On the Record...Online Podcast

On the Record...Online Podcast

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Podcasts

Link: ontherecordpodcast.com

Episodes

Social Media for Financial Services

Jul 31, 2014

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Top PR Firms Commit to Abide by Wikipedia Terms of Use

Jul 10, 2014

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Ideally, you want someone with a neutral point of view editing Wikipedia entries, not PR firms clandestinely gussying up their client’s pages.  PR has a conflict of interest. But that doesn't mean they can't also help improve the accuracy of Wikipedia entries or that they shouldn't have a right to do so.   It’s been an issue for a while now, because if a PR representative wants to alert a Wikipedia editor to an inaccuracy on a client’s entry, there’s no clear process for ethical engagement.   In January 2012, Phil Gomes (@philgomes) wrote an open letter to Jimmy Wales to initiate a rational discussion about how public relations can effectively contribute to Wikipedia entries.   Shortly thereafter, he and John Cass formed Corporate Representatives for Ethical Wikipedia Engagement (CREWE).   In February 7, 2014, William Beutler (@BeutlerInk) managed to convene a meeting of digital leaders for the world’s leading PR agencies, academics and Wikipedia editor volunteers to address issues of transparency and disclosure surrounding the ethical participation of corporate representatives to improve the accuracy of their respective entries.   On June 16, 2014, Edelman, Ogilvy & Mather, Burson-Marsteller, FleishmanHillard, Ketchum, PNConnect, Peppercomm and Allison + Partners in affirmed a commitment to abide by Wikipedia principles and endeavor to ensure that employees and clients do the same.   And finally, Wikipedia updated their terms of use to "clarify strengthen the prohibition against concealing paid editing on all Wikimedia projects.”   In this episode, Phil Gomes and Sam Ford discuss the history and impact of the PR industry’s joint statement to abibe by Wikipedia’s terms of use.   Phil Gomes’ successful career in the communications field is characterized by his passionate interest in technology, media, and emerging forms of communication. He serves as a Senior Vice President with Edelman Digital.   Sam Ford is Director of Audience Engagement with Peppercomm, an affiliate with both MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing and Western Kentucky University, and co-author of Spreadable Media.   Reference Links: The Hobson & Holtz Report - Podcast #761: June 23, 2014 Lawsuit: Rogue Wikipedia editors conspired to manipulate Wikipedia pages to ruin reputation of philanthropist, charity he co-founded   About the Podcast: On the Record...Online is an award-winning podcast launched in 2005 by Eric Schwartzman, CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow the podcast on Twitter @ontherecord and follow him @ericschwartzman.  

On the Record...Online with Mark Haas, CEO of Manning Selvage & Lee

Jul 10, 2014

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Manning Selvage & Lee CEO Mark Hass goes On the Record...Online at the 2008 PRSA International Conference about MS&L’s strategy for penetrating China, his acquisition strategy for buying new firms and what it takes to be a managing director at MS&L. Mark Hass, CEO of Manning Selvage & Lee has held this position since April 2005. In this role, Hass leads MS&L and its global leadership team, and acts as a strategic counselor to the firm's largest clients, including General Motors, Philips and Procter & Gamble. Hass joined MS&L in 2002, when his public relations agency, Hass Associates, was acquired and merged into MS&L. As CEO of Hass Associates, then Michigan’s largest PR firm, he was a senior counsel to GM, and a key consultant for Chrysler Corp. Show Notes: 2:42 - Hass on his keynote speech at the 2008 PRSA International Conference. 3:46 - Hass on how new media is changing the public relations industry. 5:50 - Hass on how to convince board rooms that social media is important. 8:41 - Hass on the relationship between stock price and new media adoption rates. 9:13 - Hass on Google’s big secret. 11:07 - Hass on the future of media relations as a PR agency revenue driver. 12:42 - Hass on reinventing the business of public relations. 14:09 - Hass on the economic future for MS&L. 17:07 - Hass on emerging PR markets. 18:51 - Hass on penetrating emerging markets like China and India. 22:38 - Hass gives advice on what he looks for in a new PR hire. 24:26 - End Eric Schwartzman is the founder of online newsroom management service iPressroom and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by over a thousand public relations and marketing executives from private, public, government and nonprofit sectors.

Enterprise Social Compliance Best Practices

Jun 28, 2014

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Most people think social media compliance is just for regulated industries. And it's true that regulated industries do have more rules to comply with.    But social media compliance is everybody’s business.   Whether you’re business is regulated or not, there are dozens of federal and state regulations and local ordinances that dictate how you can and can’t use social media lawfully for business.   In this podcast, Chris Kieff (@ckieff), Director of Sales Support and Operations, Sprinklr and Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman), CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially reveal strategies for building trust and verifying compliance.   Up to now, that strategy for winning social media compliance at most companies has been to issue a social media policy.   But no one reads your social media policy. They sign for it, and put in the bottom drawer.   Despite the fact that 80% of employers have social media policies, 70% have disciplined employees for social media misuse, research shows.   We'll also walk through the major US rules and regs that impact how organizations can and can’t use social media lawfully in the workplace.     Enterprise Social Compliance Topics Covered: Trust gap between leadership and regular employees Optimizing the impact of official voices on unofficial voices Creating a workplace environment where employees are trusted What GM did wrong when they tried to rebuild trust with social Inspiring employees to serve as goodwill ambassadors Managing the risks associated with employee advocacy programs Why social media policies don’t prevent employee misuse Unmanaged risks around encouraging employees to use social media Teaching employees about the risks of noncompliant social media use Fines and penalties of noncompliant social media use NLRB and how employers can police social media use at work Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Communications Decency Act Digital Millennium Copyright Act FTC Disclosure Guidelines FDA, HIPAA, FINRA and FFEIC Guidelines And much, much more   Download; The Complete Guide to Social Enterprise Compliance   About the Podcast: On the Record...Online is an award-winning podcast launched in 2005 by Eric Schwartzman, CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow the podcast on Twitter @ontherecord and follow him @ericschwartzman.    

Required Social Media Disclaimers Unlawful

Jun 20, 2014

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If your social policy requires your employees to include a disclaimer in their social media posts that their opinions are their own, that's unlawful, according to a US Federal judge who called the restriction “unreasonably burdensome” and unlawful. How can you include a disclaimer in a Facebook Like anyway?   The development is the latest in a series of decisions by the NLRB, which has been challenging employers to reconsider whether or not they have the right to dictate how their employees use social media at all.   Jonathan Crotty, partner at the law firm Parker Poe in Charlotte, who an article about this development explains:   Why restricting employers from requiring an “opinions are my own” disclaimer is unlawful The ompacvt of the decision on corporate social media policies How required disclaimers might chill workers rights to organize and bargain collectively Impracticality of required social media disclaimers Why restricting employees from using logos and trademarks is also unlawful How the NLRA which was enacted in 1930 governs social meida use today How employers should react to this development And much, much more About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

How To Document Social Media Policy Violations

Jun 12, 2014

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doc-vio-image   The number of social media policy violations by employees has doubled over the last 16 months, according to the 2014 Social Media in the Workplace Survey.   Don’t get us wrong.  We love social media and value free speech. We’re not condoning violating anyone’s personal privacy rights or their rights to discuss wages, hours and working conditions concertedly.   Used effectively and responsibly, numerous research reports show that social media increases profitability, productivity and job satisfaction.   But when social media is used by workers who have not been trained in social media compliance, issues arise. And enforcing policy requires documentation.   Unfortunatley, with social networking as popular as it is, social media misuse has become one of the costs of doing business.   In this episode, former broadcast journalist and Red Cross public affairs officer Ike Pigott (@ikepigott), who currently serves as communications strategist to Alabama Power (@AlabamaPower), walks us through what he’s learned in the trenches about documenting social media policy violations.   Best Practices for Documenting Social Media Policy Violations Discussed:   Overcoming social media policy enforcement challenges Job titles that typically enforce social media policy Required skills for enforcing social media policy How to document social media policy violations Use of screen capture tools to record violations Documenting social media policy violations on Facebook Documenting social media policy violations on Twitter Documenting social media policy violations on LinkedIn Risks of storing social media policy violations in the cloud   And much, much more!   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

FDA Social Media Guidance

Jun 2, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-05-30 at 2.55.50 PM What steps has the FDA taken to provide the pharma industry with guidance and regulations around how drug companies can effectively and responsibly use social media for marketing, customer engagement and scientific research?   We talk to John Mack (@pharmaguy), Editor & Publisher of the Pharma Marketing Network about the issues and challenges of regulating how pharmaceutical companies conduct social media marketing.     Digital drug marketing topics discussed:   What the FDA has done so far to try and deliver social media guidance to drug companies The difference between social media "guidance" and actual regulations Challenges for pharmaceutical companies associated with maintaining Facebook Pages How drug companies are hedging their bets and marketing on social media in lieu of guidance The British Prescription Medicines Code of Practice Authority's informal guidance Mobile Medical Apps And much, much more!   Reference links:   Pharma Guy Social Media Compendium [PDF] FDA Approved Medical Mobile Apps Dose of Digital: Social Media Wiki   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman.   photo by J. Troha

Gun Politics Trigger Social Media Policy Failure

May 23, 2014

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How money and politics drove the Kansas Board of Regents to issue a social media policy that threatens academic freedom statewide with Doug Bonney, chief counsel and legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas.   State legislators threatened to cut funding after a journalism professor sent out an angry tweet blaming the NRA for the Washington Navy Yard Shooting. The Kansas Board of Regents responded by issuing a Draconian social media policy to try and deter faculty and staff from saying anything that might attract the disdain of elected state officials.   Topics discussed include:   Concern among educators that politicians could try and control the conversations about a host of issues of public importance by threatening to cut funding.  Why the first draft of the Kansas Board of Regents social media policy caused a ruckus and what they did to try and fix it. The new draft of the policy released on May 14, 2014, which some say it still chills free speech rights and is an over reaction to an isolated incident Why tweets sent off hours from a personal device on a home network are safer than those sent from an employers device or network Problem of references to the "improper use of social media" in the new policyGenerally, citizens have more free speech rights than government employees, because government employers have some rights to impose restrictions. Also the NLRA, which protects private sector workers' rights to organize and bargain collectively do not apply to government workers or airline or railway employees for that matter, as well. Who has greater free speech protections: private sector or government employees? Issuing a looser social media policy  with stricter social media training, assessment and certification And much, much more.   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media compliance training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

FCC Proposes to End Net Neutrality

May 20, 2014

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Although the proposed FCC changes to Net Neutrality released last week are short on details about what constitutes "commercially reasonable," it looks like we're closer to reclassifying ISPs as Title Two common carriers than we were in the draft that was allegedly leaked to journalists a few weeks back.   In this podcast, we talk to EFF Intellectual Property Director Corynne McSherry (@cmcsherr), who spent the weekend pouring over FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal (@TomWheelerFCC), which is now available for public comment through DearFCC.   Topics discussed include: How could the concept of paid prioritization impact news media diversity Argument in favor of regulating ISPs like phone companies Argument agasint regulating ISPs like phone companies Reclassifying ISPs as telecommunications services Al Tompkins's (@atompkins) article about the impact of Net Neutrality on jouranlism Who's the blame for where we are and how we got here Should the Federal Trade Commission be involved to regulate unfair competition Public threat of consolidated ownership of ISPs and content providers Best practices for mobilizing the public behind thicker policy issues How to file a public comment on the proposal to the FCC   And much, much more.   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.    

