who Loves Trains." America’s railroads have gone through a tumultuous and dramatic era during the past eighty years, and Virginia played a key role through all of it. They were the times of strong, colorful personalities, men like Virginia’s Claytor brothers, Edward Ball, the man who controlled the DuPont Trust and every evening assembled his “likkah-hound” lieutenants for rounds of bourbon and ginger ale, and W. Thomas Rice, a Northern Neck boy like Ball, who ran the Seaboard Coast Line with the iron fist of a general. There, too, were Jack Fishwick of the Norfolk and Western and Furlong Baldwin, who grew up on a plantation near Cape Charles and used an Atlantic Coast Line office car to build a banking empire. Their stories are played on a stage filled with the drama of boardroom struggles and secret deals, all in the romantic setting of railroad locomotive cabs and the old Richmond Times-Dispatch newsroom. All this is told by a man who, from Depression days in Virginia on into the twenty-first century, watched as those dynamic men and others like them saved the nation’s railroads from ruin and then returned them to a new era of glory. A native of Virginia, Rush Loving Jr., began his career as a photo-journalist at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, and from 1965 until 1969 he was the paper’s business editor. He also served as an associate editor of Fortune, the chief spokesman of the Office of Management and Budget in the Carter White House, and for twenty years headed a consulting firm serving clients that included many of the nation’s major railroads. He is the author of The Well-Dressed Hobo: The Many Wondrous Adventures of a Man Who Loves Trains.

Last Chance for Peace: Virginia's Role in the Washington Peace Conference of 1861 by Mark Tooley

Sep 7, 2016 00:57:54

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On August 25 at noon, Mark Tooley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Last Chance for Peace: Virginia's Role in the Washington Peace Conference of 1861." After six states had already seceded, and after Virginia’s Secession Convention was already soon to convene, former President John Tyler, from his James River plantation, suggested in a January 1861 Richmond newspaper column that there be a conference of the border states to seek alternatives to disunion. The Virginia legislature expanded the invitation to all states, whose 131 delegates convened at the Willard Hotel in February for what became known as the “Old Gentlemen’s Convention,” with Tyler presiding. Other Virginia statesmen who attended included future Confederate War Secretary James Seddon and former U.S. Senator William Cabell Rives. Typically the convention is briefly dismissed as a failure, but actually it played an important role in slowing the secession crisis and facilitating Abraham Lincoln’s safe installation into the presidency. Mark Tooley is author of The Peace That Almost Was: The Forgotten Story of the 1861 Washington Peace Conference and the Final Attempt to Avert the Civil War. He is president of a Washington, D.C. thinktank and a lifelong resident of northern Virginia.

Realistic Visionary: The Presidency of George Washington

Aug 20, 2016 00:48:28

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On October 20, 2006, Peter Henriques delivered this lecture at the 2006 symposium, 'Virginians in the White House.' Peter Henriques is Professor of History, Emeritus, at George Mason University. He specializes on Virginia history with particular emphasis on Virginia and the American Revolution and the Virginia founding fathers. Henriques's most recent work is Realistic Visionary: A Portrait of George Washington (2006). (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Woodrow Wilson: The Virginia Factor

Aug 20, 2016 01:00:59

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On October 20, 2006, Mr. Berg delivered this lecture at the 2006 symposium, "Virginians in the White House." Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, A. Scott Berg is the author of best-selling books on Maxwell Perkins, Samuel Goldwyn, Charles Lindbergh, and Katharine Hepburn. He is currently writing a biography of Woodrow Wilson. Mr. Berg holds a B.A. from Princeton University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Patsy Cline and the Problem of Respectability

Aug 20, 2016 00:26:27

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On April 4, 2008, Beth Bailey delivered this lecture at the 2008 symposium, "Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline." The continuing tensions in Winchester over Patsy Cline provide the basis for Beth Bailey's lecture. She discussed Patsy Cline and respectability by looking at questions of sexuality and gender in the context of the importance of "respectability" in postwar American culture. Dr. Bailey is Professor of History at Temple University. She is author of Sex in the Heartland; she is co-editor of A History of our Time; she also wrote From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in 20th Century America and co-authored the twentieth-century chapters in A People and a Nation. (Introduction by Sandra G. Treadway, Library of Virginia) (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Cultural Worlds of Patsy Cline's Winchester

Aug 20, 2016 00:39:56

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On April 4, 2008, Mike Foreman and Warren Hofstra delivered this lecture at the 2008 symposium, "Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline." (Includes comments from oral history interviews) Mike Foreman is an adjunct assistant professor of political science at Shenandoah University and a history instructor in the School of Continuing Education. Mr. Foreman co-edited Images of the Past; he is the author of A History of the Nurses Training School, Winchester Memorial Hospital, 1903–1964; and is currently working on Some Worthy Women, featuring biographical sketches of pioneer women leaders from Winchester and Frederick County. Warren R. Hofstra is Stewart Bell Professor of History at Shenandoah University in Winchester. In addition to teaching in the fields of American social and cultural history and directing the Community History Project of Shenandoah University, he has written or edited five books on American regional history, including The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley; A Separate Place: The Formation of Clarke County, Virginia; George Washington and the Virginia Backcountry; After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800–1900; and Virginia Reconsidered: New Histories of the Old Dominion. (Introduction by Sandra G. Treadway, Library of Virginia)

Patsy Cline and a Changing South

Aug 20, 2016 00:37:15

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On April 4, 2008, Mr. Malone delivered this talk at the 2008 symposium, 'Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline.' Bill Malone is Professor of History, Emeritus, at Tulane University. He is author of Country Music, U.S.A.; Southern Music, American Music; Don't Get Above Your Raisin': Country Music and the Southern Working Class; and to be published this June, Working Girl Blues: The Life and Music of Hazel Dickens. He also produced and annotated the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Country Music. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow. He has delivered the Lamar Lecture at Mercer University, published as Singing Cowboys and Musical Mountaineers: Southern Culture and the Roots of Country Music. He has served as a joint visiting scholar at Duke and the University of North Carolina. His weekly radio show, "Back to the Country," on Madison, Wisconsin's WORT-FM has been on the air for years and has regularly garnered listeners' choice awards. In all, he continues is his role as the dean of country music scholarship, combining, in his words, "the passionate predilections of the fan . . . with the wary skepticism of the scholar." (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Backstory with the History Guys "Paying Up: The History of Taxation"

Aug 20, 2016 00:59:37

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On May 20, 2010, Internationally renowned historians and hosts Edward Ayers, Brian Balogh, and Peter Onuf present "Paying Up: The History of Taxation." From the very beginning, Americans have been arguing about whether their taxes are fair and just. The American History Guys will explored taxation's complicated and turbulent history—from the Stamp Act of 1765 to the Tea Party Movement of 2010—and discuss Americans' attitudes toward the Tax Man.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Notes from the Ground: Science, Soil, & Society in the American Countryside

Aug 20, 2016 00:43:33

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On March 16, 2012, Ben R. Cohen delivered a lecture entitled "Notes from the Ground: Science, Soil, and Society in the American Countryside." This lecture was session two of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Andrew Talkov)

Virginia and the Creation of the Shenandoah National Park

Aug 20, 2016 00:49:42

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On March 16, 2012, Sara M. Gregg delivered a lecture entitled "Managing the Mountains: Land Use Planning, the New Deal, and the Creation of the Federal Landscape in Appalachia." This lecture was session four of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Elaine Hagy)

Eco-History of the Tidewater: The Long View

Aug 20, 2016 00:50:42

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On March 16, 2012, Roy T. Sawyer delivered a lecture entitled "Eco-History of the Tidewater: The Long View." This lecture was session five of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Andrew Talkov)

Message, Money, and Management: A Roundtable Discussion on the Future of the Chesapeake Bay

Aug 20, 2016 01:15:36

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On March 16, 2012, Hon. Gerald Baliles, Ann F. Jennings, Gerald P. McCarthy, and Hon. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. participated in a roundtable discussion entitled "Message, Money, and Management: A Roundtable Discussion on the Future of the Chesapeake Bay." The roundtable discussion was session six of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

A Chat with Willie and Woody by Paul Woody and Willie Lanier

Aug 16, 2016 01:11:06

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On August 10, 2016, veteran Richmond Times-Dispatch sports columnist Paul Woody, and Hall of Famer Willie Lanier gave a Banner Lecture at the Virginia Historical Society. Virginia native Willie Lanier is known as one of professional football’s greatest defensive players of all time. A 1963 graduate of Maggie L. Walker High School, he was the first African American to play middle linebacker in professional football when he was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1967. During his ten season career with the Chiefs, he helped lead the team to victory in Super Bowl IV, won the NFL Man of the Year award in 1972, was a six time Pro Bowler, and was enshrined in the NFL Hall of Fame in 1986. Join us for a casual conversation as veteran Richmond Times-Dispatch sports columnist Paul Woody chats with Willie Lanier at the Virginia Historical Society.

The Roads from War to Reconstruction and Beyond, by Ed Ayers and Paul Levengood

Jul 21, 2016 01:02:26

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On June 22, Edward L. Ayers spoke with Paul Levengood in a Banner Lecture entitled “The Roads from War to Reconstruction and Beyond.” Reconstruction is central to American history, deeply interesting, and yet also deeply confusing. This conversation with Paul Levengood, VHS President and CEO, will attempt to unravel some of the complexities and mysteries of those years and why those years still matter today. Edward Ayers is President Emeritus of the University of Richmond, where he now serves as Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities. A historian of the American South, Ayers has written and edited ten books. The Promise of the New South: Life after Reconstruction was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In the Presence of Mine Enemies: Civil War in the Heart of America won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished writing in American history and the Beveridge Prize for the best book in English on the history of the Americas since 1492. He was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2013.

Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America by Douglas Brinkley

Jun 11, 2016 01:05:41

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On June 7 at noon, Douglas Brinkley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America.” In Rightful Heritage, acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley chronicles Franklin D. Roosevelt’s essential yet under-sung legacy as the founder of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and premier protector of America’s public lands. FDR built from scratch dozens of State Park systems and scenic roadways. Pristine landscapes such as the Great Smokies, the Everglades, Joshua Tree, the Olympics, Big Bend, Channel Islands, Mammoth Cave, and the slickrock wilderness of Utah were forever saved by his leadership. Brinkley traces FDR’s love for the natural world from his youth exploring the Hudson River Valley and bird watching. As America’s president from 1933 to 1945, Roosevelt—consummate political strategist—established hundreds of federal migratory bird refuges and spearheaded the modern endangered species movement. Rightful Heritage is an epic chronicle that is both an irresistible portrait of FDR’s unrivaled passion and drive, and an indispensable analysis that skillfully illuminates the tension between business and nature—exploiting our natural resources and conserving them. Rightful Heritage is essential reading for everyone seeking to preserve our treasured landscapes as an American birthright. Douglas Brinkley is a professor of history at Rice University, bestselling and award-winning author, and presidential historian for CNN. He serves as a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, The New Yorker, and The Atlantic Monthly. He is the author of numerous books—many of which have been bestsellers and New York Times Notable Books of the Year—including The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast (2006), The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America (2009), The Quiet World: Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom, 1879–1960 (2011), Cronkite (2012), and his newest bestselling book, Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America (2016).

First Dads: Parenting and Politics from George Washington to Barack Obama by Joshua Kendall

Jun 11, 2016 00:56:46

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On June 2 at noon, Joshua Kendall delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "First Dads: Parenting and Politics from George Washington to Barack Obama." Every president has had some experience as a parent. Of the forty-three men who have served in the nation's highest office, thirty-eight have fathered biological children and the other five adopted children. Each president’s parenting style reveals much about his beliefs as well as his psychological make-up. James Garfield enjoyed jumping on the bed with his kids. FDR's children, on the other hand, had to make appointments to talk to him. Biographer Joshua Kendall will both describe the parenting practices of America's presidents and discuss how their experiences as fathers forever changed the course of American history. Joshua Kendall is author of several books, including The Man Who Made Lists, a life of the lexicographer Peter Mark Roget; America's Obsessives: The Compulsive Energy That Built a Nation, a group biography of seven icons, including Thomas Jefferson, Charles Lindbergh and Estee Lauder; and, most recently, First Dads: Parenting and Politics from George Washington to Barack Obama. An award-winning freelance journalist, he has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, The LA Times, The Boston Globe, Psychology Today and BusinessWeek.

The Civil War's Most Valuable Diarist by James I. Robertson, Jr.

Jun 3, 2016 00:56:31

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On Friday, April 29, James I. Robertson, Jr., delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Civil War's Most Valuable Diarist." At the Confederate States CapitalMaryland-born John Beauchamp Jones was an established editor and novelist when civil war began. He was one of the few people who envisioned the struggle as the large-scale, all-consuming war it became. In May, 1861, he accepted a high-ranking clerkship in the Confederate War Department. For the next four years he kept a meticulous, day-by-day journal. Nothing escaped Jones's eyes and ears. Verbal descriptions of individuals, confidential reports, personal opinions, rumors, weather, inflation, newspaper articles, life inside the bloated Confederate capital—all received attention. A Rebel War Clerk's Diary appeared posthumously in 1866. This mass of information has remained only partially used because of the absences of identification of persons and events, as well as lack of an index. James I. Robertson, Jr., has edited a new edition of the diary, which includes a long introduction, 2,700 endnotes, and an index containing references to individuals and subjects. Dr. James I. "Bud" Robertson, Jr., a noted scholar on the American Civil War, is Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Virginia Tech and former executive director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies. He also served as executive director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and as a member of the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission. Robertson is the author and editor of numerous books, including The Stonewall Brigade, General A. P. Hill, Soldiers, Blue and Gray, Civil War! America Becomes One Nation, Stonewall Jackson: The Man, The Soldier, The Legend, and A Rebel War Clerk's Diary: At the Confederate States Capital. This lecture is cosponsored with The Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair and the Virginia Antiquarian Bookseller's Association (VABA).

The Civil War's Most Valuable Diarist by James I. Robertson, Jr.

May 4, 2016 00:56:31

Description:

On Friday, April 29, James I. Robertson, Jr., delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Civil War's Most Valuable Diarist." Maryland-born John Beauchamp Jones was an established editor and novelist when civil war began. He was one of the few people who envisioned the struggle as the large-scale, all-consuming war it became. In May, 1861, he accepted a high-ranking clerkship in the Confederate War Department. For the next four years he kept a meticulous, day-by-day journal. Nothing escaped Jones's eyes and ears. Verbal descriptions of individuals, confidential reports, personal opinions, rumors, weather, inflation, newspaper articles, life inside the bloated Confederate capital—all received attention. A Rebel War Clerk's Diary appeared posthumously in 1866. This mass of information has remained only partially used because of the absences of identification of persons and events, as well as lack of an index. James I. Robertson, Jr., has edited a new edition of the diary, which includes a long introduction, 2,700 endnotes, and an index containing references to individuals and subjects. Dr. James I. "Bud" Robertson, Jr., a noted scholar on the American Civil War, is Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Virginia Tech and former executive director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies. He also served as executive director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and as a member of the Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission. Robertson is the author and editor of numerous books, including The Stonewall Brigade, General A. P. Hill, Soldiers, Blue and Gray, Civil War! America Becomes One Nation, Stonewall Jackson: The Man, The Soldier, The Legend, and A Rebel War Clerk's Diary: At the Confederate States Capital. This lecture is cosponsored with The Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair and the Virginia Antiquarian Bookseller's Association (VABA).

Thunder and Flames: American Doughboys at War, 1917–1918 by Edward G. Lengel

Apr 16, 2016 00:56:40

Description:

On April 7 at noon, Edward G. Lengel delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Thunder and Flames: American Doughboys at War, 1917–1918." In November 1917, American troops were poorly trained, deficient in military equipment and doctrine, not remotely ready for armed conflict on a large scale—and they'd arrived on the Western front to help the French push back the Germans. Edward G. Lengel tells the story of what followed: the American Expeditionary Forces' trial by fire on the brutal battlefields of France at places like Cantigny, Chateau Thierry, Belleau Wood, the Marne River, Soissons, and little-known Fismette. The picture that emerges is sweeping in scope and rich in detail, with firsthand testimony conjuring the real mud and blood of combat from the perspective of the Germans as well as the Americans and French. Lengel shows how, by trial and error, through luck and ingenuity, the AEF swiftly became the independent fighting force of Gen. John "Blackjack" Pershing's long-held dream—its divisions ultimately among the most combat-effective military forces to see the war through. Edward G. Lengel is professor and director of the Papers of George Washington project at the University of Virginia. He is the author of General George Washington: A Military Life (2005), To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Epic Battle That Ended the First World War (2008), Inventing George Washington: America's Founder, in Myth and Memory (2011), and Thunder and Flames: Americans in the Crucible of Combat, 1917–1918 (2015).

Thunder and Flames: American Doughboys at War, 1917–1918 by Edward G. Lengel

Apr 15, 2016 00:56:40

Description:

On April 7 at noon, Edward G. Lengel delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Thunder and Flames: American Doughboys at War, 1917–1918." In November 1917, American troops were poorly trained, deficient in military equipment and doctrine, not remotely ready for armed conflict on a large scale—and they'd arrived on the Western front to help the French push back the Germans. Edward G. Lengel tells the story of what followed: the American Expeditionary Forces' trial by fire on the brutal battlefields of France at places like Cantigny, Chateau Thierry, Belleau Wood, the Marne River, Soissons, and little-known Fismette. The picture that emerges is sweeping in scope and rich in detail, with firsthand testimony conjuring the real mud and blood of combat from the perspective of the Germans as well as the Americans and French. Lengel shows how, by trial and error, through luck and ingenuity, the AEF swiftly became the independent fighting force of Gen. John "Blackjack" Pershing's long-held dream—its divisions ultimately among the most combat-effective military forces to see the war through. Edward G. Lengel is professor and director of the Papers of George Washington project at the University of Virginia. He is the author of General George Washington: A Military Life (2005), To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Epic Battle That Ended the First World War (2008), Inventing George Washington: America's Founder, in Myth and Memory (2011), and Thunder and Flames: Americans in the Crucible of Combat, 1917–1918 (2015).

2016 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., The Bedford Boys, by Alex Kershaw

Apr 15, 2016 01:04:47

Description:

On March 24 and noon, Bruce M. Venter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Kill Jeff Davis: The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid on Richmond in 1864." The ostensible goal of the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid was to free some 13,000 Union POWs held in Richmond. But sinister orders found on the dead body of the raid’s subordinate commander, Col. Ulric Dahlgren, pointed to a plot to capture or kill Confederate president Jefferson Davis and set the capital ablaze. Bruce Venter’s new book delves into these areas and more as he describes the political maneuvering orchestrated by Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick to get the raid approved by President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. Included is a new look at the authorship of the infamous “Dahlgren Papers.” Fresh evidence on the identity of the African American guide, hanged by Dahlgren, is also revealed. And new research shows that Richmond was not defended by only “old men and young boys” when Kilpatrick and Dahlgren attacked the city. In the end, various myths and legends surrounding the raid are exposed and put to rest.

2016 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., The Bedford Boys, by Alex Kershaw

Apr 15, 2016 01:07:37

Description:

On March 17 at 5:30 p.m., Alex Kershaw delivered the 2016 Stuart G. Christian, Jr. Lecture entitled “The Bedford Boys.” June 6, 1944: nineteen boys from rural Bedford, Virginia, died in the first bloody minutes of D-Day. They were part of Company A of the 116th Regiment of the 29th Division, and among the first wave of American soldiers to hit the beaches at Normandy. Later in the campaign, three more boys from this small Virginia community died of gunshot wounds. Twenty-two sons of Bedford lost—it is a story one cannot easily forget and one that the families of Bedford will never forget. Alex Kershaw will tell the true and intimate story of these men and the friends and families they left behind—the story of one small American town that went to war and died on Omaha Beach. Alex Kershaw, an honorary colonel in the 116th Infantry Regiment of the 29th Division, is the widely acclaimed author of several bestselling books about World War II, including The Bedford Boys: One American Town's Ultimate D-Day Sacrifice, The Longest Winter: The Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War II's Most Decorated Platoon, The Few: The American “Knights of the Air” Who Risked Everything to Save Britain in the Summer of 1940, and The Liberator: One World War II Soldier's 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. His latest book is Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris.

Matthew Fontaine Maury: The Last Crusade, by John Grady

Apr 15, 2016 01:05:11

Description:

On January 21 at noon, John Grady delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Matthew Fontaine Maury: The Last Crusade.” When Matthew Fontaine Maury was commissioned as a midshipman, he boldly wrote: “Citizen of Virginia” in accepting his warrant. Although he was born in the commonwealth, his family, like thousands of others, fled to Tennessee to start over, free of debt. He rediscovered his Virginia roots and family when he came eastward to await his first orders. Maury always returned to Virginia when awaiting new orders or needed the warmth of family and old friends. At no time did the most popular American scientist of his time show his loyalty more than when he served on the Governor’s Advisory Council, a de facto War and Navy Department, following secession. What is less well known is his critical role in rebuilding the state following the Civil War. The ambitious “Physical Survey of Virginia” from the Virginia Military Institute was an investor’s guide to opportunity. There were new struggles and controversies over what role, if any, Confederate office holders and military officers would play in the state’s public life, how the races would coexist, which institution would be the “land grant college,” and the need for a National Weather Service. That became Maury’s last crusade. John Grady, a managing editor of Navy Times for more than eight years and retired communications director of the Association of the United States Army, is a contributer to the New York Times “Disunion” series and Civil War Monitor and a blogger for the navy’s Sesquicentennial of the Civil War website. He continues writing on national security and defense. He is the author of Matthew Fontaine Maury, Father of Oceanography: A Biography, 1806–1873

George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation, by T.H. Breen

Apr 15, 2016 01:00:55

Description:

On January 19 at 5:30 p.m., T. H. Breen delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation.” T. H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we rarely meet. By nature shy and reserved, the brand new president decided that he would visit the new citizens in their own states, that only by showing himself could he make them feel part of a new nation. Washington made four grueling trips to all thirteen states. He displayed himself as victorious general (he wore his regal uniform and rode his white stallion) and as president (grand dinners, military parades, arcs of triumph, and balls—he liked to dance). He traveled by open carriage on terrible roads, in awful weather, staying and eating at lousy inns (he would not stay with wealthy would-be hosts). Washington drew on his immense popularity, even hero worship, to send a powerful and lasting message—that America was now a nation, not a collection of states. It was an enormous success. He drew the country to him. Breen takes us on Washington’s journeys. We see the country through his eyes and listen through his ears. We come to understand why George Washington is the indispensable Founding Father. He forged a new nation. Timothy H. Breen is the William Smith Mason Professor of American History Emeritus at Northwestern University. Breen received his Ph.D. in history from Yale University. He also holds an honorary MA from Oxford University. Breen is the respected author of eleven books, including Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of Revolution (1985), American Insurgents—American Patriots: The Revolution of the People (2010), and George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation (2015). This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

Kill Jeff Davis: The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid on Richmond in 1864 by Bruce M. Venter

Mar 26, 2016 01:04:47

Description:

On March 24 and noon, Bruce M. Venter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Kill Jeff Davis: The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid on Richmond in 1864." The ostensible goal of the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid was to free some 13,000 Union POWs held in Richmond. But sinister orders found on the dead body of the raid’s subordinate commander, Col. Ulric Dahlgren, pointed to a plot to capture or kill Confederate president Jefferson Davis and set the capital ablaze. Bruce Venter’s new book delves into these areas and more as he describes the political maneuvering orchestrated by Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick to get the raid approved by President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. Included is a new look at the authorship of the infamous “Dahlgren Papers.” Fresh evidence on the identity of the African American guide, hanged by Dahlgren, is also revealed. And new research shows that Richmond was not defended by only “old men and young boys” when Kilpatrick and Dahlgren attacked the city. In the end, various myths and legends surrounding the raid are exposed and put to rest.

2016 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., “The Bedford Boys,” by Alex Kershaw

Mar 24, 2016 01:07:37

Description:

On March 17 at 5:30 p.m., Alex Kershaw delivered the 2016 Stuart G. Christian, Jr. Lecture entitled “The Bedford Boys.” June 6, 1944: nineteen boys from rural Bedford, Virginia, died in the first bloody minutes of D-Day. They were part of Company A of the 116th Regiment of the 29th Division, and among the first wave of American soldiers to hit the beaches at Normandy. Later in the campaign, three more boys from this small Virginia community died of gunshot wounds. Twenty-two sons of Bedford lost—it is a story one cannot easily forget and one that the families of Bedford will never forget. Alex Kershaw will tell the true and intimate story of these men and the friends and families they left behind—the story of one small American town that went to war and died on Omaha Beach. Alex Kershaw, an honorary colonel in the 116th Infantry Regiment of the 29th Division, is the widely acclaimed author of several bestselling books about World War II, including The Bedford Boys: One American Town's Ultimate D-Day Sacrifice, The Longest Winter: The Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War II's Most Decorated Platoon, The Few: The American “Knights of the Air” Who Risked Everything to Save Britain in the Summer of 1940, and The Liberator: One World War II Soldier's 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau. His latest book is Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris.

Richmond and the American Dream: Revolution and Reality by Benjamin P. Campbell

Feb 13, 2016 00:57:23

Description:

On February 4 at noon, the Rev. Benjamin P. Campbell delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Richmond and the American Dream: Revolution and Reality.” The dream that is particularly American is not the European dream for America, lived out in the first two centuries of European settlement, but rather, the dream that emerges at the time of the American Revolution. The full articulation of that dream coincides with the birth of Richmond as the capital city of Virginia. Richmond became capital of commonwealth in the midst of the Revolution. In May 1780, the legislature met in Richmond for the first time. In 1782, the city was incorporated within Henrico County. Over the next twenty-five years, the population of the capital city grew tenfold, from 600 persons to 6,000. Thus, in many ways, Richmond is a child-city of the Revolution. The subsequent 235 years of Richmond’s history represent a textbook in the dramatic, unresolved issues, which the American Revolution presented. This lecture will look at the American Dream of Revolution, its dark underside, its achievements, and at its unparalleled potential still to be realized in Richmond’s most decisive decade. The Rev. Benjamin P. Campbell studied political science and political economy at Williams College in Massachusetts, and studied theology as a Rhodes Scholar at the Queen’s College in Oxford. He received a Master’s in Divinity and an honorary Doctorate in Divinity from the Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria. He was ordained to the priesthood of the Episcopal Church in 1966. In 1987, he became Pastoral Director of Richmond Hill, an ecumenical Christian community and retreat center on Church Hill in Richmond. He is the author of Richmond's Unhealed History.

"From Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers" by Dr. Paul Levengood

Feb 11, 2016 00:43:02

Description:

On July 24, 2008, Dr. Paul Levengood gave a banner Lecture entitled "From Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers"

"Moses Ezekiel: Civil War Soldier, Renowned Sculptor" by: Keith Gibson

Feb 9, 2016 00:47:52

Description:

On July 12, 2008, Keith Gibson gave a Banner Lecture entitled "Moses Ezekiel: Civil War Soldier, Renowned Sculptor"

"Twilight at Monticello: The final Years of Thomas Jefferson

Feb 4, 2016 00:55:56

Description:

On May 29,2008 Alan Crawford gave a Banner Lecture entitled "Twlight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson

"Lincoln: President Elect" by Harold Holzer

Feb 3, 2016 00:57:00

Description:

On December 4,2008 Harold Holzer gave a banner lecture entitled "Lincoln: President Elect".

“Matthew Fontaine Maury: The Last Crusade,” by John Grady

Feb 2, 2016 01:05:11

Description:

On January 21 at noon, John Grady delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Matthew Fontaine Maury: The Last Crusade.” When Matthew Fontaine Maury was commissioned as a midshipman, he boldly wrote: “Citizen of Virginia” in accepting his warrant. Although he was born in the commonwealth, his family, like thousands of others, fled to Tennessee to start over, free of debt. He rediscovered his Virginia roots and family when he came eastward to await his first orders. Maury always returned to Virginia when awaiting new orders or needed the warmth of family and old friends. At no time did the most popular American scientist of his time show his loyalty more than when he served on the Governor’s Advisory Council, a de facto War and Navy Department, following secession. What is less well known is his critical role in rebuilding the state following the Civil War. The ambitious “Physical Survey of Virginia” from the Virginia Military Institute was an investor’s guide to opportunity. There were new struggles and controversies over what role, if any, Confederate office holders and military officers would play in the state’s public life, how the races would coexist, which institution would be the “land grant college,” and the need for a National Weather Service. That became Maury’s last crusade. John Grady, a managing editor of Navy Times for more than eight years and retired communications director of the Association of the United States Army, is a contributer to the New York Times “Disunion” series and Civil War Monitor and a blogger for the navy’s Sesquicentennial of the Civil War website. He continues writing on national security and defense. He is the author of Matthew Fontaine Maury, Father of Oceanography: A Biography, 1806–1873

“George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation,” by T.H. Breen

Feb 2, 2016 00:57:50

Description:

On January 19 at 5:30 p.m., T. H. Breen delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation.” T. H. Breen introduces us to a George Washington we rarely meet. By nature shy and reserved, the brand new president decided that he would visit the new citizens in their own states, that only by showing himself could he make them feel part of a new nation. Washington made four grueling trips to all thirteen states. He displayed himself as victorious general (he wore his regal uniform and rode his white stallion) and as president (grand dinners, military parades, arcs of triumph, and balls—he liked to dance). He traveled by open carriage on terrible roads, in awful weather, staying and eating at lousy inns (he would not stay with wealthy would-be hosts). Washington drew on his immense popularity, even hero worship, to send a powerful and lasting message—that America was now a nation, not a collection of states. It was an enormous success. He drew the country to him. Breen takes us on Washington’s journeys. We see the country through his eyes and listen through his ears. We come to understand why George Washington is the indispensable Founding Father. He forged a new nation. Timothy H. Breen is the William Smith Mason Professor of American History Emeritus at Northwestern University. Breen received his Ph.D. in history from Yale University. He also holds an honorary MA from Oxford University. Breen is the respected author of eleven books, including Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of Revolution (1985), American Insurgents—American Patriots: The Revolution of the People (2010), and George Washington’s Journey: The President Forges a New Nation (2015). This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

The Cherokee Diaspora: A History of Migration, Survival, and Pride by Gregory D. Smithers

Dec 9, 2015 01:00:55

Description:

On December 3 at noon, Gregory D. Smithers delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Cherokee Diaspora: A History of Migration, Survival, and Pride." According to the U.S. Census, almost one million Americans self-identify as Cherokees. Wherever one travels in the United States, someone is likely to lay claim to a Cherokee ancestor somewhere in their family tree. In fact, travel as far afield as Scotland, Hawaii, or even Australia, and chances are you will meet someone who insists that they are descended from Cherokee forebears. How can so many people, scattered all over the world, claim to be Cherokee? Historian Gregory D. Smithers addresses this question in his new book, The Cherokee Diaspora. He reveals for the first time the origins of the Cherokee Diaspora. Smithers takes the reader back to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to uncover the importance of migration and removal, land and tradition, and culture and language in defining what it meant to be Cherokee while living in diaspora. The story of the Cherokee Diaspora is a remarkable tale of bravery, innovation, and resilience. Gregory Smithers, an associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University, specializes in Native American history. He is the author of The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity.

The Cherokee Diaspora: A History of Migration, Survival, and Pride by Gregory D. Smithers

Dec 5, 2015 01:00:55

Description:

On December 3 at noon, Gregory D. Smithers delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Cherokee Diaspora: A History of Migration, Survival, and Pride." According to the U.S. Census, almost one million Americans self-identify as Cherokees. Wherever one travels in the United States, someone is likely to lay claim to a Cherokee ancestor somewhere in their family tree. In fact, travel as far afield as Scotland, Hawaii, or even Australia, and chances are you will meet someone who insists that they are descended from Cherokee forebears. How can so many people, scattered all over the world, claim to be Cherokee? Historian Gregory D. Smithers addresses this question in his new book, The Cherokee Diaspora. He reveals for the first time the origins of the Cherokee Diaspora. Smithers takes the reader back to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to uncover the importance of migration and removal, land and tradition, and culture and language in defining what it meant to be Cherokee while living in diaspora. The story of the Cherokee Diaspora is a remarkable tale of bravery, innovation, and resilience. Gregory Smithers, an associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University, specializes in Native American history. He is the author of The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity.

Champion of War, Champion of Peace: The Leadership of George C. Marshall by Gerald M. Pops

Dec 2, 2015 00:59:37

Description:

On November 19 at noon, Gerald M. Pops will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Champion of War, Champion of Peace: The Leadership of George C. Marshall." George Catlett Marshall, recognized early on as the U.S. Army’s most capable leader, overcame a number of obstacles to become Army Chief of Staff on the very day World War II began. He served as the de facto leader of America’s military until the end of the war and then went on to serve in China as President Truman’s ambassador and then as secretary of state, president of the American Red Cross, and secretary of defense. As the father of the European Recovery Act (appropriately labeled by Truman as the “Marshall Plan”), Marshall is credited with jump-starting western Europe’s postwar economic and political recovery and laying the foundation for long-term European-American relations. For this he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. This lecture will focus primarily on his extraordinary leadership between September 1939 and December 1941 in preparing America for war. Gerald M. Pops is emeritus professor of public administration at West Virginia University. He is the author of several books, including Ethical Leadership in Turbulent Times: Modeling the Public Career of George C. Marshall.

Weird-but-True Things Most People Don't Know about the Roaring Twenties by Mary Miley Theobald

Dec 2, 2015 00:52:22

Description:

On November 14 at 2 p.m., Mary Miley Theobald delivered a lecture entitled "Weird-but-True Things Most People Don't Know about the Roaring Twenties." Mary Miley Theobald thinks the Roaring Twenties is the most fascinating decade in American history. In this lecture, she touches on some of the surprising things she learned about vaudeville, prohibition, silent movies, and fashion while doing background research for her mystery series. Mary Miley Theobald is the author of several works of nonfiction, including Death by Petticoat: American History Myths Debunked and First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families, and an award-winning mystery series set in the Roaring Twenties. Her novels include The Impersonator and Silent Murders.

Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession, and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War by Larry Denton

Dec 2, 2015 01:04:10

Description:

On October 29 at noon, Larry Denton will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession, and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War." Whether the Civil War was preventable is a debate that began shortly after Appomattox and continues today. But even earlier, in 1861, a group of Union-loyal Virginians—led by George Summers, John Brown Baldwin, John Janney, and Jubal Early—felt war was avoidable. In the statewide election for delegates to the Secession Convention that same spring, the Unionists defeated the Southern Rights Democrats with a huge majority of the votes across the state. These men unsuccessfully negotiated with Sec. of State William Henry Seward to prevent the national tragedy that would ensue. Author and historian Larry Denton traces this remarkable story of the Virginians who worked against all odds in a failed attempt to save a nation from going to war. Denton is the author of A Southern Star for Maryland: Maryland and the Secession Crisis; William Henry Seward and the Secession Crisis: The Effort to Prevent Civil War; and Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War. He lectures widely throughout the mid-Atlantic. Now retired, he lives with his wife, Susan, near Oxford on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Champion of War, Champion of Peace: The Leadership of George C. Marshall by Gerald M. Pops

Nov 25, 2015 00:59:37

Description:

On November 19 at noon, Gerald M. Pops will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Champion of War, Champion of Peace: The Leadership of George C. Marshall." George C. MarshallMore informationGeorge Catlett Marshall, recognized early on as the U.S. Army’s most capable leader, overcame a number of obstacles to become Army Chief of Staff on the very day World War II began. He served as the de facto leader of America’s military until the end of the war and then went on to serve in China as President Truman’s ambassador and then as secretary of state, president of the American Red Cross, and secretary of defense. As the father of the European Recovery Act (appropriately labeled by Truman as the “Marshall Plan”), Marshall is credited with jump-starting western Europe’s postwar economic and political recovery and laying the foundation for long-term European-American relations. For this he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. This lecture will focus primarily on his extraordinary leadership between September 1939 and December 1941 in preparing America for war. Gerald M. Pops is emeritus professor of public administration at West Virginia University. He is the author of several books, including Ethical Leadership in Turbulent Times: Modeling the Public Career of George C. Marshall.

Weird-but-True Things Most People Don't Know about the Roaring Twenties by Mary Miley Theobald

Nov 24, 2015 00:52:22

Description:

On November 14 at 2 p.m., Mary Miley Theobald delivered a lecture entitled "Weird-but-True Things Most People Don't Know about the Roaring Twenties." Mary Miley Theobald thinks the Roaring Twenties is the most fascinating decade in American history. In this lecture, she touches on some of the surprising things she learned about vaudeville, prohibition, silent movies, and fashion while doing background research for her mystery series. Mary Miley Theobald is the author of several works of nonfiction, including Death by Petticoat: American History Myths Debunked and First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families, and an award-winning mystery series set in the Roaring Twenties. Her novels include The Impersonator and Silent Murders.

Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession, and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War by Larry Denton

Oct 31, 2015 01:04:10

Description:

On October 29 at noon, Larry Denton will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession, and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War." Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession, and Their Plan to Prevent Civil WarWhether the Civil War was preventable is a debate that began shortly after Appomattox and continues today. But even earlier, in 1861, a group of Union-loyal Virginians—led by George Summers, John Brown Baldwin, John Janney, and Jubal Early—felt war was avoidable. In the statewide election for delegates to the Secession Convention that same spring, the Unionists defeated the Southern Rights Democrats with a huge majority of the votes across the state. These men unsuccessfully negotiated with Sec. of State William Henry Seward to prevent the national tragedy that would ensue. Author and historian Larry Denton traces this remarkable story of the Virginians who worked against all odds in a failed attempt to save a nation from going to war. Denton is the author of A Southern Star for Maryland: Maryland and the Secession Crisis; William Henry Seward and the Secession Crisis: The Effort to Prevent Civil War; and Unionists in Virginia: Politics, Secession and Their Plan to Prevent Civil War. He lectures widely throughout the mid-Atlantic. Now retired, he lives with his wife, Susan, near Oxford on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

God’s Acre: Why African American Cemeteries Matter by Lynn Rainville

Oct 9, 2015 00:59:37

Description:

On October 8 at noon, Lynn Rainville delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “God’s Acre: Why African American Cemeteries Matter.” In Hidden History, Lynn Rainville travels through the forgotten African American cemeteries of central Virginia to recover information crucial to the stories of the black families who lived and worked there for more than two hundred years. The subjects of Rainville’s research are not statesmen or plantation elites; they are hidden residents, people who are typically underrepresented in historical research but whose stories are essential for a complete understanding of our national past. Rainville studied above-ground funerary remains in more than 150 historic African American cemeteries in Virginia to provide an overview of mortuary and funerary practices from the late eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth. Combining historical, anthropological, and archaeological perspectives, she analyzes documents—such as wills, obituaries, and letters—as well as gravestones and graveside offerings. Rainville’s findings shed light on family genealogies, the rise and fall of segregation, and attitudes toward religion and death. As many of these cemeteries are either endangered or already destroyed, the book and this talk will include a discussion about the challenges of preservation and how Virginians may visit, and help preserve, these valuable cultural assets. Lynn Rainville is a research professor in the humanities and the founding director of the Tusculum Institute for local history, located at Sweet Briar College. Her most recent book is Hidden History: African American Cemeteries in Central Virginia.

God’s Acre: Why African American Cemeteries Matter by Lynn Rainville

Oct 8, 2015 00:59:37

Description:

On October 8 at noon, Lynn Rainville delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “God’s Acre: Why African American Cemeteries Matter.” In Hidden History, Lynn Rainville travels through the forgotten African American cemeteries of central Virginia to recover information crucial to the stories of the black families who lived and worked there for more than two hundred years. The subjects of Rainville’s research are not statesmen or plantation elites; they are hidden residents, people who are typically underrepresented in historical research but whose stories are essential for a complete understanding of our national past. Rainville studied above-ground funerary remains in more than 150 historic African American cemeteries in Virginia to provide an overview of mortuary and funerary practices from the late eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth. Combining historical, anthropological, and archaeological perspectives, she analyzes documents—such as wills, obituaries, and letters—as well as gravestones and graveside offerings. Rainville’s findings shed light on family genealogies, the rise and fall of segregation, and attitudes toward religion and death. As many of these cemeteries are either endangered or already destroyed, the book and this talk will include a discussion about the challenges of preservation and how Virginians may visit, and help preserve, these valuable cultural assets. Lynn Rainville is a research professor in the humanities and the founding director of the Tusculum Institute for local history, located at Sweet Briar College. Her most recent book is Hidden History: African American Cemeteries in Central Virginia

Magna Carta: 800 Years since Runnymede by A. E. Dick Howard

Sep 21, 2015 01:01:54

Description:

On September 9 at noon, A. E. Dick Howard will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Magna Carta: 800 Years since Runnymede." A. E. Dick HowardIn 2015 people on both sides of the Atlantic will mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. On June 15, 1215, at Runnymede, a reluctant King John agreed to the barons' terms in a document which came to be known as Magna Carta. Though the king never meant to keep his promises, Magna Carta survived. Down through the centuries, it has been a symbol of opposition to arbitrary government. Magna Carta came to America with the English colonies' first charters. In the years leading up to the Revolution, Americans framed their arguments against British policies by drawing upon the language of the early charters and upon Magna Carta as their birthright. Having declared independence, Americans turned to writing and implementing state constitutions and, ultimately, a Federal Constitution. Magna Carta left an indelible mark on these developments. At the core of this legacy is the rule of law—the thesis that no one, including those in government, is above the law. Another principle traceable to the Great Charter is constitutional supremacy—the idea of a superstatute against which ordinary laws are to be measured. Constitutional provisions guaranteeing due process of law derive directly from Magna Carta's assurance of proceedings according to the "law of the land." And the uses successive generations, in England and America, have made of the Charter have given us the idea of an organic, evolving Constitution, one that can be adapted to the needs and challenges of our own time. A. E. Dick Howard is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. A Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, he was a law clerk to Justice Hugo L. Black of the Supreme Court of the United States. A member of High Table at Christ Church, Oxford, Professor Howard has written extensively on constitutional law and history, including The Road from Runnymede: Magna Carta and Constitutionalism in America. Recently the University of Virginia conferred on him its Thomas Jefferson Award—the highest honor the University accords a member of the faculty

William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve by Barclay Rives

Sep 21, 2015 00:58:08

Description:

On September 3 at noon, Barclay Rives delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve." Defying the president and Democratic Party leaders in an 1838 Senate speech, William Cabell Rives declared, “I can never forget that I have a country to serve as well as a party to obey.” His career of public service began under the tutelage of his neighbors, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, and extended beyond the Civil War he struggled to prevent. Rives was the third president of the Virginia Historical Society (1847–68), biographer of Madison, and editor of a four volume edition of Madison’s papers. Barclay Rives will discuss highlights of the life of this Virginia statesman, historian, and agriculturalist. Barclay Rives has published articles and stories in Virginia Sportsman, In & Around Horse Country, Albemarle Magazine, and other periodicals. He is the author of A History of Grace Church, The 100 Year History of the Keswick Hunt Club, William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve, and See You at Second Horses.

Magna Carta: 800 Years since Runnymede by A. E. Dick Howard

Sep 12, 2015 01:01:54

Description:

On September 9 at noon, A. E. Dick Howard will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Magna Carta: 800 Years since Runnymede." A. E. Dick HowardIn 2015 people on both sides of the Atlantic will mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. On June 15, 1215, at Runnymede, a reluctant King John agreed to the barons' terms in a document which came to be known as Magna Carta. Though the king never meant to keep his promises, Magna Carta survived. Down through the centuries, it has been a symbol of opposition to arbitrary government. Magna Carta came to America with the English colonies' first charters. In the years leading up to the Revolution, Americans framed their arguments against British policies by drawing upon the language of the early charters and upon Magna Carta as their birthright. Having declared independence, Americans turned to writing and implementing state constitutions and, ultimately, a Federal Constitution. Magna Carta left an indelible mark on these developments. At the core of this legacy is the rule of law—the thesis that no one, including those in government, is above the law. Another principle traceable to the Great Charter is constitutional supremacy—the idea of a superstatute against which ordinary laws are to be measured. Constitutional provisions guaranteeing due process of law derive directly from Magna Carta's assurance of proceedings according to the "law of the land." And the uses successive generations, in England and America, have made of the Charter have given us the idea of an organic, evolving Constitution, one that can be adapted to the needs and challenges of our own time. A. E. Dick Howard is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. A Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, he was a law clerk to Justice Hugo L. Black of the Supreme Court of the United States. A member of High Table at Christ Church, Oxford, Professor Howard has written extensively on constitutional law and history, including The Road from Runnymede: Magna Carta and Constitutionalism in America. Recently the University of Virginia conferred on him its Thomas Jefferson Award—the highest honor the University accords a member of the faculty.

William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve by Barclay Rives

Sep 11, 2015 00:58:08

Description:

On September 3 at noon, Barclay Rives delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve.” Defying the president and Democratic Party leaders in an 1838 Senate speech, William Cabell Rives declared, “I can never forget that I have a country to serve as well as a party to obey.” His career of public service began under the tutelage of his neighbors, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, and extended beyond the Civil War he struggled to prevent. Rives was the third president of the Virginia Historical Society (1847–68), biographer of Madison, and editor of a four volume edition of Madison’s papers. Barclay Rives will discuss highlights of the life of this Virginia statesman, historian, and agriculturalist. Barclay Rives has published articles and stories in Virginia Sportsman, In & Around Horse Country, Albemarle Magazine, and other periodicals. He is the author of A History of Grace Church, The 100 Year History of the Keswick Hunt Club, William Cabell Rives: A Country to Serve, and See You at Second Horses.

She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer by Diane Kiesel

Aug 31, 2015 01:01:58

Description:

On August 20 at noon, Diane Kiesel delivered Banner Lecture entitled "She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer." At a time when blacks faced Jim Crow segregation, menial employment opportunities, and lynch mobs, Dorothy Ferebee, a native of Norfolk, was sought after to advise presidents and Congress on civil rights matters and to assist foreign governments on public health issues. She ran one of the nation’s most influential civil rights’ organizations—the National Council of Negro Women—during the nascent racial equality movement and led one of history’s most famous public health efforts—the Mississippi Health Project—in the Deep South during the Great Depression. Dr. Ferebee was a household name in black America for forty years. In her day, she was the media darling of the then thriving African American press. Ironically, her fame faded and her relevance waned as blacks achieved the professional and political power for which she so vigorously fought. This is the first full-scale biography of this significant but relatively unknown black leader. Judge Diane Kiesel—a former reporter in the Washington, D.C., bureau of Copley Newspapers; prosecutor in the Office of the New York County District Attorney; and adjunct professor of law at New York Law School—is currently an Acting Supreme Court Justice on the New York state trial court. She is the author of Domestic Violence: Law, Policy, and Practice and She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer by Diane KieselAt a time when blacks faced Jim Crow segregation, menial employment opportunities, and lynch mobs, Dorothy Ferebee, a native of Norfolk, was sought after to advise presidents and Congress on civil rights matters and to assist foreign governments on public health issues. She ran one of the nation’s most influential civil rights’ organizations—the National Council of Negro Women—during the nascent racial equality movement and led one of history’s most famous public health efforts—the Mississippi Health Project—in the Deep South during the Great Depression. Dr. Ferebee was a household name in black America for forty years. In her day, she was the media darling of the then thriving African American press. Ironically, her fame faded and her relevance waned as blacks achieved the professional and political power for which she so vigorously fought. This is the first full-scale biography of this significant but relatively unknown black leader. Judge Diane Kiesel—a former reporter in the Washington, D.C., bureau of Copley Newspapers; prosecutor in the Office of the New York County District Attorney; and adjunct professor of law at New York Law School—is currently an Acting Supreme Court Justice on the New York state trial court. She is the author of Domestic Violence: Law, Policy, and Practice and She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer.

The Quest for Loving: Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry by Peter Wallenstein

Aug 31, 2015 01:11:53

Description:

On August 6 at noon, Peter Wallenstein delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Quest for Loving: Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry." Mildred Jeter was not a white woman. Richard Loving, all agreed, was a white man. So Virginia state law not only rendered their 1958 marriage illegal but also required a penalty for it of at least a year in prison. Circuit Court Judge Leon F. Bazile chose, though, to suspend their prison sentences if they agreed to leave the state. After a few years of exile, the Lovings sought legal assistance to let them return home, and this they obtained from Bernard S. Cohen and Philip J. Hirschkop. The court appeal elicited from the judge a declaration that “Almighty God created the races” and, intending that they never cross racial lines and marry, “placed them on separate continents.” Two young lovers, two young lawyers, and an elderly local judge—this talk explores their tangled biographies on the way toward a breakthrough Supreme Court ruling in 1967, a ruling that resonates down to the present. Peter Wallenstein is an award-winning professor of history at Virginia Tech. His many books include Cradle of America: A History of Virginia and Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry: Loving v. Virginia.

A Native Son Comes Home: The Life and Legacy of Arthur Ashe by Eric Hall

Aug 31, 2015 00:59:39

Description:

On July 23 at noon, Eric Hall delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “A Native Son Comes Home: The Life and Legacy of Arthur Ashe.” Virginia’s own Arthur Ashe was one of the world’s best tennis players in the 1960s and 1970s, winning multiple Davis Cup titles and three Grand Slam events: the U.S. Open, the Australian Open, and Wimbledon. He was also deeply committed to human and civil rights causes, most notably the antiapartheid movement in South Africa. His career as an athlete and activist straddling the civil rights and Black Power movements, Ashe fought against racism and injustice from the political center and welcomed public and private debate. This lecture will explore Ashe’s early life in Richmond and Lynchburg as well as his legacy as a public intellectual. Eric Allen Hall is an assistant professor of history and Africana studies at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro. He is the author of Arthur Ashe: Tennis and Justice in the Civil Rights Era.

What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life by Marc Leepson

Aug 31, 2015 00:47:26

Description:

On July 2 at noon, Marc Leepson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life.” Just about every American knows the name Francis Scott Key, but very few know anything more about him other than the fact that he wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner.” But there was much more to Francis Scott Key. One of the most famous, admired, and accomplished men in the early American Republic, Key was a patriotic, pious, hard-working, and well-connected Washington, D.C., lawyer. He had a thriving private legal practice; argued more than a hundred cases before the Supreme Court; and served as U.S. attorney in Washington for eight years. A confidant of President Andrew Jackson, Key was a member of Old Hickory’s kitchen cabinet and handled many sensitive legal matters for the Jackson Administration. Marc Leepson’s new biography, What So Proudly We Hailed, describes in detail how Key found himself in Baltimore Harbor on the night of September 13, 1814. It goes on to recount the other important events of his life, including his role as a founding member and one of the leaders of the American Colonization Society. Marc Leepson, historian and former staff writer for Congressional Quarterly in Washington, is the author of eight books, including Saving Monticello, Lafayette: Idealist General, and What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life.

She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer by Diane Kiesel

Aug 29, 2015 01:01:58

Description:

On August 20 at noon, Diane Kiesel delivered Banner Lecture entitled "She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer." At a time when blacks faced Jim Crow segregation, menial employment opportunities, and lynch mobs, Dorothy Ferebee, a native of Norfolk, was sought after to advise presidents and Congress on civil rights matters and to assist foreign governments on public health issues. She ran one of the nation’s most influential civil rights’ organizations—the National Council of Negro Women—during the nascent racial equality movement and led one of history’s most famous public health efforts—the Mississippi Health Project—in the Deep South during the Great Depression. Dr. Ferebee was a household name in black America for forty years. In her day, she was the media darling of the then thriving African American press. Ironically, her fame faded and her relevance waned as blacks achieved the professional and political power for which she so vigorously fought. This is the first full-scale biography of this significant but relatively unknown black leader. Judge Diane Kiesel—a former reporter in the Washington, D.C., bureau of Copley Newspapers; prosecutor in the Office of the New York County District Attorney; and adjunct professor of law at New York Law School—is currently an Acting Supreme Court Justice on the New York state trial court. She is the author of Domestic Violence: Law, Policy, and Practice and She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer by Diane KieselAt a time when blacks faced Jim Crow segregation, menial employment opportunities, and lynch mobs, Dorothy Ferebee, a native of Norfolk, was sought after to advise presidents and Congress on civil rights matters and to assist foreign governments on public health issues. She ran one of the nation’s most influential civil rights’ organizations—the National Council of Negro Women—during the nascent racial equality movement and led one of history’s most famous public health efforts—the Mississippi Health Project—in the Deep South during the Great Depression. Dr. Ferebee was a household name in black America for forty years. In her day, she was the media darling of the then thriving African American press. Ironically, her fame faded and her relevance waned as blacks achieved the professional and political power for which she so vigorously fought. This is the first full-scale biography of this significant but relatively unknown black leader. Judge Diane Kiesel—a former reporter in the Washington, D.C., bureau of Copley Newspapers; prosecutor in the Office of the New York County District Attorney; and adjunct professor of law at New York Law School—is currently an Acting Supreme Court Justice on the New York state trial court. She is the author of Domestic Violence: Law, Policy, and Practice and She Can Bring Us Home: Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Civil Rights Pioneer.

The Quest for Loving: Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry by Peter Wallenstein

Aug 28, 2015 01:11:53

Description:

On August 6 at noon, Peter Wallenstein delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Quest for Loving: Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry." Mildred Jeter was not a white woman. Richard Loving, all agreed, was a white man. So Virginia state law not only rendered their 1958 marriage illegal but also required a penalty for it of at least a year in prison. Circuit Court Judge Leon F. Bazile chose, though, to suspend their prison sentences if they agreed to leave the state. After a few years of exile, the Lovings sought legal assistance to let them return home, and this they obtained from Bernard S. Cohen and Philip J. Hirschkop. The court appeal elicited from the judge a declaration that “Almighty God created the races” and, intending that they never cross racial lines and marry, “placed them on separate continents.” Two young lovers, two young lawyers, and an elderly local judge—this talk explores their tangled biographies on the way toward a breakthrough Supreme Court ruling in 1967, a ruling that resonates down to the present. Peter Wallenstein is an award-winning professor of history at Virginia Tech. His many books include Cradle of America: A History of Virginia and Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry: Loving v. Virginia.

What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life by Marc Leepson

Aug 28, 2015 00:47:26

Description:

On July 2 at noon, Marc Leepson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life.” Just about every American knows the name Francis Scott Key, but very few know anything more about him other than the fact that he wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner.” But there was much more to Francis Scott Key. One of the most famous, admired, and accomplished men in the early American Republic, Key was a patriotic, pious, hard-working, and well-connected Washington, D.C., lawyer. He had a thriving private legal practice; argued more than a hundred cases before the Supreme Court; and served as U.S. attorney in Washington for eight years. A confidant of President Andrew Jackson, Key was a member of Old Hickory’s kitchen cabinet and handled many sensitive legal matters for the Jackson Administration. Marc Leepson’s new biography, What So Proudly We Hailed, describes in detail how Key found himself in Baltimore Harbor on the night of September 13, 1814. It goes on to recount the other important events of his life, including his role as a founding member and one of the leaders of the American Colonization Society. Marc Leepson, historian and former staff writer for Congressional Quarterly in Washington, is the author of eight books, including Saving Monticello, Lafayette: Idealist General, and What So Proudly We Hailed: Francis Scott Key, A Life.

A Native Son Comes Home: The Life and Legacy of Arthur Ashe by Eric Hall

Aug 26, 2015 00:59:39

Description:

On July 23 at noon, Eric Hall delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “A Native Son Comes Home: The Life and Legacy of Arthur Ashe.” Virginia’s own Arthur Ashe was one of the world’s best tennis players in the 1960s and 1970s, winning multiple Davis Cup titles and three Grand Slam events: the U.S. Open, the Australian Open, and Wimbledon. He was also deeply committed to human and civil rights causes, most notably the antiapartheid movement in South Africa. His career as an athlete and activist straddling the civil rights and Black Power movements, Ashe fought against racism and injustice from the political center and welcomed public and private debate. This lecture will explore Ashe’s early life in Richmond and Lynchburg as well as his legacy as a public intellectual. Eric Allen Hall is an assistant professor of history and Africana studies at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro. He is the author of Arthur Ashe: Tennis and Justice in the Civil Rights Era.

The History Crisis in America: Myth and Reality by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.

Aug 4, 2015 00:59:53

Description:

On July 9 at noon, Charles F. Bryan, Jr., delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The History Crisis in America: Myth and Reality." History occupies a paradoxical and problematic place in contemporary American culture. Numerous commentators argue that we face a growing crisis of historical amnesia, and that Americans do not value and support history as much as previous generations. They worry that history is not being properly taught. Historian Charles Bryan disagrees. “Never before have a people done as much to collect, preserve, and share their history on such a scale as have Americans,” he writes. This contrarian view of the state of history in the United States should come as no surprise to the thousands of readers of his regular columns in the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Dr. Charles F. Bryan, Jr., is an American historian who spent most of his career in the museum field, including twenty as president of the Virginia Historical Society. He began writing essays for the Richmond Times-Dispatch in the 1990’s. He is coeditor of Eye of the Storm: A Civil War Odyssey and Images from the Storm: 300 Civil War Images by the Author of Eye of the Storm.

The Bartlett Book of Garden Elements by Rose Love Bartlett

Aug 1, 2015 00:52:28

Description:

On June 18 at noon, Rose Love Bartlett delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Bartlett Book of Garden Elements." Every beautiful garden, large or small, is a composition of carefully chosen details. Although the choices can be daunting, The Bartlett Book of Garden Elements offers a guide that is both visual and practical, highlighting classic as well as innovative details to delight the eye while serving the form and function of any garden. In this lecture, Rose Bartlett will take us on a pictorial journey through highlights of her new book. She will discuss the origins and roots of garden design features while providing practical suggestions for the use and maintenance of these elements in the contemporary garden. Rose Love Bartlett worked in partnership with her husband, Michael V. Bartlett, for more than twenty-eight years, complementing the bones of his garden designs with flower, herb, and edible plantings. She was a member of the board of directors of the Friends of the U.S. National Arboretum for eight years. Rose now owns a garden shop in Asheville, North Carolina, that specializes in unusual plants as well as garden and nature-related antiques. She and her husband co-wrote The Bartlett Book of Garden Elements: A Practical Compendium of Inspired Designs.

2015 Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture - "Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth," by Terry Alford

Jul 16, 2015 01:10:12

Description:

On June 11, Terry Alford delivered the 2015 Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture, entitled "Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth." With a single shot from a pistol small enough to conceal in his hand, John Wilkes Booth catapulted into history on the night of April 14, 1865. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln stunned a nation that was just emerging from the chaos and calamity of the Civil War, and the president's untimely death altered the trajectory of postwar history. But to those who knew Booth, the event was even more shocking-for no one could have imagined that this fantastically gifted actor and well-liked man could commit such an atrocity. In Fortune's Fool, Terry Alford provides the first comprehensive look at the life of an enigmatic figure whose life has been overshadowed by his final, infamous act. Terry Alford is a professor of history at Northern Virginia Community College. He is the author of Prince Among Slaves, which was made into a PBS documentary in 2007, and Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth

Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture - "Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth," by Terry Alford

Jun 30, 2015 01:10:12

Description:

On June 11, Terry Alford delivered the 2015 Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture, entitled "Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth." With a single shot from a pistol small enough to conceal in his hand, John Wilkes Booth catapulted into history on the night of April 14, 1865. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln stunned a nation that was just emerging from the chaos and calamity of the Civil War, and the president's untimely death altered the trajectory of postwar history. But to those who knew Booth, the event was even more shocking-for no one could have imagined that this fantastically gifted actor and well-liked man could commit such an atrocity. In Fortune's Fool, Terry Alford provides the first comprehensive look at the life of an enigmatic figure whose life has been overshadowed by his final, infamous act. Terry Alford is a professor of history at Northern Virginia Community College. He is the author of Prince Among Slaves, which was made into a PBS documentary in 2007, and Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth.

The Poe You May Not Know by Barbara Anne Cantalupo

Jun 29, 2015 00:45:00

Description:

On June 4 at noon, Barbara Anne Cantalupo delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Poe You May Not Know." Although Edgar Allan Poe’s name is most often identified with stories of horror and fear, Barbara Cantalupo's talk will reveal the less familiar Poe—the one who often goes unrecognized or forgotten—the Poe whose early love of beauty was a strong and enduring draw. Poe’s “deep worship of all beauty,” expressed in an 1829 letter to John Neal when Poe was just twenty, never entirely faded, despite the demands of his commercial writing and editorial career. “The Poe You May Not Know” gives us a look at Poe’s connection to such visual beauty, his commitment to “graphicality” (a word he coined), and his knowledge of the visual arts. Barbara Cantalupo, professor of English at Penn State Lehigh Valley, is the editor of The Edgar Allan Poe Review and author of Poe and the Visual Arts.

The Poe You May Not Know by Barbara Anne Cantalupo

Jun 11, 2015 00:45:00

Description:

On June 4 at noon, Barbara Anne Cantalupo delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Poe You May Not Know." Although Edgar Allan Poe’s name is most often identified with stories of horror and fear, Barbara Cantalupo's talk will reveal the less familiar Poe—the one who often goes unrecognized or forgotten—the Poe whose early love of beauty was a strong and enduring draw. Poe’s “deep worship of all beauty,” expressed in an 1829 letter to John Neal when Poe was just twenty, never entirely faded, despite the demands of his commercial writing and editorial career. “The Poe You May Not Know” gives us a look at Poe’s connection to such visual beauty, his commitment to “graphicality” (a word he coined), and his knowledge of the visual arts. Barbara Cantalupo, professor of English at Penn State Lehigh Valley, is the editor of The Edgar Allan Poe Review and author of Poe and the Visual Arts.

2015 Stuart G. Christian Jr. Lecture: Leadership and Decision-Making in the D-Day Invasion

Jun 4, 2015 01:00:15

Description:

On May 14, Craig L. Symonds delivered the 2015 Stuart G. Christian Jr. Lecture entitled “Leadership and Decision-Making in the D-Day Invasion.” On June 6, 1944, more than six thousand Allied ships carried more than a million soldiers across the English Channel to a fifty-mile-wide strip of the Normandy coast in German-occupied France. It was the greatest sea-borne assault in human history. The code names given to the beaches where the ships landed the soldiers have become immortal: Gold, Juno, Sword, Utah, and especially Omaha, the scene of almost unimaginable human tragedy. The sea of crosses in the cemetery sitting today atop a bluff overlooking the beaches recalls to us its cost. Most accounts of this epic story begin with the landings on the morning of June 6. In fact, however, D-Day was the culmination of months and years of planning and intense debate. Craig L. Symonds now offers the complete story of this Olympian effort. The obstacles to success were many. In addition to divergent strategic views and cultural frictions, Symonds includes vivid portraits of the key decision-makers, from Franklin Roosevelt and Churchill, to Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, and Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay, who commanded the naval element of the invasion. Craig L. Symonds is Professor of History Emeritus at the United States Naval Academy. He is the author of many books on American naval history, including The Battle of Midway, Lincoln and His Admirals, co-winner of the Lincoln Prize in 2009, and Neptune: The Allied Invasion of Europe and the D-Day Landings.

Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington By Cokie Roberts

Jun 4, 2015 00:58:18

Description:

On May 12 at noon, Cokie Roberts will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington By Cokie Roberts." Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868With the outbreak of the Civil War, the small, social southern town of Washington, D.C., found itself caught between warring sides in a four-year struggle to determine the future of the United States. While the nation’s men marched off to war, either on the battlefield or into the halls of Congress, the women of Washington joined the cause as well, serving as nurses, supply organizers, relief workers, and journalists. Cokie Roberts brings the war-torn capital into focus through the lives of formidable ladies like Sara Agnes Pryor and Elizabeth Blair Lee. Compelling social history at its best, Capital Dames concludes that the war not only changed Washington, but it also forever changed the role of women in American society. Cokie Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News and NPR. She has won countless awards and in 2008 was named a “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She is the author of several bestselling books, including Founding Mothers, Ladies of Liberty, and Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848–1868.

Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson by S. C. Gwynne

Jun 4, 2015 01:04:11

Description:

On May 7 at noon, S. C. Gwynne delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson." Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. He is considered, without argument, one of America’s greatest military figures. Jackson’s brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. In April 1862, Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the western world. S. C. Gwynne’s Rebel Yell is a vivid narrative that delves deep into Jackson’s private life, including the loss of his beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. Gwynne traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero. S. C. Gwynne has spent most of his career as a journalist, including stints with Time as bureau chief, national correspondent, and senior editor, and with Texas Monthly as executive editor. He is the author of Empire of the Summer Moon and Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson.

VEE Oral History Project-Gerald P. McCarthy (3 of 3 interviews)

May 21, 2015 01:01:10

Description:

The Virginia Environmental Endowment Oral History Project McCarthy, Gerald P. 2009 October 26 (3 of 3 interviews) Length: 1:01:10 Mss 3 V81951a FA2

VEE Oral History Project-Gerald P. McCarthy (2 of 3 interviews)

May 21, 2015 01:56:34

Description:

The Virginia Environmental Endowment Oral History Project McCarthy, Gerald P. 2009 October 2 (2 of 3 interviews) Length 1:56:29 Mss 3 V81951a FA2 The Virginia Historical Society

VEE Oral History Project-Gerald P. McCarthy (1 of 3 interviews)

May 21, 2015 01:38:35

Description:

The Virginia Environmental Endowment Oral History Project. McCarthy, Gerald P. 2009 September 4 (1 of 3 interviews) The Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. Length: 1:38:35 Mss 3 V81951a FA2

2015 Stuart G. Christian Jr. Lecture: Leadership and Decision-Making in the D-Day Invasion

May 19, 2015 01:00:15

Description:

On May 14, Craig L. Symonds delivered the 2015 Stuart G. Christian Jr. Lecture entitled “Leadership and Decision-Making in the D-Day Invasion.” On June 6, 1944, more than six thousand Allied ships carried more than a million soldiers across the English Channel to a fifty-mile-wide strip of the Normandy coast in German-occupied France. It was the greatest sea-borne assault in human history. The code names given to the beaches where the ships landed the soldiers have become immortal: Gold, Juno, Sword, Utah, and especially Omaha, the scene of almost unimaginable human tragedy. The sea of crosses in the cemetery sitting today atop a bluff overlooking the beaches recalls to us its cost. Most accounts of this epic story begin with the landings on the morning of June 6. In fact, however, D-Day was the culmination of months and years of planning and intense debate. Craig L. Symonds now offers the complete story of this Olympian effort. The obstacles to success were many. In addition to divergent strategic views and cultural frictions, Symonds includes vivid portraits of the key decision-makers, from Franklin Roosevelt and Churchill, to Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, and Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay, who commanded the naval element of the invasion. Craig L. Symonds is Professor of History Emeritus at the United States Naval Academy. He is the author of many books on American naval history, including The Battle of Midway, Lincoln and His Admirals, co-winner of the Lincoln Prize in 2009, and Neptune: The Allied Invasion of Europe and the D-Day Landings.

Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington By Cokie Roberts

May 16, 2015 00:58:18

Description:

On May 12 at noon, Cokie Roberts will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington By Cokie Roberts." Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868With the outbreak of the Civil War, the small, social southern town of Washington, D.C., found itself caught between warring sides in a four-year struggle to determine the future of the United States. While the nation’s men marched off to war, either on the battlefield or into the halls of Congress, the women of Washington joined the cause as well, serving as nurses, supply organizers, relief workers, and journalists. Cokie Roberts brings the war-torn capital into focus through the lives of formidable ladies like Sara Agnes Pryor and Elizabeth Blair Lee. Compelling social history at its best, Capital Dames concludes that the war not only changed Washington, but it also forever changed the role of women in American society. Cokie Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News and NPR. She has won countless awards and in 2008 was named a “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She is the author of several bestselling books, including Founding Mothers, Ladies of Liberty, and Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848–1868.

Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson by S. C. Gwynne

May 12, 2015 01:04:11

Description:

On May 7 at noon, S. C. Gwynne delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson." Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall JacksonStonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. He is considered, without argument, one of America’s greatest military figures. Jackson’s brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. In April 1862, Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the western world. S. C. Gwynne’s Rebel Yell is a vivid narrative that delves deep into Jackson’s private life, including the loss of his beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. Gwynne traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero. S. C. Gwynne has spent most of his career as a journalist, including stints with Time as bureau chief, national correspondent, and senior editor, and with Texas Monthly as executive editor. He is the author of Empire of the Summer Moon and Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson.

James Madison's Gift: The Power of Partnership by David O. Stewart

May 5, 2015 01:06:30

Description:

On April 30 at noon, David O. Stewart delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “James Madison’s Gift: The Power of Partnership.” To reach his lifelong goal of a self-governing constitutional republic, James Madison blended his talents with those of key partners—the dashing Alexander Hamilton, the heroic George Washington, the magnetic Thomas Jefferson, and the soldierly James Monroe. With those extraordinary partners, Madison led the drive for the Constitutional Convention, pressed for an effective new government, co-wrote the Federalist Papers, secured the Constitution's ratification, drafted and won adoption of the Bill of Rights, founded the nation's first political party and guided the nation through the War of 1812. Then he handed the leadership of a happy nation to his old friend and sometime rival Monroe. But it was his final partnership that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights. Dolley was the woman he married in middle age and who presided over both him and an enlivened White House. Their partnership was a love story, a unique one that sustained Madison through his political rise, his presidency, and a fruitful retirement. David O. Stewart, an attorney and an independent historian, is the author of several books, including The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America, and Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia

Lee's Last War Winter by William C. Davis

May 5, 2015 01:04:32

Description:

On April 22 at 5:30 p.m., William C. Davis delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Lee's Last War Winter." Robert E. Lee faced the coming of 1865’s spring campaign season with decided unease. His army dwindled daily from disease and desertion. Across the South the Confederacy had met with nothing but disaster the previous fall, and meanwhile Union forces steadily grew in numbers and power. His only real hope was that Abraham Lincoln might be defeated in his bid for reelection, a hope that was dashed. In that desperate winter, Lee struggled to bolster his army and persuade Richmond to adopt mass conscription, making it clear that without more men, he would be almost powerless to resist Grant. And as the spring of 1865 approached, he did one more thing that few seem aware of today. He met with a few Confederate leaders to discuss surrender and reunion in return for political concessions, and he contemplated engaging in political and public relations maneuvering to force President Jefferson Davis to go along. Even with the coming of April and the evacuation of Richmond, Lee still clung to some hope, if not for victory, then for an end short of absolute defeat. William C. Davis is a retired professor of history and the director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech. He is the author or editor of more than fifty books and numerous documentary screenplays in the fields of Civil War and southern history. His most recent book is Crucible of Command: Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee—The War They Fought, the Peace They Forged. This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park.