Inside the Digital Anti Establishment

May 16, 2014

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Marcia Stepanek is a journalist, new media strategist, NYU professor and an award winning news and features editor. Her upcoming book is "Swarms: the Rise of Digital Anti‑Establishment.   Eric:  Tell us about yourself.   Marcia:  I have been covering the intersection of technology and its impact on society and business, for pretty much the past 25 years. I did a new media fellowship at Stanford and went out there all primed from Hearst Media in Washington to cover the shrinking middle class in America and the increasing division between the haves and have‑nots. Instead, when I got out to Silicon Valley everyone said, "Are you crazy?" [laughs] "We are in the middle of Silicon Valley, and there's a revolution happening here." Certainly, there was at the time I was out there with the rise of e‑commerce and with the rise of technology.   I switched my entire curriculum in order to study the impact of communications and new media technology and the law on business, on technology itself, and on the way people advocate for social change. Even back then, we saw the center of power moving from the center of establishment organizations to outside the organizations.   The evolution and implications of that happening, as you well know, has been going on for over a decade and is still continuing.   Eric:  You had to shift from class warfare to digital revolutions.   Marcia:  Often, they're the one and the same.   Eric:  Now you've got this book coming out about digital swarms, which talks about digital swarms becoming even more powerful and more sophisticated.   Marcia:  It's more about how networks and communities have been evolving and scaling. As they mature, a more sophisticated and permanent presence is created. We're seeing a lot of people organizing themselves into networks. Certainly this is also occurring politically around various interest groups. It also occurs in more of these informal communities and around communities of political interest.   In many ways, we have seen them start to exercise their muscle. I'm not talking so much about the Arab Spring.  I'm not talking about all of that.  I'm talking, now, about a communities ability to organize very rapidly as accountability networks.   For example, a couple of years ago, the Komen Foundation, a foundation that was dedicated to fighting breast cancer, made some controversial decisions.  The organization did not communicate these decisions very transparently or openly with so many of its supporters  In fact,  it started trying to dissuade people when they found out about some of the decisions that were being made, from commenting. This kicked up an angry swarm among supporters who, over the course of three days, were not only were able to hold some of the leaders of the Komen Foundation accountable for those decisions, but wouldn't stop organizing around this until some of the leadership had in fact been changed.   We've seen this repeatedly. We've seen this when people get angry at Rush Limbaugh, or get angry at any number of incidents. We saw this with the Stop SOPA campaign. We can see communities organized very quickly to achieve something, a singular goal, very rapidly and very clearly.  All in the course of a week or less. These aren't accidents. This basically show that these networks have matured and that they're pretty consistent. They don't organize overnight. They don't always express themselves, but when they have a reason to do so, they can. That's what a swarm is.  We're going to see more of that. It's about not so much about the toppling of establishment organizations, but like sand against limestone we see the corrosion,  the uncomfortable reshaping of the status quo.   Eric:  You've been looking at this space for a long time, and you have some perspective here. Let me give you my take, my uninformed take compared to yours, of what I see with these digital swarms. To me, it seems like they lack stamina.   You see people organize around these flash points, around these wedge issues, around these issues that they're emotionally invested in. Then when it comes to the drudging work of something like policy‑making, they seem to dissipate.   I'm thinking about Egypt, for example. When it came to organizing to overthrow the Mubarak regime, everybody had their hand in that. When it came to the hard work of organizing behind parties and changing the political landscape, it didn't seem like people really had the stamina for that.   I also think about the type of responses I get from my social networks to issues that are serious. I'll post once in a while about an issue like climate change or net neutrality, and honestly, it doesn't seem like people have a lot of patience for that type of stuff unless it's really some sort of a flash point. Is that your perception? Am I missing something?   Marcia:  I don't think it's about stamina. I think there are permanent accountability networks. I do think that, yes, if it gets to a flash point, you're going to be there, and I'm going to be there.  In a lot of cases, I'm not just going to be online. I'm going to be out in the street, as well. We saw this, again, with Stop SOPA. We've seen it on small‑scale actions. We've seen it in neighborhoods who are organizing. We've also seen it evolving out of so much of the crisis. We look at organized neighborhood groups, like IOB and other things that are basically organizing themselves as permanent accountability networks around a very singular goal. In IOB's case, to build park space out of urban blight in Brooklyn. I think pieces like that represent the transformation of some of these flash‑in‑the‑pan anger groups that are permanent organizations. Most of this works very well on a local scale. There's always been the challenge of moving people from online to offline action.   There's always been the challenge of, for lack of a better term in the nonprofit sector, transforming people from "click‑and‑givers" to actually rolling up their sleeves and attending the walk. [laughs] Attending the fundraising events and so on and so forth.   So much of this is still in transition from getting people and more inclusive voices to be organized and to see that they can have a say. And then strategically figuring out how to organize not only keeps people engaged, but keeps them engaged across multiple platforms, including face‑to‑face engagements.   We're seeing some groups doing this better than other groups. Chiefly, I am impressed with this area, and I think we're going to be hearing a lot more about, a lot of feminists with the small f networks. We're seeing a lot of women organizing online, in very effective ways, and in ways that create offline engagements as well.   We're also seeing it in the neighborhood, as I just mentioned, of IOB. We're also seeing it in certain pockets of students working for long‑term change around educational reform. There are some areas that are doing it well and some areas that are doing it not so well.   To the extent that there is no such thing as viral...

Social Media Education Programs with Eric Schwartzman

Apr 5, 2014

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macbook-training-1 Anyone can create an online course. Making it an engaging and educational experience is a whole other question.   In FIR on Higher Education episode 7, Comply Socially Founder Eric Schwartzman talks about how to make content interesting and educational in an online learning format. Eric has been conducting social media trainings in different parts of the world for several years. He recently took his courses online through his company which helps employers manage risk and scale engagement through innovative online social media training courseware.  He talks about how to deliver curriculum online versus in person, the importance of high quality production and the future of MOOCs, among other related topics.   Also on episode 7, Harry Hawk gives an update on how he has integrated Twitter into his classroom, while I provide a short book review on why Gini Dietrich’s new book Spin Sucks is an important read for higher education communicators, administrators and academics.   About Eric Schwartzman
Eric is the Founder and CEO of Comply Socially, which helps employers manage risk and scale engagement through innovative online social media training courseware. He is also the best-selling coauthor of Social Marketing to the Business Customer, the first book devoted exclusively to B2B social media communications. He’s been conducting live social media training programs to accelerate digital literacy in the workplace since 2004 and introduced online social media training in January 2013.   Get this Podcast: Download the MP3 file (39.8 Mb, 41:18) Subscribe to “FIR on Higher Education with Kevin Anselmo RSS feed Get the show at iTunes Get the FIR app for your mobile device - iPhone | Android | Windows About Your Host Kevin Anselmo is the Founder and Principal of Experiential Communications, a consultancy focused on education. He helps brands within academia - whether individual or corporate - communicate with stakeholders. He also teaches communications and public relations workshops to different individuals and groups. Previously, Kevin was Director of Public Relations for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and prior to that managed the media relations for IMD Business School in Switzerland. In addition, he was an adjunct communications professor at Nyack College in New York. Currently based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Kevin lived and worked in Switzerland for eight years and in Germany for two years. He has led public relations initiatives in various countries around the world.   Find Kevin on Twitter: @kevinanselmo.   Share your comments or questions about this podcast, or suggestions for future podcasts, in the online FIR Podcast Community on Google+. You can also send us instant voicemail via SpeakPipe, right from the FIR website. Or, call the Comment Line at +1 415 895 2971 (North America), +44 20 3239 9082 (Europe), or Skype: fircomments. You can tweet us: @FIRpodcast. And you can email us at fircomments@gmail.com. If you wish, you can email your comments, questions and suggestions as MP3 file attachments (max. 3 minutes / 5Mb attachment, please!). We’ll be happy to see how we can include your audio contribution in a show.   To receive all podcasts in the FIR Podcast Network, subscribe to the “everything” RSS feed. To stay informed about occasional FIR events (eg, FIR Live), sign up for FIR Update email news.   FIR on Higher Education is brought to you with Lawrence Ragan Communications, serving communicators worldwide for 35 years. Information: www.ragan.com.

How To Prevent a Crisis

Mar 29, 2014

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Social Media Crisis Prevention PanelEarlier this week the Los Angeles Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America hosted a panel discussion on what it takes to prevent a social media crisis.   In my opinion, PR spends too much time talking about crisis management and not enough time thinking about how to prevent them from happening in the first place.     The panel was moderated by Karen North, Chair of the Online Communities Graduate Program at USC and this is an audio recording of the discussion.   Panelists Siobhan O'Neill, VP, Edelman Digital (@angelcityblues) Chris Baccus, Executive Director, Digital, GolinHarris (@cbaccus) Laura Knapp, President, Social Spotlight Media (@LauraKnapp) Eric Schwartzman, CEO, Comply Socially (@ericschwartzman) Despite the PR industry's growing digital expertise, online crises continue to play out and leave professional communicators scrambling to minimize the damage. This panel is about what can be done to prevent these volatile situations in the first place.  This program examined recent high-profile digital disasters and what steps could have been taken to prevent them.   If you're interested in practical solutions for managing social media risk, check out out social media compliance training curriculum. They're all online, self-paced and ready to go.   Special thanks to chapter president Erik Deutsch (@ErikDeutsch) for producing the event and inviting me to participate.

Social Media Monitoring Big Data

Feb 15, 2014

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In this episode, sponsored by IBM Big Data, Marc Teerlink, Ph.D., Global Strategist & Data Scientist talks about separating the signal from the noise, using the past to predict the future and social media monitoring for ROI.

When you're dealing with Big Data, finding KPIs is tougher because there's more information to consider, so it's easier to get off course. We spoke to Marc will he was a drift, charting an unknown nautical course.

In this episode, Marc discusses:

How to use social media monitoring tools to prove a positive ROI Why you can't predict the future based on the past, despite the fact that so many organizations try. How Watson tells the difference between "write," "Mrs. Wright" and "right now." Overcoming challenges associated with visualizing Big Data patterns. Using the source of the data to disqualify erroneous speculation. Why listening to teenagers is particularly challenging in the age of Big Data. Why sentiment is particularly ill-suited to predicting outcomes. Using impact, influence, sentiment and intent to make more confident predictions.   And much, much more.   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

Social Media Education for Employees

Feb 1, 2014

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So you're using social media for business. And sometimes customers and prospects actually notice.  But you can't figure out how to scale engagement more consistently.   You need to get more people involved becuase on social networks, reach is a factor of engagement.  You've thought about getting your coworkers involved.   But they don't all know how to use social networks for business. And they're not skilled in the art of public disclosure.  They might make the mistake of saying something discriminatory or defamatory, or inadvertently leak proprietary information. And you could wind up a lot of hot water.   Altimeter Group social media analyst Ed Terperning (@edterpening), Plein Air Artist and Anders Zoren loyalist can help.     His new report Social Media Education for Employees, coauthored with Charlene Li (@charleneli), details how organizations design and implement social media training programs for employees that reduce social media risk and activate employee advocacy programs at scale.
In this exclusive audio interview, Ed discusses the four different types of social media education programs, managing risks through social media policy training, social media training formats and modalities, motivating employees to complete on-demand courseware, required resources for keeping social media training courses current, strategies for knowledge transfer assessment and more.   You can download the report below.   Ballerina painting pictures above by Ed Terpening.     Ballerina painting above by Ed Terpening.

Big Data Risks and Rewards

Jan 18, 2014

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  IBM fellow Jeff Jonas (@JeffJonas) talks about Ironman Triathlons, how casinos catch card counters, the future of personal privacy and big data analytics.   Jeff’s career is storied and diverse.  He’s built systems to protect the gambling industry from card counters, technology that allows organization’s to collect and analyze personally identifiable information without invading personal privacy and ways to make sense of data as it happens.   In this exclusive interview, sponsored by IBM, Jeff talks about pulling useful business intelligence from big data, comparing data points, why big data improves the accuracy of predictions, helping casino operators bring down the MIT Blackjack Team with data, the value of automated trading algorithms to Goldman Sachs, how Watson uses contradictory information to eliminate false positives, the shortcomings of pulling meaningful KPIs from social media monitoring services and sentiment analytics alone, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, why insufficient an observation space leads to fantasy analytics, the future of secrets and the importance of corporate training and business process improvement.    About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

Future of Ed Tech

Jan 6, 2014

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  Marina Gorbis (@mgorbis) is executive director of the Institute of the Future and author of The Nature of the Future.  In this interview, she talks about hwo technology is changing the world of education, what motivates people to learn and digital literacy.   Eric:  What is "socialstructing."   Marina:  There’s a new way we are creating value. The ways we're doing things that were not possible before are, all of a sudden, possible. The kind of things that previously you needed the whole organization to do, now you can do it with one person or a few people.   Sometimes, we can do unimaginable things with the power of these technologies and connections with each other. The idea is that we're creating. We're doing something in new ways. We're structuring things in new ways.   The other part of it is that the way we're doing it is through connections with others, when you're using social media, social technologies and ultimately connections to multitudes of others who we can engage in whatever activity we're doing.   Eric:  How do you see social media changing education in a professional context?   Marina:  One of the important things that we see is that a lot of education is moving out of institutions, and the kind of resources that previously resided just in organizations or were closed are now widely available.   Content itself has become a commodity. There's a lot of content. Almost anything you want to learn is out there between Khan Academy, Coursera, all the MOOCs ‑‑ but not just MOOCs, but all kinds of other platforms where people share.   WikiHow, Wikipedia ‑‑ you can think of Wikipedia as a learning resource. The content is all out there. It's moving from institutions into these flows. Imagine that there is a river of resources out there, and it's always there.   The challenge becomes, what makes people want to dip into those flows? What makes you motivated to dip into those information and content flows and ultimately learn?   Eric:  What motivates people to learn?   Marina:  What motivates people are very different things for different people. If you're a professional, and you need to learn, and you need to pass the test or exam, or you need it for your professional development, you can do that for that reason.   I think for all of us, a lot of the motivation is ultimately social. If you're a young person, your motivation to learn is to be in a conversation with the kind of people you want to be in a conversation.   If your social group is all about philosophy, you want to learn about philosophy. If your social group is about math or coding, you want to learn that. It's both for professional reasons, but a lot of that motivation is really social motivation for a lot of people.   That's why what's interesting is what I see happening is people signing up for online courses but then organize the meet‑ups in physical spaces with the same people who are taking the same course. There they engage in peer‑to‑peer counseling, and people learn from each other.   There's a lot of that going on. What's interesting is that they're bringing this online content and bringing it into social spaces.   Eric:  Several years back, people were speculating that, in the future, inner‑city folks, or people with less money wouldn't have access to the Internet, so there would be this digital divide between those that have access to the Internet and those that don't. Now, we're seeing that that's less of a factor.   Marina:  I think the kind of divide we're seeing is in agency and motivation, and that goes back to that social. If you grow up in an environment where people don't read books and they're not motivated to learn, and they have different kinds of ideas about what's important in life, that's a kind of divide. Or if you don't have the self‑agency to engage in that and take advantage of all those resources out there and nobody's there to show you that that exists and those resources are out there...that's the kind of...I would say...it's motivation but also, it's social divide. Eric:  It's interesting because originally we thought that technology would be this great leveler and it would put everyone on an equal playing field. Of course, Friedman, who mentioned you, speaking about the motivational divide in his column, wrote this book, "The Flat Earth," which says everyone will be on an equal playing field and big can compete with small. I think a lot of us really believed that, but then we saw that the net result of all that information online was that...I guess some people who could collect that data and store that data would have an upper‑hand because obviously they could use that information against us. Now that we're sort of moving into this era where we're starting to realize that when we take conversations to a public environment where they're recorded and stored, that information out of context could be used against us. What sort of education do you think people need moving forward to learn to be able to use these tools responsibly without creating some sort of archival record that could maybe someday haunt them? Marina:  I'm not sure that you can totally avoid all of that information because it looks now the government gets the information and a lot of other people have access to the same information. I think media illiteracy is a critical part of education and talking about these issues...about what happens to this information and also where it's going to go because even the kinds of things that may be protected today, I always feel that whatever I put online is ultimately public information. Whatever is private today may be public tomorrow. We may develop other kinds of techniques for protecting our information. I certainly hope so. For now, you just have to assume that all of that information is public in some way or another. I do think that media literacy is something that needs to be taught at a young age and it needs to be taught to adults also. Eric:  For those that are growing up in this environment, they have an opportunity to learn as they grow, but for those of us who are living through the transformation, some of us need to be skilled later in life. Often, the skills we need aren't clear. If you were charged with skilling a generation of digital immigrants ‑‑ and I know you say we're all immigrants to the future ‑‑ what specifically would you do to prepare the workforce of tomorrow to be able to participate in social media conversations without necessarily leaving a trail of digital breadcrumbs that could someday harm them? Marina:  I've seen some really good media courses. Howard Rheingold teaches a course on media literacy that involves multiple components. First of all, understand that the kind of technology that is available...I'm constantly surprised how little people know about some of the platforms. For example, things like ODesk and...