James Madison's Gift: The Power of Partnership by David O. Stewart

May 2, 2015 01:06:30

Description:

On April 30 at noon, David O. Stewart will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled “James Madison’s Gift: The Power of Partnership.” Madison's Gift: Five Partnerships That Built AmericaTo reach his lifelong goal of a self-governing constitutional republic, James Madison blended his talents with those of key partners—the dashing Alexander Hamilton, the heroic George Washington, the magnetic Thomas Jefferson, and the soldierly James Monroe. With those extraordinary partners, Madison led the drive for the Constitutional Convention, pressed for an effective new government, co-wrote the Federalist Papers, secured the Constitution's ratification, drafted and won adoption of the Bill of Rights, founded the nation's first political party and guided the nation through the War of 1812. Then he handed the leadership of a happy nation to his old friend and sometime rival Monroe. But it was his final partnership that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights. Dolley was the woman he married in middle age and who presided over both him and an enlivened White House. Their partnership was a love story, a unique one that sustained Madison through his political rise, his presidency, and a fruitful retirement. David O. Stewart, an attorney and an independent historian, is the author of several books, including The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America, and Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

Lee's Last War Winter by William C. Davis

Apr 24, 2015 01:04:32

Description:

On April 22 at 5:30 p.m., William C. Davis delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Lee's Last War Winter." Robert E. Lee faced the coming of 1865’s spring campaign season with decided unease. His army dwindled daily from disease and desertion. Across the South the Confederacy had met with nothing but disaster the previous fall, and meanwhile Union forces steadily grew in numbers and power. His only real hope was that Abraham Lincoln might be defeated in his bid for reelection, a hope that was dashed. In that desperate winter, Lee struggled to bolster his army and persuade Richmond to adopt mass conscription, making it clear that without more men, he would be almost powerless to resist Grant. And as the spring of 1865 approached, he did one more thing that few seem aware of today. He met with a few Confederate leaders to discuss surrender and reunion in return for political concessions, and he contemplated engaging in political and public relations maneuvering to force President Jefferson Davis to go along. Even with the coming of April and the evacuation of Richmond, Lee still clung to some hope, if not for victory, then for an end short of absolute defeat. William C. Davis is a retired professor of history and the director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech. He is the author or editor of more than fifty books and numerous documentary screenplays in the fields of Civil War and southern history. His most recent book is Crucible of Command: Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee—The War They Fought, the Peace They Forged. This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park.

Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865 by John J. Fox III

Apr 3, 2015 00:57:25

Description:

On April 1 at noon, John J. Fox III, will deliver a Banner Lecture entitled "Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865." Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865General Robert E. Lee faced the most monumental crisis of his military career on April 2, 1865. By sunrise that morning, the Union 6th Corps had punched a huge hole in Lee's outer line, southwest of Petersburg. He needed time for reinforcements to arrive from Richmond, but how could his depleted army buy that time? Against overwhelming odds, a handful of Confederates made a suicidal desperate last stand at Fort Gregg. Douglas Southall Freeman called this epic fight “one of the most dramatic incidents of an overwhelming day,” and yet it has been overshadowed by all the other historic events of April 1865. Fourteen Union soldiers received the Medal of Honor for their bravery at Fort Gregg. Many battle-scarred veterans from both sides described this clash as the nastiest of their four-year war experience. John J. Fox III, will tell the story of this long-overlooked battle that took place in the last days of the war in Virginia. Fox, a native of Richmond, graduated from Washington and Lee University before serving on active duty in the U.S. Army for seven years as an armor officer and aviator. He is the author of Red Clay to Richmond: Trail of the 35th Georgia Infantry Regiment (2005), The Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865 (2010), and Stuart’s Finest Hour: The Ride Around McClellan, June 1862 (2013). When not writing, Fox is a pilot for American Airlines.

What's Wrong with Black Beard? by Kevin P. Duffus

Apr 1, 2015 01:07:07

Description:

On March 19 at noon, Kevin P. Duffus delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "What's Wrong with Black Beard?" The traditional historical interpretation of the notorious Black Beard, and the pop culture-Hollywood incarnations it has begotten, may be among the more enduring historical frauds of colonial American history. Much of what the public knows about the infamous pirate simply isn’t true, nor is there documentary evidence to support it. To find the elusive truth of history, noted North Carolina research historian and author Kevin Duffus has delved deeper into the primary sources than anyone to discover a new, more accurate account that reveals the identity, origins, and motivations of Black Beard and his inner circle of cohorts. Join the award-winning research historian, author, and filmmaker in an all-new multimedia presentation that lays bare the popular myths of Black Beard’s widely believed surname of Teach, his ferocity, his purported birth date, his many houses, his many “wives,” and his long-lost treasure. Kevin P. Duffus, a researcher and filmmaker, is the author of several books, including Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865 by John J. Fox III

Mar 5, 2015 57:25

Description:

On April 1 at noon, John J. Fox III, delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865." Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865General Robert E. Lee faced the most monumental crisis of his military career on April 2, 1865. By sunrise that morning, the Union 6th Corps had punched a huge hole in Lee's outer line, southwest of Petersburg. He needed time for reinforcements to arrive from Richmond, but how could his depleted army buy that time? Against overwhelming odds, a handful of Confederates made a suicidal desperate last stand at Fort Gregg. Douglas Southall Freeman called this epic fight “one of the most dramatic incidents of an overwhelming day,” and yet it has been overshadowed by all the other historic events of April 1865. Fourteen Union soldiers received the Medal of Honor for their bravery at Fort Gregg. Many battle-scarred veterans from both sides described this clash as the nastiest of their four-year war experience. John J. Fox III, will tell the story of this long-overlooked battle that took place in the last days of the war in Virginia. Fox, a native of Richmond, graduated from Washington and Lee University before serving on active duty in the U.S. Army for seven years as an armor officer and aviator. He is the author of Red Clay to Richmond: Trail of the 35th Georgia Infantry Regiment (2005), The Confederate Alamo: Bloodbath at Petersburg’s Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865 (2010), and Stuart’s Finest Hour: The Ride Around McClellan, June 1862 (2013). When not writing, Fox is a pilot for American Airlines.

What's Wrong with Black Beard? by Kevin P. Duffus

Mar 5, 2015 01:07:07

Description:

On March 19 at noon, Kevin P. Duffus delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "What's Wrong with Black Beard?" The traditional historical interpretation of the notorious Black Beard, and the pop culture-Hollywood incarnations it has begotten, may be among the more enduring historical frauds of colonial American history. Much of what the public knows about the infamous pirate simply isn’t true, nor is there documentary evidence to support it. To find the elusive truth of history, noted North Carolina research historian and author Kevin Duffus has delved deeper into the primary sources than anyone to discover a new, more accurate account that reveals the identity, origins, and motivations of Black Beard and his inner circle of cohorts. Join the award-winning research historian, author, and filmmaker in an all-new multimedia presentation that lays bare the popular myths of Black Beard’s widely believed surname of Teach, his ferocity, his purported birth date, his many houses, his many “wives,” and his long-lost treasure. Kevin P. Duffus, a researcher and filmmaker, is the author of several books, including Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

Fellow Travelers on the Road to Black Ned’s Forge by Turk McCleskey

Feb 21, 2015 00:55:18

Description:

On February 19 at noon, Turk McCleskey delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Fellow Travelers on the Road to Black Ned’s Forge." Edward Tarr, known widely as “Black Ned,” became a blacksmith while enslaved in Pennsylvania. After purchasing his freedom, Tarr and his white wife moved to Timber Ridge, in modern Rockbridge County, Virginia, where his forge on the Great Wagon Road became a well-known landmark. In 1753, Tarr helped found the Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church. When he bought a 270-acre farm on Mill Creek in 1754, Tarr became the first free black land owner west of the Blue Ridge. The son of Tarr’s last master attempted to re-enslave him, but with the help of his neighbors, Tarr preserved his independence. Exceptional free persons of color, such as Edward Tarr, can be found in every region and in every period during the history of slavery. As Edward Tarr’s story illustrates, these were more than isolated individuals: by the coming of the American Revolution, they constituted a self-aware, cohesive set of lobbyists capable of wielding the rhetoric of political liberty to roll back the encroachments of racist laws. Ironically, however, the Revolution undercut the legal gains made by free persons of color in the 1760s. Turk McCleskey is professor of history at Virginia Military Institute and the author of The Road to Black Ned's Forge: A Story of Race, Sex, and Trade on the Colonial American Frontier.

Fellow Travelers on the Road to Black Ned’s Forge by Turk McCleskey

Feb 17, 2015 00:55:18

Description:

On February 19 at noon, Turk McCleskey delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Fellow Travelers on the Road to Black Ned’s Forge." Edward Tarr, known widely as “Black Ned,” became a blacksmith while enslaved in Pennsylvania. After purchasing his freedom, Tarr and his white wife moved to Timber Ridge, in modern Rockbridge County, Virginia, where his forge on the Great Wagon Road became a well-known landmark. In 1753, Tarr helped found the Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church. When he bought a 270-acre farm on Mill Creek in 1754, Tarr became the first free black land owner west of the Blue Ridge. The son of Tarr’s last master attempted to re-enslave him, but with the help of his neighbors, Tarr preserved his independence. Exceptional free persons of color, such as Edward Tarr, can be found in every region and in every period during the history of slavery. As Edward Tarr’s story illustrates, these were more than isolated individuals: by the coming of the American Revolution, they constituted a self-aware, cohesive set of lobbyists capable of wielding the rhetoric of political liberty to roll back the encroachments of racist laws. Ironically, however, the Revolution undercut the legal gains made by free persons of color in the 1760s. Turk McCleskey is professor of history at Virginia Military Institute and the author of The Road to Black Ned's Forge: A Story of Race, Sex, and Trade on the Colonial American Frontier.

Welcome and Introduction

Feb 13, 2015 00:06:44

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." Sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society, the City of Richmond Slave Trail Commission, and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, the half-day conference presented recent scholarship on two downtown Richmond historical sites, the Burial Ground for Negroes and Lumpkin's Slave Jail, both of which have special importance for the history of African Americans in Virginia. Welcome and Introduction by Kathleen Kilpatrick, Director, Virginia Dept. of Historic Resources Paul Levengood, President and CEO, Virginia Historical Society Dr. Lauranett Lee, Curator of African American History, Virginia Historical Society

Questions on first two presentations

Feb 13, 2015 00:10:30

Description:

Questions on first two presentations by

"Shockoe Valley Topography and the Slave Trade"By Jeffrey Ruggles, Curator of Prints and Photographs, Virginia Historical Society

Feb 13, 2015 00:33:20

Description:

"Shockoe Valley Topography and the Slave Trade"By Jeffrey Ruggles, Curator of Prints and Photographs, Virginia Historical Society by

"Locating the 1809 Negro Burial Ground" By Dr. Chris Stevenson, VDHR

Feb 13, 2015 00:27:10

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." Sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society, the City of Richmond Slave Trail Commission, and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, the half-day conference presented recent scholarship on two downtown Richmond historical sites, the Burial Ground for Negroes and Lumpkin's Slave Jail, both of which have special importance for the history of African Americans in Virginia.

From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia by John O. Peters

Feb 12, 2015 01:00:49

Description:

On February 5 at noon, John O. Peters, author of "From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia," was interviewed by The Honorable Henry E. Hudson, Judge of the U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Virginia, on the fascinating stories in Peters's book. The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia has, arguably, the most interesting and important history of any trial jurisdiction in the country, state or federal. The Honorable Henry E. Hudson, Judge of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District, will interview John O. Peters, author of From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia, who will explain what makes this such a great story. Peters will discuss the role of Chief Justice John Marshall, who sat on the bench of this court for thirty-four years as a trial judge, including the trial of Aaron Burr for treason. Other topics will include the court's role during the Civil War and Reconstruction; the trials of some of America's most notorious spies and terrorists, culminating with the trial of Zacharias Moussaoui; more than twenty years of school desegregation litigation that changed the face of America and Virginia’s way of life; and a colorful admiralty jurisdiction that has seen cases related to pirates, privateers, prize ships, the Titanic, and Spanish gold. John O. Peters, a former commercial litigator who appeared before the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District on numerous occasions, began writing about courts, judges, and lawyers in 1969 with the publication of Courts of the Richmond Area—A Primer. His other books include Virginia’s Historic Courthouses (1995), Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery (2010), and From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia (2013). U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson started his legal career as an assistant commonwealth’s attorney for Arlington. During his tenure in public service, he has served as the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, director of the U.S. Marshal Service, and as a circuit court judge for Fairfax County. Judge Hudson received his commission as a federal district judge in August 2002 and sits in the Richmond Division of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. He is the author of Quest for Justice: From Deputy Sheriff to Federal Judge . . . and the Lessons Learned Along the Way (2007). This lecture is cosponsored with the Historical Society of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia by John O. Peters

Feb 11, 2015 01:00:49

Description:

On February 5 at noon, John O. Peters, author of "From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia," was interviewed by The Honorable Henry E. Hudson, Judge of the U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Virginia, on the fascinating stories in Peters's book. The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia has, arguably, the most interesting and important history of any trial jurisdiction in the country, state or federal. The Honorable Henry E. Hudson, Judge of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District, will interview John O. Peters, author of From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia, who will explain what makes this such a great story. Peters will discuss the role of Chief Justice John Marshall, who sat on the bench of this court for thirty-four years as a trial judge, including the trial of Aaron Burr for treason. Other topics will include the court's role during the Civil War and Reconstruction; the trials of some of America's most notorious spies and terrorists, culminating with the trial of Zacharias Moussaoui; more than twenty years of school desegregation litigation that changed the face of America and Virginia’s way of life; and a colorful admiralty jurisdiction that has seen cases related to pirates, privateers, prize ships, the Titanic, and Spanish gold. John O. Peters, a former commercial litigator who appeared before the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District on numerous occasions, began writing about courts, judges, and lawyers in 1969 with the publication of Courts of the Richmond Area—A Primer. His other books include Virginia’s Historic Courthouses (1995), Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery (2010), and From Marshall to Moussaoui: Federal Justice in the Eastern District of Virginia (2013). U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson started his legal career as an assistant commonwealth’s attorney for Arlington. During his tenure in public service, he has served as the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, director of the U.S. Marshal Service, and as a circuit court judge for Fairfax County. Judge Hudson received his commission as a federal district judge in August 2002 and sits in the Richmond Division of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. He is the author of Quest for Justice: From Deputy Sheriff to Federal Judge . . . and the Lessons Learned Along the Way (2007). This lecture is cosponsored with the Historical Society of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home by Robert M. Poole (Audio)

Jan 28, 2015 01:03:31

Description:

Robert Poole’s newest book, Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home, is the powerful contemporary biography of a fourteen-acre plot where many of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan have been laid to rest alongside service members from earlier wars. It is a portrait of our national cemetery as a living, breathing community, and a narrative about how improvised explosive devices, suicide bombs, and enemies who blend in with local populations have changed the nature and aftermath of conflict. Using Section 60 as a window into the latest wars, Poole recounts stories of courage and sacrifice by fallen heroes, and he explores the ways in which soldiers’ comrades, friends, and families honor and remember those lost to war—carrying on with life in the aftermath of wartime tragedy. Section 60 is a moving tribute to those who have fought and died for our country, and to those who love them. Robert M. Poole, former executive editor of National Geographic, is a writer whose work has taken him around the world. His books include On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington Cemetery and Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home.

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home by Robert M. Poole (Audio)

Jan 27, 2015 01:03:31

Description:

On January 22 at noon, Robert M. Poole delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home." Writer and reporter Robert Poole’s newest book, Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home, is the powerful contemporary biography of a fourteen-acre plot where many of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan have been laid to rest alongside service members from earlier wars. It is a portrait of our national cemetery as a living, breathing community, and a narrative about how improvised explosive devices, suicide bombs, and enemies who blend in with local populations have changed the nature and aftermath of conflict. Using Section 60 as a window into the latest wars, Poole recounts stories of courage and sacrifice by fallen heroes, and he explores the ways in which soldiers’ comrades, friends, and families honor and remember those lost to war—carrying on with life in the aftermath of wartime tragedy. Section 60 is a moving tribute to those who have fought and died for our country, and to those who love them. Robert M. Poole, former executive editor of National Geographic, is a writer whose work has taken him around the world. His books include On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington Cemetery and Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery—Where War Comes Home.

A Gunner in Lee's Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter by Graham Dozier (Audio)

Dec 18, 2014 00:50:32

Description:

On December 4 at noon, Graham Dozier delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "A Gunner in Lee's Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter to His Wife" In May 1861, Thomas Henry Carter raised an artillery battery and joined the Confederate army. Over the next four years he rose steadily in rank from captain to colonel, placing him among the senior artillerists in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. During that time, Carter wrote more than 100 revealing letters to his wife Susan about his service in the South’s most successful army. In this lecture, Graham Dozier will discuss the process of editing the letters; tell the story of Tom Carter's life before, during, and after the Civil War; and share some of the many fascinating observations that can be found in the letters. Graham Dozier is the managing editor of publications at the VHS and the editor of A Gunner in Lee’s Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter.

A Gunner in Lee's Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter by Graham Dozier (Audio)

Dec 10, 2014 00:50:32

Description:

On December 4 at noon, Graham Dozier delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "A Gunner in Lee's Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter to His Wife" In May 1861, Thomas Henry Carter raised an artillery battery and joined the Confederate army. Over the next four years he rose steadily in rank from captain to colonel, placing him among the senior artillerists in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. During that time, Carter wrote more than 100 revealing letters to his wife Susan about his service in the South’s most successful army. In this lecture, Graham Dozier will discuss the process of editing the letters; tell the story of Tom Carter's life before, during, and after the Civil War; and share some of the many fascinating observations that can be found in the letters. Graham Dozier is the managing editor of publications at the VHS and the editor of A Gunner in Lee’s Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter

Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War by Karen Abbott (Audio)

Nov 21, 2014 00:50:11

Description:

On Tuesday, November 11, at noon, Karen Abbott delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War." After shooting a Union soldier in her front hall with a pocket pistol, Belle Boyd became a courier and spy for the Confederate army, using her charms to seduce men on both sides. Emma Edmonds cut off her hair and assumed the identity of a man to enlist as a Union private, witnessing the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Rose O’Neale Greenhow, engaged in affairs with powerful northern politicians to gather intelligence for the Confederacy. Elizabeth Van Lew, a wealthy Richmond abolitionist, hid behind her proper southern manners as she orchestrated a far-reaching espionage ring. Using a wealth of primary source material and interviews with the spies’ descendants, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little-known aspects of the Civil War: the stories of four courageous women—a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow—who were spies.

The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior by Mark A. Bradley (Audio)

Nov 21, 2014 00:56:54

Description:

On November 6 at noon, Mark A. Bradley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior." Duncan Chaplin Lee was a Rhodes Scholar, patriot, and descendent of one of America’s most distinguished families—and possibly the best-placed mole ever to infiltrate U.S. intelligence operations. In his new book, Mark A. Bradley traces the tangled roots of Lee’s betrayal and reveals his harrowing struggle to stay one step ahead of America’s spy hunters during and after World War II. Drawing on Lee’s letters and thousands of previously unreleased CIA, FBI, and state department records, Bradley tells the unlikely story of a spy who chose his conscience over his country and its dark consequences. Mark Bradley is a former CIA intelligence officer and is currently serving as an attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division. He is the author of A Very Principled Boy: The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior.

Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War by Karen Abbott (Audio)

Nov 14, 2014 00:50:11

Description:

On Tuesday, November 11, at noon, Karen Abbott delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War." After shooting a Union soldier in her front hall with a pocket pistol, Belle Boyd became a courier and spy for the Confederate army, using her charms to seduce men on both sides. Emma Edmonds cut off her hair and assumed the identity of a man to enlist as a Union private, witnessing the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Rose O’Neale Greenhow, engaged in affairs with powerful northern politicians to gather intelligence for the Confederacy. Elizabeth Van Lew, a wealthy Richmond abolitionist, hid behind her proper southern manners as she orchestrated a far-reaching espionage ring. Using a wealth of primary source material and interviews with the spies’ descendants, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little-known aspects of the Civil War: the stories of four courageous women—a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow—who were spies. Abbott is a featured contributor to Smithsonian's history blog, Past Imperfect, and also writes for Disunion, the New York Times series about the Civil War. She is the author of several books, including American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare: The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee (2010) and Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War (2014). This lecture is cosponsored with the American Civil War Museum.

The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior by Mark A. Bradley (Audio)

Nov 8, 2014 00:56:54

Description:

On November 6 at noon, Mark A. Bradley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior." Duncan Chaplin Lee was a Rhodes Scholar, patriot, and descendent of one of America’s most distinguished families—and possibly the best-placed mole ever to infiltrate U.S. intelligence operations. In his new book, Mark A. Bradley traces the tangled roots of Lee’s betrayal and reveals his harrowing struggle to stay one step ahead of America’s spy hunters during and after World War II. Drawing on Lee’s letters and thousands of previously unreleased CIA, FBI, and state department records, Bradley tells the unlikely story of a spy who chose his conscience over his country and its dark consequences. Mark Bradley is a former CIA intelligence officer and is currently serving as an attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division. He is the author of A Very Principled Boy: The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior.

Richmond’s Old Stone House and Poe Museum by Rose Marie Mitchell (Audio)

Nov 6, 2014 00:59:49

Description:

On October 30 at noon, Rose Marie Mitchell delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Richmond’s Old Stone House and Poe Museum." Even though the Old Stone House in Richmond is often called the Poe House because the legend has grown that the writer once lived in the structure, the story is not true. Poe never lived there. How then did the connection between the man and the house eventually become a reality and not just an Idea? After countless years of interest in Edgar Allan Poe and over three years of research, Rose Marie Mitchell has gathered the facts and stories to bring it all together to show how the house and the man are connected and how the Old Stone House is worthy of preservation in its own right and certainly worthy of being a memorial site for the internationally known and respected author.

J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr., Lecture "Woodrow Wilson-Across Three Centuries" by A. Scott Berg

Nov 6, 2014 01:07:56

Description:

On October 15 at 5:30 p.m., A. Scott Berg delivered the J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr., Lecture entitled "Woodrow Wilson-Across Three Centuries." One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. A. Scott Berg will speak about his newest biography, Wilson, the most personal and penetrating study about not only Wilson the icon but also Wilson the man.

Richmond’s Old Stone House and Poe Museum by Rose Marie Mitchell (Audio)

Oct 31, 2014 00:59:49

Description:

On October 30 at noon, Rose Marie Mitchell delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Richmond’s Old Stone House and Poe Museum." Even though the Old Stone House in Richmond is often called the Poe House because the legend has grown that the writer once lived in the structure, the story is not true. Poe never lived there. How then did the connection between the man and the house eventually become a reality and not just an Idea? After countless years of interest in Edgar Allan Poe and over three years of research, Rose Marie Mitchell has gathered the facts and stories to bring it all together to show how the house and the man are connected and how the Old Stone House is worthy of preservation in its own right and certainly worthy of being a memorial site for the internationally known and respected author.

J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr., Lecture "Woodrow Wilson-Across Three Centuries" by A. Scott Berg

Oct 24, 2014 01:07:56

Description:

On October 15 at 5:30 p.m., A. Scott Berg delivered the J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr., Lecture entitled "Woodrow Wilson-Across Three Centuries." One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. A. Scott Berg will speak about his newest biography, Wilson, the most personal and penetrating study about not only Wilson the icon but also Wilson the man.

Founders as Fathers: Going Home with Virginia's Revolutionary by Lorri Glover

Oct 22, 2014 00:48:01

Description:

On October 9 at noon, Lorri Glover delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Founders as Fathers: Going Home with Virginia's Revolutionary." Set against the backdrop of Revolutionary Virginia, Lorri Glover’s new book, Founders as Fathers: Family Values and Revolutionary Politics, offers an intimate portrait of the lives of the country’s most celebrated political leaders, revealing, for the first time, how they struggled to balance civic duties against domestic responsibilities and contended with a revolution that remade family life every bit as much as political institutions. Glover’s lecture will bring to life the surprising, profound connections between family and politics in the lives of the Virginians who became the principal architects of the American Republic: George Mason, Patrick Henry, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison. Lorri Glover, the John Francis Bannon Endowed Chair in the Department of History at Saint Louis University, has written several books about early American history from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth, including Southern Sons: Becoming Men in the New Nation (2007) and Founders as Fathers: Family Values and Revolutionary Politics (2014).

Founders as Fathers: Going Home with Virginia's Revolutionary by Lorri Glover

Oct 11, 2014 00:48:01

Description:

On October 9 at noon, Lorri Glover delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Founders as Fathers: Going Home with Virginia's Revolutionary." Set against the backdrop of Revolutionary Virginia, Lorri Glover’s new book, Founders as Fathers: Family Values and Revolutionary Politics, offers an intimate portrait of the lives of the country’s most celebrated political leaders, revealing, for the first time, how they struggled to balance civic duties against domestic responsibilities and contended with a revolution that remade family life every bit as much as political institutions. Glover’s lecture will bring to life the surprising, profound connections between family and politics in the lives of the Virginians who became the principal architects of the American Republic: George Mason, Patrick Henry, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison. Lorri Glover, the John Francis Bannon Endowed Chair in the Department of History at Saint Louis University, has written several books about early American history from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth, including Southern Sons: Becoming Men in the New Nation (2007) and Founders as Fathers: Family Values and Revolutionary Politics (2014).

Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison by Alvin Townley

Sep 27, 2014 00:55:35

Description:

On September 25 at noon, Alvin Townley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison." Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never ReturnedDuring the Vietnam War, hundreds of American prisoners of war faced years of brutal conditions and horrific torture at the hands of North Vietnamese guards and interrogators who ruthlessly grilled them for military intelligence and propaganda. Determined to maintain their Code of Conduct, the POWs developed a powerful underground resistance. To quash it, their captors singled out its eleven leaders and banished them to an isolated jail that would become known as Alcatraz. None would leave its solitary cells and interrogation rooms unscathed; one would never return. When the survivors of Alcatraz finally came home, one veteran would go on to receive the Medal of Honor, another would become a U.S. Senator, and a third still serves in the U.S. Congress. A powerful story of survival and triumph, Alvin Townley's Defiant will inspire anyone wondering how courage, faith, and brotherhood can endure even in the darkest of situations. Alvin Townley, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is the author of several books, including Spirit of Adventure: Eagle Scouts and the Making of America's Future, Fly Navy: Discovering the Extraordinary People and Enduring Spirit of Naval Aviation, and Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never Returned.

Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison by Alvin Townley

Sep 27, 2014 00:55:35

Description:

On September 25 at noon, Alvin Townley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison." Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never ReturnedDuring the Vietnam War, hundreds of American prisoners of war faced years of brutal conditions and horrific torture at the hands of North Vietnamese guards and interrogators who ruthlessly grilled them for military intelligence and propaganda. Determined to maintain their Code of Conduct, the POWs developed a powerful underground resistance. To quash it, their captors singled out its eleven leaders and banished them to an isolated jail that would become known as Alcatraz. None would leave its solitary cells and interrogation rooms unscathed; one would never return. When the survivors of Alcatraz finally came home, one veteran would go on to receive the Medal of Honor, another would become a U.S. Senator, and a third still serves in the U.S. Congress. A powerful story of survival and triumph, Alvin Townley's Defiant will inspire anyone wondering how courage, faith, and brotherhood can endure even in the darkest of situations. Alvin Townley, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is the author of several books, including Spirit of Adventure: Eagle Scouts and the Making of America's Future, Fly Navy: Discovering the Extraordinary People and Enduring Spirit of Naval Aviation, and Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never Returned.

Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison by Alvin Townley

Sep 26, 2014 00:55:35

Description:

On September 25 at noon, Alvin Townley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Defiant: American POWs in Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison." Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never ReturnedDuring the Vietnam War, hundreds of American prisoners of war faced years of brutal conditions and horrific torture at the hands of North Vietnamese guards and interrogators who ruthlessly grilled them for military intelligence and propaganda. Determined to maintain their Code of Conduct, the POWs developed a powerful underground resistance. To quash it, their captors singled out its eleven leaders and banished them to an isolated jail that would become known as Alcatraz. None would leave its solitary cells and interrogation rooms unscathed; one would never return. When the survivors of Alcatraz finally came home, one veteran would go on to receive the Medal of Honor, another would become a U.S. Senator, and a third still serves in the U.S. Congress. A powerful story of survival and triumph, Alvin Townley's Defiant will inspire anyone wondering how courage, faith, and brotherhood can endure even in the darkest of situations. Alvin Townley, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is the author of several books, including Spirit of Adventure: Eagle Scouts and the Making of America's Future, Fly Navy: Discovering the Extraordinary People and Enduring Spirit of Naval Aviation, and Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam's Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never Returned.

Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris, 1785

Sep 17, 2014 01:06:24

Description:

On September 11 at noon, James C. Thompson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris, 1785." In the summer of 1784, Thomas Jefferson traveled to Paris as minister of the United States to France and lived there for five years. During this time, he made a series of excursions with Pierre Cabanis, a philosophe and an influential member of French society. Cabanis acquainted Jefferson not only with the city and its people but also with the enlightened ideas in French thought. James Thompson provides rich details of this transformative period in Thomas Jefferson’s life in his book, Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris 1785. James C. Thompson has taught philosophy at Strayer University in Alexandria. He is the author of Beyond the Veil of Reason—Thomas Jefferson’s Early Political Initiatives, The Birth of Virginia’s Aristocracy, and Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris 1785.

Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris, 1785

Sep 17, 2014 01:06:24

Description:

On September 11 at noon, James C. Thompson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris, 1785." In the summer of 1784, Thomas Jefferson traveled to Paris as minister of the United States to France and lived there for five years. During this time, he made a series of excursions with Pierre Cabanis, a philosophe and an influential member of French society. Cabanis acquainted Jefferson not only with the city and its people but also with the enlightened ideas in French thought. James Thompson provides rich details of this transformative period in Thomas Jefferson’s life in his book, Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris 1785. James C. Thompson has taught philosophy at Strayer University in Alexandria. He is the author of Beyond the Veil of Reason—Thomas Jefferson’s Early Political Initiatives, The Birth of Virginia’s Aristocracy, and Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightenment—Paris 1785.

Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring by Anne Rutherford Lower

Sep 4, 2014 00:40:52

Description:

On August 28 at noon, Anne Rutherford Lower delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring." Sheltering Arms HospitalSheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring is a new book featuring photographs and stories from every era of the organization’s rich history. Published in honor of Sheltering Arms’ 125th anniversary, the book chronicles the healthcare institution’s growth from humble beginnings in a donated house in downtown Richmond to a nationally recognized physical rehabilitation leader in 2014. Anne Lower has been an ardent supporter of Sheltering Arms for decades and has served as a member of the board of directors, president of the board, member of the women’s council, and as patient advocate. She is the author of Sheltering Arms Hospital: A Centennial History (1889–1989) and served as a valuable resource during the production of Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring.

Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring by Anne Rutherford Lower

Sep 3, 2014 00:40:52

Description:

On August 28 at noon, Anne Rutherford Lower delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring." Sheltering Arms HospitalSheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring is a new book featuring photographs and stories from every era of the organization’s rich history. Published in honor of Sheltering Arms’ 125th anniversary, the book chronicles the healthcare institution’s growth from humble beginnings in a donated house in downtown Richmond to a nationally recognized physical rehabilitation leader in 2014. Anne Lower has been an ardent supporter of Sheltering Arms for decades and has served as a member of the board of directors, president of the board, member of the women’s council, and as patient advocate. She is the author of Sheltering Arms Hospital: A Centennial History (1889–1989) and served as a valuable resource during the production of Sheltering Arms: A Legacy of Caring.

Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia by Kathryn Shively Meier

Sep 1, 2014 00:54:45

Description:

On August 14 at noon, Kathryn Shively Meier delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia." Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 VirginiaIn the Shenandoah Valley and Peninsula Campaigns of 1862, Union and Confederate soldiers faced unfamiliar and harsh environmental conditions, which contributed to escalating disease and diminished morale. Using a wealth of personal accounts, medical sources, newspapers, and government documents, Kathryn Shively Meier reveals how these soldiers strove to maintain their physical and mental health by combating their deadliest enemy—nature. To survive, soldiers forged informal networks of health care based on prewar civilian experience and adopted a universal set of self-care habits, and they periodically had to adjust their ideas of manliness, class values, and race to the circumstances at hand.

Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia by Kathryn Shively Meier

Aug 16, 2014 00:54:45

Description:

On August 14 at noon, Kathryn Shively Meier delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 Virginia." Nature's Civil War: Common Soldiers and the Environment in 1862 VirginiaIn the Shenandoah Valley and Peninsula Campaigns of 1862, Union and Confederate soldiers faced unfamiliar and harsh environmental conditions, which contributed to escalating disease and diminished morale. Using a wealth of personal accounts, medical sources, newspapers, and government documents, Kathryn Shively Meier reveals how these soldiers strove to maintain their physical and mental health by combating their deadliest enemy—nature. To survive, soldiers forged informal networks of health care based on prewar civilian experience and adopted a universal set of self-care habits, and they periodically had to adjust their ideas of manliness, class values, and race to the circumstances at hand.

Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia by Thomas E. Buckley

Aug 6, 2014 00:48:34

Description:

On July 24 at noon, Thomas E. Buckley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia." The significance of the Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom goes far beyond the borders of the Old Dominion. Its influence ultimately extended to the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the separation of church and state. In his latest book, Thomas Buckley tells the story of the statute, beginning with its background in the struggles of colonial dissenters against an oppressive Church of England. Displacing an established church by instituting religious freedom, the Virginia statute provided the most substantial guarantees of religious liberty of any state in the new nation. The effort to implement Jefferson’s statute has even broader significance in its anticipation of the conflict that would occupy the whole country after the Supreme Court nationalized the religion clause of the First Amendment in the 1940s. Thomas E. Buckley, professor in residence in the department of history of Loyola Marymount University, is the author of several books on Virginia’s religious history, including Church and State in Revolutionary Virginia, 1776–1787 and Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia.

Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia by Thomas E. Buckley (Audio)

Aug 6, 2014 00:48:34

Description:

On July 24 at noon, Thomas E. Buckley delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia." The significance of the Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom goes far beyond the borders of the Old Dominion. Its influence ultimately extended to the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the separation of church and state. In his latest book, Thomas Buckley tells the story of the statute, beginning with its background in the struggles of colonial dissenters against an oppressive Church of England. Displacing an established church by instituting religious freedom, the Virginia statute provided the most substantial guarantees of religious liberty of any state in the new nation. The effort to implement Jefferson’s statute has even broader significance in its anticipation of the conflict that would occupy the whole country after the Supreme Court nationalized the religion clause of the First Amendment in the 1940s. Thomas E. Buckley, professor in residence in the department of history of Loyola Marymount University, is the author of several books on Virginia’s religious history, including Church and State in Revolutionary Virginia, 1776–1787 and Establishing Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Statute in Virginia.

From a Richmond Streetcar: Life through the Lens of Harris Stilson by Kitty Snow

Jul 17, 2014 00:49:05

Description:

On July 10, Kitty Snow delivererd a Banner Lecture entitled "From a Richmond Streetcar: Life through the Lens of Harris Stilson." Streetcar motorman Harris Stilson spent countless hours using his camera to capture Richmond and its everyday citizens nearly 100 years ago, giving us a priceless look at the city’s many slices of life. This lecture, presented by Kitty Snow, Harry’s great-granddaughter, will reveal the city’s past as told through Harry’s prolific images and her thoughtful narration.

From a Richmond Streetcar: Life through the Lens of Harris Stilson

Jul 16, 2014 00:49:05

Description:

On July 10, Kitty Snow delivererd a Banner Lecture entitled "From a Richmond Streetcar: Life through the Lens of Harris Stilson." Streetcar motorman Harris Stilson spent countless hours using his camera to capture Richmond and its everyday citizens nearly 100 years ago, giving us a priceless look at the city’s many slices of life. This lecture, presented by Kitty Snow, Harry’s great-granddaughter, will reveal the city’s past as told through Harry’s prolific images and her thoughtful narration.

Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause by Heath Hardage Lee

Jun 27, 2014 00:55:55

Description:

On June 26, Heath Hardage Lee delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause." Varina Anne “Winnie” Davis was the youngest daughter of Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his second wife, Varina Howell Davis. Winnie’s birth in June 1864 was hailed as a blessing by war-weary southerners. Her arrival seemed a good omen that might signify future victory. After the war, Winnie, who spent her early life as a genteel refugee and a European expatriate, was christened the “Daughter of the Confederacy” in 1886. This role was bestowed upon her by a southern society trying to come to terms with defeat. Particularly idolized by such organizations as the United Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Winnie became an icon of the Lost Cause, eclipsing even her father in popularity. Her controversial engagement in 1890 to a northern lawyer, whose grandfather was a famous abolitionist, shocked her friends, family, and the southern groups that idolized her. She later moved to New York City, where she became a writer for family friend and newspaper baron Joseph Pulitzer at The World. Despite her blooming literary career, the young woman was unable to escape the looming legacy of the Lost Cause. Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause is the first published biography of this little-known woman who unwittingly became the symbolic female figure of the defeated South. Heath Hardage Lee, author of Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause, is the History Series Coordinator at Salisbury House and Gardens in Des Moines, Iowa. She is a writer whose work has appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Charlotte Magazine, Charlotte Home Design, Charlotte Place, and Charlotte Business, and she regularly contributes to several blogs on history, art, and design.

Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause by Heath Hardage Lee

Jun 27, 2014 00:55:55

Description:

On June 26, Heath Hardage Lee delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause." Varina Anne “Winnie” Davis was the youngest daughter of Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his second wife, Varina Howell Davis. Winnie’s birth in June 1864 was hailed as a blessing by war-weary southerners. Her arrival seemed a good omen that might signify future victory. After the war, Winnie, who spent her early life as a genteel refugee and a European expatriate, was christened the “Daughter of the Confederacy” in 1886. This role was bestowed upon her by a southern society trying to come to terms with defeat. Particularly idolized by such organizations as the United Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Winnie became an icon of the Lost Cause, eclipsing even her father in popularity. Her controversial engagement in 1890 to a northern lawyer, whose grandfather was a famous abolitionist, shocked her friends, family, and the southern groups that idolized her. She later moved to New York City, where she became a writer for family friend and newspaper baron Joseph Pulitzer at The World. Despite her blooming literary career, the young woman was unable to escape the looming legacy of the Lost Cause. Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause is the first published biography of this little-known woman who unwittingly became the symbolic female figure of the defeated South. Heath Hardage Lee, author of Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause, is the History Series Coordinator at Salisbury House and Gardens in Des Moines, Iowa. She is a writer whose work has appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Charlotte Magazine, Charlotte Home Design, Charlotte Place, and Charlotte Business, and she regularly contributes to several blogs on history, art, and design.

War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast by Kevin P. Duffus

Jun 19, 2014 01:07:42

Description:

On June 12 at noon, Kevin P. Duffus delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast." For seven months in 1942, black smoke and orange flames from torpedoed vessels filled the ocean skies off the coast of North Carolina. Explosions rattled window panes and the nerves of coastal residents. Beaches were awash with wreckage, oil, empty lifeboats, and bodies. War Zone follows the accounts of three climactic engagements between U.S. forces and German U-boats off North Carolina’s coast when the battle of the Atlantic hung in the balance. This story is told from the perspective of everyday people who faced daunting challenges with perseverance, patriotism, and uncommon valor. Kevin Duffus, a researcher and filmmaker, is the author of several books, including Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast by Kevin P. Duffus

Jun 18, 2014 01:07:42

Description:

On June 12 at noon, Kevin P. Duffus delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast." For seven months in 1942, black smoke and orange flames from torpedoed vessels filled the ocean skies off the coast of North Carolina. Explosions rattled window panes and the nerves of coastal residents. Beaches were awash with wreckage, oil, empty lifeboats, and bodies. War Zone follows the accounts of three climactic engagements between U.S. forces and German U-boats off North Carolina’s coast when the battle of the Atlantic hung in the balance. This story is told from the perspective of everyday people who faced daunting challenges with perseverance, patriotism, and uncommon valor. Kevin Duffus, a researcher and filmmaker, is the author of several books, including Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

Lee at Appomattox by Elizabeth R. Varon (Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture)

Jun 12, 2014 01:04:13

Description:

On June 5, Elizabeth Varon delivered the Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture entitled "Lee at Appomattox." Robert E. Lee's surrender to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a highly gratifying image in the popular mind—it was, many believe, a moment that transcended politics, a moment of healing, a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But as Elizabeth Varon reveals in her latest book, this rosy image conceals a seething debate over precisely what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. In Appomattox, she deftly captures the events swirling around that well remembered—but not well understood—moment when the Civil War ended. Did America's best days lie in the past or in the future? For Lee, it was the past, the era of the founding generation. For Grant, it was the future, represented by northern moral and material progress. They held, in the end, two opposite views of the direction of the country—and of the meaning of the war that had changed the country forever.

Lee at Appomattox by Elizabeth R. Varon (Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture )

Jun 12, 2014 01:04:13

Description:

Robert E. Lee's surrender to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a highly gratifying image in the popular mind—it was, many believe, a moment that transcended politics, a moment of healing, a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But as Elizabeth Varon reveals in her latest book, this rosy image conceals a seething debate over precisely what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. In Appomattox, she deftly captures the events swirling around that well remembered—but not well understood—moment when the Civil War ended. Did America's best days lie in the past or in the future? For Lee, it was the past, the era of the founding generation. For Grant, it was the future, represented by northern moral and material progress. They held, in the end, two opposite views of the direction of the country—and of the meaning of the war that had changed the country forever.

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire

May 29, 2014 01:02:30

Description:

On May 22 at noon, Andrew O’Shaughnessy delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire." The loss of America was an unexpected defeat for the British Empire. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders must have been to blame. Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men who directed the British dimension of the war, historian Andrew O’Shaughnessy dispels the incompetence myth and uncovers the real reasons that rebellious colonials were able to achieve their surprising victory. British victories were frequent throughout the war. Yet roiling political complexities at home, combined with the fervency of the fighting Americans, proved fatal to the British war effort. Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy, the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and professor of history at the University of Virginia, is the author of The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire, winner of the 2014 George Washington Book Prize. Purchase a copy of The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia.

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire

May 28, 2014 01:02:30

Description:

On May 22 at noon, Andrew O’Shaughnessy delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire." The loss of America was an unexpected defeat for the British Empire. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders must have been to blame. Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men who directed the British dimension of the war, historian Andrew O’Shaughnessy dispels the incompetence myth and uncovers the real reasons that rebellious colonials were able to achieve their surprising victory. British victories were frequent throughout the war. Yet roiling political complexities at home, combined with the fervency of the fighting Americans, proved fatal to the British war effort. Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy, the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and professor of history at the University of Virginia, is the author of The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire, winner of the 2014 George Washington Book Prize.

The Spring of 1864: A Season of Hope in the United States and the Confederacy by Gary Gallagher

May 12, 2014 01:05:53

Description:

On May 7, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a special evening Banner Lecture entitled "The Spring of 1864: A Season of Hope in the United States and the Confederacy." Many people consider the summer of 1863 to be the Civil War's great turning point, after which the Confederacy stood no chance of achieving independence. In fact, citizens in both the United States and the Confederacy entered the spring of 1864 with hopes for a favorable outcome of the war. This lecture will assess opinion inside and outside the armies as the campaigning season approached in April, highlighting the importance of U. S. Grant and R. E. Lee to expectations in their respective nations. It will also underscore the importance of engaging contemporary evidence, rather than retrospective accounts, if we are to understand historical events. Gary W. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia and the author of many books and articles, including Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty (2013).

The Spring of 1864: A Season of Hope in the United States and the Confederacy by Gary Gallagher

May 9, 2014 01:05:53

Description:

On May 7, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a special evening Banner Lecture entitled "The Spring of 1864: A Season of Hope in the United States and the Confederacy." Many people consider the summer of 1863 to be the Civil War's great turning point, after which the Confederacy stood no chance of achieving independence. In fact, citizens in both the United States and the Confederacy entered the spring of 1864 with hopes for a favorable outcome of the war. This lecture will assess opinion inside and outside the armies as the campaigning season approached in April, highlighting the importance of U. S. Grant and R. E. Lee to expectations in their respective nations. It will also underscore the importance of engaging contemporary evidence, rather than retrospective accounts, if we are to understand historical events. Gary W. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia and the author of many books and articles, including Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty (2013). This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park.

Frozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival and a Modern Quest for Lost Heroes of WWII

May 1, 2014 00:46:25

Description:

On April 16, Mitchell Zuckoff delivered the 2014 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture entitled "Frozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival and a Modern Quest for Lost Heroes of World War II."

Frozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival and a Modern Quest for Lost Heroes of WWII

Apr 30, 2014 00:46:25

Description:

On April 17, Mitchell Zuckoff delivered the 2014 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture entitled "Frozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival and a Modern Quest for Lost Heroes of World War II.

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 By Alan Taylor

Apr 29, 2014 01:01:57

Description:

On April 17, 2014 Alan Taylor delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832." In 1813, British warships appeared in the Chesapeake Bay to punish Americans for declaring war on the empire. Over many nights, hundreds of slaves paddled out to the vessels seeking protection for their families from the ravages of slavery. The runaways pressured the British into becoming liberators. As guides, pilots, sailors, and marines, the former slaves used their intimate knowledge of the countryside to transform the war. Tidewater masters had long dreaded their slaves as "an internal enemy." By mobilizing that enemy, the war ignited the deepest fears of Chesapeake slaveholders. It also alienated Virginians from a national government that had neglected their defense. Alan Taylor is the Distinguished Professor in History at the University of California, Davis, and the author of The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772–1832.

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 By Alan Taylor

Apr 28, 2014 1:01:57

Description:

On April 17, 2014 Alan Taylor delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832." In 1813, British warships appeared in the Chesapeake Bay to punish Americans for declaring war on the empire. Over many nights, hundreds of slaves paddled out to the vessels seeking protection for their families from the ravages of slavery. The runaways pressured the British into becoming liberators. As guides, pilots, sailors, and marines, the former slaves used their intimate knowledge of the countryside to transform the war. Tidewater masters had long dreaded their slaves as "an internal enemy." By mobilizing that enemy, the war ignited the deepest fears of Chesapeake slaveholders. It also alienated Virginians from a national government that had neglected their defense. Alan Taylor is the Distinguished Professor in History at the University of California, Davis, and the author of The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772–1832.

The Grandees of Government: The Origins and Persistence of Undemocratic Politics in Virginia

Apr 12, 2014 00:59:43

Description:

On March 27, 2014 Brent Tarter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Grandees of Government: The Origins and Persistence of Undemocratic Politics in Virginia." From the formation of the first institutions of representative government and the use of slavery in the seventeenth century through the American Revolution, the Civil War, the civil rights movement, and into the twenty-first century, Virginia’s history has been marked by obstacles to democratic change. In The Grandees of Government, Brent Tarter offers an extended commentary based in primary sources on how these undemocratic institutions and ideas arose and how they were both perpetuated and challenged. With its thorough reevaluation of the interrelationship between the words and actions of Virginia’s political leaders, The Grandees of Government provides an entirely new interpretation of Virginia’s political history. Tarter is a founding editor of the Library of Virginia’s Dictionary of Virginia Biography and a cofounder of the annual Virginia Forum.

The Grandees of Government: The Origins and Persistence of Undemocratic Politics in Virginia

Apr 11, 2014 59:43

Description:

On March 27, 2014 Brent Tarter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Grandees of Government: The Origins and Persistence of Undemocratic Politics in Virginia." From the formation of the first institutions of representative government and the use of slavery in the seventeenth century through the American Revolution, the Civil War, the civil rights movement, and into the twenty-first century, Virginia’s history has been marked by obstacles to democratic change. In The Grandees of Government, Brent Tarter offers an extended commentary based in primary sources on how these undemocratic institutions and ideas arose and how they were both perpetuated and challenged. With its thorough reevaluation of the interrelationship between the words and actions of Virginia’s political leaders, The Grandees of Government provides an entirely new interpretation of Virginia’s political history. Tarter is a founding editor of the Library of Virginia’s Dictionary of Virginia Biography and a cofounder of the annual Virginia Forum.

From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future

Mar 20, 2014 01:15:36

Description:

From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future was a FREE, day-long conference focusing on the historic relationship between Virginia's environment and its people held at the Virginia Historical Society on March 16, 2012. The conference was sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society and made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment.

Thanksgiving American History By The HistoryGuys

Mar 20, 2014 01:03:41

Description:

On November 21, 2011, Internationally renowned historians and hosts Edward Ayers, Brian Balogh, and Peter Onuf presented "Thanksgiving in American History."

Pistol, Pop, Peanut & Pedro: The Negro League Baseball Experience

Mar 20, 2014 01:17:10

Description:

On Saturday, August 11, 2012, the Virginia Historical Society (VHS) hosted four Negro League baseball players at its museum located at 428 North Boulevard in Richmond. Henry "Pistol" Mason, Joe "Pop" Durham, Mamie "Peanut" Johnson-Goodman, and Pedro Sierra participated in an interview-style educational program answering questions about their Negro League ball-playing days and Civil Rights struggles in the 1950s and 1960s.

Midnight Risinig: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War By Tony Horwitz

Mar 12, 2014 00:58:01

Description:

On November 16, 2011, Tony Horwitz delivered the Alexander W. Weddell Trustees lecture entitled Midnight Risinig: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War. (Introduction by Paul Levengood).

"We Cannot be Tame Spectators": Four Centuries of Virginia Women's History by Cynthia A. Kierner

Mar 11, 2014 01:06:44

Description:

From before Jamestown to our own new millennium, women have been central figures in the families and communities of the Old Dominion. In recent decades, historians have also shown that Virginia women—as civic leaders and reformers, genteel ladies and embattled laborers—were also significant historical actors. Join us in commemorating Women’s History Month by celebrating the flourishing field of Virginia women’s history, and by exploring how what we’ve learned about women’s historical experiences can transform our understanding of Virginia history generally.

Secretariat By Kate Chenery Tweedy

Mar 8, 2014 00:57:40

Description:

Secretariat, the great red stallion who became the 1973 Triple Crown winner, was born on March 30, 1970, at The Meadow, a historic farm in Caroline County. The new book, Secretariat's Meadow, celebrates the farm, the family—especially Chris Chenery and his daughter, Penny—and Secretariat. The story is told by Penny Chenery's daughter, Kate Chenery Tweedy, with the assistance of her coauthor, Leeanne Ladin. More than 300 photos, most of which have never been seen, offer a magnificent visual journey to complement this special story in one of America's greatest sports moments.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

We Cannot be Tame Spectators: Four Centuries of Virginia Women's History by Cynthia A. Kierner

Mar 7, 2014 01:06:44

Description:

From before Jamestown to our own new millennium, women have been central figures in the families and communities of the Old Dominion. In recent decades, historians have also shown that Virginia women—as civic leaders and reformers, genteel ladies and embattled laborers—were also significant historical actors. Join us in commemorating Women’s History Month by celebrating the flourishing field of Virginia women’s history, and by exploring how what we’ve learned about women’s historical experiences can transform our understanding of Virginia history generally.

The Business of Virginia Has Always Been Business By Paul A. Levengood

Mar 6, 2014 00:50:12

Description:

On September 13, 2007, Dr. Levengood delivered this lecture on his book, Virginia: Catalyst of Commerce for Four Centuries. He is president-elect and CEO-elect of the Virginia Historical Society. This lecture was a program of the VHS's Reynolds Business History Center. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Tobacco, Mosquito, Slave: Colonial Virginia and the Dawn of Globalization By Charles C. Mann

Mar 6, 2014 00:28:28

Description:

On April 10, 2008, Charles C. Mann delivered the 2008 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Trustees Lecture. In his recent best-selling book, 1491, a groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Mr. Mann radically altered our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492. In "Tobacco, Mosquito, Slave," Mann gave VHS members a preview of his next book, which will describe the creation of the first truly global network of trade and ideas—from the triangular trade linking Europe, West Africa, and the New World to the first trans-Pacific ties between the New World and East Asia. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Twilight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson By Alan Pell Crawford

Mar 6, 2014 00:29:52

Description:

Thomas Jefferson returned to Monticello in 1809 at the end of his second presidential term and died there seventeen years later. In his new book, Alan Pell Crawford reveals the private Jefferson at home, coping with debt and illness, mediating family quarrels, and navigating public disputes, still a towering figure in the early republic. Mr. Crawford's previous book on a Virginia subject was Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman—and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

History Begins at Home: A Personal Journey By Charles F Bryan, JR

Mar 6, 2014 00:56:32

Description:

In this autobiographical lecture, Dr. Bryan reflects on the field of public history as it developed during the course of his own career. In 1988, he was appointed as President and CEO of the Virginia Historical Society. During his tenure, Dr. Bryan oversaw fund-raising campaigns that raised more than $110 million. These efforts have resulted in quadrupling the size of the Society's headquarters building and a significant expansion of educational programs statewide. In November 2008, Dr. Bryan retired from the VHS and was named president emeritus by the board of trustees. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Lincoln: President-Elect By Harold Holzer

Mar 6, 2014 00:42:58

Description:

In the winter of 1860–61, the crisis that erupted with the election of Abraham Lincoln threatened to split the nation. In his newest Lincoln book, Lincoln: President-Elect, Harold Holzer examines the perilous interregnum before the president-elect's inauguration and recounts Lincoln's public and private struggle to preserve the Union. Mr. Holzer is co-chairman of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and senior vice president for external affairs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

2009 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture: "Jefferson in Perspective" By Daniel P. Jordan

Mar 6, 2014 00:48:24

Description:

Daniel P. Jordan recently retired as president of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, one of the most beloved historic sites in America. No other historian today has immersed himself more deeply into the multifaceted life of our third president. Drawing on his many years at Monticello, Dr. Jordan reflected on the meaning of Thomas Jefferson within the broader context of his times and his enduring legacy for us today. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Historic Virginia Gardens By Margaret Bemiss & Will Rieley

Mar 6, 2014 00:43:58

Description:

For nearly a century, the Garden Club of Virginia has undertaken garden research and preservation work at numerous historic sites across the Old Dominion. It has restored and created beautiful landscapes for the education and enjoyment of all, from backyard gardeners to design professionals. Author Margaret Bemiss and Will Rieley, landscape architect to the Garden Club of Virginia, presented an illustrated lecture on the new book, Historic Virginia Gardens, documenting this important contribution to the commonwealth's botanical and architectural heritage. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

George Marshall, His Men, and the Recovery of Europe By Josiah Bunting III

Mar 6, 2014 01:12:24

Description:

On November 18, 2009, Josiah Bunting, III, delivered the 2009 Alexander W. Weddell Trustees Lecture. The topic of his lecture was "George Marshall, His Men, and the Recovery of Europe." Mr. Bunting is the President of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation in New York, Former President of Hampden-Sydney College, and Superintendent Emeritus of the Virginia Military Institute. (Introduction by J. Stewart Bryan, III, and Paul A. Levengood)

On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery By Robert Poole

Mar 6, 2014 00:51:18

Description:

On February 18, 2010, Robert Poole delivered a lecture on his book On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery. In his new book, Robert Poole traces the founding of Arlington Cemetery on what had been the family plantation of Robert E. Lee's wife. Arlington first became a U.S. Army headquarters and then a cemetery for indigent Civil War soldiers before Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton made it the new national cemetery. Arlington's special significance grew after the war, as the government gathered soldiers' remains hastily buried on nearby battlefields and reinterred them at Arlington, where they received the honors of a grateful nation. The rituals and reverence associated with Arlington evolved over the next hundred years, paid through the blood of those who fought in the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Cold War, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Iraq, and Afghanistan. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Virginia Environmental Endowment: Leadership, Leverage, and Legacy By Gerald P. McCarthy

Mar 6, 2014 01:05:53

Description:

On Thursday October 7, 2010, Gerald P. McCarthy discussed the Virginia Environmental Endowment. Since its inception in 1977, Virginia Environmental Endowment has had a profound influence throughout the Old Dominion. This lecture focused on the origins, mission, and accomplishments of VEE. Gerald P. McCarthy examined the effects of the endowment's grants on Virginia's environment and the people who have helped to make those results possible. Sometimes described as "venture capital for environmental improvement in Virginia," VEE has played a unique role in the development of environmental research, education, and civic engagement. This lecture addressed each of these aspects of its work and the strategic approach to grant making that has made VEE a leader within the foundation world. Mr. McCarthy is executive director of Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

An African Republic: Black and White Virginians in the Making of Liberia By Marie Tyler-McGraw

Mar 6, 2014 00:55:31

Description:

On October 28, 2010, Marie Tyler-McGraw discussed her book An African Republic: Black and White Virginians in the Making of Liberia. The West African nation Liberia arose from the aspirations of the American Colonization Society, which attempted to persuade free blacks to emigrate from the United States to that colony. Ultimately, the colonization scheme failed, but Liberia endured. No state was more involved with the project than Virginia. Virginians figured prominently among both leaders of the ACS and among settlers building a new life in Africa. Though their paths rarely intersected, these black and white Virginians played key roles in founding Liberia. In this presentation based on her latest book, Marie Tyler-McGraw told this compelling story of hope and misunderstanding, race and freedom. Also the author of a history of Richmond, Dr. Tyler-McGraw is an independent scholar and public historian. The lecture was co-sponsored by The Richmond Forum in conjunction with its November 6, 2010 program, featuring President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia.

The Letters of Oliver and Bernie Hill: The Making of a Legendary Civil Rights Lawyer

Feb 22, 2014 01:06:08

Description:

On February 6 at noon, Margaret Edds will delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Letters of Oliver and Bernie Hill: The Making of a Legendary Civil Rights Lawyer." Author-journalist Margaret Edds discusses more than 200 letters written during the first years of the Hills’ marriage, while Oliver was struggling to launch a law practice in Roanoke and Bernie was teaching in Washington D.C. The 1934–36 letters illuminate Hill’s early association with the N.A.A.C.P. and the Virginia Teachers Association, work that led in future years to participation in historic court challenges to Jim Crow segregation. Margaret Edds is an author and retired journalist who is researching a book on Oliver Hill and Spottswood Robinson.

The Letters of Oliver and Bernie Hill: The Making of a Legendary Civil Rights Lawyer

Feb 21, 2014 01:06:08

Description:

On February 6 at noon, Margaret Edds will delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Letters of Oliver and Bernie Hill: The Making of a Legendary Civil Rights Lawyer." Author-journalist Margaret Edds discusses more than 200 letters written during the first years of the Hills’ marriage, while Oliver was struggling to launch a law practice in Roanoke and Bernie was teaching in Washington D.C. The 1934–36 letters illuminate Hill’s early association with the N.A.A.C.P. and the Virginia Teachers Association, work that led in future years to participation in historic court challenges to Jim Crow segregation. Margaret Edds is an author and retired journalist who is researching a book on Oliver Hill and Spottswood Robinson.

Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families By Jeffrey McClurken

Feb 21, 2014 00:59:03

Description:

The Civil War ended in spring 1865, but for Confederate veterans and their families, its consequences persisted far longer as they began to pick up the pieces of their civilian lives in the devastated South. In his new book, Jeffrey W. McClurken assesses the wide-ranging effects of the war on Confederate veteran families in Southside Virginia. Coming to terms with postwar reality on an individual level meant reconstructing the household and seeking jobs and financial assistance. It also involved the state in providing replacement limbs for amputees, pensions, and homes for old soldiers and widows. These changes would influence the shape of southern society for generations to come. Dr. McClurken teaches history at the University of Mary Washington. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Memories of World War II By Brig. Gen. John W. Mountcastle (USA, Ret.)

Feb 21, 2014 00:53:09

Description:

On July 22, 2010, Jack Mountcastle discussed photos from the temporary exhibition Memories of World War II: Photographs from the Archives of The Associated Press. The exhibition presented a stunning array of photographs from the greatest war in human history. It included photographs of Hitler and Mussolini at their peak, Londoners during the Blitz, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943, Allied leaders at Tehran, GIs in Normandy, and Marines on the black sands of Iwo Jima. Organized from the archives of the Associated Press, this exhibition presented a spectrum of 121 of the most dramatic photographs from all theaters of the war and the home front. In this lecture Brig. Gen. John W. Mountcastle (USA, Ret.) surveyed the most important of these images. Before retiring from active duty, Jack Mountcastle was the army's chief of military history in Washington, D.C. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Grand Avenues: The Story of Pierre Charles L'Enfant, the French Visionary By Scott W. Berg

Feb 21, 2014 00:57:56

Description:

In 1791 George Washington asked Pierre Charles L'Enfant, who had been a French volunteer during the American Revolution, to design a new federal city on the Potomac for the young republic. Suffering from constant interference, L'Enfant persisted in his work for a year before being dismissed. Yet, his ambitious geometrical plan for the District of Columbia survived and endures to this day. In Grand Avenues, Scott W. Berg resurrects the cranky L'Enfant and reveals how his influence persists in the nation's capital city. Dr. Berg teaches English at George Mason University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Portent: John Brown's Raid in American Memory By William M. S. Rasmussen

Feb 21, 2014 00:50:08

Description:

On October 15, 2009, William M. S. Rasmussen delivered a lecture in conjunction with the current exhibition The Portent: John Brown's Raid in American Memory. One hundred and fifty years ago, John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry failed utterly. But the violent event and the executions it prompted shocked the nation. They reinforced white southern fears about slave insurrection, emboldened secessionists, and made Brown a martyr in the eyes of many northerners. Ever since, Brown has been a symbol of contrast and controversy. Dr. Rasmussen is Lora M. Robins Curator at the VHS and curator of the exhibition that marks these tumultuous events leading up to the Civil War. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend By Scott Reynolds Nelson

Feb 19, 2014 01:00:51

Description:

According to the ballad that made him famous, John Henry did battle with a steam-powered drill, beat the machine, and died. Folklorists have long thought John Henry to be mythical, but historian Scott Nelson has discovered that he was a real person—a nineteen-year-old from New Jersey who was convicted of theft in a Virginia court in 1866, sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary, and put to work building the C&O Railroad. There, at the Lewis Tunnel, Henry and other prisoners worked alongside steam-powered drills. In his book, Nelson pieces together the biography of the real John Henry. It is also the story of work songs, songs that not only turned Henry into a folk hero but also, in reminding workers to slow down or die, were a tool of resistance and protest. This lecture complements the VHS exhibition Organized Labor in Virginia. Scott Reynolds Nelson teaches history at William and Mary.

"We Shall Not Be Moved": Virginia Songs of Labor By Gregg Kimball, Jackie Frost, and Sheryl Warner

Feb 19, 2014 01:02:27

Description:

From the textile mills of Danville to the coal fields of Wise to the tobacco factories of Richmond, workers have rallied to songs of labor. The songs told of heavy work, unjust conditions, and union struggles and were typically performed in the musical styles of their native folk traditions. On December 2, 2010, historian Gregg Kimball along with singers Jackie Frost and Sheryl Warner performed songs by such Virginia musical luminaries as the Carter Family as well as rank-and-file workers who filled churches, labor halls, and strike lines to protest their working conditions.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery By John Peters

Feb 19, 2014 00:55:51

Description:

One of America's great rural cemeteries, overlooking the falls of the James River, Hollywood provides a final resting place for Richmond's—indeed, Virginia's—political, business, and creative leaders, as well as 18,000 Confederate dead. Since before the Civil War, the elaborate ironwork, stone monuments, mausoleums, and natural setting have memorialized the varied lives of the individuals who have populated Virginia’s capital city. In this lecture based on his new book, Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery, author and photographer John Peters brings these stories to life once more. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Jeffersons at Shadwell By Susan Kern

Feb 19, 2014 00:55:29

Description:

On January 13, 2011, Susan Kern discussed her book, Jefferson's at Shadwell.In her book Susan Kern merges archaeology, material culture, and social history to reveal the fascinating story of Shadwell, the birthplace of Thomas Jefferson and home to his parents, Jane and Peter Jefferson, their eight children, and more than sixty slaves. Kern's scholarship offers new views of the family's role in settling Virginia as well as new perspectives on Thomas Jefferson himself. The story of Shadwell affects how we interpret much of what we know about Thomas Jefferson today. Dr. Kern is a visiting assistant professor of history at the College of William and Mary

Inventing George Washington: America's Founder in Myth and Memory By Edward Lengel

Feb 19, 2014 00:56:51

Description:

On February 24, 2011, Ed Lengel delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Inventing George Washington: America's Founder in Myth and Memory." In Inventing George Washington, Edward G. Lengel shows how the former president and war hero continued to serve his nation on two distinct levels after his death. The public Washington evolved into an eternal symbol as the "Father of His Country," while the private man remained at the periphery of the national vision for successive generations. As some exalted Washington, others sought to bring him down to the earth, thus creating a series of competing mythologies that depicted Washington as every imaginable sort of human being. Dr. Lengel is editor-in-chief of the Washington Papers Project and a professor of history at the University of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War By Gary W. Gallagher

Feb 19, 2014 01:00:19

Description:

On November 17, 2010, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a talk on "The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War" at the Alexander W. Weddell Trustees Lecture. 2011 marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War. Only through the bloodiest conflict of our history did Americans resolve long-running disputes over Union and slavery. Ever since then, the significance of the war—its advent and its many outcomes—has stirred debate and study. In "The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War," Gary W. Gallagher addressed the way North and South have reflected on the nature of what it meant to be a part of the United States of America. Dr. Gallagher is the Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professor and Nau Professor of History at the University of Virginia and the author of The Confederate War and Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Diary of a Public Man and Abraham Lincoln By Dr. Daniel Crofts

Feb 19, 2014 00:55:28

Description:

On March 3, 2011, Daniel Crofts delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Diary of a Public Man and Abraham Lincoln." "The Diary of a Public Man," published anonymously in several installments in the North American Review in 1879, claimed to offer verbatim accounts of secret conversations with Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Stephen A. Douglas—among others—in the weeks just before the start of the Civil War. Despite repeated attempts to decipher the diary, historians never have been able to pinpoint its author or determine its authenticity. Part detective story, part biography, and part a detailed narrative of events in early 1861, A Secession Crisis Enigma presents a compelling answer to an enduring mystery. Dr. Crofts is a professor of history at The College of New Jersey. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

American City, Southern Place: Richmond on the Eve of War By Gregg Kimball

Feb 19, 2014 00:58:06

Description:

On March 10, 2011, Gregg Kimball delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "American City, Southern Place: Richmond on the Eve of War." As a city of the upper South intimately connected to northeastern cities, the southern slave trade, and the Virginia countryside, Richmond embodied many of the contradictions of mid-nineteenth-century America. Gregg Kimball depicts the Richmond community as a series of dynamic, overlapping networks, showing how various groups of residents—immigrants and natives, free people and slaves, those high born and low—understood themselves and their society within this web of experience. Drawing on a wealth of archival material and private letters, Dr. Kimball elicits new perspectives on the nature of antebellum society and the coming of the Civil War. Gregg Kimball is director of education and outreach at the Library of Virginia and the author of American City, Southern Place: A Cultural History of Antebellum Richmond. This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Year of Meteors: Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and the Election By Douglass R. Egerton

Feb 19, 2014 01:00:15

Description:

On March 24, 2011, Douglas R. Egerton delivered a Banner Lecture entitled Year of Meteors: Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and the Election that Brought on the Civil War. In Year of Meteors, Douglas R. Egerton recreates the tumultuous presidential election year of 1860, which upset every conventional expectation and split the American political system beyond repair. At the beginning of the year, Senator Stephen A. Douglas, leader of the Democrats, the only party with a large following in both North and South, seemed poised to win. By fall the Democratic Party had disintegrated, enabling the upstart Republicans to put an untried but canny dark horse candidate in the White House. Year of Meteors tells the story of Abraham Lincoln's rise to power and the series of events that led to secession and ultimately civil war. Dr. Egerton teaches history at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, N.Y.(Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Crooked Road to Civil War, 1861 By Nelson D. Lankford

Feb 19, 2014 00:59:32

Description:

On April 14, 2011, Nelson D. Lankford delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Crooked Road to Civil War." When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated in March 1861, Virginia remained a loyal state within the Union. In the convention that met in Richmond to consider the commonwealth's relationship to the national government, union men held a strong majority. But as events unfolded, their loyalty wavered. Nelson Lankford recounts the dramatic events of that spring, when no one could foretell the future of the country, seemingly poised on the brink of dissolution. Dr. Lankford is vice president for programs at the Virginia Historical Society and author of "Cry Havoc! The Crooked Road to Civil War, 1861." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Motives of Honor, Pleasure, and Profit: Plantation Management, 1607–1763 By Lorena S. Walsh

Feb 19, 2014 00:59:56

Description:

On April 21, 2011, Lorena S. Walsh delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Motives of Honor, Pleasure, and Profit: Plantation Management in the Colonial Chesapeake, 1607–1763." In a new account of early English America, Walsh offers an enlightening history of plantation management in the Chesapeake colonies of Virginia and Maryland. Her scope ranges from the founding of Jamestown to the close of the Seven Years' War and the end of the "Golden Age" of colonial Chesapeake agriculture. Walsh's narrative incorporates stories about the planters themselves, including family dynamics and relationships with enslaved workers. An accomplished author of books on early America, Lorena S. Walsh was for twenty-seven years a historian at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. This lecture was cosponsored with The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Lincoln and McClellan By John C. Waugh

Feb 19, 2014 01:02:22

Description:

On May 12, 2011, John C. Waugh delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Lincoln and McClellan." There was no more remarkable yoking of personalities in the Civil War than Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. In Lincoln and McClellan, award-winning author John C. Waugh takes an in-depth look at this fascinating pair, from the early days of the conflict to the 1864 presidential election when McClellan ran against Lincoln on an antiwar platform and lost. Waugh weaves a tale of hubris, paranoia, failure, and triumph, illuminating as never before this unique and complicated relationship. John C. Waugh is an independent historian and former correspondent and bureau chief for The Christian Science Monitor. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

George Washington's America: A Biography Through His Map By Barnet Schecter

Feb 19, 2014 00:57:41

Description:

The maps George Washington drew and purchased, from his teens until his death, were always central to his work. Inspired by these remarkable maps, Barnet Schecter has crafted a unique portrait of our first Founding Father, revealing his early career as a surveyor, his dramatic exploits in the French and Indian War, his struggles throughout the American Revolution as he outmaneuvered the far more powerful British army, his diplomacy as president, and his shaping of the new republic. Schecter, the author of The Battle for New York, the hinge battle in the American Revolution, and The Devil's Own Work, a chronicle of the Civil War draft riots in New York, is an independent historian who lives in New York City. This lecture was cosponsored with The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Wild Vine: A Forgotten Grape and the Untold Story of American Wine By Todd Kliman

Feb 19, 2014 01:08:22

Description:

Vineyards and wine making have become all-American success stories in recent years, especially in Virginia. In his book, The Wild Vine, author Todd Kliman engagingly traces the story of the native grape hybrid, and its nineteenth-century Virginia advocate, that led by a circuitous path to the rebirth of wine-making in the twentieth century. The story begins long before California supposedly put America on the viticulture map with Dr. Daniel Norton's experimentations with grapes in Richmond. The Norton hybrid migrated to the Midwest and then, after seemingly disappearing, returned to Virginia soil to great success in more recent times. Todd Kliman is food and wine editor of the Washingtonian. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood and Jack Berninger)

The Virginia Plan: William B. Thalhimer and a Rescue from Nazi Germany By Robert H. Gillette

Feb 19, 2014 01:09:21

Description:

On August 4, 2011, Robert H. Gillette delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Virginia Plan: William B. Thalhimer and a Rescue from Nazi Germany." Among the Jews attempting to flee Nazi Germany in the 1930s were students of the Gross Breesen agricultural institute who hoped to secure visas to America. In a bold plan, Richmond department store owner William B. Thalhimer created a safe haven for the students on a Burkeville farm. This is the remarkable history of Thalhimer's heroic rescue mission and the struggle of the refugees to make a new home in rural America. In his new book, The Virginia Plan, Robert H. Gillette narrates a saga of sacrifice, survival, and hope on two continents. (Introduction by Nelson Lankford)

The Constitution of Virginia: From Jefferson's Day to Our Own Time By A.E. Dick Howard

Feb 19, 2014 00:58:45

Description:

On September 8, 2011, A. E. Dick Howard delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Constitution of Virginia: From Jefferson's Day to Our Own Time." Commentators often refer to Professor A. E. Dick Howard as "The Father of Virginia's Constitution" for good reason. He was executive director of the commission that wrote Virginia’s current constitution and directed the successful referendum campaign for ratification of that document. In this lecture, held during the 40th year since ratification, he will weave the story of Virginia's constitution with the great issues of our state's history—founding a republic, nurturing religious liberty, grappling with problems of race, facing the challenges of a changing society, and reflecting the hopes and aspirations of the people of Virginia. It is a story that has its great moments, such as Jefferson's Statute for Religious Freedom, and its sobering chapters, such as massive resistance. Ultimately, it is the story of how a people, though their constitution, shape their destiny. The author of numerous books, Professor Howard is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Battle of the Ironclads By John V. Quarstein

Feb 19, 2014 00:58:01

Description:

On September 21, 2011, John V. Quarstein delivered the first annual Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture entitled "The Battle of the Ironclads." (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond By Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi

Feb 19, 2014 00:49:55

Description:

On July 14, Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond." Basing their presentation on their recent book, Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi will give an illustrated lecture on the history of sports in Virginia's capital city. Smith and Dementi will present the venues, memorable events, and athletes of Richmond sports. The essays in Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond were originally presented in Smith's commentary series, which first aired on WCVE public radio. The many new and vintage photographs featured in the book come from the collections of the Dementi family of photographers. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The First Thanksgiving By Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos

Feb 19, 2014 00:51:08

Description:

On October 13, 2011, Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos delivered their lecture entitled The First Thanksgiving. Because of what they learned in elementary school, most Americans probably associate Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims in Massachusetts in 1621. Less well know outside Virginia is the fact that more than a year earlier, a hardy band of Englishmen landed at Berkeley Hundred on the James River and held the real first Thanksgiving. Captain John Woodlief and thirty-seven men sailed from Bristol, England, on the ship Margaret and reached Berkeley Hundred nearly three months later in December 1619. They marked their deliverance from the stormy north Atlantic with a simple service of thanks to God. Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos will tell the story of this first Thanksgiving in English-speaking America and of the origins of the Virginia Thanksgiving Festival, which led to President Kennedy's mention of Virginia in his Thanksgiving proclamation of 1963. This lecture is cosponsored with the Virginia Thanksgiving Festival. (Introduction by Thomas A. Silvestri, President and Publisher, Richmond Times-Dispatch).