Putting Social Data in Context

Dec 7, 2013

Description:

  In this special episode sponsored by IBM, Big Data enthusiast, working mom, Duke Blue Devil, runner, cook, golfer and karate black belt Inhi Cho Suh (@inhicho), vice president and general manager of Big Data, Integration, & Governance at IBM, talks about the opportunities and risks of Big Data.   Topics discussed include:   Why should non-technical business people care about big data? Transactional, machine, social and enterprise data The difference between social media and social data The risks of collecting, storing and analyzing social data OODA: What it is and how it applies to big data Applying sound IT governance practices to big data projects Respecting the intellectual property rights of others on big data We’ve talked about harnessing Big Data to deliver improved business outcomes, but what about political and social outcomes. Using what Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff said at the UN after she learned her phone was being tapped as a guide, in your opinion, does freedom of expression depend on the right to privacy? What if CIA director of intelligence James Clapper hired you to make the PRISM program more constitutional? Could you? How? Privacy by design   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

Social Media Literacy and Ethics

Oct 26, 2013

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Social Media Security Special

Aug 19, 2013

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Scial Media Attorney Ryan Garcia Drawing the line between what’s okay to share and what’s just too risky to share, the potential impact of the NSA PRISM surveillance program on the private sector and the top 5 things not to share on social media.   Social media training specialist Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) interviews Dell Computer social media attorney Ryan Garcia (@SoMeDellLawyer) about the impact of social media usage in the workplace of personal privacy and security.   Ryan has spoken at and chaired numerous social media legal conferences around the country. He has also been invited to speak on social media legal topics before American Bar Association committees, the Word of Mouth Marketing Association Summit, and the Game Developers Conference. Ryan frequently blogs about social media legal issues at somelaw.wordpress.com. New York Times technology columnist David Pogue has called Ryan the funniest Dell lawyer he knows.   Topics Addressed:   Staying ahead of the legal issues that pertain to enterprise wide social media usage. Future proofing corporate social media training programs. Challenges of relying on sensational headlines for corporate social media education. The lack of attention people pay to the terms of service screens when signing up for online services of downloading apps. Risks of content ownership versus granting a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license. Importance of teaching people about the security and privacy risks of publishing geo-data. Discussion of setting limits on setting boundaries of what you share, since “publication is a self-invasion of privacy” as Marshall McLuhan once said. The top 5 things not sure on social networks. Potential impact of the NSA’s PRISM program on private sector usage of social media. What BYOD means for personal privacy and organizational security.    Reference Links: Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore at SXSW NY Times: Those Wordy Contracts We All So Quickly Accept Study: Cybercasing the Joint by Gerald Friedland and Robin Sommer [PDF]   About the Host:   Eric Schwartzman is CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Google+. and on Twitter @ericschwartzman.

Social Media Training at Intel

Aug 10, 2013

Description:

photo(3) What does it take to help a company become a social business? It takes the support of management and employees, and that requires education and enablement. Which is why Intel launched their Digital IQ social media training program.  Because they knew that without the buy-in of Intel’s 100,000 employees, social marketing would never be truly effective.   But where do you start?  You can’t boil the ocean. So Intel focused on training marketers first, before rolling the program out broadly.    Rather than launch a social media center of excellence, they opted to build a social business at all levels of the enterprise. Their objective was to tap the power of an internal advocacy program that enabled everyone to help prospects and customers via social networks.   The Digital IQ program at Intel is organized like a higher education program with 60 classes organized into 4-tiers or levels of training. Some course are required, others are elective.  Entry level courses were digital so everyone had access on-demand. Intermediate courses were focused on enabling social media practitioners with live training. And advanced were very high-touch, one-on-one, interactive training sessions targeted to executives and SMEs.   How did they decide what was basic, and what was advanced?  Basic trainings were focused on answering the question of why.  Intermediate classes answered who and how.  And advanced classes really dug deeper into how at an even deeper level.   In this podcast, Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman), founder and CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially talks to former Intel social media strategist Ekaterina Walter (@ekaterina).  Ekaterina was a member of the team that spearheaded the development of Digital IQ University at Intel.     Topics Addressed:   Strategies for organizing tiered social media training programs Inside the different courses in the Digital IQ program How to design high-level, advanced social media training programs Social media crisis communications training Social media training programs by Comply Socially Benefits of classroom social media training vs. online social media training Biggest challenges associated with live social media training programs The biggest challenge of social media training programs Recommended lengths for online social media training courses   51B5Z5H19vL._SY346_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_ Ekaterina is the best-selling author of Think like Zuck, The Five Business Secrets of Facebook's Improbably Brilliant CEO Mark Zuckerberg, which details why purpose, people, process and partnerships are the keys to success in the modern age.   Ekaterina Walters is Partner and CMO at Branderati. which provides software as a service to manage online advocacy programs though influencers relations.   About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman specializes in social media training. His company Comply Socially, provides employers with blended social media training programs that help manage risk and scale engagement.  You can follow Eric Schwartzman on Twitter @ericschwartzman and also on Google+.  

Social Media Training at Dell

Aug 6, 2013

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Social media marketing at scale requires engagement at scale and few organizations do a better job social media training their workforce to engage en masse than Dell Computer.   The PC-maker’s Social Media and Community University (SMaC) has already social media trained thousands of employees from virtually all segments of the enterprise.  Whether you’re a social media manager or shipping and receiving clerk, Dell has a social media course that’s right for you.   In this podcast social media training specialist Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) and former Director of Social Media & Community at Dell Liz Bullock (@lizbbullock) go beyond social media marketing to discuss the practical aspects of driving enterprise wide adoption through social media training, social media courses, Twitter training, SEO training and more.     Topics Addressed: Business case for enterprise wide social media management training Best practices for designing social media training program curricula. Inside the Dell Governance Portal, which was used for password management of branded social networking accounts and communicating ongoing best practices. How Dell designed a tiered social media training program with basic, intermediate and advanced levels. The different training modalities Dell used to deliver their social media training program with classroom and self-paced courses. How Dell deals with the challenges of keeping their social media training program up to date. How Dell assesses and certifies social media training participants. Why Dell launched a channel partner social media training program and the company’s recent decision to expand that initiative.   Liz Bullock currently serves as CEO and Co-founder of the Social Arts & Science Institute in Austin Texas.     About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is the founder and CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.  Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman and on Google+.

Social Media Compliance with Grant Crowell

Jul 30, 2013

Description:

photo Videologist Grant Crowell (@grantcrowell) discusses online display marketing, video marketing and dovetails into social media compliance in this episode of On the Record…Online, the podcast about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate and how people consume media and information.   Topics Addressed:   Ethical issues surrounding undisclosed online advertising Responsibility Google has to distinguish between paid and unpaid search listings Lack of evidence on the credibility of paid content Ethics of sponsored content and inconspicuous disclosures Use of mobile apps to move unclear and inconspicuous paid content Celebrities that disrespect the FTC Dotcom disclosure guidelines Journalistic ethical breaches in the newsroom Broadcast disclosure double standards Ethics of social media endorsements versus mentions Ethics of journalism versus entertainment   Referenced Podcasts:   SEO for PR Tools and Tips from Search Engine Land editor Danny Sullivan State of Sponsored Content with Steve Rubel   Bonus Content:   FTC Dotcom Disclosure Guidelines [PDF] NY Times: Disruptions: Celebrities’ Product Plugs on Social Media Draw Scrutiny TechCrunch's Michael Arrington fired by AOL? About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman and on Google+.

Crowdfunding Leaps Forward

Jul 22, 2013

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Optimize Your Content Marketing with Lee Odden

Jul 16, 2013

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This episode is sponsored by social media training provider Comply Socially.   Screen Shot 2013-07-15 at 11.01.14 AM This audio podcast is a presentation delivered by Top Rank Marketing CEO Lee Odden (@LeeOdden) on Friday June 28th at the PRSA Digital Impact Conference in New York.   The session was titled:   Attract, Engage and Convert: Get Ahead With Content Digital Marketing and PR   In today’s fast moving search and social Web, content flows in every direction throughout diverse platforms, formats and devices. Now more than ever, creating content that influences growth in media and new business requires an integrated approach.   During this session, you’ll learn the Attract, Engage and Convert model, which can help organizations optimize the performance of their content-focused digital marketing and public relations programs.   Topics Discussed: Understand the future trends in online marketing and PR identify 3 Major problems with most content marketing and social media efforts Present a new model for social content success everyone can understand: attract, engage, convert Review of who’s doing it right: a case study in integrated marketing 5 best practices for 360 degree content marketing & digital PR Tools for better content planning, management and amplification   Lee is the author of the book Optimize: How to Attract and Engage More Customers by Integrating SEO, Social Media, and Content Marketing.     “Lee Odden is one of the true thought leaders in an industry where you are not always sure who to trust. Well, you can trust this book to help take your online and content marketing to the next level.” — Joe Pulizzi – Founder, Content Marketing Institute  Lee also wrote a blog post about his presentation for the ComPRhension blog and posted another article about it on his own Top Rank Blog.   Related Podcasts: State of Sponsored Content with Steve Rubel Social Media Monitoring Trifecta Future of Social Media Strategy with Brian Solis   Referenced Content: Social Media Policy Development Whitepaper 7 Deadly Social Media Sins Whitepaper   About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman and on Google+.

State of Sponsored Content

Jul 1, 2013

Description:

steve-rubel This is a recording of the luncheon keynote title "The Content Imperative" delivered at the PRSA Digital Impact Conference on June 27, 2013.   The speaker is Steve Rubel (@steverubel) is Chief Content Strategist for Edelman - the world's largest independent public relations firm.

In this role Rubel is responsible for creating and cultivating best practices in content strategy and for piloting innovative media partnerships that blend paid, owned and earned strategies. He serves as a strategic advisor to both the firm's Executive Committee as well as its clients. For more see http://nyti.ms/13nxonG and http://bitly.com/EdelmanCCS

While with Edelman Rubel has served in a number of senior advisory roles. He helped evolve both the firm's thinking and strategy around the rapid advance of social media and, more recently, disruptions in the broader media landscape.

As part of his remit, Rubel publishes regular reports that are based on in-depth interviews with executives and thought leaders in the media, technology and entertainment industries. He also represents Edelman on the World Economic Forum's Media, Entertainment and Information Industry Partnership.

Rubel is one of Edelman's most visible industry thought leaders. He has written a monthly column for Advertising Age since 2006. Further, he was one of the first marketers picked to join the LinkedIn Influencer content network. He is followed by 80,000 on Twitter.   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman and on Google+.

Social Media Hiring

Jun 24, 2013

Description:

Online hiring is not particularly new, but social media hiring is.    After years working on the front lines of recruiting, Gerry Crispin saw a new potential in the Internet for hiring online.  In 1994, he created CareerXroads® which helps corporations of all sizes with career planning and placement, contract recruiting, executive search, recruitment advertising and human resource management.   In this interview, Gerry Crispin discusses his most current Sources of Hire Report [PDF], which attempt to attribute the hiring of candidate to specific media channel, of which social is one.   Online hiring is not particularly new, but social media hiring is.    Reference Links:   1.) 7 Deadly Social Media Sins: New Report – http://DraftPolicy.com   2.) Social Media Policy Development: Report – http://7SocialSins.com   3.) Brian Solis Podcast - http://ontherecordpodcast.com/solis   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman and on Google+.