Civil War Medicine By Dr. Adrian Wheat

Feb 19, 2014 00:59:08

Description:

Staggering numbers of sick and wounded soldiers placed unprecedented demands on the practice of medicine on both sides during the Civil War. This lecture describes the state of medical science in the 1860s and its application in Virginia during the war, mostly on the Confederate side. It also assess the complicated issue of care on the battlefield, transportation of patients to fixed general hospitals, and the role of sanitation. Dr. Adrian Wheat practiced medicine for many years as an army surgeon and helped found the Society of Civil War Surgeons. Most recently he advised the VHS on surgical topics for the exhibition An American Turning Point: The Civil War in Virginia. This lecture was cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park.(Introduction by Paul Levengood).

1861: The Civil War Awakening By Adam Goodheart

Feb 19, 2014 00:59:12

Description:

With his new book, 1861: The Civil War Awakening, Adam Goodheart revisits the most turbulent and consequential year in American history. In the hands of a master storyteller, we relive a time that witnessed the breakup of the nation and the first bloodletting in what became a four-year catalog of internecine violence and destruction. As the first year of the Civil War Sesquicentennial comes to an end, this lecture pulls together all of the drama and tumult of 1861 and present vividly the characters who populated that decisive era. Adam Goodheart teaches history and is director of the C. V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Maryland. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Virginia's Confederate Monuments By Timothy S. Sedore

Feb 19, 2014 00:55:53

Description:

Hundreds of memorials in stone commemorate the Civil War in Virginia at courthouses, cemeteries, town squares, and battlefields. With An Illustrated Guide to Virginia's Confederate Monuments, Timothy S. Sedore presents the first comprehensive handbook of this legacy of America's greatest national trauma in the Old Dominion. Timothy S. Sedore is a professor of English at The City University of New York, Bronx Community College. (Introduction by Paul Levengood).

Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade By Maurie D. McInnis

Feb 19, 2014 00:56:15

Description:

In 1853 Eyre Crowe, a young British artist, visited a slave auction in Richmond and captured the scene in sketches that he later developed into a series of illustrations and paintings, including the culminating work, Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia. In her new book, Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade, Maurie D. McInnis uses Crowe's paintings to explore the trade in Richmond, Charleston, and New Orleans. Through that exploration, which her illustrated lecture will present, she describes the evolving iconography of abolitionist art and the role of visual culture in the transatlantic world of abolitionism. Professor McInnis teaches in the department of art at the University of Virginia. (Introduction by Cheryl Magazine)

When the Sun Stood Still: Reflections on the Rev. John Jasper By Samuel K. Roberts

Feb 19, 2014 01:03:32

Description:

Among the larger than life personages in Richmond during the latter years of the nineteenth century is to be counted the pastor of Jackson Ward’s Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church, the Rev. John Jasper. He was born a slave in the second decade of the century, and his mark on Richmond's popular consciousness lasts even to the present. In large measure, this is because of a sermon he first preached in 1878, "The Sun Do Move and the Earth Am Square." Hailed by some and vilified by others, Jasper's sermon seemed to defy modern notions of astronomy. Yet, he was asked to preach it more than 250 times, including before the General Assembly, before his death in 1901. Reflections on this enigmatic character will explore the context in which his audiences heard him, as well as that of our own. Samuel K. Roberts is the Anne Borden and E. Hervey Evans Professor of Theology and Ethics at Union Presbyterian Seminary. This lecture was cosponsored with Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church.

American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America By David O. Stewart

Feb 19, 2014 01:04:44

Description:

A canny and charismatic politician who rose to become third vice president of the new United States, Aaron Burr seemed to throw it all away in 1805 and 1806 in an extraordinary attempt to lead a secession of the American West. American Emperor by acclaimed author David O. Stewart traces Burr from the threshold of the presidency in the contested election of 1800, through his duel with Alexander Hamilton, and then across the American West as he schemed with foreign ambassadors, the traitorous general-in-chief of the army, and future presidents, including Andrew Jackson. His immense ambition was matched by his undisguised contempt for Thomas Jefferson, a president he thought ineffective and unwise. The indecisive Jefferson finally had Burr arrested and charged with treason. Burr led his own legal defense in an historic treason trial in Richmond before Chief Justice John Marshall, winning an acquittal and freedom. Mr. Stewart is an attorney who practices law in Washington, D.C. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Before It Was Virginia: Setting the Stage By Helen C. Rountree

Feb 19, 2014 00:50:23

Description:

When English settlers arrived here 400 years ago, they encountered the first Virginians, the most famous of whom are the subjects of Helen C. Rountree's book, Pocahontas, Powhatan, and Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown. This presentation was the keynote address of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference was made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. Dr. Rountree is professor emerita of anthropology at Old Dominion University. She now concentrates full time on writing and speaking about early Virginia Indians, as well as consulting with the Virginia Council on Indians and on tribal recognition. (Introduction by Gerald P. McCarthy)

Fighting for America: The Struggle for Mastery in North America, 1519-1871 By Jeremy Black

Feb 19, 2014 01:09:40

Description:

In his latest book, prize-winning author Jeremy Black traces the competition for control of North America from the landing in 1519 of Spanish troops in what became Mexico to 1871 when, with the Treaty of Washington, Britain accepted American mastery in North America. The story Black tells is one of conflict, diplomacy, and geopolitics. The eventual result was the creation of a United States of America that stretched from Atlantic to Pacific and dominated the continent. The gradual withdrawal of France and Spain, the British accommodation to the expanding U.S. reality, the impact of the American Civil War, and the subjugation of native peoples are all carefully drawn out. Jeremy Black teaches history at Exeter University in the United Kingdom. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Nicole McMullin)

Lost in Shangri-La: A Story of Survival and Rescue during World War II By Mitchell Zuckoff

Feb 19, 2014 00:50:41

Description:

On April 5, 2012, Mitchell Zuckoff delivered the 2012 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture entitled Lost in Shangri-La: A Story of Survival and Rescue during World War II. The Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture was named in honor of the former president of the VHS (1989–91). Near the end of World War II, a plane carrying twenty-four members of the United States military, including nine Women’s Army Corps members, crashed into the New Guinea jungle. Three survivors were stranded deep in a jungle valley inhabited by cannibals. The story of their survival and the efforts undertaken to save them are the crux of Lost in Shangri-La. A riveting story of deliverance under the most unlikely circumstances, Mitchell Zuckoff’s book deserves its place among the great survival stories of World War II. Zuckoff teaches journalism at Boston University. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Brown's Battleground in Prince Edward County, Virginia by Jill Titus

Feb 19, 2014 00:55:30

Description:

On April 12, 2012, Jill Titus delivered a lecture entitled Brown's Battleground in Prince Edward County, Virginia. When the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Prince Edward County abolished its public school system rather than integrate. In her new book, Brown's Battleground: Students, Segregationists, and the Struggle for Justice in Prince Edward County, Virginia, Jill Titus situates the crisis in Prince Edward County within the seismic changes brought by Brown and Virginia's decision to resist desegregation. She reveals the ways that ordinary people, black and white, battled, and continue to battle, over the role of public education in the United States. Dr. Titus is associate director of the C. V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd and the First Flight to the North Pole by Sheldon Bart

Feb 8, 2014 01:05:31

Description:

On January 23 at noon, Sheldon Bart delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd and the First Flight to the North Pole." In the age of adventure, when dirigibles coasted through the air and vast swaths of the earth remained untouched and unseen by man, one pack of relentless explorers competed in the race of a lifetime: to be the first aviator to fly over the North Pole. The main players in this high stakes game were Richard Byrd, a dashing navy officer and early aviation pioneer; and Roald Amundsen, a bitter rival of Byrd’s and a hardened veteran of polar expeditions. Each man was determined to be the first to fly over the North Pole, despite brutal weather conditions, financial disasters, world wars, and their own personal demons. Byrd and Amundsen’s epic struggle for air primacy ended in a Homeric episode, in which one man had to fly to the rescue of his downed nemesis and left behind an enduring mystery: who was the first man to fly over the North Pole? Sheldon Bart, an authority on polar pioneer Admiral Richard E. Byrd, is the president and founder of the Wilderness Research Foundation and a member of the board of governors of the American Polar Society.

George Thomas: Virginian for the Union By Christopher Einolf

Feb 1, 2014 00:44:13

Description:

Most southern-born army officers resigned their commissions to join the Confederacy in 1861. But a substantial minority remained loyal to the national government, including George H. Thomas, the "Rock of Chickamauga," one of the most successful Union generals of the Civil War. On March 6, 2008, Christopher Einolf spoke on his biography of the career soldier from Southampton County. Dr. Einolf teaches at the University of Virginia.(Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Telling Our Stories: School Desegregation in Western Virginia By Theodore C. DeLaney

Jan 28, 2014 00:32:06

Description:

On February 22, 2007, Dr. DeLaney delivered this Banner Lecture at the VHS. In 1954 the Supreme Court held in Brown v. Board of Education that segregation by race in public schools was unconstitutional. In subsequent years, the course of integration followed a slow and varied path. The unfolding of that experience in the schools of western Virginia, particularly as related through oral history interviews, is the special focus of research by Theodore C. DeLaney. Dr. DeLaney is associate professor of history and director of the African American Studies Program at Washington and Lee University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Battle of Hué City, South Vietnam, 1968 By Lt. Gen. G.R. Christmas

Jan 28, 2014 01:04:10

Description:

On August 20, 2009, Lt. Gen. G. R. (Ron) Christmas, USMC (Ret.) delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Battle of Hué City, South Vietnam, 1968." The year 1968 marked a crucial turning point in the Vietnam War. During Tet, the lunar New Year holiday, the North Vietnamese and their Viet Cong allies staged attacks across South Vietnam, none more dramatic than the assault on Hué, the old imperial capital. The offensive ended in crippling military defeat for the attackers, and yet the strength of their assault led to a political setback for the United States, as critics at home gained traction and public support for the war eroded. Lt. Gen. G. R. (Ron) Christmas, USMC (Ret.), participated in the battle for Hué as a company commander and will present a first-hand account of the conflict. General Christmas is president and CEO of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation. This lecture was part of the VHS commemoration of the Vietnam War era. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

For Better or For Worse: The Journey of a POW and His Wife By Phyllis and Paul Galanti

Jan 28, 2014 01:10:04

Description:

On June 11, 2009, Phyllis and Paul Galanti delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "For Better or For Worse: The Journey of a POW and His Wife." In June 1966, Lt. Cmdr. Paul Galanti was shot down over Vietnam and endured nearly seven years of captivity. His wife Phyllis played a leading role in the efforts of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia to publicize the plight of their loved ones and to secure their release. The Galantis presented an illustrated lecture recounting this dramatic story. Their talk was held in conjunction with the exhibition "Bring Paul Home: Phyllis Galanti and Vietnam War POWs," which is based on the collection given by Phyllis and Paul Galanti to the VHS. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Distorted Mirrors: Americans and Their Relations with Russia and China in the Twentieth Century

Jan 28, 2014 00:50:17

Description:

On April 1, 2010, Eugene P. Trani delivered a Banner Lecture on his book "Distorted Mirrors: Americans and Their Relations with Russia and China in the Twentieth Century." During the last century, United States relations with Russia and China went through many tumultuous changes. In a new appraisal, Eugene Trani shows where American images of Russia and China originated, how they evolved, and how they have often helped sustain foreign policies that were generally negative toward Russia and more positive toward China. Trani's wide-ranging new book draws on memoirs, archives, and interviews to show how influential individuals shaped perceptions and policies based on what they saw or thought they saw in those two countries. Dr. Trani is president emeritus of Virginia Commonwealth University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Struggle with Drugs and Thugs in U.S.-Mexican Relations By George W. Grayson

Jan 28, 2014 00:55:52

Description:

On December 3, 2009, George W. Grayson delivered a Banner Lecture titled "The Struggle with Drugs and Thugs in U.S.-Mexican Relations: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?" about his book "Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?". The armed conflict between Mexico's rival drug cartels and the central government is headline news in the United States. George W. Grayson put Mexican-American relations into historical context and examined Mexican efforts to tackle both the demand and supply sides of the problems spawned by the wildly profitable supply route for illegal drugs making their way into the United States. Professor Grayson teaches at the College of William & Mary. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks By Ray McAllister

Jan 28, 2014 00:49:27

Description:

On July 23, 2009, Ray McAllister delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks." The Outer Banks have enticed Virginians with the lure of sun, sky, and sea for generations. Despite this idyllic appeal, these once-isolated barrier islands have also witnessed a turbulent past. Pirates, hurricanes, shipwrecks, and U-boats all make their appearance in the varied story of the Outer Banks. Ray McAllister, an award-winning former Richmond Times Dispatch columnist, has become the established chronicler of coastal North Carolina with his latest volume on Hatteras, which follows earlier books on Wrightsville Beach and Topsail Island. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

One Nation Under Debt By Robert E. Wright

Jan 28, 2014 00:24:46

Description:

On September 4, 2008, Robert E. Wright delivered a Banner Lecture on his book, "Virginia: Catalyst of Commerce for Four Centuries." The United States was born in debt. Was this obligation a vital tool for forging national unity, or a monstrous burden? In "One Nation Under Debt: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the History of What We Owe," Robert E. Wright follows our nation's debt from the founding to the credit crisis of today. A compelling and witty storyteller, Wright shows how the past can illuminate current financial woes. Dr. Wright teaches history at New York University's Stern School of Business. This lecture was a program of the VHS's Reynolds Business History Center. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington By Robert J. Norrell

Jan 28, 2014 00:26:49

Description:

In his compelling new biography, the first full-length life of Booker T. Washington in a generation, Robert J. Norrell recreates the broad context in which the African American leader worked to overcome past exploitation and present discrimination. Although Washington has often been disparaged since the 1960s, "Up from History" details the positive power of his vision to invoke hope and optimism. On February 5, 2009, Dr. Norrell reinstated this extraordinary historical figure to the pantheon of black leaders. Robert J. Norrell teaches history at the University of Tennessee. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Battle That Ended World War I By Edward G. Lengel

Jan 24, 2014 01:00:25

Description:

On September 17, 2009, Edward G. Lengel delivered a lecture on his book Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Battle That Ended World War I. After four years of stalemate on the Western Front, a final Allied push broke the German army in autumn 1918. The Meuse-Argonne Offensive represented the war's largest commitment of American troops to battle and helped pave the way to German capitulation in November. In To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918, Edward G. Lengel tells the epic tale of American soldiers in the final campaign of World War I. Dr. Lengel is associate professor of history at UVA and an editor of the Papers of George Washington. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Tears in the Darkness: The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath

Jan 24, 2014 01:06:26

Description:

On Thursday, May 6, 2010, the VHS held its annual Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture in the Robins Family Forum. Elizabeth and Michael Norman discussed their book Tears in the Darkness: The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath, the gripping story of the 1942 battle for the Philippines, the surrender of 76,000 Americans and Filipinos to the Japanese, and the infamous Bataan death march. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

From Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers: The Transformation of the South in the Twentieth Century

Jan 22, 2014 00:50:12

Description:

At the dawn of the twentieth century, the South was by all measurements the poorest, most segregated region in the United States. One hundred years later, it was one of the fastest-growing parts of the nation, attracting population and industry at a dizzying rate. How did this transformation take place? How much of the traditional South remains? Looking at such key events as World War II and the South’s longstanding effort to attract business investment, Paul A. Levengood will chart the breathtaking course of the twentieth century and examine what survives and what has been lost in the rush toward prosperity and growth. Dr. Levengood is president-elect and CEO-elect of the VHS. This lecture is a program of the VHS's Reynolds Business History Center.(Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Louis Brandeis: An American Legal Giant By Melvin Urofsky

Jan 22, 2014 00:51:40

Description:

On March 25, 2010, Melvin Urofsky delivered a lecture on his book Louis Brandeis: An American Legal Giant. Louis Brandeis was one of the most important and distinguished justices to sit on the United States Supreme Court. In his latest book, Melvin Urofsky presents not only Brandeis the reformer, lawyer, and jurist, but also Brandeis the man, in all of his complexity, passion, and wit. Drawing on family papers and materials never before available, Urofsky gives us the remarkable story of Brandeis's influence on American society and jurisprudence, and the electrifying story of his time. Dr. Urofsky is a former professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters By Elizabeth Brown Pryor

Jan 22, 2014 00:39:55

Description:

On May 24, 2007, Ms. Pryor delivered this lecture on her book, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters Since his death, researchers have lamented that Robert E. Lee never wrote a memoir. But, as author Elizabeth Brown Pryor revealed during her Banner Lecture at the VHS, this collection contains numerous letters and notes in the hand of Robert E. Lee reflecting on his long career. Pryor, who was granted access to selected portions of the collection found at Burke & Herbert Bank before processing at the Society began, spoke about her recently published book, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters. In her book, Pryor explores the thoughts and actions of Robert E. Lee largely through his own words—some of which were derived from the newly released papers at the VHS—focusing on Lee's religious beliefs, his views on slavery, his father, his days at West Point, and his decision to join the South during the Civil War. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Lee and Grant By William M.S. Rasmussen

Jan 22, 2014 01:04:50

Description:

On November 1, 2007, William M. S. Rasmussen delivered a lecture in conjunction with exhibition Lee and Grant. The two great opposing military commanders of the Civil War, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, towered over their contemporaries. In a major exhibition and book created in the 200th anniversary year of Lee's birth, the VHS explored the parallel lives of these two American heroes. In an illustrated lecture, co-curator and co-author William M. S. Rasmussen examined Lee and Grant and their influence on our history. Dr. Rasmussen is Lora M. Robins Curator at the VHS and curator of the exhibition. (Introduction by James C. Kelly)

Who Looks at Lee Must Think of Washington By Robert Tilton

Jan 22, 2014 00:44:13

Description:

In his 1866 poem, "Lee in the Capitol," Herman Melville portrays a dignified Robert E. Lee advocating reconciliation before the Congressional committee on Reconstruction. One of the poet's most powerful references is his association of Lee with George Washington. On February 28, 2008, Robert Tilton's lecture examined Melville's interpretation of Lee and his role in American history. Professor Tilton is co-curator of the exhibition Lee and Grant and teaches English and American Studies at the University of Connecticut.

General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse By Dr. Glatthaar

Jan 22, 2014 00:51:58

Description:

In this lecture, based on his new book General Lee's Army, Dr. Glatthaar used the story of Robert E. Lee's army as a powerful lens for viewing the entire Civil War, from the early springtime of southern hopes to final crushing defeat, from the homefront to the heart of the most famous battles of the war. Dr. Glatthaar teaches history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Lee and the Historians in the Age of the Anti-Hero By Robert K. Krick

Jan 21, 2014 00:36:04

Description:

According to some recent historians, Gen. Robert E. Lee was not a hero to southerners during the Civil War but only afterward. Robert K. Krick argues to the contrary that he was idolized as a great leader in the midst of the conflict, not just later when the defeated South groped to interpret what had happened. For thirty years, Mr. Krick was chief historian of the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. He is the author of many books including, most recently, Civil War Weather in Virginia (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Moses Ezekiel: Civil War Soldier, Renowned Sculptor By Keith Gibson

Jan 21, 2014 00:36:30

Description:

Few sculptors of the nineteenth century were as well known during their lifetimes as Moses Ezekiel, though he is little-known today. The first Jewish cadet at VMI, he fought in the battle of New Market in 1864. Encouraged by Robert E. Lee to pursue his artistic calling, Ezekiel studied in Europe and became the first American to win the coveted Prix de Rome. Keith Gibson will draw on his biography of Ezekiel to bring to life this luminary of nineteenth-century art. Colonel Gibson is executive director of museum programs and architectural historian at the Virginia Military Institute.(Introduction by Robert F. Strohm)

So Ends This Day: An Illustrated Update on the Life and Times of the Monitor, from 1861 to yesterday

Jan 21, 2014 01:06:58

Description:

Although the Union ironclad Monitor may have ended her working career in a gale off Cape Hatteras in December 1862, her story does not end there. Discovered in 1973, established as a National Marine Sanctuary in 1975, and the subject of intense recovery operations by NOAA and the U.S. Navy since then, the curious "cheesebox on a raft" still has stories to tell. Anna Holloway brought the Monitor to life in this lively, illustrated presentation by combining log entries, official correspondence, personal letters from officers and crew, and material evidence found in the ship itself. Holloway serves as vice president of museum collections and programs at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News, where she recently curated the award-winning exhibition Ironclad Revolution at the USS Monitor Center. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Hidden Treasures: A Short History of the Mary Custis Lee Trunks By Lee Shepard

Jan 21, 2014 00:47:05

Description:

On April 22, 2010, Lee Shepard delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Hidden Treasures: A Short History of the Mary Custis Lee Trunks." In 2002, two wooden trunks were found at Burke & Herbert Bank & Trust Company in Alexandria, Va. The trunks contained letters, legal papers, journals, travel souvenirs, financial records, and smaller artifacts that were collected by Mary Custis Lee, the eldest daughter of General Robert E. Lee. The collection of manuscripts and artifacts, now at the Virginia Historical Society, have been added to what is currently the largest holding of Lee family papers in any single repository. Lee Shepard will discuss and show images of items found in the trunks—including an 1810 letter from George Washington Parke Custis, the builder of Arlington House; an 1863 order from Robert E. Lee, in his own hand, announcing the death of General Stonewall Jackson; and an 1872 letter from former Arlington House slave Selina Gray to Mary Randolph Custis Lee. He will also reveal new information that we have learned not only about Robert E. Lee but also about his very interesting daughter Mary. Lee Shepard is vice president for collections at the VHS. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership By Noah Andre Trudeau

Jan 21, 2014 00:53:45

Description:

On January 28, 2010, Noah Andre Trudeau delivered a lecture on his book Robert E. Lee. Almost 150 years after the fact, Robert E. Lee remains a towering figure of the Civil War era, an acclaimed strategist and an enigmatic personality. In his new book, the latest in the critically received Great Generals Series, prolific author Noah Andre Trudeau presents an insightful narrative about the Confederacy's preeminent military leader. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Skeletons on the Zahara By Dean King

Jan 21, 2014 00:47:34

Description:

On January 24, 2008, Dean King delivered this Banner Lecture. In 1815 the American sailing ship Commerce ran aground on the northwestern shore of Africa. In his prize-winning book, Skeletons on the Zahara, Dean King recounts the misfortunes of the shipwrecked crew. They were captured by nomadic Arab slave traders and marched across the desert, subjected to heat, starvation, and cruelty. At last the survivors made it back to the coast where they were ransomed and freed. King, a Richmond writer, brings this once-famous adventure story, well known to nineteenth-century readers, back to life. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Sites and Stories: African American History in Virginia By Lauranett Lee

Jan 21, 2014 00:25:10

Description:

On February 14, 2008, Lauranett Lee delivered this Banner Lecture. Historic highway markers are beloved features of the Old Dominion's landscape. Through these signs, away from the high speed of interstates, the careful motorist can piece together major themes running through Virginia's past. One of the most important but sometimes neglected such strands is the story of African Americans. In Sites and Stories, Lauranett L. Lee mounted an exhibition to present the narratives told by these markers. Her lecture highlighted the struggles and triumphs of African Americans in Virginia from 1619 to the recent past. Dr. Lee is curator of African American history at the VHS. (Introduction by James C. Kelly)

Prestwould: Gracious Living on the American Frontier, 1790-1830 By Julia Hudson

Jan 21, 2014 00:54:36

Description:

On October 1, 2009, Julian Hudson delivered a lecture entitled "Prestwould: Gracious Living on the American Frontier, 1790-1830." Prestwould Plantation, built at the end of the eighteenth century in a post-revolutionary Georgian style, is located on the bluffs above the Roanoke River near Clarksville, Virginia. Dr. Julian Hudson, the executive director of the Prestwould Foundation, has overseen the restoration of this historic property by leading preservation specialists. His lecture illustrated the material culture represented by Prestwould, beginning with Sir Peyton and Lady Jean Skipwith and extending down four subsequent generations. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke By James Horn

Jan 21, 2014 00:59:33

Description:

In 1587, a small band of men, women, and children put down the first tentative roots of English settlement on the sandy soil of Roanoke Island along the North Carolina coast, in what was then considered part of Virginia. In the face of dwindling supplies and hostile Indians, the English leader, John White, left his family and friends and re-crossed the Atlantic in a desperate attempt to assemble ships to rescue the failing colony. However, the threat from the Spanish Armada delayed his return until 1590, and when he did, the colonists had completely disappeared. In his dramatic new account, master historian James Horn revisits the tragedy of this first, failed effort at English colonization in the New World. He offers new evidence about what happened to the Lost Colony and its people. The author of five books on early American history, James Horn is vice president of research and historical interpretation and director of the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library at Colonial Williamsburg. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia.

"Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War" By Michael Kranish

Jan 21, 2014 00:54:13

Description:

On March 4, 2010, Michael Kranish delivered a lecture on his book Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War. In his new book, Michael Kranish recounts Thomas Jefferson's difficult tenure as Virginia's governor during the Revolution. The story begins with the background of struggle against British rule, then the tumultuous outbreak of fighting and Jefferson's role in the Continental Congress, followed by his rise to the governorship. Influenced by Jefferson, Virginia provided for a weak chief executive, and the state was ill-prepared for invasion. When war came to the Old Dominion, the legislature fled the capital, and Jefferson narrowly eluded capture twice. Kranish describes his many stumbles as he struggled to respond to the crisis. "Jefferson's record was both remarkable and unsatisfactory, filled with contradictions," writes Kranish. As a revolutionary leader who felt he was unqualified to conduct a war, Jefferson never resolved those contradictions. But, as Kranish shows, he did learn lessons from the hard tutelage of war. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon" By John Ferling

Jan 11, 2014 01:06:00

Description:

On May 28, 2009 John Ferling delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon." In 2007 John Ferling spoke at the VHS on his history of the Revolutionary War, "Almost a Miracle." Now he has drawn on his unsurpassed knowledge of that era to provide a fresh and provocative new portrait of the greatest of the Founders in "The Ascent of George Washington." Dr. Ferling is the author of an earlier biography of George Washington and numerous books on the American Revolution. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"Dolley Madison: A Documentary" By Muffie Meyer

Jan 11, 2014 00:53:33

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On February 4, 2010, Muffie Meyer delivered a lecture entitled "Dolley Madison: A Documentary." In March, the "American Experience" history series on PBS will broadcast a new documentary on the life of Dolley Madison. Today’s event offers a preview of part of the documentary, along with commentary about the making of the film by the producer and director, Muffie Meyer. This event is jointly sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society and James Madison’s Montpelier. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788–1800" By Jay Winik

Jan 11, 2014 00:29:19

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On April 16, 2008, Jay Winik delivered a lecture entitled "The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788–1800." As the 1790s began, a fragile American republic took its first uncertain steps, the Russian empire expanded, and France plunged into revolution. Jay Winik's new book, "The Great Upheaval," illuminates how events in these three nations combined to change the course of civilization. Mr. Winik is the author of the best-selling "April 1865." (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

"Jefferson in Perspective" By Daniel Jordan

Jan 11, 2014 00:48:24

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On May 21, 2009, Daniel P. Jordan delivered the 2009 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., lecture entitled "Jefferson in Perspective." Daniel P. Jordan recently retired as president of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, one of the most beloved historic sites in America. No other historian today has immersed himself more deeply into the multifaceted life of our third president. Drawing on his many years at Monticello, Dr. Jordan reflected on the meaning of Thomas Jefferson within the broader context of his times and his enduring legacy for us today. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"The Shipwreck That Saved Jamestown: The Sea Venture Castaways and the Fate of America"

Jan 9, 2014 00:39:15

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On April 16, 2009, Lorri Glover delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Shipwreck That Saved Jamestown: The Sea Venture Castaways and the Fate of America." The wreck of the "Sea Venture" on Bermuda in 1609 and the role its survivors played in the eventual rescue of the failing colony at Jamestown are dramatic tales from the founding years of the nation. In a new book, authors Lorri Glover and Daniel Blake Smith retell this account of shipwreck, courage, mutiny, and deliverance. The authors make a forceful case that the "Sea Venture" bears no small part in the ultimate survival of English colonization in America. Dr. Glover teaches American history at Saint Louis University. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke"

Jan 9, 2014 00:59:33

Description:

On May 27, 2010, James Horn discussed his book A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke." In 1587, a small band of men, women, and children put down the first tentative roots of English settlement on the sandy soil of Roanoke Island along the North Carolina coast, in what was then considered part of Virginia. In the face of dwindling supplies and hostile Indians, the English leader, John White, left his family and friends and re-crossed the Atlantic in a desperate attempt to assemble ships to rescue the failing colony. However, the threat from the Spanish Armada delayed his return until 1590, and when he did, the colonists had completely disappeared. In his dramatic new account, master historian James Horn revisits the tragedy of this first, failed effort at English colonization in the New World. He offers new evidence about what happened to the Lost Colony and its people. The author of five books on early American history, James Horn is vice president of research and historical interpretation and director of the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library at Colonial Williamsburg. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"Werowocomoco and Fairfield Plantation: Rediscovering the Forgotten Landscapes of Gloucester County"

Jan 9, 2014 01:08:00

Description:

On April 2, 2009, David Brown and Thane Harpole delivered this lecture entitled "Werowocomoco and Fairfield Plantation: Rediscovering the Forgotten Landscapes of Gloucester County." The excitement of discovering lost landscapes, including the Burwell family's ancestral home and the nearby village of Powhatan and Pocahontas, has resulted in the resurgence of support for historic preservation in the Middle Peninsula. David Brown and Thane Harpole described these activities to illustrate everyday life in colonial Virginia and to show how our interpretations of it influence our own day. Brown and Harpole are archaeologists, co-directors of the Fairfield Foundation, and founding members of the Werowocomoco Research Group. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood) This event was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia.

Mapping Virginia: Pictures of a Moving Place, 1587–1783 by William C. Wooldridge

Dec 11, 2013 01:00:33

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On December 5, William C. Wooldridge delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Mapping Virginia: Pictures of a Moving Place, 1587-1783." Drawing from the engaging images in Mapping Virginia: From the Age of Discovery to the Civil War, Bill Wooldridge shows the very different ways that cartographers, and by implication their audiences, conceived of Virginia from generation to generation from the sixteenth century through the Revolutionary War. Until the mid-eighteenth century, these changing visions of Virginia had only a distant connection to changes in the colony's legal boundaries. Instead, they reflected the Old World's evolving understanding of the place, from exotic Eden to much of Eastern North America to the country around Chesapeake Bay to imperial England's greatest province. William C. Wooldridge, a retired attorney and current VHS trustee, is the author of Mapping Virginia and of several articles on cartographic history.

Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd and the First Flight to the North Pole by Sheldon Bart

Dec 10, 2013 01:05:31

Description:

On January 23 at noon, Sheldon Bart delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd and the First Flight to the North Pole." In the age of adventure, when dirigibles coasted through the air and vast swaths of the earth remained untouched and unseen by man, one pack of relentless explorers competed in the race of a lifetime: to be the first aviator to fly over the North Pole. The main players in this high stakes game were Richard Byrd, a dashing navy officer and early aviation pioneer; and Roald Amundsen, a bitter rival of Byrd’s and a hardened veteran of polar expeditions. Each man was determined to be the first to fly over the North Pole, despite brutal weather conditions, financial disasters, world wars, and their own personal demons. Byrd and Amundsen’s epic struggle for air primacy ended in a Homeric episode, in which one man had to fly to the rescue of his downed nemesis and left behind an enduring mystery: who was the first man to fly over the North Pole? Sheldon Bart, an authority on polar pioneer Admiral Richard E. Byrd, is the president and founder of the Wilderness Research Foundation and a member of the board of governors of the American Polar Society..

Mapping Virginia: Pictures of a Moving Place, 1587-1783 by William C. Wooldridge

Dec 10, 2013 01:00:33

Description:

On December 5, William C. Wooldridge delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Mapping Virginia: Pictures of a Moving Place, 1587-1783." Drawing from the engaging images in Mapping Virginia: From the Age of Discovery to the Civil War, Bill Wooldridge shows the very different ways that cartographers, and by implication their audiences, conceived of Virginia from generation to generation from the sixteenth century through the Revolutionary War. Until the mid-eighteenth century, these changing visions of Virginia had only a distant connection to changes in the colony's legal boundaries. Instead, they reflected the Old World's evolving understanding of the place, from exotic Eden to much of Eastern North America to the country around Chesapeake Bay to imperial England's greatest province. William C. Wooldridge, a retired attorney and current VHS trustee, is the author of Mapping Virginia and of several articles on cartographic history.

Carillon: The Story of a Richmond Community by Elizabeth O'Leary

Nov 18, 2013 01:11:20

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On November 14, 2013, Elizabeth O'Leary delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Carillon: The Story of a Richmond Community." An active community nestled near Richmond's Byrd Park, the Carillon neighborhood has a surprisingly rich, complex history. Basing her lecture on her recently published work,The Carillon Neighborhood: A History, Dr. Elizabeth O'Leary will relate the story of the area’s land and people from the colonial frontier to antebellum farmland; Gilded Age streetcar suburb to upscale Jazz Age development; site of a postwar housing boom to hub for civil rights activism. The lecture will provide special focus on the formation of the Carillon Civic Association and its efforts in the turbulent 1960s and '70s in nurturing one of Virginia's first successfully integrated communities.

Carillon: The Story of a Richmond Community by Elizabeth O'Leary

Nov 16, 2013 01:11:20

Description:

On November 14, 2013, Elizabeth O'Leary delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Carillon: The Story of a Richmond Community." An active community nestled near Richmond's Byrd Park, the Carillon neighborhood has a surprisingly rich, complex history. Basing her lecture on her recently published work,The Carillon Neighborhood: A History, Dr. Elizabeth O'Leary will relate the story of the area’s land and people from the colonial frontier to antebellum farmland; Gilded Age streetcar suburb to upscale Jazz Age development; site of a postwar housing boom to hub for civil rights activism. The lecture will provide special focus on the formation of the Carillon Civic Association and its efforts in the turbulent 1960s and '70s in nurturing one of Virginia's first successfully integrated communities. An art historian who resides in Richmond, O'Leary is the former associate curator of American art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Family of Assassins: The Surratts of Maryland by David O. Stewart

Nov 11, 2013 59:34

Description:

On October 31, David O. Stewart delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Family of Assassins: The Surratts of Maryland." Everyone knows about John Wilkes Booth, the man who killed Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. But what about Mary Surratt, the boardinghouse keeper who "kept the nest that hatched the egg" of assassination and was the first woman executed by the United States government? Or her son John, a Confederate courier and boon companion to Booth, who fled through Canada and Britain to Vatican City, ending up as a Papal Zouave until he was chased across the Mediterranean and hauled back to face a Washington, D.C., jury that deadlocked and set him free?

Family of Assassins: The Surratts of Maryland by David O. Stewart

Nov 2, 2013 00:59:34

Description:

On October 31, David O. Stewart delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Family of Assassins: The Surratts of Maryland. "Everyone knows about John Wilkes Booth, the man who killed Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. But what about Mary Surratt, the boardinghouse keeper who "kept the nest that hatched the egg" of assassination and was the first woman executed by the United States government? Or her son John, a Confederate courier and boon companion to Booth, who fled through Canada and Britain to Vatican City, ending up as a Papal Zouave until he was chased across the Mediterranean and hauled back to face a Washington, D.C., jury that deadlocked and set him free?

First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families by Mary Miley Theobald

Oct 11, 2013 00:46:04

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On October 10, Mary Theobald delivered a banner lecture entitled First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families. Conceived during the Revolutionary War, built during the War of 1812, and looted during the Civil War, Virginia's executive mansion has endured fires, threats, riots, and hurricanes. Written to coincide with the mansion's bicentennial in 2013, First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Family by Mary Miley Theobald brings to life the private stories of the governors and their families who shaped the destiny of this unique home. The book traces triumph and tragedy through the turbulence of wars, fires, economic depressions, and renovations in a story that mirrors Virginia's progress from the nineteenth century into the twenty-first.

Contested Borderland: The Civil War in Appalachian Kentucky and Virginia

Oct 4, 2013 01:00:38

Description:

On July 25, Brian D. McKnight delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Contested Borderland: The Civil War in Appalachian Kentucky and Virginia." During the four years of the Civil War, the border between eastern Kentucky and southwestern Virginia was highly contested territory, alternately occupied by both the Confederacy and the Union. In Contested Borderland, Brian McKnight examines the features of the region's geography and the influence of the attacks on borderlands caught in the crossfire of opposing forces. He reveals how the dual occupation of the Union and Confederate armies divided the borderland population, creating hostilities within the region that would persist long after the war's conclusion. Professor McKnight teaches history at the University of Virginia's College at Wise.

War and Pieces: Quilts through America's War Years

Oct 4, 2013 01:02:36

Description:

On Thursday, August 22, Neva Hart delivered a banner lecture entitled "War and Pieces: Quilts through America's War Years." For soldiers in the field or citizen soldiers who declared the moral equivalent of war, quilts have been used throughout America's history not only as comfort, but to further "the Cause." It wasn't the Boston Tea Party that started the fight! Learn how quilt makers, impacted by textile trade and social trends, were influenced by the Revolutionary War to today’s Middle East conflicts. This illustrated lecture featuring examples as early as the late 1700s, will discuss embargoes to the Colonies, development of America's textile manufacturing, the Underground Railroad, Civil War, women and politics, development of the Red Cross, Quilts of Valor, and virtual quilts. Neva Hart served as president of the Professional Association of Appraisers-Quilted Textiles and as a board member for the Virginia Quilt Museum. Editor and contributor to Quilts of Virginia, 1607–1899 (2006), she writes, lectures, researches and collects antique and art quilts from her home near Roanoke.

Fighting for Freedom: African Americans and the War of 1812

Oct 4, 2013 01:03:42

Description:

On Wednesday September, 4, Gene Allen Smith, delivered a banner lecture entitled "Fighting for Freedom: African Americans and the War of 1812." Images of American slavery conjure up cotton plantations and African Americans locked in bondage until the Civil War. Yet early in the nineteenth century the state of slavery was very different, and the political vicissitudes of the young nation offered diverse possibilities to slaves. Though surprising numbers of slaves did assist the Americans in the War of 1812, the conflict created opportunities for slaves to find freedom among the British. The Slaves' Gamble: Choosing Sides in the War of 1812 by Gene Smith offers a fascinating and original narrative history of an extraordinary yet little-known chapter in the dark saga of American history.

Ocracoke: The Pearl of the Outer Banks

Aug 23, 2013 00:58:23

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On August 8, 2013, Ray McAllister delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Ocracoke: The Pearl of the Outer Banks." The Outer Banks have enticed Virginians with the lure of sun, sky, and sea for generations. Despite this idyllic appeal, these once-isolated barrier islands have also witnessed a turbulent past. Pirates, hurricanes, shipwrecks, and U-boats all make their appearance in the varied story of the Outer Banks. Ray McAllister, an award-winning former Richmond Times Dispatch columnist, has become the established chronicler of coastal North Carolina with his latest volume on Ocracoke, which follows earlier books on Hatteras Island, Wrightsville Beach, and Topsail Island.

Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks

Aug 23, 2013 00:49:27

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On July 23, 2009, Ray McAllister delivered a lecture entitled "Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks." The Outer Banks have enticed Virginians with the lure of sun, sky, and sea for generations. Despite this idyllic appeal, these once-isolated barrier islands have also witnessed a turbulent past. Pirates, hurricanes, shipwrecks, and U-boats all make their appearance in the varied story of the Outer Banks. Ray McAllister, an award-winning former Richmond Times Dispatch columnist, has become the established chronicler of coastal North Carolina with his latest volume on Hatteras, which follows earlier books on Wrightsville Beach and Topsail Island.

The Feud: The All-American, No-Holds-Barred, Blood-and-Guts Story of the Hatfields and McCoys

Aug 17, 2013 01:08:15

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On June 20, 2013, Dean King delivered the 2013 Hazel and Fulton Chauncey Lecture at the Virginia Historical Society entitled "The Feud: The All-American, No-Holds-Barred, Blood-and-Guts Story of the Hatfields and McCoys."

Skeletons of the Zahara

Aug 16, 2013 00:47:34

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On January 24, 2008, Dean King delivered this Banner Lecture. In 1815 the American sailing ship Commerce ran aground on the northwestern shore of Africa. In his prize-winning book, "Skeletons on the Zahara," Dean King recounts the misfortunes of the shipwrecked crew. They were captured by nomadic Arab slave traders and marched across the desert, subjected to heat, starvation, and cruelty. At last the survivors made it back to the coast where they were ransomed and freed. King, a Richmond writer, brings this once-famous adventure story, well known to nineteenth-century readers, back to life. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Secession, Civil War

Aug 16, 2013 01:00:06

Description:

On June 13, 2013, David C. Keehn delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Secession, Civil War." The Knights of the Golden Circle was a mysterious southern-based society that set out in 1859 to establish a slave empire in Mexico. In late 1860, it shifted its focus to supporting the secession movement and intimidating Unionists in the South. According to David Keehn, once the war began, the Knights helped build up the nascent Confederate army and carried out various clandestine actions, including an attempt to assassinate Abraham Lincoln as he passed through Baltimore in 1861. Keehn, an attorney from Allentown, Pa., is the author of Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Southern Secession, Civil War.

The Civil War at a Crossroads: The Seven Days

Jul 10, 2013 01:20:25

Description:

On June 19, 2012, Edward Ayers delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Civil War at a Crossroads: The Seven Days." In the spring of 1862, Virginia's civilians faced a different kind of war than they had the year before. Advancing Union armies now occupied large amounts of territory in western Virginia and in Tidewater, and their presence had a dramatic effect on local populations. Pro-Confederate white Virginians became refugees as they left their homes, and enslaved Virginians began to flee to the safety of Union lines. In this lecture, Edward L. Ayers analyzed the impact of the Civil War on Virginia's civilians up through the first half of 1862. He is president of the University of Richmond and the author of "In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859–1863." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park and The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Introduction by Paul Levengood, Dave Ruth, and Cheryl Magazine)

Unlocking Menokin’s Secrets: Archaeological and Landscape Research at a Northern Neck Plantation

Jul 10, 2013 00:52:09

Description:

On October 25, 2012, David Brown delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Unlocking Menokin’s Secrets: Archaeological and Landscape Research at a Northern Neck Plantation." One of the great houses to survive from colonial Virginia, Menokin was the result of a unique collaboration between John Tayloe II of Mount Airy and Francis Lightfoot Lee, the husband of his daughter Rebecca. Tayloe gave Lee a life interest in 1,000 acres of his vast Richmond County estate and, as a wedding present, built the plantation house and surrounding structures. Though scant written records remain, other clues offer insight into this adaptation of European design to the environment of eastern Virginia. David Brown with DATA Investigations will discuss recent archaeological and landscape research conducted at the site. Brown is a consulting archaeologist for The Menokin Foundation. This lecture is cosponsored by the foundation, which owns and operates the home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife Rebecca Tayloe Lee. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Sarah Dillard Pope)

John Randolph of Roanoke

Jul 10, 2013 00:53:16

Description:

On June 28, 2012, David Johnson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "John Randolph of Roanoke." One of the most eccentric and accomplished politicians in all of American history, John Randolph of Roanoke led a life marked by controversy. The long-serving Virginia congressman and architect of southern conservatism grabbed headlines with his prescient comments, public brawls, and clashes with every president from John Adams to Andrew Jackson. The first biography of Randolph in nearly a century, "John Randolph of Roanoke" provides a full account of the powerful Virginia planter's hardcharging life and his influence on the formation of conservative politics. John Randolph of Roanoke tells the story of a young nation and the unique philosophy of a southern lawmaker who defended America's agrarian tradition and reveled in his own controversy. David Johnson is deputy attorney general for the state of Virginia and the author of a biography of Douglas Southall Freeman. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Andrew Cain).

To Bind Up the Nation’s Wounds: An Overview of the Thirteenth Amendment

Jul 10, 2013 00:53:42

Description:

On April 14, 2012, Dr. Lauranett delivered a lecture entitled "To Bind Up the Nation’s Wounds: An Overview of the Thirteenth Amendment." This talk highlighting the historical significance of the document. Other speakers during the lecture included Edward Ayers and Senator Henry Marsh. (Introduction by Edward Ayers and Senator Henry Marsh)

Lost Communities of Virginia

Jul 10, 2013 00:53:28

Description:

On May 3, 2012, Terri Fisher delivered a lecture entitled "Lost Communities of Virginia." Virginia's back roads and rural areas are dotted with traces of once-thriving communities. General stores, train depots, schools, churches, banks, and post offices provide intriguing details of a way of life now gone. "Lost Communities of Virginia" documents thirty small communities from throughout the commonwealth that have lost their original industry, transportation mode, or way of life. Using contemporary photographs, maps, and excerpts of interviews with longtime residents of these communities, the book documents the present conditions, recalls past boom times, and explains the role of each community in regional settlement. Terri Fisher is outreach and programs coordinator at the Community Design Assistance Center at Virginia Tech and executive director of the Giles County Historical Society. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The U.S. Marines at Belleau Wood, June 1918

Jul 10, 2013 01:20:29

Description:

On June 14, 2012, Patrick Mooney delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The U.S. Marines at Belleau Wood, June 1918." In 1917 the German Empire won its war on the Eastern Front by imposing humiliating terms on Russia. It then mounted a giant spring offensive on the Western Front in 1918 to crush the weakened Allied armies. U.S. Marines of the American Expeditionary Force helped blunt the German thrust and turn the tide. The pivotal action took place in June at the battle of Belleau Wood, the bloodiest fighting involving American troops since the Civil War. Patrick Mooney will describe this dramatic chapter in Marine Corps history and America's participation in World War I. Mr. Mooney is visitor services chief at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

More Important Than Gettysburg: The Seven Days Campaign as a Turning Point

Jul 10, 2013 01:08:12

Description:

On July 11, 2012, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "More Important Than Gettysburg: The Seven Days Campaign as a Turning Point." Ever since the Civil War ended, it has been a popular pastime to look for dramatic turning points in that conflict. For many, the battle of Gettysburg represents the great event that tipped the balance toward the North. Key political, diplomatic, social, and military issues, however, were at stake in the summer of 1862 as Robert E. Lee and George B. McClellan faced off in the Seven Days Battles. Gary W. Gallagher argues that Lee's victory had a profound effect on the conflict and that perhaps the series of battles waged on the Virginia Peninsula should be regarded as a major turning point of the war. Dr. Gallagher is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is "The Union War." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park and The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Dave Ruth)

The Queen and the USA: Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee in America

Jul 9, 2013 00:54:17

Description:

On July 26, 2012, H. Edward "Chip" Mann delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Queen and the USA: Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee" in America. Although the United States was born out of revolution against Great Britain, Americans have warmly greeted the reigning British monarch on each of her visits to this country. Queen Elizabeth II has made three state visits to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Each has rekindled appreciation of the common bonds between the United Kingdom and the United States: the rule of law, representative government, and economic freedom. "The Queen and the USA" was published to celebrate those ties on the occasion of Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee. With illustrations from his new book, H. Edward "Chip" Mann will describe the queen's special relationship with Virginia and all of America on the anniversary of her sixty years as queen of England. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Daphne Maxwell Reid)

Edward Coles: Crusade Against Slavery

Jul 9, 2013 00:51:32

Description:

On August 2, 2012, Bruce G. Carveth delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Edward Coles: Crusade Against Slavery." Edward Coles was a wealthy heir to a central Virginia plantation who left his family's Virginia tobacco plantation in 1819 and started the long trip west to Edwardsville, Illinois. He paused along the Ohio River on an emotional April morning to free his slaves and offer each family 160 acres of Illinois land of their own. Some continued to work for Coles, while others were left to find work for themselves. Coles later became the second governor of Illinois, the loyal personal secretary to President James Madison, and a close antislavery associate of Thomas Jefferson. In "Crusade Against Slavery," Bruce G. Carveth and his coauthor detail Coles's remarkable life story and his role in the struggle to free all slaves. Carveth is an independent writer and former editor. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters

Jul 9, 2013 01:02:01

Description:

On November 8, 2012, Scott Reynolds Nelson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters." Pundits will argue that the 2008 financial crisis was the first crash in American history driven by consumer debt. But Scott Nelson demonstrates in his new book, "A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters," that consumer debt has underpinned almost every major financial panic in the nation’s history. In each case, the chain of banks, brokers, moneylenders, and insurance companies that separated borrowers and lenders made it impossible to distinguish good loans from bad. Bound up in this history are stories of national banks funded by smugglers, fistfights in Congress over the gold standard, America's early dependence on British bankers, and how presidential campaigns were forged in controversies over private debt. Scott Reynolds Nelson is the Leslie and Naomi Legum Professor of History at the College of William and Mary.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition

Jul 9, 2013 01:04:08

Description:

On November 14, Daniel Okrent delivered the 2012 Alexander W. Weddell Lecture entitled "Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition." The first annual Alexander W. Weddell Lecture took place in 1983 and was named in honor of Alexander Weddell, former president of the VHS. Ambassador Weddell and his wife, Virginia, bequeathed Virginia House and a generous endowment to the VHS. The Weddell Lecture takes place on the evening of the last board of trustees meeting of the year, usually the third Wednesday in November. Past Weddell Lecturers have included Gary W. Gallagher, Edward L. Ayers, Rick Atkinson, and Tony Horwitz. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Good to Great to Gone: The Circuit City Story

Jul 7, 2013 00:58:50

Description:

On November 29, 2012, Alan Wurtzel discussed his book, Good to Great to Gone: The 60 Year Rise and Fall of Circuit City. Not many years ago, Circuit City stood out as perhaps the premier name in the highly competitive sector of consumer electronics and a prominent corporate presence in Virginia. No longer. The author of Good to Great to Gone is uniquely placed to relate this story. Alan Wurtzel was the creator and first chief executive officer of the company. His newly published account gives the inside perspective, as only the CEO can provide, on the company's spectacular rise and fall. The book is a complement to the documentary, A Tale of Two Cities: The Circuit City Story. This lecture is part of the Reynolds Business History Center series. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Gregory J. Gilligan)

The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury

Jul 7, 2013 00:57:10

Description:

On March 28, 2013, Eugene P. Trani delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury." During his career at the New York Times, Harrison Salisbury served as the bureau chief in post–World War II Moscow, reported from Hanoi during the Vietnam War, and in retirement he witnessed the Tiananmen Square massacre firsthand. In a new biography of the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Eugene P. Trani and Donald E. Davis make use of Salisbury's personal archive of interviews, articles, and correspondence to shed light on the personal triumphs and shortcomings of this preeminent reporter and illuminate the world in which he lived. Doctor Trani is President Emeritus and University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and the author, with Davis, of The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury and the New York Times. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 by Rick Atkinson

May 31, 2013 1:04:52

Description:

On May 23, 2013, Rick Atkinson delivered the 2013 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture entitled "The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945." The Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture was named in honor of the former president of the VHS and takes place in the spring. Because "Punky" Christian was a decorated veteran of the Normandy Campaign, we have focused the series on topics from the era of World War II. Previous speakers have included Elizabeth and Michael Norman, Robert Edsel, and Mitchell Zuckoff. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Winslow Homer's Virginia

May 31, 2013 01:02:40

Description:

On April 18, 2013, Elizabeth O'Leary delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Winslow Homer's Virginia." When his paintings were exhibited in 1866, artist Winslow Homer gained critical acclaim for picturing "what he has seen and known." Afterward, this reputation for objectivity helped bolster the celebrated artist's long and prosperous career. Focusing on Homer's representations of Virginia during the Civil War and post-Reconstruction era, Elizabeth O'Leary examines the more subjective aspects—political, cultural, and personal—that informed his creation of some of the most enduring images of nineteenth-century America. An art historian who resides in Richmond, O'Leary is the former associate curator of American art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South

May 31, 2013 00:57:49

Description:

On May 16, 2013, Stephanie Deutsch delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South." Booker T. Washington, the founder of Tuskegee Institute, and Julius Rosenwald, the president of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, first met in 1911. By charting the lives of these two men both before and after the meeting, Stephanie Deutsch offers a fascinating glimpse into the partnership that would bring thousands of modern schoolhouses to African American communities in the rural South. By the time segregation ended, the "Rosenwald Schools" that sprang from this unlikely partnership were educating one third of the South's African American children. Deutsch, a writer and critic living in Washington, D.C., is the author of "You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South." (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945

May 31, 2013 01:04:52

Description:

On May 23, 2013 Rick Atkinson delivered the 2013 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture entitled "The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945." The Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture was named in honor of the former president of the VHS and takes place in the spring. Because "Punky" Christian was a decorated veteran of the Normandy Campaign, we have focused the series on topics from the era of World War II. Previous speakers have included Elizabeth and Michael Norman, Robert Edsel, and Mitchell Zuckoff.

Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South by Stephanie Deutsch

May 30, 2013 57:49

Description:

On May 16, 2013, Stephanie Deutsch delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South." Booker T. Washington, the founder of Tuskegee Institute, and Julius Rosenwald, the president of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, first met in 1911. By charting the lives of these two men both before and after the meeting, Stephanie Deutsch offers a fascinating glimpse into the partnership that would bring thousands of modern schoolhouses to African American communities in the rural South. By the time segregation ended, the "Rosenwald Schools" that sprang from this unlikely partnership were educating one third of the South’s African American children. Deutsch, a writer and critic living in Washington, D.C., is the author of "You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South." (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Winslow Homer's Virginia by Elizabeth O'Leary

May 30, 2013 1:02:40

Description:

On April 18, 2013, Elizabeth O'Leary delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Winslow Homer's Virginia." When his paintings were exhibited in 1866, artist Winslow Homer gained critical acclaim for picturing "what he has seen and known." Afterward, this reputation for objectivity helped bolster the celebrated artist's long and prosperous career. Focusing on Homer's representations of Virginia during the Civil War and post-Reconstruction era, Elizabeth O'Leary examines the more subjective aspects - political, cultural, and personal - that informed his creation of some of the most enduring images of nineteenth-century America. An art historian who resides in Richmond, O'Leary is the former associate curator of American art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury by Eugene P. Trani

May 30, 2013 57:10

Description:

On March 28, 2013, Eugene P. Trani delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury." During his career at the "New York Times", Harrison Salisbury served as the bureau chief in post–World War II Moscow, reported from Hanoi during the Vietnam War, and in retirement he witnessed the Tiananmen Square massacre firsthand. In a new biography of the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Eugene P. Trani and Donald E. Davis make use of Salisbury's personal archive of interviews, articles, and correspondence to shed light on the personal triumphs and shortcomings of this preeminent reporter and illuminate the world in which he lived. Doctor Trani is President Emeritus and University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University and the author, with Davis, of "The Reporter Who Knew Too Much: Harrison Salisbury and the New York Times". (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Why Washington Burned and How the President Survived: James Madison and the War of 1812 by Jeff Broadwater

Mar 18, 2013 48:17

Description:

On March 7, 2013, Jeff Broadwater delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Why Washington Burned and How the President Survived: James Madison and the War of 1812." In his recent biography of the fourth president, Broadwater focuses on James Madison's role in the battle for religious freedom in Virginia, his contributions to the adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, his place in the evolution of the party system, his views on slavery, and his relationship with Dolley Madison. In this lecture, Broadwater will shed light on Madison’s performance as a wartime commander in chief and reveal how the unlikely wartime leader survived repeated setbacks in the War of 1812 with his popularity intact. Jeff Broadwater is a professor of history at Barton College. (Introduction by Paul Levengood) This lecture was cosponsored with the War of 1812 Commission and the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission.

Why Washington Burned and How the President Survived: James Madison and the War of 1812

Mar 7, 2013 00:48:17

Description:

On March 7, 2013, Jeff Broadwater delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Why Washington Burned and How the President Survived: James Madison and the War of 1812." In his recent biography of the fourth president, Broadwater focuses on James Madison's role in the battle for religious freedom in Virginia, his contributions to the adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, his place in the evolution of the party system, his views on slavery, and his relationship with Dolley Madison. In this lecture, Broadwater will shed light on Madison's performance as a wartime commander in chief and reveal how the unlikely wartime leader survived repeated setbacks in the War of 1812 with his popularity intact. Jeff Broadwater is a professor of history at Barton College. (Introduction by Paul Levengood) This lecture was cosponsored with the War of 1812 Commission and the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission.

Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves by Henry Wiencek

Feb 13, 2013 1:01:32

Description:

On February 7, 2013, Henry Wiencek delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves." Is there anything new to say about Thomas Jefferson and slavery? The answer is a resounding yes. Master of the Mountain, Henry Wiencek's eloquent, persuasive book--based on new information coming from archaeological work at Monticello and on previously overlooked or disregarded evidence in Jefferson's papers--opens up a huge, poorly understood dimension of Jefferson's world. Wiencek's Jefferson is a man of business and public affairs who makes a success of his debt-ridden plantation thanks to what he calls the "silent profits" gained from his slaves--and thanks to a moral universe that he and thousands of others readily inhabited. Henry Weincek, a nationally prominent historian and writer, lives in Charlottesville.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

My Father’s Name: A Black Virginia Family after the Civil War by Lawrence Jackson

Feb 11, 2013 1:01:32

Description:

On January 31, 2013, Lawrence Jackson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "My Father's Name: A Black Virginia Family after the Civil War." Part history and part detective story, My Father's Name is a moving narrative full of the mixture of anguish and fulfillment that accompanies any search into the history of slavery. In this intimate study of a black Virginia family and neighborhood, Lawrence Jackson vividly reconstructs moments in the lives of his father's grandfather, Edward Jackson, and great-grandfather, Granville Hundley. In the process the author brings to life stories of the people of Pittsylvania County during and immediately after slavery. Lawrence Jackson teaches in the English department at Emory University. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves

Feb 7, 2013 01:03:14

Description:

On February 7, 2013, Henry Wiencek delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves." Is there anything new to say about Thomas Jefferson and slavery? The answer is a resounding yes. Master of the Mountain, Henry Wiencek's eloquent, persuasive book—based on new information coming from archaeological work at Monticello and on previously overlooked or disregarded evidence in Jefferson's papers—opens up a huge, poorly understood dimension of Jefferson's world. Wiencek's Jefferson is a man of business and public affairs who makes a success of his debt-ridden plantation thanks to what he calls the "silent profits" gained from his slaves—and thanks to a moral universe that he and thousands of others readily inhabited. Henry Weincek, a nationally prominent historian and writer, lives in Charlottesville.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello by Cynthia A. Kierner

Jan 29, 2013 1:02:20

Description:

On January 17, 2013, Cynthia A. Kierner delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello." As the oldest and favorite daughter of Thomas Jefferson, Martha "Patsy" Jefferson Randolph was extremely well educated, traveled in the circles of presidents and aristocrats, and was known on two continents for her particular grace and sincerity. Yet, as mistress of a large household, she was not spared the tedium, frustration, and great sorrow that most women of her time faced. Though Patsy's name is familiar because of her famous father, Cynthia Kierner is the first historian to place Patsy at the center of her own story, taking readers into the largely ignored private spaces of the founding era. Kierner is professor of history and director of the Ph.D. program in history and art history at George Mason University. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Nicole McMullin)

Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello

Jan 17, 2013 01:02:19

Description:

On January 17, 2013, Cynthia A. Kierner delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello.” As the oldest and favorite daughter of Thomas Jefferson, Martha "Patsy" Jefferson Randolph was extremely well educated, traveled in the circles of presidents and aristocrats, and was known on two continents for her particular grace and sincerity. Yet, as mistress of a large household, she was not spared the tedium, frustration, and great sorrow that most women of her time faced. Though Patsy's name is familiar because of her famous father, Cynthia Kierner is the first historian to place Patsy at the center of her own story, taking readers into the largely ignored private spaces of the founding era. Kierner is professor of history and director of the Ph.D. program in history and art history at George Mason University. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Nicole McMullin)

My Father’s Name: A Black Virginia Family after the Civil War

Jan 13, 2013 01:01:32

Description:

On January 31, 2013, Lawrence Jackson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “My Father’s Name: A Black Virginia Family after the Civil War.” Part history and part detective story, "My Father’s Name" is a moving narrative full of the mixture of anguish and fulfillment that accompanies any search into the history of slavery. In this intimate study of a black Virginia family and neighborhood, Lawrence Jackson vividly reconstructs moments in the lives of his father’s grandfather, Edward Jackson, and great-grandfather, Granville Hundley. In the process the author brings to life stories of the people of Pittsylvania County during and immediately after slavery. Lawrence Jackson teaches in the English department at Emory University. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The 1811 Richmond Theater Fire by Meredith Henne Baker

Dec 11, 2012 56:41

Description:

On December 6, 2012, Meredith Henne Baker delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The 1811 Richmond Theater Fire." On the day after Christmas in 1811, the state of Virginia lost its governor and almost one hundred citizens in a devastating nighttime fire that consumed a Richmond playhouse. The tragic Richmond Theater fire would inspire a national commemoration and become its generation's defining disaster. In "The Richmond Theater Fire," the first book about the event and its aftermath, Meredith Henne Baker explores a forgotten catastrophe and its wide societal impact. The story of transformation comes alive through survivor accounts of slaves, actresses, ministers, and statesmen. Investigating private letters, diaries, and sermons, among other rare or unpublished documents, Baker views the event and its outcomes through the fascinating lenses of early nineteenth-century theater, architecture, and faith and reveals a rich and vital untold story from America's past. Meredith Henne Baker, an independent scholar, lives in Washington, D.C. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Good to Great to Gone: The Circuit City Story by Alan Wurtzel

Dec 10, 2012 58:50

Description:

On November 29, 2012, Alan Wurtzel discussed his book "Good to Great to Gone: The 60 Year Rise and Fall of Circuit City." Not many years ago, Circuit City stood out as perhaps the premier name in the highly competitive sector of consumer electronics and a prominent corporate presence in Virginia. No longer. The author of "Good to Great to Gone" is uniquely placed to relate this story. Alan Wurtzel was the creator and first chief executive officer of the company. His newly published account gives the inside perspective, as only the CEO can provide, on the company's spectacular rise and fall. The book is a complement to the documentary, "A Tale of Two Cities: The Circuit City Story." (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Gregory J. Gilligan)

Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition by Daniel Okrent

Dec 10, 2012 1:04:09

Description:

On November 14, Daniel Okrent delivered the 2012 Alexander W. Weddell Lecture entitled "Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition." The first annual Alexander W. Weddell Lecture took place in 1983 and was named in honor of Alexander Weddell, former president of the VHS. Ambassador Weddell and his wife, Virginia, bequeathed Virginia House and a generous endowment to the VHS. The Weddell Lecture takes place on the evening of the last board of trustees meeting of the year, usually the third Wednesday in November. Past Weddell Lecturers have included Gary W. Gallagher, Edward L. Ayers, Rick Atkinson, and Tony Horwitz. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The 1811 Richmond Theater Fire

Dec 6, 2012 00:56:41

Description:

On December 6, 2012, Meredith Henne Baker delivered a Banner Lecture entitled “The 1811 Richmond Theater Fire.” On the day after Christmas in 1811, the state of Virginia lost its governor and almost one hundred citizens in a devastating nighttime fire that consumed a Richmond playhouse. The tragic Richmond Theater fire would inspire a national commemoration and become its generation's defining disaster. In "The Richmond Theater Fire," the first book about the event and its aftermath, Meredith Henne Baker explores a forgotten catastrophe and its wide societal impact. The story of transformation comes alive through survivor accounts of slaves, actresses, ministers, and statesmen. Investigating private letters, diaries, and sermons, among other rare or unpublished documents, Baker views the event and its outcomes through the fascinating lenses of early nineteenth-century theater, architecture, and faith and reveals a rich and vital untold story from America's past. Meredith Henne Baker, an independent scholar, lives in Washington, D.C. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters by Scott Reynolds Nelson

Dec 4, 2012 1:02:01

Description:

On November 8, 2012, Scott Reynolds Nelson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters." Pundits will argue that the 2008 financial crisis was the first crash in American history driven by consumer debt. But Scott Nelson demonstrates in his new book, "A Nation of Deadbeats: An Uncommon History of America's Financial Disasters," that consumer debt has underpinned almost every major financial panic in the nation’s history. In each case, the chain of banks, brokers, moneylenders, and insurance companies that separated borrowers and lenders made it impossible to distinguish good loans from bad. Bound up in this history are stories of national banks funded by smugglers, fistfights in Congress over the gold standard, America's early dependence on British bankers, and how presidential campaigns were forged in controversies over private debt. Scott Reynolds Nelson is the Leslie and Naomi Legum Professor of History at the College of William and Mary.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Unlocking Menokin's Secrets: Archaeological and Landscape Research at a Northern Neck Plantation by David Brown

Nov 7, 2012 52:09

Description:

On October 25, 2012, David Brown delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Unlocking Menokin’s Secrets: Archaeological and Landscape Research at a Northern Neck Plantation." One of the great houses to survive from colonial Virginia, Menokin was the result of a unique collaboration between John Tayloe II of Mount Airy and Francis Lightfoot Lee, the husband of his daughter Rebecca. Tayloe gave Lee a life interest in 1,000 acres of his vast Richmond County estate and, as a wedding present, built the plantation house and surrounding structures. Though scant written records remain, other clues offer insight into this adaptation of European design to the environment of eastern Virginia. David Brown with DATA Investigations will discuss recent archaeological and landscape research conducted at the site. Brown is a consulting archaeologist for The Menokin Foundation. This lecture is cosponsored by the foundation, which owns and operates the home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife Rebecca Tayloe Lee. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Sarah Dillard Pope)

Planter Oligarchy on Virginia’s Northern Neck by John C. Coombs

Oct 12, 2012 1:03:18

Description:

On October 4, 2012, John C. Coombs delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Planter Oligarchy on Virginia’s Northern Neck." The rise of a distinct class of affluent families to economic, social, and political dominance in Virginia during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries is without doubt one of the most important developments in the Old Dominion's early history. As a group, however, the “gentry” were far from homogenous. John C. Coombs will draw on research for his forthcoming book "The Rise of Virginia Slavery" to discuss the foundations of power that were common across all ranks of the elite, as well as the circumstances that allowed the Carters, Lees, and Tayloes to achieve distinction as the colony's “first families.” Dr. Coombs is a professor of history at Hampden-Sydney College and coeditor of "Early Modern Virginia: Reconsidering the Old Dominion." This lecture is cosponsored by The Menokin Foundation, which owns and operates the Richmond County plantation home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife Rebecca Tayloe Lee. This lecture was cosponsored with The Menokin Foundation. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Sarah Dillard Pope)

Planter Oligarchy on Virginia’s Northern Neck

Oct 12, 2012 01:03:17

Description:

On October 4, 2012, John C. Coombs delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Planter Oligarchy on Virginia’s Northern Neck." The rise of a distinct class of affluent families to economic, social, and political dominance in Virginia during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries is without doubt one of the most important developments in the Old Dominion's early history. As a group, however, the “gentry” were far from homogenous. John C. Coombs will draw on research for his forthcoming book "The Rise of Virginia Slavery" to discuss the foundations of power that were common across all ranks of the elite, as well as the circumstances that allowed the Carters, Lees, and Tayloes to achieve distinction as the colony's “first families.” Dr. Coombs is a professor of history at Hampden-Sydney College and coeditor of Early Modern Virginia: Reconsidering the Old Dominion. This lecture is cosponsored by The Menokin Foundation, which owns and operates the Richmond County plantation home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife Rebecca Tayloe Lee. This lecture was cosponsored with The Menokin Foundation. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Sarah Dillard Pope)