Protecting Your Privacy Rights on Social Media

Jun 10, 2013

Description:

With the nation’s attention fixed on the George Snowden leaked top-secret NSA surveillance program with Verizon and others, this week we drill down on social media and personal privacy at work.   In the case of the NSA collecting data from Verizon, what’s missing is probable cause or a specific threat argues Tony Bradley (@bradleystrategy) in a recent Forbes article.     Since the NSA is collecting the data without an intent to prosecute, it’s not a 4th amendment violation, Tony writes. But in this interview, you’ll learn why probable cause and intent to prosecute are not required to violate Federal, and in some cases state, personal privacy laws.    Do you know what your social media privacy rights are as an employee?  Do you know what your employee’s rights to privacy on social media are as an employer? If not, you need to listen to this interview. It could save you your job or six- to seven-figures in legal fees.   How does the device and the ISP you use to access the Internet impact your personal privacy rights, how do those rights vary from state to state, what are the risks of bosses “friending” subordinates and what are the legal limits protecting the privacy of your Facebook social graph?  Are there any at all?   The 4th Amendment of the United State Constitution protects citizens against “unreasonable search and seizure” and the 14th Amendment has been interpreted as giving them the “right to be left alone.” But what does that mean for employees and employers?  And are there any explicit privacy guarantees that apply?   Learn how to protect your personal privacy rights on social media in this in-depth audio recording of a discussion with James DeSimone (@vjdesimone), known as "Jim" to his friends, family and colleagues, about your personal privacy rights on social media. Jim graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1981, earned his law degree from UCLA and was admitted to practice law in California in 1985. Since then, he has specialized in representing those whose civil and constitutional rights have been violated by corporations or government entities.   Social Media and Personal Privacy: Topics Discussed:   How US employee personal privacy rights apply to social media communications. State laws prohibiting employers from demanding social networking passwords from employees How social media privacy rights for employees differ from state to stat? Legal issues surrounding the use of social media background checks in pre-employment recruiting and hiring Privacy rights, equal employment opportunity rights and the Fair Credit and Reporting Act Employees have the right to privacy on social media off duty? Use of social media policies to manage employees’ expectations Challenges associated with segregating personal and professional identities on social media with new services like the Linkedin Contact iPhone App, which automatically adds all the your contacts on your iPhone to your Linkedin contacts page  Are employers allowed to monitor their employees social media use at work by shoulder-surfing? Noel Canning vs. NLRB case on recess appointments and what it could come diffuse recent decisions by the NLRB over the right of employees to bargain collectively and organize to improve working conditions on social media.  How your Facebook privacy settings impact whether or not your employer or a litigator can access your profile to verify statements or to check your background. Who owns an employee’s content or connections after they leave and why employers should state that contributing content is within the scope of employment and also maintain their own database of contacts. Is it legal for an employee to withhold login credentials to a company branded account after they’ve been terminated?  In Christou v. Beatport, LLC, the United States District Court for the District of Colorado held that log-in information to a MySpace account may constitute a trade secret. What are your rights to privacy on mobile devices?  On the precipice of the release of Google Glass and other wearable technologies, what rights to privacy do US employees have over the information they access or create with mobile devices. Are privacy protections for company-owned mobile devices weaker than employee owned devices, and the impact of accessing the web on personal mobile device via the company’s wireless signal as well as cell phone expense reimbursements. How might Google Glass give rise to a new class of personal privacy invasions in the work place?   About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   Follow him on Twitter @ericschwartzman.  Or connect with him on Google+.   Disclaimer: This interview is for general informational purposes only and should NOT be considered legal advice.  Please refer any legal questions you may have to an attorney from your jurisdiction.

7 Deadly Social Media Sins

Jun 3, 2013

Description:

Bussing bio 1 Heather Bussing (@heatherbussing), California employment lawyer discusses Social Media’s Real Legal Issues.  Ms. Bussing is a labor and employment law specialist with 25-years experience.   In this episode, she explains why social media policies are not the best way to manage what employees can and cannot say on social media, Section 7 of the NLRA which protects employee’s discussions regarding wages, hours and working conditions and why employers need to think through how it tried to regulate what employees say on social media.   Legal issues employers face as a result of social media in the workplace discussed in this interview:   Social Media Discrimination - Discrimination on Social Media with adverse employment impact that could lead to a hostile work environment. Issues concerning managers and employees such as age discrimination, settlements and awarded damages. Workplace discrimination suits cost employers start at $50 to $70 thousand in attorney fees, not including punitive damages, which can easily run in the six figures, and sometimes run into the millions.   Social Media Defamation - Libel in Social Media is considered shares that are untrue and unflattering. Libel does not have to cause damage, because they are inferred. If it’s negative and untrue, it could be libelous, slanderous and defamatory. Defamation is the overall category of unkind, untrue or unflattering statements. Slander is statements that are made verbally, or are published verbally and libel are statements that are made in writing. Generally, anything that is recorded in one-way of another would be considered libel.   Social Media Harassment - There are two types of legal harassment that could take place on social media.  The first is called quid pro quo, which is sleep with me and I’ll promote you and the second is a hostile work environment, which is harassment that is so pervasive that a reasonable person could not tolerate it and could not continue to perform under those conditions. Harassment could be based on any of the categories that are protected by civil rights and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) law such as age, national origin, religion, race/color, sex, sexual preference or disability.   Social Media and Personal Privacy - To circumvent personal privacy issues, employees should be trained on what type of information has to kept private by an employer such as medical and financial information or sexual orientation. But there are limitations. If there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, such as personal belongings being kept in a locked desk drawer, where the desk is owned by the employer, in certain states the employer may still have to give the employee notice before they unlocked that drawer.   Employee Privacy at Work – If the employer owns the hardware, the employers is entitled to see anything that it is used for or anything that’s on that. Privacy rights are very limited at work when an employee uses their employer’s hardware.   Requesting Employee Social Networking Passwords - Generally, an employer has the right the user names and passwords of an employee’s personal social media accounts if that employee uses company-owned hardware to access that social media account. In 2012, 5 states enacted legislation preventing employers from requesting passwords to personal Internet accounts to get or keep a job.  Legislation has been introduced or is pending in 35 US States, according the National Conference of State Legislatures.    Social Media and Intellectual Property – Titles are not generally copyrighted but the content of the work itself usually is, a copyright is a particular set of words or images. You can’t copyright titles or ideas. But something that somebody else wrote, or an image created by someone else, is generally protected by copyright and cannot be used without permission unless you’ve paid for the right to use it, or are using an excerpt under the Fair Use Doctrine, which allows you to use a small excerpt for the purpose of review or discussion. “Small” is based on the percentage of the excerpt compared to the entire copyrighted work and which could be considered substantially less than the whole thing. Furthermore, the excerpt should include a link back to the entire copyrighted work at a web domain owned by the copyright holder.  Attribution is also key. While it labor intensive, copyright owners can submit take down notices, which Google provides visibility over on a quarter-by-quarter basis.   Social Media Jurisdiction - Federal law applies to all US employers and State law applies to where the employee works. A temporary vacation with the intent to return home as not enough to invoke jurisdiction in another state.     Mitigating Risk through Social Media Policies - Reliance on social media policy is not enough to guarantee compliance. Policies don’t prevent people from acting out and doing stupid things, because policies are usually part of a large pile of paperwork distributed to new hires as part of the on boarding process and don’t get read. Employees don’t pay attention to policy. Policy alone is not enough.   Leaking Corporate Strategy with Location Based Social Networking - How services like Foursquare can compromise the confidentiality of a company’s strategy and what type of training employers should provide to employees to minimize misuse.    FTC Disclosure Requirements - Legal disclosure requirements in place that employers must follow if they have use their employees to say good things about them on social media.   Reference Links: http://www.hrexaminer.com/social-medias-real-legal-issues/ http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/ http://www.ncsl.org/issues-research/telecom/employer-access-to-social-media-passwords-2013.aspx  http://www.hrexaminer.com/how-employers-can-still-see-employee-social-media-accounts/   About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal...

Does HR Get Social Media

May 28, 2013

Description:

Just how well does the broader HR community get social media? The answer to that question and many more about the state of social media in HR are revealed in this epsiode of the On the Record...Online podcast.   We talk to Tim Sackett (@TimSackett), EVP at HRU Technical Resources, a $40M IT and Engineering contract staffing firm and Recruiting Processing Outsourcers (RPOs) about a vareity of social media HR issues.   Prior to joining HRU, he was Director of Employment at Sparrow Health System and before that he was Regional HR and Staffing Director at Applebee’s International and has served others in similar capacities.  He’s split his career between recruiting and HR working for HR vendors and corporations.   Topics Discussed:   How is HR changing to accommodate social media in the workplace. Challenges of managing social media usage among staffers at Applebee’s Overcoming the operational challenges social media at work Business case for HR to manage social media usage in the workplace Social media compliance in an era of increasing regulation from government agencies such as the NLRB, FTC and SEC Social media governance strategies Strategies for educating large employee populations on social media literacy and compliance Challenges of social media training for HR people, integrating personal and professional profiles and inefficiencies of live training Corporate social media policy fairness, employee recruitment and retention Risks of Equal Employment Opportunity charges due to social media   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can also find him on Google+.

SoLoMo Recruitment Marketing at Sodexo

May 20, 2013

Description:

Social media recruiting at Sodexo Careers involves much more than just a Linkedin presence and a blog. Under the guidance of Arie Ball, VP of Talent Acquisition, the Sodexo social media recruitment strategy encompasses the Sodexo Jobs mobile app, nearly a dozen managed communities tailored to specific job tasks and branded social media accounts on every major social network.   Chloe Rada is the voice of Sodexo Careers and senior marketing manager in the talent acquisition department.  She’s focused on the use of social media to open up lines of communications between candidates and recruiters and her mission is to help the talent acquisition department communicate what it’s like to work at Sodexo.  Her team is 100% virtual and supports the hiring of management positions only. Hourly employees are hired by others.   Sodexo is the world’s 20th largest employer, processing roughly 20,000 job applications each month. They started using social media for recruiting in 2007 to develop deeper relationships with the talent community by communicating with them on their preferred social network.
  Social Media Recruiting Topics Discussed:   The history of social media recruiting at Sodexo Content marketing for career advancement Rules of engagement for social media communications Social media training needs at large organizations Growing importance of generating original, visual content. Que Social platform for scaling engagement inside organizations Resume tips for jobseekers   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can also find him on Google+.

Social Media for Recruiting

May 13, 2013

Description:

usage-comparison Social media for recruiting best practices, using social media for recruiting and sourcing and screening candidates with social media are discussed in this episode by guests Steve Levy blogs at The Recruiting Inferno and Tom Bolt who blogs at Make HR Happen.   Topics discussed include:   Legal risks of identifying and screening candidates with social media. Keeping candidate research legal. When to review a candidates social media profiles. Legislative trends in social media governance. Findings of the Sources of Hire 2013 Report by Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler Best practices for Twitter recruiting. Job seeker tweet chats Hire Friday Chat and Open Mic Career Chat. SEO recruiting, Linkedin recruiting, Facebook recuiting, Blogs recruiting. If you use blogs for recruiting, those blogs must be authored companywide. Arie Ball at Sodexo turns every employee into a talent scout. Linkedin Profile optimization for job seekers. Resume writing best practices. About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can also find him on Google+.

Social Media Monitoring Trifecta

May 6, 2013

Description:

salesforce-marketing-cloud-550x420 Social Media Monitoring has been the focus of a podcast series released over the last few weeks in the wake of Google’s announcement they’ll be retiring Google Reader.    As the producer of an online social media monitoring course based on Google Reader, I’ve been intently evaluating free Google reader alternatives such as Feedly and Netvibes.  After an in depth evaluation of these two contenders, I also wrote a post comparing them for Venture Beat last Friday.   While Salesforce Marketing Cloud, which bundles Radian6, Buddy Media and Social.com, isn’t free, in the quest for thoroughness, I decided to include their offering on this evaluation to check in and see what’s new over there.   Radian6 is the monitoring and engagement module, Buddy Media is the publishing platform and Social.com (acquired by Buddy Media) as a way to manage paid social media campaigns. They’re currently in the process of integrating those three platforms seamlessly together.   What was most interesting to me about our conversation about CRM software, the primary business Salesforce is in.  Imagine the KPIs you could generate if they acquired a company like Quicken or Sage and integrated it with their CRM and Marketing Cloud products.  The, in my opinion, would a big data trifecta.   IN this episode, Jeffrey L. Cohen, from the content marketing team at Salesforce Marketing Cloud and I discuss content marketing, social media monitoring, engagement  dashboards and big data analysis. Jeffrey is also editor at Social Media B2B (a blog I’ve written for in the past) and The B2B Social Media Book, released after my title with Paul Gillin Social Marketing to the Business Customer.   Social Media Monitoring Topics Discussed:   Top of the sales funnel lead generation content marketing Brian Solis’s cluster funnel analogy Understanding the content funnel Creating content that solves the customers problems Using content marketing to make sales reps more productive How to motivate service agents Social media is always a hot topic Integrating online sales and marketing through lead scoring Winning purchase consideration through the best educational materials Third-party semantic analysis products available in Radian6 Number of Radian6 customers Richard Binhammer’s social media avalanche analogy Radian6’s social media monitoring features

Social Media Monitoring with Netvibes

Apr 24, 2013

Description:

Netvibes Premium   In this episode, Netvibes CEO Freddy Mini (@freddymini) shares why a social media monitoring tool without integrated social media analytics is a hammer without a nail. Most of the Google Reader alternatives out there are focused on giving users social filters to discover the best content.  But Netvibes has been there and done that. They’re more interested in helping users finding meaning through context.   Netvibes will give you their news reader for free. But if you want their analytics, you’ll have to pay. They are a business, after all, with a revenue model.  But their free version is ad free, has been around for nearly 8 years and since it's the centerpoint of their freemium sales model, the company says they have no plans to lay it to rest.    Netvibes is a wholly owned subsidiary of Dassault Systèmes.   Why am I so interested in Google Reader alternatives?  Well my company ComplySocially has an online social media monitoring course based on Google Reader. And it needs to be updated. So I’m intently studying the major Google Reader alternatives to determine which ones to include in my course revision. Here’s my conversation with Cyril Moutran of Feedly last week and I'm talking to the founder of The Old Reader tomorrow.   What other Google Reader alternatives should I be looking at?   Social Media Monitoring Topics Discussed:   Feedly vs. Netvibes, feature by feature Netvibes free vs. premium versions Netvibes biggest advantage over Feedly Twitter API 1.1, which impose limits on all free monitoring tools New users acquired since Google killed Reader Why it’s too soon to compare Netvibes to Feedly Why Netvibes covets analysis over engagement Evolution of Netvibes, from information overload to crowdsourcing to semantics Using monitoring analytics to trigger dark PPC campaigns On Malik and finding the soul of big data You can see some prebuilt premium Netvibes social media monitoring dashboards in action here.   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can also find him on Google+.