Civil War Lawyers: Constitutional Questions and Courtroom Dramas by Arthur T. Downey

Sep 27, 2012 1:17:09

Description:

On September 13, 2012, Arthur T. Downey delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Civil War Lawyers: Constitutional Questions and Courtroom Dramas." Lawyers dominated public life during the first third of American history, and many who were prominent during the Civil War era had tried cases with and against each other before the conflict. The key members of Lincoln's cabinet were all lawyers, as were many diplomatic appointees and the five men who tried to end the war at the Hampton Roads Peace Conference in February 1865. "Civil War Lawyers" is a book not just for lawyers. It examines the dramatic issues and courtroom theatrics that played their parts in the story of how the nation divided and went to war against itself. Arthur T. Downey has taught at Georgetown University Law Center and is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Civil War Lawyers: Constitutional Questions and Courtroom Dramas

Sep 12, 2012 01:17:08

Description:

On September 13, 2012, Arthur T. Downey delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Civil War Lawyers: Constitutional Questions and Courtroom Dramas." Lawyers dominated public life during the first third of American history, and many who were prominent during the Civil War era had tried cases with and against each other before the conflict. The key members of Lincoln's cabinet were all lawyers, as were many diplomatic appointees and the five men who tried to end the war at the Hampton Roads Peace Conference in February 1865. "Civil War Lawyers" is a book not just for lawyers. It examines the dramatic issues and courtroom theatrics that played their parts in the story of how the nation divided and went to war against itself. Arthur T. Downey has taught at Georgetown University Law Center and is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Rights to Self-Governance by J. Harvie Wilkinson III

Sep 7, 2012 58:27

Description:

On September 6, 2012, J. Harvie Wilkinson III delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Rights to Self-Governance." American constitutional law has undergone a transformation. Issues once left to the people have increasingly become the province of the courts. Subjects as diverse as abortion rights, firearms regulations, and health care reform are increasingly the domain of judges. What sparked this development? Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III argues that America's most brilliant legal minds have launched a set of cosmic constitutional theories that, for all their value, are undermining self-governance. The loser in all the theoretical fireworks is the old and honorable tradition of judicial restraint, which has given way to competing schools of liberal and conservative activism—Living Constitutionalism, Originalism, Process Theory, or the supposedly anti-theoretical creed of Pragmatism. Wilkinson calls for a plainer, self-disciplined commitment to judicial restraint and democratic governance, a course that may be impossible as long as the cosmic constitutionalists continue to dominate legal thought. J. Harvie Wilkinson III is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Todd Culbertson)

Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Rights to Self-Governance

Sep 6, 2012 00:58:26

Description:

On September 6, 2012, J. Harvie Wilkinson III delivered a Banner Lecture "entitled Cosmic Constitutional Theory: Why Americans Are Losing Their Inalienable Rights to Self-Governance." American constitutional law has undergone a transformation. Issues once left to the people have increasingly become the province of the courts. Subjects as diverse as abortion rights, firearms regulations, and health care reform are increasingly the domain of judges. What sparked this development? Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III argues that America's most brilliant legal minds have launched a set of cosmic constitutional theories that, for all their value, are undermining self-governance. The loser in all the theoretical fireworks is the old and honorable tradition of judicial restraint, which has given way to competing schools of liberal and conservative activism—Living Constitutionalism, Originalism, Process Theory, or the supposedly anti-theoretical creed of Pragmatism. Wilkinson calls for a plainer, self-disciplined commitment to judicial restraint and democratic governance, a course that may be impossible as long as the cosmic constitutionalists continue to dominate legal thought. J. Harvie Wilkinson III is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Todd Culbertson)

Edward Coles: Crusade Against Slavery by Bruce G. Carveth

Aug 13, 2012 51:32

Description:

On August 2, 2012, Bruce G. Carveth delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Edward Coles: Crusade Against Slavery." Edward Coles was a wealthy heir to a central Virginia plantation who left his family's Virginia tobacco plantation in 1819 and started the long trip west to Edwardsville, Illinois. He paused along the Ohio River on an emotional April morning to free his slaves and offer each family 160 acres of Illinois land of their own. Some continued to work for Coles, while others were left to find work for themselves. Coles later became the second governor of Illinois, the loyal personal secretary to President James Madison, and a close antislavery associate of Thomas Jefferson. In "Crusade Against Slavery," Bruce G. Carveth and his coauthor detail Coles's remarkable life story and his role in the struggle to free all slaves. Carveth is an independent writer and former editor. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Queen and the USA: Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee in America by H. Edward Mann

Aug 3, 2012 54:18

Description:

On July 26, 2012, H. Edward "Chip" Mann delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Queen and the USA: Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee in America." Although the United States was born out of revolution against Great Britain, Americans have warmly greeted the reigning British monarch on each of her visits to this country. Queen Elizabeth II has made three state visits to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Each has rekindled appreciation of the common bonds between the United Kingdom and the United States: the rule of law, representative government, and economic freedom. The Queen and the USA was published to celebrate those ties on the occasion of Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee. With illustrations from his new book, H. Edward "Chip" Mann will describe the queen's special relationship with Virginia and all of America on the anniversary of her sixty years as queen of England. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Daphne Maxwell Reid)

More Important Than Gettysburg: The Seven Days Campaign as a Turning Point by Gary W. Gallagher

Jul 30, 2012 1:08:13

Description:

On July 11, 2012, Gary W. Gallagher delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "More Important Than Gettysburg: The Seven Days Campaign as a Turning Point". Ever since the Civil War ended, it has been a popular pastime to look for dramatic turning points in that conflict. For many, the battle of Gettysburg represents the great event that tipped the balance toward the North. Key political, diplomatic, social, and military issues, however, were at stake in the summer of 1862 as Robert E. Lee and George B. McClellan faced off in the Seven Days Battles. Gary W. Gallagher argues that Lee's victory had a profound effect on the conflict and that perhaps the series of battles waged on the Virginia Peninsula should be regarded as a major turning point of the war. Dr. Gallagher is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is "The Union War." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park and The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Dave Ruth)

John Randolph of Roanoke by David Johnson

Jul 6, 2012 53:17

Description:

On June 28, 2012, David Johnson delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "John Randolph of Roanoke." One of the most eccentric and accomplished politicians in all of American history, John Randolph of Roanoke led a life marked by controversy. The long-serving Virginia congressman and architect of southern conservatism grabbed headlines with his prescient comments, public brawls, and clashes with every president from John Adams to Andrew Jackson. The first biography of Randolph in nearly a century, "John Randolph of Roanoke" provides a full account of the powerful Virginia planter's hardcharging life and his influence on the formation of conservative politics. "John Randolph of Roanoke" tells the story of a young nation and the unique philosophy of a southern lawmaker who defended America's agrarian tradition and reveled in his own controversy. David Johnson is deputy attorney general for the state of Virginia and the author of a biography of Douglas Southall Freeman. (Introduction by Paul Levengood and Andrew Cain).

The Civil War at a Crossroads: The Seven Days by Ed Ayers

Jun 28, 2012 1:20:26

Description:

On June 19, 2012, Edward Ayers delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Civil War at a Crossroads: The Seven Days." In the spring of 1862, Virginia's civilians faced a different kind of war than they had the year before. Advancing Union armies now occupied large amounts of territory in western Virginia and in Tidewater, and their presence had a dramatic effect on local populations. Pro-Confederate white Virginians became refugees as they left their homes, and enslaved Virginians began to flee to the safety of Union lines. In this lecture, Edward L. Ayers analyzed the impact of the Civil War on Virginia's civilians up through the first half of 1862. He is president of the University of Richmond and the author of In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859–1863. This lecture was cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Introduction by Paul Levengood, Dave Ruth, and Cheryl Magazine)

Lost Communities of Virginia by Terri Fisher

May 7, 2012 53:28

Description:

On May 3, 2012, Terri Fisher delivered a lecture entitled "Lost Communities of Virginia". Virginia's back roads and rural areas are dotted with traces of once-thriving communities. General stores, train depots, schools, churches, banks, and post offices provide intriguing details of a way of life now gone. Lost Communities of Virginia documents thirty small communities from throughout the commonwealth that have lost their original industry, transportation mode, or way of life. Using contemporary photographs, maps, and excerpts of interviews with longtime residents of these communities, the book documents the present conditions, recalls past boom times, and explains the role of each community in regional settlement. Terri Fisher is outreach and programs coordinator at the Community Design Assistance Center at Virginia Tech and executive director of the Giles County Historical Society. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

To Bind Up the Nation’s Wounds: An Overview of the Thirteenth Amendment by Lauranett Lee

Apr 30, 2012 53:43

Description:

On April 14, 2012, Dr. Lauranett Lee delivered a lecture entitled "To Bind Up the Nation’s Wounds: An Overview of the Thirteenth Amendment". This talk highlighting the historical significance of the document. Other speakers during the lecture included Edward Ayers and Senator Henry Marsh. (Introduction by Edward Ayers and Senator Henry Marsh)

Brown's Battleground in Prince Edward County, Virginia by Jill Titus

Apr 24, 2012 55:31

Description:

On April 12, 2012, Jill Titus delivered a lecture entitled "Brown's Battleground in Prince Edward County, Virginia". When the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Prince Edward County abolished its public school system rather than integrate. In her new book, Brown's Battleground: Students, Segregationists, and the Struggle for Justice in Prince Edward County, Virginia, Jill Titus situates the crisis in Prince Edward County within the seismic changes brought by Brown and Virginia's decision to resist desegregation. She reveals the ways that ordinary people, black and white, battled, and continue to battle, over the role of public education in the United States. Dr. Titus is associate director of the C. V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Fighting for America: The Struggle for Mastery in North America, 1519-1871 by Jeremy Black

Apr 10, 2012 1:09:41

Description:

On March 28, 2012, Jeremy Black delivered a lecture entitled Fighting for America: The Struggle for Mastery in North America, 1519–1871. In his latest book, prize-winning author Jeremy Black traces the competition for control of North America from the landing in 1519 of Spanish troops in what became Mexico to 1871 when, with the Treaty of Washington, Britain accepted American mastery in North America. The story Black tells is one of conflict, diplomacy, and geopolitics. The eventual result was the creation of a United States of America that stretched from Atlantic to Pacific and dominated the continent. The gradual withdrawal of France and Spain, the British accommodation to the expanding U.S. reality, the impact of the American Civil War, and the subjugation of native peoples are all carefully drawn out. Jeremy Black teaches history at Exeter University in the United Kingdom. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Nicole McMullin)

Message, Money, and Management: A Roundtable Discussion on the Future of the Chesapeake Bay by Hon. Gerald Baliles, Ann F. Jennings, Gerald P. McCarthy, and Hon. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr.

Apr 5, 2012 1:15:37

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Hon. Gerald Baliles, Ann F. Jennings, Gerald P. McCarthy, and Hon. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. participated in a roundtable discussion entitled "Message, Money, and Management: A Roundtable Discussion on the Future of the Chesapeake Bay." The roundtable discussion was session six of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Eco-History of the Tidewater: The Long View by Roy T. Sawyer

Apr 5, 2012 50:42

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Roy T. Sawyer delivered a lecture entitled "Eco-History of the Tidewater: The Long View." This lecture was session five of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Andrew Talkov)

Managing the Mountains: Land Use Planning, the New Deal, and the Creation of the Federal Landscape in Appalachia by Sara M. Gregg

Apr 5, 2012 49:42

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Sara M. Gregg delivered a lecture entitled "Managing the Mountains: Land Use Planning, the New Deal, and the Creation of the Federal Landscape in Appalachia." This lecture was session four of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Elaine Hagy)

Notes from the Ground: Science, Soil, and Society in the American Countryside by Ben R. Cohen

Apr 5, 2012 43:34

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Ben R. Cohen delivered a lecture entitled "Notes from the Ground: Science, Soil, and Society in the American Countryside." This lecture was session two of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Andrew Talkov)

Byrd's Line: A Natural History by Stephen C. Ausband

Apr 5, 2012 1:01:05

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Stephen C. Ausband delivered a lecture entitled "Byrd's Line: A Natural History." This lecture was session one of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Before It Was Virginia: Setting the Stage by Helen C. Rountree

Mar 28, 2012 50:24

Description:

On March 16, 2012, Helen C. Rountree delivered a lecture entitled "Before It Was Virginia: Setting the Stage." When English settlers arrived here 400 years ago, they encountered the first Virginians, the most famous of whom are the subjects of Helen C. Rountree's book, Pocahontas, Powhatan, and Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown. Today's presentation is the keynote address of "From the Earth: The Environment in Virginia's Past and Future," a free day-long conference on the historical relationship between Virginia's environment and its people. The conference is made possible by a generous grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment. Dr. Rountree is professor emerita of anthropology at Old Dominion University. She now concentrates full time on writing and speaking about early Virginia Indians, as well as consulting with the Virginia Council on Indians and on tribal recognition. (Introduction by Gerald P. McCarthy)

American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America by David O. Stewart

Mar 28, 2012 1:04:44

Description:

On March 15, 2012, David O. Stewart delivered a lecture entitled "American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America." A canny and charismatic politician who rose to become third vice president of the new United States, Aaron Burr seemed to throw it all away in 1805 and 1806 in an extraordinary attempt to lead a secession of the American West. American Emperor by acclaimed author David O. Stewart traces Burr from the threshold of the presidency in the contested election of 1800, through his duel with Alexander Hamilton, and then across the American West as he schemed with foreign ambassadors, the traitorous general-in-chief of the army, and future presidents, including Andrew Jackson. His immense ambition was matched by his undisguised contempt for Thomas Jefferson, a president he thought ineffective and unwise. The indecisive Jefferson finally had Burr arrested and charged with treason. Burr led his own legal defense in an historic treason trial in Richmond before Chief Justice John Marshall, winning an acquittal and freedom. Mr. Stewart is an attorney who practices law in Washington, D.C.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

When the Sun Stood Still: Reflections on the Reverend John Jasper in His Bicentennial Year by Samuel K. Roberts

Mar 2, 2012 1:03:33

Description:

On February 23, 2012, Samuel K. Roberts delivered a lecture entitled "When the Sun Stood Still: Reflections on the Reverend John Jasper in His Bicentennial Year." Among the larger than life personages in Richmond during the latter years of the nineteenth century is to be counted the pastor of Jackson Ward’s Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church, the Rev. John Jasper. He was born a slave in the second decade of the century, and his mark on Richmond's popular consciousness lasts even to the present. In large measure, this is because of a sermon he first preached in 1878, "The Sun Do Move and the Earth Am Square." Hailed by some and vilified by others, Jasper's sermon seemed to defy modern notions of astronomy. Yet, he was asked to preach it more than 250 times, including before the General Assembly, before his death in 1901. Reflections on this enigmatic character will explore the context in which his audiences heard him, as well as that of our own. Samuel K. Roberts is the Anne Borden and E. Hervey Evans Professor of Theology and Ethics at Union Presbyterian Seminary. This lecture is cosponsored with Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade by Maurie D. McInnis

Jan 30, 2012 56:16

Description:

On January 26, 2012, Maurie D. McInnis delivered a lecture entitled "Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade."In 1853 Eyre Crowe, a young British artist, visited a slave auction in Richmond and captured the scene in sketches that he later developed into a series of illustrations and paintings, including the culminating work, "Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia." In her new book, "Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade," Maurie D. McInnis uses Crowe's paintings to explore the trade in Richmond, Charleston, and New Orleans. Through that exploration, which her illustrated lecture will present, she describes the evolving iconography of abolitionist art and the role of visual culture in the transatlantic world of abolitionism. Professor McInnis teaches in the department of art at the University of Virginia. (Introduction by Cheryl Magazine)

Thanksgiving in American History

Dec 14, 2011 1:03:42

Description:

On November 21, 2011, internationally renowned historians and hosts Edward Ayers, Brian Balogh, and Peter Onuf presented "Thanksgiving in American History." Exploring competing myths surrounding Thanksgiving’s origins, the American History Guys peeled back layers of tradition that have created the celebration that we know today. From Pilgrims, to turkey, to football games, to parade floats, the Guys offered surprising perspectives on the shaping of one our nation’s most beloved holidays. A special guest—who made a case for Virginia’s claim on Thanksgiving’s roots— also joined the Guys.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Virginia's Confederate Monuments by Timothy S. Sedore

Dec 13, 2011 55:54

Description:

On December 8, 2011, Timothy S. Sedore delivered a lecture entitled "Virginia's Confederate Monuments." Hundreds of memorials in stone commemorate the Civil War in Virginia at courthouses, cemeteries, town squares, and battlefields. With "An Illustrated Guide to Virginia's Confederate Monuments", Timothy S. Sedore presents the first comprehensive handbook of this legacy of America's greatest national trauma in the Old Dominion. Timothy S. Sedore is a professor of English at The City University of New York, Bronx Community College. (Introduction by Paul Levengood).

1861: The Civil War Awakening by Adam Goodheart

Dec 2, 2011 59:12

Description:

On November 30, 2011, Adam Goodheart delivered a lecture entitled "1861: Civil War Awakening." With his new book, "1861: The Civil War Awakening," Adam Goodheart revisits the most turbulent and consequential year in American history. In the hands of a master storyteller, we relive a time that witnessed the breakup of the nation and the first bloodletting in what became a four-year catalog of internecine violence and destruction. As the first year of the Civil War Sesquicentennial comes to an end, this lecture will pull together for us all of the drama and tumult of 1861 and present vividly the characters who populated that decisive era. Adam Goodheart teaches history and is director of the C. V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Maryland. (Introduction by Paul Levengood)

Civil War Medicine by Dr. Adrian Wheat

Oct 18, 2011 59:09

Description:

On October 27, 2011, Dr. Adrian Wheat delivered a lecture entitled "Civil War Medicine." Staggering numbers of sick and wounded soldiers placed unprecedented demands on the practice of medicine on both sides during the Civil War. This lecture will describe the state of medical science in the 1860s and its application in Virginia during the war, mostly on the Confederate side. It will assess the complicated issue of care on the battlefield, transportation of patients to fixed general hospitals, and the role of sanitation. Dr. Adrian Wheat practiced medicine for many years as an army surgeon and helped found the Society of Civil War Surgeons. Most recently he advised the VHS on surgical topics for the exhibition "An American Turning Point: The Civil War in Virginia". This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park.(Introduction by Paul Levengood).

The First Thanksgiving by Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos

Oct 18, 2011 51:09

Description:

On October 13, 2011, Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos delivered their lecture entitled "The First Thanksgiving." Because of what they learned in elementary school, most Americans probably associate Thanksgiving with the Pilgrims in Massachusetts in 1621. Less well know outside Virginia is the fact that more than a year earlier, a hardy band of Englishmen landed at Berkeley Hundred on the James River and held the real first Thanksgiving. Captain John Woodlief and thirty-seven men sailed from Bristol, England, on the ship "Margaret" and reached Berkeley Hundred nearly three months later in December 1619. They marked their deliverance from the stormy north Atlantic with a simple service of thanks to God. Graham Woodlief and Barbara Ramos will tell the story of this first Thanksgiving in English-speaking America and of the origins of the Virginia Thanksgiving Festival, which led to President Kennedy's mention of Virginia in his Thanksgiving proclamation of 1963. This lecture is cosponsored with the Virginia Thanksgiving Festival. (Introduction by Thomas A. Silvestri, President and Publisher, Richmond Times-Dispatch).

The Constitution of Virginia: From Jefferson's Day to Our Own Time by A. E. Dick Howard

Sep 12, 2011 58:46

Description:

On September 8, 2011, A. E. Dick Howard delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Constitution of Virginia: From Jefferson's Day to Our Own Time." Commentators often refer to Professor A. E. Dick Howard as "The Father of Virginia's Constitution" for good reason. He was executive director of the commission that wrote Virginia’s current constitution and directed the successful referendum campaign for ratification of that document. In this lecture, held during the 40th year since ratification, he will weave the story of Virginia's constitution with the great issues of our state's history—founding a republic, nurturing religious liberty, grappling with problems of race, facing the challenges of a changing society, and reflecting the hopes and aspirations of the people of Virginia. It is a story that has its great moments, such as Jefferson's Statute for Religious Freedom, and its sobering chapters, such as massive resistance. Ultimately, it is the story of how a people, though their constitution, shape their destiny. The author of numerous books, Professor Howard is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.(Introduction by Paul Levengood)

The Virginia Plan: William B. Thalhimer and a Rescue from Nazi Germany by Robert H. Gillette

Aug 8, 2011 1:09:21

Description:

On August 4, 2011, Robert H. Gillette delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Virginia Plan: William B. Thalhimer and a Rescue from Nazi Germany." Among the Jews attempting to flee Nazi Germany in the 1930s were students of the Gross Breesen agricultural institute who hoped to secure visas to America. In a bold plan, Richmond department store owner William B. Thalhimer created a safe haven for the students on a Burkeville farm. This is the remarkable history of Thalhimer's heroic rescue mission and the struggle of the refugees to make a new home in rural America. In his new book, "The Virginia Plan", Robert H. Gillette narrates a saga of sacrifice, survival, and hope on two continents. (Introduction by Nelson Lankford)

Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond by Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi

Jul 19, 2011 49:55

Description:

On July 14, Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond." Basing their presentation on their recent book, Brooks Smith and Wayne Dementi will give an illustrated lecture on the history of sports in Virginia's capital city. Smith and Dementi will present the venues, memorable events, and athletes of Richmond sports. The essays in "Facts & Legends of Sports in Richmond" were originally presented in Smith's commentary series, which first aired on WCVE public radio. The many new and vintage photographs featured in the book come from the collections of the Dementi family of photographers. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Wild Vine: A Forgotten Grape and the Untold Story of American Wine

Jul 1, 2011 1:08:22

Description:

On June 30, 2011, Todd Kliman delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Wild Vine: A Forgotten Grape and the Untold Story of American Wine." Vineyards and wine making have become all-American success stories in recent years, especially in Virginia. In his book, "The Wild Vine", author Todd Kliman engagingly traces the story of the native grape hybrid, and its nineteenth-century Virginia advocate, that led by a circuitous path to the rebirth of wine-making in the twentieth century. The story begins long before California supposedly put America on the viticulture map with Dr. Daniel Norton's experimentations with grapes in Richmond. The Norton hybrid migrated to the Midwest and then, after seemingly disappearing, returned to Virginia soil to great success in more recent times. Todd Kliman is food and wine editor of the "Washingtonian". (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood and Jack Berninger)

George Washington's America: A Biography Through His Maps

Jun 14, 2011 57:41

Description:

On June 9, 2011, Barnet Schecter delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "George Washington's America: A Biography Through His Maps." The maps George Washington drew and purchased, from his teens until his death, were always central to his work. Inspired by these remarkable maps, Barnet Schecter has crafted a unique portrait of our first Founding Father, revealing his early career as a surveyor, his dramatic exploits in the French and Indian War, his struggles throughout the American Revolution as he outmaneuvered the far more powerful British army, his diplomacy as president, and his shaping of the new republic. Schecter, the author of "The Battle for New York", the hinge battle in the American Revolution, and "The Devil's Own Work", a chronicle of the Civil War draft riots in New York, is an independent historian who lives in New York City. This lecture is cosponsored with The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Lincoln and McClellan

May 17, 2011 1:02:23

Description:

On May 12, 2011, John C. Waugh delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Lincoln and McClellan." There was no more remarkable yoking of personalities in the Civil War than Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. In "Lincoln and McClellan", award-winning author John C. Waugh takes an in-depth look at this fascinating pair, from the early days of the conflict to the 1864 presidential election when McClellan ran against Lincoln on an antiwar platform and lost. Waugh weaves a tale of hubris, paranoia, failure, and triumph, illuminating as never before this unique and complicated relationship. John C. Waugh is an independent historian and former correspondent and bureau chief for "The Christian Science Monitor". (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Motives of Honor, Pleasure, and Profit: Plantation Management in the Colonial Chesapeake, 1607–1763

Apr 27, 2011 59:57

Description:

On April 21, 2011, Lorena S. Walsh delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Motives of Honor, Pleasure, and Profit: Plantation Management in the Colonial Chesapeake, 1607–1763." In a new account of early English America, Walsh offers an enlightening history of plantation management in the Chesapeake colonies of Virginia and Maryland. Her scope ranges from the founding of Jamestown to the close of the Seven Years' War and the end of the "Golden Age" of colonial Chesapeake agriculture. Walsh's narrative incorporates stories about the planters themselves, including family dynamics and relationships with enslaved workers. An accomplished author of books on early America, Lorena S. Walsh was for twenty-seven years a historian at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. This lecture was cosponsored with The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Crooked Road to Civil War

Apr 16, 2011 59:33

Description:

On April 14, 2011, Nelson D. Lankford delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Crooked Road to Civil War." When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated in March 1861, Virginia remained a loyal state within the Union. In the convention that met in Richmond to consider the commonwealth's relationship to the national government, union men held a strong majority. But as events unfolded, their loyalty wavered. Nelson Lankford recounts the dramatic events of that spring, when no one could foretell the future of the country, seemingly poised on the brink of dissolution. Dr. Lankford is vice president for programs at the Virginia Historical Society and author of "Cry Havoc! The Crooked Road to Civil War, 1861." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Year of Meteors: Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and the Election that Brought on the Civil War

Mar 25, 2011 1:00:16

Description:

On March 24, 2011, Douglas R. Egerton delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Year of Meteors: Stephen Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, and the Election that Brought on the Civil War." In "Year of Meteors," Douglas R. Egerton recreates the tumultuous presidential election year of 1860, which upset every conventional expectation and split the American political system beyond repair. At the beginning of the year, Senator Stephen A. Douglas, leader of the Democrats, the only party with a large following in both North and South, seemed poised to win. By fall the Democratic Party had disintegrated, enabling the upstart Republicans to put an untried but canny dark horse candidate in the White House. "Year of Meteors" tells the story of Abraham Lincoln's rise to power and the series of events that led to secession and ultimately civil war. Dr. Egerton teaches history at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, N.Y. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

American City, Southern Place: Richmond on the Eve of War.

Mar 11, 2011 58:07

Description:

On March 10, 2011, Gregg Kimball delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "American City, Southern Place: Richmond on the Eve of War." As a city of the upper South intimately connected to northeastern cities, the southern slave trade, and the Virginia countryside, Richmond embodied many of the contradictions of mid-nineteenth-century America. Gregg Kimball depicts the Richmond community as a series of dynamic, overlapping networks, showing how various groups of residents, immigrants and natives, free people and slaves, those high born and low, understood themselves and their society within this web of experience. Drawing on a wealth of archival material and private letters, Dr. Kimball elicits new perspectives on the nature of antebellum society and the coming of the Civil War. Gregg Kimball is director of education and outreach at the Library of Virginia and the author of "American City, Southern Place: A Cultural History of Antebellum Richmond." This lecture is cosponsored with the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Diary of a Public Man and Abraham Lincoln

Mar 11, 2011 55:29

Description:

On March 3, 2011, Daniel Crofts delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "The Diary of a Public Man and Abraham Lincoln." "The Diary of a Public Man," published anonymously in several installments in the North American Review in 1879, claimed to offer verbatim accounts of secret conversations with Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Stephen A. Douglas among others in the weeks just before the start of the Civil War. Despite repeated attempts to decipher the diary, historians never have been able to pinpoint its author or determine its authenticity. Part detective story, part biography, and part a detailed narrative of events in early 1861, A Secession Crisis Enigma presents a compelling answer to an enduring mystery. Dr. Crofts is a professor of history at The College of New Jersey. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Inventing George Washington: America's Founder in Myth and Memory

Feb 28, 2011 56:52

Description:

On February 24, 2011, Ed Lengel delivered a Banner Lecture entitled 'Inventing George Washington: America's Founder in Myth and Memory.' In 'Inventing George Washington,' Edward G. Lengel shows how the former president and war hero continued to serve his nation on two distinct levels after his death. The public Washington evolved into an eternal symbol as the "Father of His Country," while the private man remained at the periphery of the national vision for successive generations. As some exalted Washington, others sought to bring him down to the earth, thus creating a series of competing mythologies that depicted Washington as every imaginable sort of human being. Dr. Lengel is editor-in-chief of the Washington Papers Project and a professor of history at the University of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Jeffersons at Shadwell

Jan 18, 2011 55:40

Description:

On January 13, 2011, Susan Kern discussed her book, 'The Jeffersons at Shadwell.' In The Jeffersons at Shadwell, Susan Kern merges archaeology, material culture, and social history to reveal the fascinating story of Shadwell, the birthplace of Thomas Jefferson and home to his parents, Jane and Peter Jefferson, their eight children, and more than sixty slaves. Kern's scholarship offers new views of the family's role in settling Virginia as well as new perspectives on Thomas Jefferson himself. The story of Shadwell affects how we interpret much of what we know about Thomas Jefferson today. Dr. Kern is a visiting assistant professor of history at the College of William and Mary. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery

Dec 14, 2010 55:52

Description:

On December 9, 2010, John Peters discussed his new book, 'Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery. One of America's great rural cemeteries, overlooking the falls of the James River, Hollywood provides a final resting place for Richmond's indeed, Virginia's political, business, and creative leaders, as well as 18,000 Confederate dead. Since before the Civil War, the elaborate ironwork, stone monuments, mausoleums, and natural setting have memorialized the varied lives of the individuals who have populated Virginia’s capital city. In this lecture based on his new book, 'Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery' , author and photographer John Peters brings these stories to life once more. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

"We Shall Not Be Moved": Virginia Songs of Labor

Dec 2, 2010 1:02:28

Description:

From the textile mills of Danville to the coal fields of Wise to the tobacco factories of Richmond, workers have rallied to songs of labor. The songs told of heavy work, unjust conditions, and union struggles and were typically performed in the musical styles of their native folk traditions. On December 2, 2010, historian Gregg Kimball along with singers Jackie Frost and Sheryl Warner performed songs by such Virginia musical luminaries as the Carter Family as well as rank-and-file workers who filled churches, labor halls, and strike lines to protest their working conditions. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War

Nov 23, 2010 1:00:19

Description:

On Thursday November 17, 2010, Gary W. Gallagher delviered a talk on "The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War" at the Alexander W. Weddell Trustees Lecture. Next year we mark the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War. Only through the bloodiest conflict of our history did Americans resolve long-running disputes over Union and slavery. Ever since then, the significance of the war—its advent and its many outcomes—has stirred debate and study. In "The Real Lost Cause: The Idea of Union in the Memory of the Civil War," Gary W. Gallagher addressed the way North and South have reflected on the nature of what it meant to be a part of the United States of America. Dr. Gallagher is the Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professor and Nau Professor of History at the University of Virginia and the author of "The Confederate War and Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War." (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend

Nov 5, 2010 1:00:52

Description:

On Thursday, November 4, 2010, Scott Reynolds Nelson discussed his book Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend. According to the ballad that made him famous, John Henry did battle with a steam-powered drill, beat the machine, and died. Folklorists have long thought John Henry to be mythical, but historian Scott Nelson has discovered that he was a real person—a nineteen-year-old from New Jersey who was convicted of theft in a Virginia court in 1866, sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary, and put to work building the C and O Railroad. There, at the Lewis Tunnel, Henry and other prisoners worked alongside steam-powered drills. In his book, Nelson pieces together the biography of the real John Henry. It is also the story of work songs, songs that not only turned Henry into a folk hero but also, in reminding workers to slow down or die, were a tool of resistance and protest. This lecture complements the VHS exhibition Organized Labor in Virginia. Scott Reynolds Nelson teaches history at William and Mary.(Introduction by E. Lee Shepard)

Secretariat

Oct 14, 2010 57:40

Description:

On Thursday, October 13, 2010, Kate Chenery Tweedy discussed her book Secretariat's Meadow. Secretariat, the great red stallion who became the 1973 Triple Crown winner, was born on March 30, 1970, at The Meadow, a historic farm in Caroline County. The new book, Secretariat's Meadow, celebrates the farm, the family—especially Chris Chenery and his daughter, Penny—and Secretariat. The story is told by Penny Chenery's daughter, Kate Chenery Tweedy, with the assistance of her coauthor, Leeanne Ladin. More than 300 photos, most of which have never been seen, offer a magnificent visual journey to complement this special story in one of America's greatest sports moments.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

An African Republic: Black and White Virginians in the Making of Liberia

Oct 14, 2010 55:32

Description:

On Thursday, October 28, 2010, Marie Tyler-McGraw discussed her book, An African Republic: Black and White Virginians in the Making of Liberia. The West African nation Liberia arose from the aspirations of the American Colonization Society, which attempted to persuade free blacks to emigrate from the United States to that colony. Ultimately, the colonization scheme failed, but Liberia endured. No state was more involved with the project than Virginia. Virginians figured prominently among both leaders of the ACS and among settlers building a new life in Africa. Though their paths rarely intersected, these black and white Virginians played key roles in founding Liberia. In this presentation based on her latest book, Marie Tyler-McGraw tells this compelling story of hope and misunderstanding, race and freedom. Also the author of a history of Richmond, Dr. Tyler-McGraw is an independent scholar and public historian. The lecture is co-sponsored by The Richmond Forum in conjunction with its November 6, 2010 program, featuring President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia.(Introduction by E. Lee Shepard)

Virginia Environmental Endowment: Leadership, Leverage, and Legacy

Oct 8, 2010 1:05:54

Description:

On Thursday October 7, 2010, Gerald P. McCarthy discussed the Virginia Environmental Endowment. Since its inception in 1977, Virginia Environmental Endowment has had a profound influence throughout the Old Dominion. This lecture will focus on the origins, mission, and accomplishments of VEE. Gerald P. McCarthy will examine the effects of the endowment's grants on Virginia’s environment and the people who have helped to make those results possible. Sometimes described as "venture capital for environmental improvement in Virginia," VEE has played a unique role in the development of environmental research, education, and civic engagement. This lecture will address each of these aspects of its work and the strategic approach to grant making that has made VEE a leader within the foundation world. Mr. McCarthy is executive director of Virginia Environmental Endowment. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Grand Avenues: The Story of Pierre Charles L'Enfant, the French Visionary Who Designed Washington, D.C.