Future of Business with Brian Solis

Apr 22, 2013

Description:

To make sure our online Social Media Training Bootcamp stays timely, I spoke to social media marketing analyst Brian Solis about his new book What’s the Future of Business – Changing the Way Business Create Experiences, which redefines the key elements of an effective social media strategy.   If you haven’t read it yet, the new book advances his “shareable moments” concept into a framework for social media engagement by identifying when, what and how organizations can best shape the dynamic customer journey, suggesting social media marketing should be about shaping intentional experiences or the experiences customers have through experience architecture.   If you’re not farmiliar with Brian, he’s a principal at Altimeter Group, which is a research and advisory firm. He’s also a keynote speaker and the author of two best-sellers The End of Business as Usual and Engage!     Prior to Altimeter, he founded FutureWorks, a marketing agency focused on digital media, branding, and business strategy. He also created The Conversation Prism in 2008, an infographic categorizing the various social media categories and the companies that provide those services.   Brian Solis interview covers:   Overarching social media management strategy Intentional experiences and how organizations and individuals put together an experiential strategy The dynamic customer journey The 4 moments of truth Impact of connected consumers and connected audiences on industries Connecting social media marketing with customer service Shaping intentional experiences through enterprise wide digital literacy Why the sales funnel is dead Practical tips for listening to customer experiences Om Malik and finding the soul of big data Newsle, Linkedin and the future of interoperability   Also, I talk about overcoming the challenges associated with social media consulting, recurring revenue and invite listeners to sign-in for the Comply Socially reseller program.   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social media training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.   You can also find him on Google+.

SEC Ruling on Social Media

Apr 14, 2013

Description:

GDG bio On April 2, 2013 social media was officially deemed an acceptable venue for publicly traded companies to disclose material information to investors by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.   The new SEC ruling on social media stipulates that before companies use social media for material disclosures, they must alert investors where they’ll be doing so in advance.  In this interview, Glen Gilmore, author of Social Media Law for Business and principal at Gilmore Business Network talks about the impact and ramifications of the ruling for employers and employees.   The SEC Ruling on Social Media is particularly important to investor relations professionals, who are charged with distributing information that could impact their company's stock price.  The SEC released Regulation Fair Disclosure back in 2000 to prevent institutional investors from gaining an unfair trading advantage over individual investors by requiring publicly listed companies to nonselectively release material information.  Since then, companies have been complying with Reg FD by using paid newswire services like PR Newswire and BusinessWire to satisfy their nonselective disclosure requirements.  As would be expected, the SEC Ruling on Social Media prompted a defensive posture from the paid PR newswire services.   But if the SEC's 2008 Guidance on the Use of Company Websites for Corporate Disclosures is any indication, the new SEC Ruling on Social Media is unlikely to provoke a sea change in hopw listed companies disclose their news.  In this interview, Glen discusses these and other issues that the new ruling on social media have brought into the limelight for investor relations professionals.   SEC Ruling on Social Media Interview Covers:   Caveats to the SEC Ruling on Social Media IR industries response to the SEC Ruling on Social Media Practical methods for giving investors advance notice to impending material disclosure via social media Will the new SEC guidance on social media spur more embedding of social activity on company websites? Implementation challenges of the new SEC social media ruling Does the inclusion of tweets on Bloomberg terminals make Twitter a more or less risky venue for material disclosures? Navigating material disclosures between personal and branded social media accounts? Updates HR managers should consider making to their employee handbook as a result of this new social media ruling from the SEC.   Disclaimer:     This interview is for general informational purposes only and should NOT be considered legal advice.  Please refer any legal questions you may have to an attorney from your jurisdiction.   Reference Links: http://forimmediaterelease.biz/index.php?/C8 http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenmakovsky/2013/04/11/the-sec-and-social-media/ http://blogs.wsj.com/cfo/2013/04/08/companies-take-cautious-approach-to-social-media-disclosures/?mod=google_news_blog http://www.bulldogreporter.com/dailydog/article/sec-ruling-changes-the-distribution-game-social-media-now-acceptable-for-material-0   About the Podcaster:   Eric Schwartzman is Founder and CEO of online social meida training provider Comply Socially, which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunities of social media in the workplace.

He is also an independent communications consultant for hire to businesses, global nonprofits, the US Military, US Federal government agencies and foreign governments. His consulting services include digital strategy, social media audits, social media policy development, online public relations, social media marketing, search engine optimization and web development.

Schwartzman founded iPRSoftware, his best-selling book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" is the first book devoted exclusively to social media for business-to-business communications, and he's founding chair of the Digital Impact Conference in NYC.

Social Media Monitoring with Feedly

Apr 10, 2013

Description:

cyrilsq2 Social media monitoring remains critical to effective social media marketing.  Because if you don’t know what people are talking about, you don’t know what’s important to them or where to focus your efforts.   Since the announcement that one of the most popular social monitoring tools Google Reader will be discontinued on July 1, 2013, Feedly has emerged as one of the leading social media tools users should consider shifting to, signing up 3 million new users since in last month or so.   In this episode, Cyril Moutran, co-founder at Feedly, discusses the monitoring tools the web and mobile versions of their news readers offers including subscribing to raw RSS feeds, feed views, Facebook monitoring and Twitter monitoring.   Social Media Monitoring with Feedly covers:   How far back Feedly goes Subscribing to Google News feeds via RSS Social media monitoring latency issues Social media monitoring trends Search within RSS feeds and feed directories Content curation capabilities of Feedly Options for analyzing feed activity How Feedly curates content based on social activity How Feedly compares to Flipboard Value of discovery vs. chronology in feeds Using Feedly social measurement feature Hacking RSS feeds   With more than 3 million users, Feedly is an angel-funded start-up with 10 employees and a newsreader app for the desktop, iPhone, iPad and Android.  The company has not figured out how to generate revenue yet, but they’re kicking around different premium service ideas that would be paid. But the free version is not going away. “We’ll always have a free model,” says Cyril Moutran.

Whole Foods Social Media

Apr 2, 2013

Description:

Web1Natanya Anderson_5386_small Natanya Anderson (@NatanyaP), Director Social Media and Digital Marketing at Whole Foods Market, which includes a branded Twitter account with over 3 million followers and more than 600 local social meida accounts representing the grocery stores that are part of the chain. Natanya has a food blog at Austin Food Lover’s Companion and is a past president of the Austin Food Lover’s Alliance. Whole Foods Market (NASDAQ: WFM) is the world's largest organic and natural foods supermarket chain.   In this exclusive interview, she discusses:   How Whole Foods coordinates and localizes their social media efforts. How Whole Foods trains and qualifies personnel to engage on behalf of the stores. Managing the sprawl of social media among 1200 representatives How the brand provides tools, reports, content and engagement guidance to the stores How they use online social media training to bring people up to speed What happens if someone makes a mistake? Costco vs. Food Workers Union compliant filed with the NLRB. And much more!   Special thanks to Babette Pepaj at BakeSpace.

2013 Social Media B2B Expert Panel

Mar 23, 2013

Description:

BFxVAcfCMAAkr79.jpg_large   How do businesses use social media differently than individuals, what’s the secret to leveraging social media to steer B2B purchasing decisions and how do you sell social media to disengaged bosses, coworkers and clients?   These are other B2B Social Media Topics are discussed on this expert panel produced by Social Media Club L.A. and moderated by Eric Schwartzman, founder and CEO of Comply Socially which helps employers manage the risk and capitalize on the opportunity of social media at work through self-paced, on-demand social media training.   Panelists: Rachel Luxemburg, Principal Strategist at Adobe Stephen Gundee, Enterprise Relationship Manager at LinkedIn Erick Brownstein, EVP for Marketing at YTM Lauren Buchman, marketing consultant specializing in channel marketing   Topics: What are the differences between B2C and B2B social media marketing? How should B2B determine their paid, earned and owned social media mix? How are B2Bs inspiring the Ultimate Moment of Truth that Brian Solis suggests in his new book What are the essential ingredients of a vibrant B2B customer community? How do you build a B2B ambassador program that gets coworkers and SMEs using social media as well? Is there a relationship between trust and ease-of-use and do you trust the new Linkedin Skills & Expertise Endorsements?   Special thanks to Steven Swimmer of Swimmer Media.

HIPAA Social Media Guidelines

Mar 12, 2013

Description:

3269feb Dan Goldman (@danielg280), legal counsel at Mayo Clinic and Advisory Board member to the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, discusses the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which sets national standards for the security of electronic protected health information; and the confidentiality provisions of the Patient Safety Rule, which protect identifiable information being used to analyze patient safety events and improve patient safety.   Dan specializes in Internet law, HIPAA and Privacy law, telemedicine, trademark law, copyright law, and social media legal issues.  

Topics Covered: Identifiable health information The HIPAA Security Rule Confidentiality provisions of the Patient Safety Rule Patient rights over medical information The HIPAA Patient Privacy Rule How advances in electronic technology can erode the privacy of health information Impact of recently NLRB rulings on patient privacy HIPAA compliant social media policy Importance of social media compliance training

About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Le Web 2012 Report

Dec 9, 2012

Description:

Online Social Media Training: Social Media Pros 30 Simulcast

Aug 25, 2012

Description:

This is Episode 30 of the Social Pros Podcast : Real People Doing Real Work in Social Media. This episode features Eric Schwartzman, online social media training provider, entrepreneur and the best-selling co-author of Social Marketing to the Business Customer. Read on for insights from Eric plus Eric Boggs‘s Social Media Stat of the Week (This week: Twitter gets 15% more media mentions than Facebook.)   Social Pros Transcript For Your Reading Enjoyment, Thanks to Speechpad for the Transcription SpeechpadLogo Social Pros 30   Eric Schwartzman, Social Media Boot Camp Jay: Hey, everybody, and we’re back with another episode of Social Pros, shining the light on real people doing real work in social media. I am Jay Baer, joined, as always, by social media marketing software company genius, Founder, President and man among boys, live from the woods of North Carolina, Mr. Eric Boggs. Eric B.: These introductions keep getting better and better, Jay. Jay: And longer. The next time I’m going to do a 20-minute introduction and a seven-minute show. Eric B.: That sounds fantastic. Jay: How are you my friend? Eric B.: Doing just great. What’s new? Jay: Oh, man, it’s been a crazy week in the interwebs. We’re going to talk about that in just a second. Let’s take a real quick minute to acknowledge our sponsors in addition to Eric’s company Argyle Social, who we use for all of our social media content missives. Also our friends at Infusionsoft, fantastic e-mail CRM company, who we use for all of our emailings; our buddy Jim Kukral at digitalbooklaunch.com, who is our erstwhile guest host; and the good folks at Janrain, who do all kinds of amazing social sign-in and matching up your database to real people in social media. Solving common problems, those folks at Janrain.   We, today, have ourselves quite a show, quite a show, Eric Boggs. We have a professional on the show today. We actually have somebody who actually knows something about podcasting and other stuff, but podcasting in particular. Mr. Eric Schwartzman will be joining us here on the program in a minute. Eric handles the On the Record podcast and is at like episode 300 or some crazy thing like that. Eric is also the Founder of iPressroom from back in the day – that’s where I first met Eric when he was running that company – co-author of the fantastic book “Social Marketing to the Business Customer”, with Paul Gillin. We’re going to talk to Eric specifically today about a really interesting series of web-based training programs he has now about social media, social media boot camp, if you will. Eric B.: Yep. Jay: So, we’ll do that in a second. Eric B.: It’s bonus, extra Eric also in this podcast. Jay’s Thought of the Week Jay: Two Erics, one Jay, it is a Jay sandwich. So crazy week in social media and a lot of things potentially to talk about, but the one I wanted to talk about, especially because you’re on the show is what is the deal with Twitter? This crazy API pronouncement and, “You must make everything look the way we make it look,” and, “If you don’t want to do it the way we want to do it, we’re going to revoke your access.” For somebody in your line of work, it feels to me like a shot across the bow. How did that go over in the halls of Argyle Social? Eric B.: You actually reminded me that I was supposed to write a blog post about this earlier today. It’s on my to-do list and obviously… Jay: Now you can just link to the podcast transcript. Eric B.: Exactly, yeah. Now, I haven’t done it and thank you for reminding me. We actually saw it as a good thing, oddly enough. If you read through that whole massive post from the Twitter API guys, they had a quadrant at the bottom of the post that basically, I think they divided the world in engagement and analytics, and then business and consumer and they basically called out their four quadrants. One of them is sort of consumer engagement apps. Another is sort of consumer-influenced analytics, obviously Klout being the only thing in that quadrant. Then there’s business engagement and management in business analytics and they basically said, “Look, if you’re in the consumer engagement quadrant, you might want to think about starting another company.” That type of clarity from Twitter is welcome to us. One, because Argyle is not in that quadrant, we’re firmly nestled in the business analytics and business engagement side of the world along with quite a few competitors. Getting sort of clarity and a sense of roadmap from Twitter is actually good. In terms of all the display guidelines, that’s peanuts. That’s piece of cake stuff. That is all kind of driven by Twitter’s ad model and trying to protect page views and consumer experience. So, overall, I thought it was welcome, actually. There are obviously big chunks of the market whose businesses will need to change in a really big way and some of whom whose businesses will probably really suffer. But Twitter’s got to do what Twitter’s got to do and I felt the announcement was necessary and I thought they handled it pretty well. Jay: Very interesting. That’s not precisely what I thought you would say. I guess because you’re not Echofon or somebody who they almost and did call out by name and say, “Guess what? We’re going to shut you down.” Eric B.: Yeah. Jay: I certainly understand the perspective of, “Hey, you know what? It’s our data and we’re going to do what we need to do to protect our intrasite.” I understand that. But it does seem that it is quite an evolution of their general...

Your Social Media Policy is Illegal

Mar 9, 2012

Description:

unlawful-sm I've updated my sample social media policy as a result of this conversation with Lisa Milam-Perez, who edits a blog by CCH Wolters Kluwer about US law and business practices, and who recently published a post about the latest guidance from the National Labor Relations Board, which says organizations need to be more specific in the language they use to govern the use of social media policy for US-based employees.   Under the National Labor Relations Act, US-based employees have a legal right to organize to improve their working conditions, even if that effort includes publicly criticizing their employer or discussing confidential information, such as a salaries, on social networks.  That's right, restricting employees from discussing "confidential information" is too broad a requirement to pass muster.   In this podcast, Lisa discusses two memoranda that were recently released by the NLRB Acting General Counsel Lafe Solomon. The first one (OM 11-74) on August 18, 2011, profiles the NLRB’s resolution of 14 social media cases; a second memo (OM-12-31) on January 25, outlines more recent cases reviewed by his office.   As Lisa says in her blog post:   "An employer’s policies “should not be so sweeping that they prohibit the kinds of activity protected by federal labor law, such as the discussion of wages or working conditions among employees,” according to Solomon. Distilled to its essence: standard labor law principles apply here. That means that even if it does not expressly bar NLRA-protected activity, the NLRB would still find fault with a policy that: “chills” employees from exercising their protected Section 7 rights; significantly burdens an employee’s exercise of those rights; was enacted in direct response to union activity; or is applied in such a manner that it restricts the exercise of protected rights."   If you haven't updated you social media policy in a while and you need enforceable employee guidelines, now is the time. As I mentioned earlier, I'm in the process of updating my social media policy template so sign up for my email newsletter (upper right-column of this page) if you'd like a notification when it's available.

Auto Industry Crisis PR at GM

Feb 6, 2012

Description:

  Handling crisis PR at GM before, during and after US taxpayers rescued the automaker with Jennifer Ecclestone (@jenecclestone), Social Media and Executive Communications for the GM Product and Technology division.

Jennifer and Eric discuss the automotive industry crisis of 2008-2010, how the US automakers got caught without hybrids when gas prices increased, how US Dept. of Defense Secretary of Defense Robert Gates accelerated production of MRAPs, the politics of setting fuel efficiency standards and what crisis PR firms can learn from her handling of communications through the automotive industry bailout crisis.

This interview was recorded the 2011 PRSA International Conference in Orlando.

Related Content: Toyota Online Newsroom Best Practices Mitsubishi Motors PR Director Dan Irvin Haiti Emergency Communications Case Study
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Linkedin B2B Social Marketing Update

Jan 31, 2012

Description:

PhotoBooth is fun If you’re a B2B marketer looking to fine tune your Linkedin marketing strategy, this podcast is for you.  Your’re going to get tanglible, applicabler Linkedin marketing tips and learn Linkedin marketing strategy from the company’s own developer advocate Kirsten Jones (@synedra), who blogs at Princess Polymath.

In this episode, she discusses the technology behind Linkedin’s marketing strategy for extending their services beyond their website and helping members take their credentials with them wherever they go online.  With more than 135 million members, and 4 million new members joining each month, Linkedin is the world’s third largest online network and in this podcast, she tells you everything you need to know to mastermind a smart Linkedin marketing startegy.

Linkedin’s goal is to connect to world’s professionals and make them more productive and successful and one way they do that is by making it easy for members to leverage their Linkedin professional profile and network of contacts on third-party websites and in mobile environments.  
Kirsten speaks at conferences and meetups to educate and engage developers with the LinkedIn API. She has given presentations at various events, including the Silicon Valley iOS Developer Meetup, the Semantic Web Meetup, the DataInsight Hackathon and Silicon Valley Code Camp. Her talks range from overviews of our platform to hands-on workshops. She's comfortable speaking in front of small and large groups, and is an engaging and entertaining speaker, interacting with the audience during and after the presentation.

Topics Discussed:
Presdo Match Linkedin Integration for Connecting at Le Web Demographics of Linkedin’s user base Linkedin’s competitive values: Identity, Insights and Everywhere Linkedin Homepage, Linkedin Today and Linkedin Groups Linkedin’s Javascript APIs and REST backend Linkedin’s prebuilt, easy to integrate Plugins Integrating Linkedin into trade show and conference website Integrating Linkedin into recruiting websites Linkedin Company Insider Plugin at CNNMoney.com Linkedin’s iPhone, Android and Blackberry mobile apps Information Storing Kerfuffle between Monster and Linkedin Linkedin Plugin Builder
This presentation was recorded at Le Web 2011 in Paris.  Special thanks to Loic and Geraldine Le Meur for accommodating On the Record...Online as an official conference blogger.



Related Content: Social Marketing Insights from Le Web Marketing through B2B Social Networks B2B SEO Strategies and Tactics
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline

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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

AirBNB Fail Episode

Jan 22, 2012

Description:

Social Design as Social Marketing

Jan 11, 2012

Description:

christian In this podcast, recorded at Le Web 2011 in Paris, Christian Hernandez, Director of Platform Partnerships at Facebook discusses “The Power of the Graph" and explains why social design and engineering is the future of social marketing.   Social marketing campaigns -- where people-powered social media optimization and social networking activities comprise the bulk of the social marketing strategy -- are about to be replaced carte blanche by web developers as the age of social media automation comes into fruition.

The workshop also features presentations by Facebook partner Axel Dauchez, CEO and Beatrice Tourvieille, marketing director at Deezer, and Jens Begemann, Founder and CEO or Wooga Games.

After a thorough discussion about the rationale behind the introduction of Facebook Timeline and the business case for integrating Facebook into online services to promote viral distribution, the developer partners discuss the increase in users they’ve secured, and why Wooga is focused on HTML5 as the future of social mobile app design.

Topics Discussed:

Why Social Design is the Future of Social Marketing Facebook Social Graph, Object Graph and Interest Graph Redesign of Facebook with Messaging, Newsfeed, Ticker and Profiles From Edge Rank to Graph Rank, and it Changes Social Optimization Beyond the “Like” Button. The Lexicon of Expanded Social Gestures Why Fiskers and Geno Church Should Think Long and Hard About Timeline
For my write up on the workshop, please read the blog post “Why Social Design is the Future of Social Marketing” which is right here.   Related Content: HOW TO: Create Social Media Training Courses Balancing Transparency against Operational Security at the United States Marine Corps Strategic Social Media Communications at US Pacific Command
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Social Marketing Insights from Le Web

Jan 4, 2012

Description:

Most Facebook and Linkedin members are outside of the US. So when you market through social networks or through Google, you're marketing to a global audience. To be successful, you need a global perspective. And that's what this episode is about. In it, you will get the major take aways and social marketing insights that came out of what remains my favorite tech conference of the year.   It's called Le Web and it brings together a very influential audience of US and European executives from businesses within the Internet ecosystem. Top industry entrepreneurs, executives, investors, senior press and bloggers gather for two days in Paris each December to focus on the key issues and opportunities in the web marketplace and this was my second year attending as an official conference blogger.

In this podcast panel discussion, moderated by For Immediate Release co-hosts Neville Hobson (@jangles) and Shel Holtz (@shelholtz), official Le Web conference bloggers Tac Anderson, Chris Heuer and Eric Schwartzman exhange riffs on the key takeaways on the keynotes, the newsbreaks and other happenings at this year’s confab.
Le Web offers attendees a European perspective of how technology is developing and its the most entertaining and best looking tech event. At LeWeb 2011, there were a total of over 3500 attendees in Paris from 69 countries, and more than 200,000 participants online. Nearly 235,000 viewers watches sessions via Ustream, over 300,000 watched on-demand sessions via YouTube and more than 100,000 viewers watched Eric Schmidt's keynote. 

Topics Discussed:
Eric Schmidt’s keynote address and his message to European Governments The benefits of understanding the French and the European perspective The dirty little secrets about prepaid broadband in Paris Karl Lagerfeld’s keynote on the use of technology for fashion design Sean Parker’s keynote on the rise of collaborative comsumption Social, local, mobile trends    
About the Panelists Tac Anderson (@TacAnderson) is vice president and head of digital strategies for Waggener Edstrom, based in London. Chris Heuer (@ChrisHeuer) is specialist leader for social media at Deloitte Consulting and one of the founders of the Social Media Club. Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) runs Schwartzman & Associates and founded iPressroom.
This is a simulcast of a Google+ Hangout organized by Neville Hobson and recorded with Camtasia by Shel Holtz, co-hosts of the For Immediate Release podcast.

Related Content: How Social Media Killed the Cold Call Marketing through B2B Social Networks B2B SEO Strategies and Tactics
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

PRSA Chair-Elect Gerald Corbett

Dec 22, 2011

Description:

Mr. Gerard Corbett, Incoming Chairman and CEO of the Public Relations Society of America and CEO of Redphlag discusses the benefits of membership in a tough economy, mentoring public relations professionals, the three-legged stool of the job hunt, combating negative stereotype of PR, PRSA’s international ambitions, the Global Alliance for public relations and communications management, the 2011 PRSA $30 dues increase, Ketchum’s blogger relations campaign for Con Agraand the fallout from the Motrin Mom’s incident.   This interview was recorded the 2011 PRSA International Conference in Orlando.

Related Content: PRSA CEO and Chair-Elect Gerald Corbett PRSA CEO and Chair-Elect Gary D. McCormack PRSA CEO and Chair-Elect Michael Cherenson
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Blocking Access to Social Media

Dec 17, 2011

Description:

  “Most users are only two clicks away from malicious content,” says Patricia Hogan (@patriciahogan), senior public relations specialist at WebSense, who discusses web security, email security and data loss prevention through content security and why some companies chose to implement technology to safeguard their data and users by blocking access to social media.

Eric and Patricia discuss the decision some companies filter access to social networks versus just training employees to use it responsibly, Jeremiah Owyang’s report on Social Business, Websense’s policy for acceptable use of social media policy, enabling businesses to safely leverage the social web, blocking access with demotivating your employees, securing content with classified and non-classified networks, restricting access through technology versus improving security through social media training and working with your IT team to safely embrace the social web.

This interview was recorded the 2011 PRSA International Conference in Orlando. Photo by Rogelio Perea. There is some profanity in this podcast.

Related Content: HOW TO: Create Social Media Training Courses Balancing Transparency against Operational Security at the United States Marine Corps Strategic Social Media Communications at US Pacific Command


Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline


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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

How To Find Influencers Online

Nov 29, 2011

Description:

One of the most interesting alternatives to measuring online influence to surface yet is Traackr, a premium service that reveals reach, resonance and rank in online social spheres. In this exclusive interview, Traackr Founder and CEO Pierre-Loic Assayag, talks about how his service differs from Klout and other online influence scoring services. Related Content: HOW TO: Increase Your Klout Score Why the Future of Business is Social Winning Resources and Buy-In for Social Media with Brain Solis Google Analytics Deep Dive - Part One Google Analytics Deep Dive - Part Two Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Social Media Week Closing Keynote

Nov 15, 2011

Description:


Eric Schwartzman 9-23-11 (104)   This is a recording of the closing keynote address at Social Media Week Los Angeles delivered on Sept. 23, 2011 by Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman), coauthor of "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with an introduction by Michael Terpin, CEO of Social Radius.  Eric discusses social business, how social is changing the way organizations communicate, and the way business customers procure and make purchasing decisions.   Topics: How are B2Bs using social media differently from B2Cs? What are the biggest challenges to successful B2B social media outreach? Content marketing, community management and social automation: What works best in B2B? How are organizations calculating a return on investment for B2B social media initiatives? What is the role of mobile in B2B social business and how might GPS technology change the way products and services are made? What new opportunities does the prevailing social infrastructure make possible?