Sep 24, 2010 57:56

Description:

On September 23, 2010, Scott W. Berg discussed his book Grand Avenues: The Story of Pierre Charles L'Enfant, the French Visionary Who Designed Washington, D.C. In 1791 George Washington asked Pierre Charles L'Enfant, who had been a French volunteer during the American Revolution, to design a new federal city on the Potomac for the young republic. Suffering from constant interference, L'Enfant persisted in his work for a year before being dismissed. Yet, his ambitious geometrical plan for the District of Columbia survived and endures to this day. In Grand Avenues, Scott W. Berg resurrects the cranky L'Enfant and reveals how his influence persists in the nation's capital city. Dr. Berg teaches English at George Mason University.(Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Memories of World War II

Jun 29, 2010 59:10

Description:

On July 22, 2010, Jack Mountcastle discussed photos from the temporary exhibition Memories of World War II: Photographs from the Archives of The Associated Press. The exhibition presented a stunning array of photographs from the greatest war in human history. It included photographs of Hitler and Mussolini at their peak, Londoners during the Blitz, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943, Allied leaders at Tehran, GIs in Normandy, and Marines on the black sands of Iwo Jima. Organized from the archives of the Associated Press, this exhibition presented a spectrum of 121 of the most dramatic photographs from all theaters of the war and the home front. In this lecture Brig. Gen. John W. Mountcastle (USA, Ret.) surveyed the most important of these images. Before retiring from active duty, Jack Mountcastle was the army's chief of military history in Washington, D.C.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families in Virginia

Jun 15, 2010 59:03

Description:

On June 10, 2010, Jeffrey W. McClurken, discussed his book, "Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families in Virginia." The Civil War ended in spring 1865, but for Confederate veterans and their families, its consequences persisted far longer as they began to pick up the pieces of their civilian lives in the devastated South. In his new book, Jeffrey W. McClurken assesses the wide-ranging effects of the war on Confederate veteran families in Southside Virginia. Coming to terms with postwar reality on an individual level meant reconstructing the household and seeking jobs and financial assistance. It also involved the state in providing replacement limbs for amputees, pensions, and homes for old soldiers and widows. These changes would influence the shape of southern society for generations to come. Dr. McClurken teaches history at the University of Mary Washington.(Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke

Jun 9, 2010 59:34

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On May 27, 2010, James Horn discussed his book "A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke". In 1587, a small band of men, women, and children put down the first tentative roots of English settlement on the sandy soil of Roanoke Island along the North Carolina coast, in what was then considered part of Virginia. In the face of dwindling supplies and hostile Indians, the English leader, John White, left his family and friends and re-crossed the Atlantic in a desperate attempt to assemble ships to rescue the failing colony. However, the threat from the Spanish Armada delayed his return until 1590, and when he did, the colonists had completely disappeared. In his dramatic new account, master historian James Horn revisits the tragedy of this first, failed effort at English colonization in the New World. He offers new evidence about what happened to the Lost Colony and its people. The author of five books on early American history, James Horn is vice president of research and historical interpretation and director of the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library at Colonial Williamsburg. "This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia." (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Paying Up: The History of Taxation

Jun 9, 2010 59:37

Description:

On May 20, 2010, Internationally renowned historians and hosts Edward Ayers, Brian Balogh, and Peter Onuf present "Paying Up: The History of Taxation." From the very beginning, Americans have been arguing about whether their taxes are fair and just. The American History Guys will explored taxation's complicated and turbulent history—from the Stamp Act of 1765 to the Tea Party Movement of 2010—and discuss Americans' attitudes toward the Tax Man. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Tears in the Darkness: The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath

May 18, 2010 1:06:26

Description:

On Thursday, May 6, 2010, the VHS held its annual Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture in the Robins Family Forum. Elizabeth and Michael Norman discussed their book Tears in the Darkness: The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath, the gripping story of the 1942 battle for the Philippines, the surrender of 76,000 Americans and Filipinos to the Japanese, and the infamous Bataan death march.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Cultural Worlds of Patsy Cline's Winchester

May 4, 2010 39:56

Description:

On April 4, 2008, Mike Foreman and Warren Hofstra delivered this lecture at the 2008 symposium, "Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline." (Includes comments from oral history interviews) Mike Foreman is an adjunct assistant professor of political science at Shenandoah University and a history instructor in the School of Continuing Education. Mr. Foreman co-edited Images of the Past; he is the author of A History of the Nurses Training School, Winchester Memorial Hospital, 1903–1964; and is currently working on Some Worthy Women, featuring biographical sketches of pioneer women leaders from Winchester and Frederick County. Warren R. Hofstra is Stewart Bell Professor of History at Shenandoah University in Winchester. In addition to teaching in the fields of American social and cultural history and directing the Community History Project of Shenandoah University, he has written or edited five books on American regional history, including The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley; A Separate Place: The Formation of Clarke County, Virginia; George Washington and the Virginia Backcountry; After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800–1900; and Virginia Reconsidered: New Histories of the Old Dominion. (Introduction by Sandra G. Treadway, Library of Virginia)

Patsy Cline and the Problem of Respectability

May 4, 2010 26:27

Description:

On April 4, 2008, Beth Bailey delivered this lecture at the 2008 symposium, "Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline." The continuing tensions in Winchester over Patsy Cline provide the basis for Beth Bailey's lecture. She discussed Patsy Cline and respectability by looking at questions of sexuality and gender in the context of the importance of "respectability" in postwar American culture. Dr. Bailey is Professor of History at Temple University. She is author of Sex in the Heartland; she is co-editor of A History of our Time; she also wrote From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in 20th Century America and co-authored the twentieth-century chapters in A People and a Nation. (Introduction by Sandra G. Treadway, Library of Virginia) (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Woodrow Wilson: The Virginia Factor

May 4, 2010 50:11

Description:

On October 20, 2006, Mr. Berg delivered this lecture at the 2006 symposium, "Virginians in the White House." Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, A. Scott Berg is the author of best-selling books on Maxwell Perkins, Samuel Goldwyn, Charles Lindbergh, and Katharine Hepburn. He is currently writing a biography of Woodrow Wilson. Mr. Berg holds a B.A. from Princeton University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Realistic Visionary: The Presidency of George Washington

May 4, 2010 48:27

Description:

On October 20, 2006, Peter Henriques delivered this lecture at the 2006 symposium, 'Virginians in the White House.' Peter Henriques is Professor of History, Emeritus, at George Mason University. He specializes on Virginia history with particular emphasis on Virginia and the American Revolution and the Virginia founding fathers. Henriques's most recent work is Realistic Visionary: A Portrait of George Washington (2006). (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

George Marshall, His Men, and the Recovery of Europe

May 4, 2010 1:12:53

Description:

On November 18, 2009, Josiah Bunting, III, delivered the 2009 Alexander W. Weddell Trustees Lecture. The topic of his lecture was "George Marshall, His Men, and the Recovery of Europe." Mr. Bunting is the President of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation in New York, Former President of Hampden-Sydney College, and Superintendent Emeritus of the Virginia Military Institute. (Introduction by J. Stewart Bryan, III, and Paul A. Levengood)

Jefferson in Perspective

May 4, 2010 48:23

Description:

On March 21, 2009, Daniel P. Jordan delivered the Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Lecture. Drawing on his many years as president of Monticello, Dr. Jordan reflected on the meaning of Thomas Jefferson within the broader context of his times and his enduring legacy for us today. Daniel P. Jordan recently retired as president of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, one of the most beloved historic sites in America. No other historian today has immersed himself more deeply into the multifaceted life of our third president. Drawing on his many years at Monticello, Dr. Jordan reflected on the meaning of Thomas Jefferson within the broader context of his times and his enduring legacy for us today. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

History Begins at Home: A Personal Journey

May 4, 2010 56:32

Description:

On November 19, 2008, former VHS President and CEO Charles F. Bryan, Jr., delivered the Alexander W. Weddell Trustees Lecture. In this autobiographical lecture, Dr. Bryan reflects on the field of public history as it developed during the course of his own career. In this autobiographical lecture, Dr. Bryan reflects on the field of public history as it developed during the course of his own career. In 1988, he was appointed as President and CEO of the Virginia Historical Society. During his tenure, Dr. Bryan oversaw fund-raising campaigns that raised more than $110 million. These efforts have resulted in quadrupling the size of the Society's headquarters building and a significant expansion of educational programs statewide. In November 2008, Dr. Bryan retired from the VHS and was named president emeritus by the board of trustees. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Tobacco, Mosquito, Slave: Colonial Virginia and the Dawn of Globalization

May 4, 2010 28:27

Description:

On April 10, 2008, Charles C. Mann delivered the 2008 Stuart G. Christian, Jr., Trustees Lecture. In his recent best-selling book, 1491, a groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Mr. Mann radically altered our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492. In 'Tobacco, Mosquito, Slave,' Mann gave VHS members a preview of his next book, which will describe the creation of the first truly global network of trade and ideas—from the triangular trade linking Europe, West Africa, and the New World to the first trans-Pacific ties between the New World and East Asia. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes (Questions on first two presentations)

May 4, 2010 10:30

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." Sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society, the City of Richmond Slave Trail Commission, and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, the half-day conference presented recent scholarship on two downtown Richmond historical sites, the Burial Ground for Negroes and Lumpkin's Slave Jail, both of which have special importance for the history of African Americans in Virginia.

Patsy Cline and a Changing South, from Depression to Postwar Affluence

May 4, 2010 37:15

Description:

On April 4, 2008, Mr. Malone delivered this talk at the 2008 symposium, 'Sweet Dreams: The Life and Times of Patsy Cline.' Bill Malone is Professor of History, Emeritus, at Tulane University. He is author of Country Music, U.S.A.; Southern Music, American Music; Don't Get Above Your Raisin': Country Music and the Southern Working Class; and to be published this June, Working Girl Blues: The Life and Music of Hazel Dickens. He also produced and annotated the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Country Music. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow. He has delivered the Lamar Lecture at Mercer University, published as Singing Cowboys and Musical Mountaineers: Southern Culture and the Roots of Country Music. He has served as a joint visiting scholar at Duke and the University of North Carolina. His weekly radio show, "Back to the Country," on Madison, Wisconsin's WORT-FM has been on the air for years and has regularly garnered listeners' choice awards. In all, he continues is his role as the dean of country music scholarship, combining, in his words, "the passionate predilections of the fan . . . with the wary skepticism of the scholar." (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Hidden Things Brought to Light: Locating the 1809 Negro Burial Ground

May 4, 2010 27:10

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." In this session, Chris Stevenson, spoke on locating the 1809 Negro Burial Ground.

Hidden Things Brought to Light: Shockoe Valley Topography and the Slave Trade

May 4, 2010 33:20

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." In this session ,Jeffrey Ruggles, curator for prints and photographs at the VHS, spoke on Shockoe Valley topgraphy and the slave trade.

Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes (Welcome and Introductions)

May 4, 2010 10:17

Description:

On Saturday, February 28, 2009, the community was invited to attend a conference about Richmond's African American history, "Hidden Things Brought to Light: Finding Lumpkin's Jail and Locating the Burial Ground for Negroes." Sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society, the City of Richmond Slave Trail Commission, and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, the half-day conference presented recent scholarship on two downtown Richmond historical sites, the Burial Ground for Negroes and Lumpkin's Slave Jail, both of which have special importance for the history of African Americans in Virginia.

From Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers: The Transformation of the South in the Twentieth Century

Apr 30, 2010 44:17

Description:

On July 24, 2008, Dr. Levengood delivered a talk entitled 'From Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers: The Transformation of the South in the Twentieth Century.' At the dawn of the twentieth century, the South was by all measurements the poorest, most segregated region in the United States. One hundred years later, it was one of the fastest-growing parts of the nation, attracting population and industry at a dizzying rate. How did this transformation take place? How much of the traditional South remains? Looking at such key events as World War II and the South’s longstanding effort to attract business investment, Paul A. Levengood will chart the breathtaking course of the twentieth century and examine what survives and what has been lost in the rush toward prosperity and growth. Dr. Levengood is president-elect and CEO-elect of the VHS. This lecture is a program of the VHS's Reynolds Business History Center. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Moses Ezekiel: Civil War Soldier, Renowned Sculptor

Apr 30, 2010 36:30

Description:

On June 12, 2008, Colonel Gibson delivered a talk on Moses Ezekiel, the first Jewish cadet at VMI and world renowned sculptor. Few sculptors of the nineteenth century were as well known during their lifetimes as Moses Ezekiel, though he is little-known today. The first Jewish cadet at VMI, he fought in the battle of New Market in 1864. Encouraged by Robert E. Lee to pursue his artistic calling, Ezekiel studied in Europe and became the first American to win the coveted Prix de Rome. Keith Gibson will draw on his biography of Ezekiel to bring to life this luminary of nineteenth-century art. Colonel Gibson is executive director of museum programs and architectural historian at the Virginia Military Institute. (Introduction by Robert F. Strohm)

Twilight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson

Apr 30, 2010 29:51

Description:

On May 29, 2008, Mr. Crawford delivered a talk on his new book, Twilight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson returned to Monticello in 1809 at the end of his second presidential term and died there seventeen years later. In his new book, Alan Pell Crawford reveals the private Jefferson at home, coping with debt and illness, mediating family quarrels, and navigating public disputes, still a towering figure in the early republic. Mr. Crawford's previous book on a Virginia subject was Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman—and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Lee and the Historians in the Age of the Anti-Hero

Apr 30, 2010 36:03

Description:

On May 22, 2008, Mr. Krick delivered a talk on Gen. Robert E. Lee entitled "Lee and the Historians in the Age of the Anti-Hero." According to some recent historians, Gen. Robert E. Lee was not a hero to southerners during the Civil War but only afterward. Robert K. Krick argues to the contrary that he was idolized as a great leader in the midst of the conflict, not just later when the defeated South groped to interpret what had happened. For thirty years, Mr. Krick was chief historian of the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. He is the author of many books including, most recently, Civil War Weather in Virginia. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788–1800

Apr 30, 2010 29:19

Description:

On April 16, 2008, Mr. Winik delivered a talk on his new book, The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788–1800. As the 1790s began, a fragile American republic took its first uncertain steps, the Russian empire expanded, and France plunged into revolution. Jay Winik's new book, The Great Upheaval, illuminates how events in these three nations combined to change the course of civilization. Mr. Winik is the author of the best-selling April 1865. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse

Apr 30, 2010 51:58

Description:

On March 21, 2008, Dr. Glatthaar delivered a talk on his new book, General Lee's Army: From Victory to Collapse. In this lecture, based on his new book General Lee's Army, Dr. Glatthaar used the story of Robert E. Lee's army as a powerful lens for viewing the entire Civil War, from the early springtime of southern hopes to final crushing defeat, from the homefront to the heart of the most famous battles of the war. Dr. Glatthaar teaches history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

George Thomas: Virginian for the Union

Apr 30, 2010 44:13

Description:

On March 6, 2008, Dr. Einolf delivered a talk on George H. Thomas, one of the most successful Union generals of the Civil War. Most southern-born army officers resigned their commissions to join the Confederacy in 1861. But a substantial minority remained loyal to the national government, including George H. Thomas, the "Rock of Chickamauga," one of the most successful Union generals of the Civil War. On March 6, 2008, Christopher Einolf spoke on his biography of the career soldier from Southampton County. Dr. Einolf teaches at the University of Virginia. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Who Looks at Lee Must Think of Washington

Apr 30, 2010 53:00

Description:

On February 28, 2008, Dr. Tilton delivered a talk in conjunction with the VHS exhibition, Lee and Grant. In his 1866 poem, "Lee in the Capitol," Herman Melville portrays a dignified Robert E. Lee advocating reconciliation before the Congressional committee on Reconstruction. One of the poet's most powerful references is his association of Lee with George Washington. On February 28, 2008, Robert Tilton's lecture examined Melville's interpretation of Lee and his role in American history. Professor Tilton is co-curator of the exhibition Lee and Grant and teaches English and American Studies at the University of Connecticut. (Introduction by William M. S. Rasmussen)

Sites and Stories: African American History in Virginia

Apr 30, 2010 25:10

Description:

On February 14, 2008, Lauranett Lee delivered this Banner Lecture. Historic highway markers are beloved features of the Old Dominion's landscape. Through these signs, away from the high speed of interstates, the careful motorist can piece together major themes running through Virginia's past. One of the most important but sometimes neglected such strands is the story of African Americans. In Sites and Stories, Lauranett L. Lee mounted an exhibition to present the narratives told by these markers. Her lecture highlighted the struggles and triumphs of African Americans in Virginia from 1619 to the recent past. Dr. Lee is curator of African American history at the VHS. (Introduction by James C. Kelly)

Skeletons on the Zahara

Apr 30, 2010 47:34

Description:

On January 24, 2008, Dean King delivered this Banner Lecture. In 1815 the American sailing ship Commerce ran aground on the northwestern shore of Africa. In his prize-winning book, Skeletons on the Zahara, Dean King recounts the misfortunes of the shipwrecked crew. They were captured by nomadic Arab slave traders and marched across the desert, subjected to heat, starvation, and cruelty. At last the survivors made it back to the coast where they were ransomed and freed. King, a Richmond writer, brings this once-famous adventure story, well known to nineteenth-century readers, back to life. (Introduction by Charles F. Bryan, Jr.)

Lee and Grant

Apr 30, 2010 1:00:08

Description:

On November 1, 2007, William M. S. Rasmussen delivered a lecture in conjunction with exhibition Lee and Grant. The two great opposing military commanders of the Civil War, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, towered over their contemporaries. In a major exhibition and book created in the 200th anniversary year of Lee's birth, the VHS explored the parallel lives of these two American heroes. In an illustrated lecture, co-curator and co-author William M. S. Rasmussen examined Lee and Grant and their influence on our history. Dr. Rasmussen is Lora M. Robins Curator at the VHS and curator of the exhibition. (Introduction by James C. Kelly)

The Business of Virginia Has Always Been Business

Apr 30, 2010 50:11

Description:

On September 13, 2007, Dr. Levengood delivered this lecture on his book, Virginia: Catalyst of Commerce for Four Centuries. He is president-elect and CEO-elect of the Virginia Historical Society. This lecture was a program of the VHS's Reynolds Business History Center. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters

Apr 30, 2010 39:55

Description:

On May 24, 2007, Ms. Pryor delivered this lecture on her book, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters. Since his death, researchers have lamented that Robert E. Lee never wrote a memoir. But, as author Elizabeth Brown Pryor revealed during her Banner Lecture at the VHS, this collection contains numerous letters and notes in the hand of Robert E. Lee reflecting on his long career. Pryor, who was granted access to selected portions of the collection found at Burke and Herbert Bank before processing at the Society began, spoke about her recently published book, Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through his Private Letters. In her book, Pryor explores the thoughts and actions of Robert E. Lee largely through his own words—some of which were derived from the newly released papers at the VHS—focusing on Lee's religious beliefs, his views on slavery, his father, his days at West Point, and his decision to join the South during the Civil War. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Telling Our Stories: School Desegregation in Western Virginia

Apr 30, 2010 32:06

Description:

On February 22, 2007, Dr. DeLaney delivered this Banner Lecture at the VHS. In 1954 the Supreme Court held in Brown v. Board of Education that segregation by race in public schools was unconstitutional. In subsequent years, the course of integration followed a slow and varied path. The unfolding of that experience in the schools of western Virginia, particularly as related through oral history interviews, is the special focus of research by Theodore C. DeLaney. Dr. DeLaney is associate professor of history and director of the African American Studies Program at Washington and Lee University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Struggle with Drugs and Thugs in U.S.-Mexican Relations: Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?

Apr 30, 2010 55:51

Description:

On December 3, 2009, George W. Grayson delivered a lecture on his book 'Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?' The armed conflict between Mexico's rival drug cartels and the central government is headline news in the United States. George W. Grayson put Mexican-American relations into historical context and examined Mexican efforts to tackle both the demand and supply sides of the problems spawned by the wildly profitable supply route for illegal drugs making their way into the United States. Professor Grayson teaches at the College of William and Mary. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

So Ends This Day: An Illustrated Update on the Life and Times of the USS Monitor, from 1861 to yesterday

Apr 30, 2010 1:06:55

Description:

On November 12, 2009, Anna Gibson Holloway delivered a lecture entitled 'So Ends This Day': An Illustrated Update on the Life and Times of the USS Monitor, from 1861 to yesterday.' Although the Union ironclad Monitor may have ended her working career in a gale off Cape Hatteras in December 1862, her story does not end there. Discovered in 1973, established as a National Marine Sanctuary in 1975, and the subject of intense recovery operations by NOAA and the U.S. Navy since then, the curious "cheesebox on a raft" still has stories to tell. Anna Holloway brought the Monitor to life in this lively, illustrated presentation by combining log entries, official correspondence, personal letters from officers and crew, and material evidence found in the ship itself. Holloway serves as vice president of museum collections and programs at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News, where she recently curated the award-winning exhibition Ironclad Revolution at the USS Monitor Center. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Historic Virginia Gardens: Preservation Work of the Garden Club of Virginia

Apr 30, 2010 43:56

Description:

On November 4, 2009, Margaret Bemiss and Will Rieley delivered a lecture entitled 'Historic Virginia Gardens: Preservation Work of the Garden Club of Virginia.' For nearly a century, the Garden Club of Virginia has undertaken garden research and preservation work at numerous historic sites across the Old Dominion. It has restored and created beautiful landscapes for the education and enjoyment of all, from backyard gardeners to design professionals. Author Margaret Bemiss and Will Rieley, landscape architect to the Garden Club of Virginia, presented an illustrated lecture on the new book, Historic Virginia Gardens, documenting this important contribution to the commonwealth's botanical and architectural heritage. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Portent: John Brown's Raid in American Memory

Apr 30, 2010 50:08

Description:

On October 15, 2009, William M. S. Rasmussen delivered a lecture in conjunction with the current exhibition The Portent: John Brown's Raid in American Memory. One hundred and fifty years ago, John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry failed utterly. But the violent event and the executions it prompted shocked the nation. They reinforced white southern fears about slave insurrection, emboldened secessionists, and made Brown a martyr in the eyes of many northerners. Ever since, Brown has been a symbol of contrast and controversy. Dr. Rasmussen is Lora M. Robins Curator at the VHS and curator of the exhibition that marks these tumultuous events leading up to the Civil War. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Prestwould: Gracious Living on the American Frontier, 1790–1830

Apr 30, 2010 54:36

Description:

On October 1, 2009, Julian Hudson delivered a lecture entitled "Prestwould: Gracious Living on the American Frontier, 1790–1830." Prestwould Plantation, built at the end of the eighteenth century in a post-revolutionary Georgian style, is located on the bluffs above the Roanoke River near Clarksville, Virginia. Dr. Julian Hudson, the executive director of the Prestwould Foundation, has overseen the restoration of this historic property by leading preservation specialists. His lecture illustrated the material culture represented by Prestwould, beginning with Sir Peyton and Lady Jean Skipwith and extending down four subsequent generations. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Battle That Ended World War I

Apr 30, 2010 59:54

Description:

On September 17, 2009, Edward G. Lengel delivered a lecture on his book 'To Conquer Hell Meuse-Argonne, 1918: The Battle That Ended World War I.' After four years of stalemate on the Western Front, a final Allied push broke the German army in autumn 1918. The Meuse-Argonne Offensive represented the war's largest commitment of American troops to battle and helped pave the way to German capitulation in November. In To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918, Edward G. Lengel tells the epic tale of American soldiers in the final campaign of World War I. Dr. Lengel is associate professor of history at UVA and an editor of the Papers of George Washington. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

The Battle of Hué City, South Vietnam, 1968

Apr 30, 2010 1:04:10

Description:

On August 20, 2009, General Christmas delivered a lecture entitled 'The Battle of Hué City, South Vietnam, 1968.' The year 1968 marked a crucial turning point in the Vietnam War. During Tet, the lunar New Year holiday, the North Vietnamese and their Viet Cong allies staged attacks across South Vietnam, none more dramatic than the assault on Hué, the old imperial capital. The offensive ended in crippling military defeat for the attackers, and yet the strength of their assault led to a political setback for the United States, as critics at home gained traction and public support for the war eroded. Lt. Gen. G. R. (Ron) Christmas, USMC (Ret.), participated in the battle for Hué as a company commander and will present a first-hand account of the conflict. General Christmas is president and CEO of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation. This lecture was part of the VHS commemoration of the Vietnam War era.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks

Apr 30, 2010 49:26

Description:

On July 23, 2009, Ray McAllister delivered a lecture entitled "Hatteras Island: Keeper of the Outer Banks." The Outer Banks have enticed Virginians with the lure of sun, sky, and sea for generations. Despite this idyllic appeal, these once-isolated barrier islands have also witnessed a turbulent past. Pirates, hurricanes, shipwrecks, and U-boats all make their appearance in the varied story of the Outer Banks. Ray McAllister, an award-winning former Richmond Times Dispatch columnist, has become the established chronicler of coastal North Carolina with his latest volume on Hatteras, which follows earlier books on Wrightsville Beach and Topsail Island. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

For Better or For Worse: The Journey of a POW and His Wife

Apr 30, 2010 1:10:04

Description:

On June 11, 2009, Phyllis and Paul Galanti delivered a lecture entitled "For Better or For Worse: The Journey of a POW and His Wife." In June 1966 Lt. Cmdr. Paul Galanti was shot down over Vietnam and endured nearly seven years of captivity. His wife Phyllis played a leading role in the efforts of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia to publicize the plight of their loved ones and to secure their release. The Galantis presented an illustrated lecture recounting this dramatic story. Their talk was held in conjunction with the exhibition Bring Paul Home: Phyllis Galanti and Vietnam War POWs, which is based on the collection given by Phyllis and Paul Galanti to the VHS. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon

Apr 30, 2010 1:05:59

Description:

On May 28, 2009, John Ferling delivered a talk on his book, The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon. In 2007 John Ferling spoke at the VHS on his history of the Revolutionary War, Almost a Miracle. Now he has drawn on his unsurpassed knowledge of that era to provide a fresh and provocative new portrait of the greatest of the Founders in The Ascent of George Washington. Dr. Ferling is the author of an earlier biography of George Washington and numerous books on the American Revolution. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

The Shipwreck That Saved Jamestown: The Sea Venture Castaways and the Fate of America

Apr 30, 2010 39:15

Description:

On April 16, 2009, Lorri Glover delivered a Banner Lecture entitled The Shipwreck That Saved Jamestown: The Sea Venture Castaways and the Fate of America. The wreck of the Sea Venture on Bermuda in 1609 and the role its survivors played in the eventual rescue of the failing colony at Jamestown are dramatic tales from the founding years of the nation. In a new book, authors Lorri Glover and Daniel Blake Smith retell this account of shipwreck, courage, mutiny, and deliverance. The authors make a forceful case that the Sea Venture bears no small part in the ultimate survival of English colonization in America. Dr. Glover teaches American history at the University of Tennessee. This lecture was cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Werowocomoco and Fairfield Plantation: Rediscovering the Forgotten Landscapes of Gloucester County

Apr 30, 2010 1:08:00

Description:

On April 2, 2009, David Brown and Thane Harpole delivered this lecture entitled 'Werowocomoco and Fairfield Plantation: Rediscovering the Forgotten Landscapes of Gloucester County.' The excitement of discovering lost landscapes, including the Burwell family's ancestral home and the nearby village of Powhatan and Pocahontas, has resulted in the resurgence of support for historic preservation in the Middle Peninsula. David Brown and Thane Harpole described these activities to illustrate everyday life in colonial Virginia and to show how our interpretations of it influence our own day. Brown and Harpole are archaeologists, co-directors of the Fairfield Foundation, and founding members of the Werowocomoco Research Group. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington

Apr 30, 2010 26:49

Description:

On February 5, 2009, Dr. Norrell delivered a talk on his book, Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington. In his compelling new biography, the first full-length life of Booker T. Washington in a generation, Robert J. Norrell recreates the broad context in which the African American leader worked to overcome past exploitation and present discrimination. Although Washington has often been disparaged since the 1960s, Up from History details the positive power of his vision to invoke hope and optimism. On February 5, 2009, Dr. Norrell reinstated this extraordinary historical figure to the pantheon of black leaders. Robert J. Norrell teaches history at the University of Tennessee. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Lincoln: President-Elect

Apr 30, 2010 42:57

Description:

On December 4, 2008, Mr. Holzer delivered a talk on his newest Lincoln book, Lincoln: President-Elect. In the winter of 1860–61, the crisis that erupted with the election of Abraham Lincoln threatened to split the nation. In his newest Lincoln book, Lincoln: President-Elect, Harold Holzer examines the perilous interregnum before the president-elect's inauguration and recounts Lincoln's public and private struggle to preserve the Union. Mr. Holzer is co-chairman of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and senior vice president for external affairs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Hidden Treasures: A Short History of the Mary Custis Lee Trunks

Apr 26, 2010 47:05

Description:

On April 22, 2010, Lee Shepard delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Hidden Treasures: A Short History of the Mary Custis Lee Trunks." In 2002, two wooden trunks were found at Burke and Herbert Bank and Trust Company in Alexandria, Va. The trunks contained letters, legal papers, journals, travel souvenirs, financial records, and smaller artifacts that were collected by Mary Custis Lee, the eldest daughter of General Robert E. Lee. The collection of manuscripts and artifacts, now at the Virginia Historical Society, have been added to what is currently the largest holding of Lee family papers in any single repository. Lee Shepard will discuss and show images of items found in the trunks—including an 1810 letter from George Washington Parke Custis, the builder of Arlington House; an 1863 order from Robert E. Lee, in his own hand, announcing the death of General Stonewall Jackson; and an 1872 letter from former Arlington House slave Selina Gray to Mary Randolph Custis Lee. He will also reveal new information that we have learned not only about Robert E. Lee but also about his very interesting daughter Mary. Lee Shepard is vice president for collections at the VHS.(Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Louis Brandeis: An American Legal Giant

Apr 26, 2010 51:40

Description:

On March 25, 2010, Melvin Urofsky delivered a lecture on his book "Louis Brandeis: An American Legal Giant." Louis Brandeis was one of the most important and distinguished justices to sit on the United States Supreme Court. In his latest book, Melvin Urofsky presents not only Brandeis the reformer, lawyer, and jurist, but also Brandeis the man, in all of his complexity, passion, and wit. Drawing on family papers and materials never before available, Urofsky gives us the remarkable story of Brandeis's influence on American society and jurisprudence, and the electrifying story of his time. Dr. Urofsky is a former professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. (Introduction by Nelson D. Lankford)

Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War

Apr 26, 2010 54:13

Description:

On March 4, 2010, Michael Kranish delivered a lecture on his book "Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War." In his new book, Michael Kranish recounts Thomas Jefferson's difficult tenure as Virginia's governor during the Revolution. The story begins with the background of struggle against British rule, then the tumultuous outbreak of fighting and Jefferson's role in the Continental Congress, followed by his rise to the governorship. Influenced by Jefferson, Virginia provided for a weak chief executive, and the state was ill-prepared for invasion. When war came to the Old Dominion, the legislature fled the capital, and Jefferson narrowly eluded capture twice. Kranish describes his many stumbles as he struggled to respond to the crisis. "Jefferson's record was both remarkable and unsatisfactory, filled with contradictions," writes Kranish. As a revolutionary leader who felt he was unqualified to conduct a war, Jefferson never resolved those contradictions. But, as Kranish shows, he did learn lessons from the hard tutelage of war. This lecture is cosponsored with the Society of Colonial Wars in Virginia. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Dolley Madison: A Documentary

Apr 26, 2010 53:32

Description:

On February 4, 2010, Muffie Meyer delivered a lecture on the PBS documentary Dolley Madison. n March, the "American Experience" history series on PBS will broadcast a new documentary on the life of Dolley Madison. Today’s event offers a preview of part of the documentary, along with commentary about the making of the film by the producer and director, Muffie Meyer. This event is jointly sponsored by the Virginia Historical Society and James Madison's Montpelier. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership

Apr 26, 2010 53:45

Description:

On January 28, 2010, Noah Andre Trudeau delivered a lecture on his book Robert E. Lee. Almost 150 years after the fact, Robert E. Lee remains a towering figure of the Civil War era, an acclaimed strategist and an enigmatic personality. In his new book, the latest in the critically received Great Generals Series, prolific author Noah Andre Trudeau presents an insightful narrative about the Confederacy's preeminent military leader. (Introduction by Paul A. Levengood)

First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families by Mary Theobald

00:46:04

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On October 10, Mary Theobald delivered a banner lecture entitled First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Families. Conceived during the Revolutionary War, built during the War of 1812, and looted during the Civil War, Virginia's executive mansion has endured fires, threats, riots, and hurricanes. Written to coincide with the mansion's bicentennial in 2013, First House: Two Centuries with Virginia's First Family by Mary Miley Theobald brings to life the private stories of the governors and their families who shaped the destiny of this unique home. The book traces triumph and tragedy through the turbulence of wars, fires, economic depressions, and renovations in a story that mirrors Virginia's progress from the nineteenth century into the twenty-first.

Fighting for Freedom: African Americans and the War of 1812 by Gene Allen Smith

01:03:42

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On Wednesday September, 4, Gene Allen Smith, delivered a banner lecture entitled "Fighting for Freedom: African Americans and the War of 1812." Images of American slavery conjure up cotton plantations and African Americans locked in bondage until the Civil War. Yet early in the nineteenth century the state of slavery was very different, and the political vicissitudes of the young nation offered diverse possibilities to slaves. Though surprising numbers of slaves did assist the Americans in the War of 1812, the conflict created opportunities for slaves to find freedom among the British. The Slaves' Gamble: Choosing Sides in the War of 1812 by Gene Smith offers a fascinating and original narrative history of an extraordinary yet little-known chapter in the dark saga of American history.

War and Pieces: Quilts through America's War Years by Neva Hart

01:02:36

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On Thursday, August 22, Neva Hart delivered a banner lecture entitled "War and Pieces: Quilts through America's War Years." For soldiers in the field or citizen soldiers who declared the moral equivalent of war, quilts have been used throughout America's history not only as comfort, but to further "the Cause." It wasn't the Boston Tea Party that started the fight! Learn how quilt makers, impacted by textile trade and social trends, were influenced by the Revolutionary War to today’s Middle East conflicts. This illustrated lecture featuring examples as early as the late 1700s, will discuss embargoes to the Colonies, development of America's textile manufacturing, the Underground Railroad, Civil War, women and politics, development of the Red Cross, Quilts of Valor, and virtual quilts. Neva Hart served as president of the Professional Association of Appraisers-Quilted Textiles and as a board member for the Virginia Quilt Museum. Editor and contributor to Quilts of Virginia, 1607–1899 (2006), she writes, lectures, researches and collects antique and art quilts from her home near Roanoke.

Ocracoke: The Pearl of the Outer Banks by Ray McAllister

00:58:23

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On August 8, 2013, Ray McAllister delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Ocracoke: The Pearl of the Outer Banks." The Outer Banks have enticed Virginians with the lure of sun, sky, and sea for generations. Despite this idyllic appeal, these once-isolated barrier islands have also witnessed a turbulent past. Pirates, hurricanes, shipwrecks, and U-boats all make their appearance in the varied story of the Outer Banks. Ray McAllister, an award-winning former Richmond Times Dispatch columnist, has become the established chronicler of coastal North Carolina with his latest volume on Ocracoke, which follows earlier books on Hatteras Island, Wrightsville Beach, and Topsail Island.

Contested Borderland: The Civil War in Appalachian Kentucky and Virginia by Brian D. McKnight

1:00:39

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On July 25, Brian D. McKnight delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Contested Borderland: The Civil War in Appalachian Kentucky and Virginia." During the four years of the Civil War, the border between eastern Kentucky and southwestern Virginia was highly contested territory, alternately occupied by both the Confederacy and the Union. In Contested Borderland, Brian McKnight examines the features of the region's geography and the influence of the attacks on borderlands caught in the crossfire of opposing forces. He reveals how the dual occupation of the Union and Confederate armies divided the borderland population, creating hostilities within the region that would persist long after the war's conclusion. Professor McKnight teaches history at the University of Virginia's College at Wise.

Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Secession, Civil War by David C. Keehn

1:00:07

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On June 13, 2013, David C. Keehn delivered a Banner Lecture entitled "Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Secession, Civil War." The Knights of the Golden Circle was a mysterious southern-based society that set out in 1859 to establish a slave empire in Mexico. In late 1860, it shifted its focus to supporting the secession movement and intimidating Unionists in the South. According to David Keehn, once the war began, the Knights helped build up the nascent Confederate army and carried out various clandestine actions, including an attempt to assassinate Abraham Lincoln as he passed through Baltimore in 1861. Keehn, an attorney from Allentown, Pa., is the author of Knights of the Golden Circle: Secret Empire, Southern Secession, Civil War.