Le Web 2011 Preview

Nov 8, 2011

Description:

Official conference bloggers Luca Sartoni (@lucasartoni), Karin Hoegh (@karinhoegh) and Nebojsa Radovic (@eniac) discuss the tech scene in Paris, this year’s scheduled keynotes by Eric Schmidt of Google, Sean Parker, Daniel Ek of Spotify, Brian Chesky of AirBNB  and Kevin Systrom of Instagram and what types of coverage to expect from the blogger panel.

Shira Lazar on Selling Online Ads, Leo LaPorte and CBS News

Nov 8, 2011

Description:

shira-lazarShira Lazar, Host and Executive Producer of the weekly live interactive show and 24/7 news hub, “What’s Trending” discusses hosting live streaming programming for mainstream audiences, selling online content to advertisers, online influence, premium apps, Leo LaPorte, Google Plus versus Facebook, emotional ties to social media, the future of web search and the mistake which ended her distribution deal with CBS News.

Named one of Fast Company’s 2011 Most Influential Women in Technology and Huffington Post’s “Women in Tech to follow on Twitter”, Shira has been the talent on many live-streams on the web including, The Oscars and The Grammys among many others.

Social Tips and Netiquette Rules

Oct 15, 2011

Description:

If you were denied a proper Cotillion or never had a chance to be presented at the debutante ball, it’s not too late for you. You can still learn how to act and behave politely from Philip Galanes (@SocialQPhilip) who writes the Social Q’s column in the New York Times every Sunday in Style Section.  Social Q’s offers lighthearted advice about awkward social situations and is sure to prepare you to present yourself appropriately in social circles.   In this episode:   Philip's "Social Q's:  How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries and Quagmires of Today," which comes out November 1, 2011.   How Philip's book is different from Dale Carnegie’s “Win Friends and Influence People” and Emily Post’s “Ettiquette” were recently revised for the digital age.   Are companies like Facebook and Netfilx being rude when they change their services.   Is it okay to send a Facebook friend request to the mother of a child at my school without friending her husband first?   Snooping on your friend’s Facebook feed without leaving likes or comments, showing your humanity, chiming into the newsfeeds of your younger Facebook friends   Appropriateness of married men friending married women without friending their husband first.    Mattheis Lufkens's Twitter Diplomacy at Le Web last year showing that not all heads of state follow their own ministers.   Geno Church who's daughter used Facebook and her cell phone to plan and actually run way from home.  When it comes to monitoring how your children use social media, is it okay to set up software to monitor your child’s online behavior without disclosing it to them?   Using smart phones in social situations.   In the world of search marketing, the term “black hat” refers to a search marketer who uses unethical practices to try and game search algorithms to come up first.  But what if those marketers come from other countries and cultures where unabashed capitalism is NOT necessarily frowned upon? Are they still unethical, or do we need to adjust our expectations of fairness?   "Social Q's:  How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries and Quagmires of Today"  is in stores and online on Nov. 1, 2011

Social Media in Germany - Special Episode

Sep 26, 2011

Description:

  smwberlin In preparation for my second German-American Social Media Boot Camp, which is scheduled for Oct. 10-11, 2011 in Berlin, I assembled an expert panel of digital communications professionals to discuss the state of social media in Germany, and the start-up scene in Berlin.   Germany has come a long way since Fredric Lardinois wrote on ReadWriteWeb that the country is still 5 years behind with lots to learn.  But that may not be true for all companies.   Big organizations are hiring big agencies and jumping in feet first. But privacy concerns among small and medium sized businesses have stymied adoption. In fact, Xing’s compliance with local privacy laws has allowed the service to lure more users in Germany, despite a veritable lack of features and some municipal officials are still scared to launch Facebook Pages.   Berlin’s start-up scene, including SoundCloud and Etsy, is creating jobs for the digitally literate, but the post industrial generation is still left out, because they lack the skills to compete in the digital communications marketplace and almost now formal trainings opportunities exist for them to learn these important new job skills.     Our Panelists: praus Thomas Praus (@stylewalker), managing director of Panorama 3000, a member of Box Network Europe and an advisory board member for Social Media Week Berlin 2011 gassner Oliver Gassner, (@oliverg) conversation evangelist and Blog Coach at carpe.com communicate GbR. vasta Sebastian Vasta (@sebastianvasta), Australian expat, former digital strategist and community manager, most recently for @Optus.   This episode also includes a tribute to the great Liza Minnelli and her inimitable performance in the Oscar winning film Cabaret.   Other Podcasts You May Be Interested In:   Why Use Google Plus?   Social Media in Austria   Le Web 2011 Preview
Subscribe:   iTunes: "On the Record...Online"   twitter.com/ontherecord   Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered regularly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Pick the Best Wordpress Designer

Sep 19, 2011

Description:

IMG_0787 How do you find and retain the best WordPress Designers?   WordPress, web software built by hundreds of community volunteers, to create websites and blogs, currently powers 14.7% of the top million websites in the world, up from just 8.5% last year, and the latest data shows that 22 out of every 100 new active domains in the US are running WordPress.

WordPress has over 15,000 plug-ins and has seen 200 million plug-in downloads. In the fastest upgrade in the platform’s history, WordPress 3.2, the latest version, had 500,000 downloads in the first two days according to a talk Matt Mullenweg, the original developer of WordPress, gave in August.

WordPress is easy to learn and easy to use, and has given rise to an exploding community of website designers and website developers who use the platform to build new sites for themselves and for their clients.

But because this community of specialists is still so new, and because, at least based on my own analysis, demand for competency, professionalism and quality appears to outstrip supply, finding the best WordPress designers requires a working knowledge of the platform, the people and its pieces to hire to identify and retain the right specialists to get you up and running.

Voce Communications, which was purchased by Porter Novelli earlier this year, and which counts Matthew Podboy and Mike Manuel as key team members, has gorwn it’s business over the last few years and expanded its operation with the inclusion of web development as part of its portfolio of services, and most of the sites the build run on WordPress.

Voce Communications employs a full time team of WordPress experts and with us today to talk about hiring the best WordPress designer from Voce Communications WordPress Designer Jeremy Harrington (pictured right) and WordPress Developer Chris Scott, who have built dozens of high-profile WordPress sites for the agency’s clients, and they’re going to tell us everything we need to know to find and retain the best WordPress website designers.

Topics Discussed: Advantages of WordPress over Joomla and Drupal and the extensive documentation on the framework that exists. Wordpress.org versus Wordpress.com hosted sites: What are the advantages and drawbacks of either option, and how do you decide which one is right for you? The difference between Wordpress designers and Wordpress developers, who does what and who do you need first? How to hire the best WordPress Designers and the right questions to ask to identify the best WordPress Designers. One place to look for good WordPress Designers is http://codepoet.com/ How to you hire the best WordPress Developers and the right questions to ask to identify the best WordPress Developers.   Have they contributed any patches to the WordPress core code? Have the built and released any Themes? Have they developed any Plug-Ins? What’s their WordPress.org user name and what does their profile look like? Have they answered any support questions in the forums on WordPress.org Do they have any code samples they can share? Ask specifics about what their hand was in the sites in their portfolio. WordPress Themes, Premium WordPress Themes and WordPress Frameworks. Finding the best WordPress themes by using the theme directory at: https://wordpress.org/extend/themes/  Pay special attention to the featured themes on the main page, and the themes by popularity in the right-hand column. How to upgrade a WordPress website and how to safely back-up a WordPress site prior to updating a site with https://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/backwpup/ The advantages of premium themes like Genesis and Thesis. WordPress Designers who focus on specific WordPress theme: Is it a better idea to go with a designer who works with a bunch of different themes, or are there advantages to hiring someone who specializes in one WordPress Theme? The best WordPress Plug-Ins, how to pick them, where to find them (https://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/) and distinguishing between Plug-ins and Themes. Deciding between whether to sue a WordPress Managed hosting services like Page.ly, and WP Engine and WordPress Unmanaged hosting services, like DreamHost and Media Temple. Migrating websites to WordPress without losing your search rank and the future of page rank, according to Jay Baer. How to structure your agreement and what sort of benchmarks to build in. Shout to Hyku blogger Josh Hallett.
Other Podcasts You May Be Interested In: Accuracy of Sentiment Analysis Mobile Search Strategy - Part One                     Mobile Marketing Strategy - Part Two
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social...

Design Online Training Courses

Sep 12, 2011

Description:

Lynda.com-Photoshop-CS5-Essential-Training2What is the future of elearning. How do you design online training courses? How do you keep people interested? And how, if at all, will gamification and the social web change the way we learn?

Keeping up to date with the latest changes to software and web services we use for work has become a huge challenge.  And learning to use new software and online services requires a significant investment of time and energy.

Sure, there are plenty of options for coming up to speed. You can search Google for example, but you’re on your own to vet the results.  Or you can attend a workshop or seminar, but it’s expensive, you usually have to travel, and they teach to center of the class, which is either too slow or too fast for beginners or advanced users.

Online training provider Lynda.com had a library of 53,000 on-demand, online video tutorials which it makes available on a subscription basis. And 95% percent of those videos are produced in house.

In this episode, Michael Ninness, Vice President of Content atlynda.com provides an overview of how to design an online training course and the state and future of online training.

Topics Discussed: How lynda.com grew based on customer demand. What makes a great online learning course. Formal versus informal presentation styles. What type of Internet training do tomorrow’s professionals want? Lynda.com’s online social media training courses on Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin. The episode of the Xyleme podcast, in which George Siemens argued that the future of online learning is not necessarily instructor led, on demand training, but rather, a more chaotic, participant organized environments.   Delivering compelling elearning to mobile devices. Globalization and technology have increased productivity, largely at the expense of workers.  How can online training improve efficiencies. Are activity streams and social networks a better way to locate information than directories and catalogs? Is gamification the key to keeping people interested?
Podcasts You May Be Interested in: Why Use Google Plus with Jay Baer Accuracy of Sentiment Analysis Mobile Search Strategy - Part One                     Mobile Marketing Strategy - Part Two

Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered regularly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Blogging Stats Preview from Technorati

Aug 29, 2011

Description:

shani   The latest blogging stats, including counts on blog readership and blog traffic, were presented by Technorati CEO Shani Higgins at the PR Summit in San Francisco earlier this month.  This podcast is an exclusive recording of her talk.   Much of the data she shared was a preview of the blogging stats to be included this fall in the Technorati 2011 State of the Blogosphere Report.  The blogger statistics revealed in her talk provide critical insight into best practices for blog pitching.   Blogging Statistics (Highlights):   71% of bloggers only write about brands they think are reputable Mommy bloggers get 500 pitches a day Only 20% of bloggers like the pitches they get Blog accuracy perception continues to rise, the credibility of mainstream news outlines continues to erode, mommy bloggers are the toughest to pitch, more brands are compensating bloggers and brands like Vogue, Samsung and Ebay are all more invested in blogger outreach programs than they were a year ago.     Show Notes:   7:37 Hobbyists account for 65% of bloggers. Professional bloggers are broken down into three groups:   Corporate Bloggers Part-Timer Bloggers Self-Employed Professional Bloggers   For brand marketers, with the most important are Self-Employed Professional Bloggers, since they have more at stake.   Business Blogging Statistics: All Bloggers   33% have worked within traditional media 27% are still employed by traditional media 3% blog for their traditional media employer 65% say blogs are being taken more seriously   8:16 Bloggers are heavy users of social media.   Blogging Statistics: How Blogger’s use Facebook and Twitter 87% of all bloggers use Facebook 81% use Facebook to promote their blog 64% use Facebook to interact with readers 45% say Facebook drives more traffic to their blog than it did a year ago 73% of hobbyists and 88% of professional bloggers still use Twitter More than half of all bloggers link Twitter to their blog 34% of bloggers say Twitter is a more effective traffic source than it was a year ago   10:19 Bloggers are Talking about Brands - Nearly half of non-corporate bloggers write about brands. One fourth of bloggers overall post products or brand reviews monthly and one fifth post weekly. 20% of corporate bloggers post daily about products and services.   Brand Reputation Matters to Bloggers - Bloggers care deeply about brand reputation so brand acceptance is required if companies want bloggers to write about them.   Blogging Statistics: Bloggers and Brands 42% of bloggers say they blog about brands they love (or hate) 34% say they never talk about products or brands on their blogs Among respondents who say they do blog about brands, 51% they said they rarely review brands, services or products among companies Among respondents who say they do blog about brands, 48% say they post reviews weekly 33% of hobbyist and more than 50% of the professional bloggers look at reputation when determining what to write about 64% of bloggers say brand representatives treat them less professionally than they’d like   13:16 Mommy Bloggers talk about Brands More - Even though women only represent 5% of bloggers, they are the most coveted blogging segment by brands because they blog more about brands.   Blogging Statistics: Mommy Bloggers   92% use Facebook to promote their blog 75% use Twitter to promote their blog 55% follow brands on social media sites like Facebook 54% have been approached by a brand Half say a brand’s reputation influences their decision to write about it 72% of mom bloggers are being taken more seriously than they were a year ago   15:44 Blog reliability and blog accuracy, as perceived by readers is on the rise.   Blogging Statistics: Blog Trustworthiness   46% trust traditional media less than they did 5 years ago 35% believe blogs are taken more seriously 19% believe blogs are written better than traditional media sources   17:35 Blog pitching success increases dramatically when you know how to identify the most influential bloggers who cover your topic.  Understanding how to research and select bloggers, though is not discussed in this podcast, but can certainly be attained through social media training.     21:02 Bloggers are looking for audience value in a blog pitch. Investing in the quality of the news pitch, customizing high quality of content and offering the blogger recognition never goes out of style.   23:44 Latest Blog Trends - The level of professionalism among bloggers is on the rise, as is giving bloggers opportunities to become true brand advocates.  Bloggers are also becoming more savvy about compensation and are well aware of how they are helping brands achieve goals. More brands are compensating bloggers to attend conferences to help these brand ambassadors and enthusiasts amplify the brand message and foster a tighter relationship.   25:13 Shani Higgins included a number of interesting Blogger Relations Case Studies, including: Walmart (@Walmart)and Vogue (@Voguemagazine) brand ambassador blogger outreach programs Samsung Galaxy S (@SamsungmobileUS) product review blogger outreach program Ebay Inside Source website (@theinsidesource) online traffic generation blogger outreach program30:30 For bloggers, expanding reach is important. The focus should be on the quality of the writing and integration into social networking...

Life on Mars

Aug 23, 2011

Description:

x-prize Life on Mars, space colonies and inspiring innovation with Peter H. Diamandis (@peterdiamandis) Chairman and CEO, X PRIZE Foundation, a key figure in the development of the personal spaceflight industry.

Peter has created many space-related businesses and organizations, including the X PRIZE Foundation, an educational nonprofit prize institute whose mission is “to create radical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity.” The foundation, which presents a $10 million award to the first team to achieve its current goal, is best known for the Ansari X Prize, a competition to launch a reusable, manned spacecraft into space twice within two weeks. This was the first private-sector manned spaceflight. Citing anecdotes from X PRIZE competitions in exploration, life sciences, energy, environment, education, and global development, Diamandis shares stories of innovations that are changing the way we think, work, and educate future generations. He promotes intelligent risk-taking, maverick thinking, and environments where failure is allowed and celebrated. Diamandis reveals how organizations can incentivize breakthroughs for new products and strategies and reinvent their industries.

His presentations address technology and how to spur innovation. A Passion and Business Savvy for Spaceflight. Diamandis is an international leader in the commercial space arena, having founded and run many of its leading entrepreneurial companies. Among many other ventures, he is the co-founder and managing director of Space Adventures, a space-tourism company, the co-founder and CEO of Zero Gravity Corporation, a commercial space company which offers weightless flights to the public, and the chairman & co-founder of the Rocket Racing League.

Diamandis co-founded the Singularity University, an academic institution who aims to foster thoughts leaders who will work on humanity’s largest challenges. Diamandis also co-founded the International Space University (ISU) where he served as the University’s first managing director.

Prior to ISU, Diamandis served as chairman of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS), an organization he founded at MIT in 1980. SEDS is currently the world’s largest college and high school-based student pro-space organization He is the winner of the 2007 Arthur C. Clarke Award for Innovation, the 2006 (inaugural) Heinlein Award, the 2006 Lindbergh Award, the 2006 Wired RAVE Award, the 2006 Neil Armstrong Award for Aerospace Achievement and Leadership, the Konstantine Tsiolkovsky Award, twice the winner of the Aviation & Space Technology Laurel, and the 2003 World Technology Award for Space. Peter Diamandis attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he received his undergraduate degree in molecular genetics and graduate degree in aerospace engineering. After MIT he attended Harvard Medical School where he received his M.D. In 2005, he was also awarded an honorary doctorate from the International Space University.

Podcasts You May Be Interested in: Why Use Google Plus with Jay Baer Accuracy of Sentiment Analysis Mobile Search Strategy - Part One                    

Increase Your Klout Score

Aug 15, 2011

Description:

Megan-BerryWhat’s your Klout score? How do you increase your Klout score? And who has the highest Klout score for the topics you’re interested in?

In this episode, you’ll find out why your Klout score matters and what you can do to increase your Klout score.

Klout is the company that’s attempting to use social signals to improve upon Google’s Page Rank algorithm as a way of measuring influence.  Klout’s API had 2 billion calls last month and is working with over 3,000 partners and brands.

The service began by trying to measure the influence of users on Twitter, and has evolved to consider activity on Foursquare, and last week added Blogger, Tumblr, Flickr, Instagram and Last.fm.

Out guest is Megan Berry (@meganberry), marketing manager at Klout, Blogger, social media junkie and Stanford grad talks about how your Klout score, and she talks to us about how to increase Klout scores and why it’s in your best interest to have the highest Klout score you can.

Megan has a Klout score of 71, which puts her ahead of previous guests of this podcast Kara Swisher, the co-editor of All Things D (http://klout.com/karaswisher) at 70, Natalie Petuhoff (http://klout.com/drnatalie) at 54 and your truly at 56.


Topics Discussed
How Klout establishes online influence The Klout Perks program Overcoming the shortcomings of semantic analysis Measuring popularity vs. influence Klout’s value proposition to marketers and individuals When Klout intends to integrate Google + Measuring individuals vs. measuring media Ethics of establishing influence based on ReTweets Jay Baer covers Why Use Google+ +K feature which allows you to give influence to others

Podcasts You May Be Interested in: Why Use Google Plus with Jay Baer Accuracy of Sentiment Analysis Mobile Search Strategy - Part One                     Mobile Marketing Strategy - Part Two

Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered regularly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Kara Swisher on Murdoch, Huffington and Pogue

Aug 9, 2011

Description:

Kara Swisher If you’re interested in tech news, you’re going to find this very interesting. If you’re a media relations professional who works in tech, you’ve just hit the mother lode. In this podcast, Cathy Brooks (@cathybrooks), who currently handles marketing for Draper Fisher Jurvetson backed Israeli mobile search app provider DoAT interviews All Things D co-editor Kara Swisher (@karaswisher) about her tech blog’s personality, the hamsterization of journalism, balancing accuracy against speed in the quest to be first and what makes All Things D different from other tech news outlets. Kara splits her responsibilities overseeing the coverage of All Things D with Walt Mossberg.   Kara also discusses the scandal at News Corp’s recently shuttered News of the World, Rupert Murdoch’s depth of knowledge over his business units and All Things D, her plans to expand their coverage to include gadget, game and app news and reviews and add another industry conference, Arianna Huffington’s shill for higher standards in journalism while excluding AOL employee Michael Arrington from their corporate policy that bloggers not invest in companies they cover and New York Times consumer technology reporter David Pogue  getting reprimanded for speaking at a PR conference, which I personally think was a hypocritical comment to make while discussing how to pitch All Things D at a PR conference.    Pogue never “advised” PR professionals.  Reporters speak at PR conferences all the time.  I’ve moderated panels of reporters for the Public Relations Society of America and can’t see how any of those sessions compromised anyone’s journalistic integrity.  By enlightening PR people about how to pitch, journalists are improving the quality of the information that flows their way, and that’s a good thing.  It means they’ll get better, more impartial content from companies.  Whether they’re compensated or not, reporters are under no obligation to provide coverage.  Is an expert witness less credible because they’re compensated?  What’s wrong with being paid to provide expert testimony?   This interview was recorded at the PR Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday, July 28, 2011.  I keynoted the conference later in the day, after this interview concluded.  The PR Summit Conference SF was produced by Shaun Sanders of Berkeley-based Grafitti PR.   While this interview was in no way offensive, lewd or obscene, there was some profanity used so please be advised.   Subscribe Now: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline   Recommended Podcasts: How to Share Social Media with Chris Brogan Why Use G+ with Jay Baer Is Google Broken? How the dark art of black hat SEO winning the war against search. On the Record...Online with Wall Street Journal Technology Columnist Walt Mossberg On the Record...Online with New York Times Personal Technology Columnist David Pogue Embed this Podcast: <embed width="400" height="27" src="http://www.google.com/reader/ui/3523697345-audio-player.swf" flashvars="audioUrl= http://www.ontherecordpodcast.com/pr/otro/electronic/cathy-brooks-kara-swisher.mp3" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></embed>   About the Podcaster:  Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

How to Share Social Media

Aug 1, 2011

Description:

chris-brogan How to share social media is a question asked widely by businesses and consumers. Does your corporation or business know how market on Facebook or how to tweet and how to retweet compelling shares?   Are you writing the best Facebook wall posts? Do you know how to use Twitter for business? Do you find yourself asking the question why use Google+ when you’re still getting the hang of Facebook and Twitter? And how on earth do you please managers and clients who want to control the message and earn the trust of the online community at the same time?   Chris Brogan (@chrisbrogan), best-selling author and renowned blogger, discusses how to share new media content from a business perspective, the benefits of Google+, and his experience as a thought leader in the rapidly changing world of social media.   With social media on the top of business minds everywhere, many are confused by how to share engagingly. Chris discusses why public relations professionals need to show their bosses that it’s better to be authentic and why the best Facebook wall posts could be those that reference your competitor instead of yourself.   How to share social media is becoming even more prominent in our lives and it’s time for people and businesses to start embracing and engaging with others, says Chris. With new social networking channels arising, people find themselves asking questions like, why use Google+ when I already have Twitter and Facebook accounts? This podcast skims the surface of that question, and goes deeper into the concept of how to share social media content.   Chris Brogan is President of Human Business Works; Co-Founder of PodCamp; New York Time’s Best-Selling author of Trust Agents and is this year’s keynote presenter at the PRSA 2011 International Conference in Orlando this October.   Show Notes:   2:11 Trust agents are the voices or faces of businesses, but they aren’t at the CEO level, Brogan explains and shares an example of how this is happening at Google. The trust agent knows how to share twitter messages and posts and stays engaged on social networking sites. A lot of companies are using the social networking websites for business networking and to help humanize their brands.   4:21 We have to learn we’re never right all of the time online and must show our managers and clients that one of the parts of how to share social media content correctly is using the Three A’s: Acknowledge, Apologize and Act. In PR, professionals are sometimes compelled by managers to try and spin a silver lining around even the worst news, but that isn’t working anymore. On online social networks like Linkedin, Facebook, Twiiter and now G+, people talk whether you like it or not, says Brogan.     6:04 How to share social media as an organization authentically, understanding what legally what you can and cannot be said, acknowledging without endorsing negative status updates, wall posts, tweets, RTs, comments, likes and shares.   7:02 When sharing via social media, is there a danger of being too available? It is important for PR professionals to social media train their clients to tweet and share on Facebook effectively?  Some people are avoiding their “handlers” and taking care of it themselves, like Kanye West who demonstrated how to share Twitter posts that reflect you in a better light.   8:00 The role of a PR professional is to educate clients or managers on how to handle things themselves by giving them social media training. There is a risk of people or companies being overexposed and it’s important to be able to explain the pluses and minuses to the client or manager and be able to handle the situation if that does happen.   8:50 What makes the best Facebook wall post? Joe Ciarallo (@joeciarallo) of Buddy Media discussed a study his company did on what makes an effective wall post and found that promotional language is usually the kiss of death. Brogan agrees with Ciarallo’s statement by saying that always promoting your own brand is not necessarily the best option. When in doubt use the 12 to 1 rule, promote other people’s or companies things 12 times more than your own, this is the best way to build and earn relationships.   9:19 Frank Eliason (@FrankEliason) of CitiBank has said that you can earn the right to sell once people know you. Because today is such an opt-in world with Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and all of the social networking sites, you have to earn the right by building relationships first.   9:58 The best Facebook wall posts or the best twitter posts are sometimes those where you recommend your competitor because your product isn’t the right product. When a company or person can do that it’s a huge opportunity to win the trust of the community and become an influencer.   10:45 What if your company is so large that there isn’t a lot of choice on the consumer side, does social media even matter? What if the company is essentially too big to fail? You have to take a different approach on how to post tweets or how to share Facebook wall posts in general. You don’t necessarily need to build relationships but you can use it to build future credibility and get positive press. Brogan points out Comcast as an example of this.   14:25 In social media, it’s not just about how to share new media content but who you are sharing it with. The problem of one-way intimacy arises for people who are successful on social media sites. You may follow someone on Twitter but they may not follow you back. It’s hard for people to keep up with everyone but there are some celebrities who find the time to get back to people, which in turn gives them a big payoff and helps improve their credibility online.   17:18 How to share social media without oversharing can be a problem.  Exclusivity increases desirability.  Many people don’t know what is ok to share and what isn’t. A lot of it depends on your business. If you work for a financial company or pharmaceutical company for instance, you have to work with your legal team to know exactly you can and can’t divulge.  That happens by accelerating digital literacy by setting boundaries.   18:44 The most value in sharing comes in customization. If you give away as much as possible you will get the longer win. PR people should start...

Why Use Google Plus

Jul 28, 2011

Description:

Jay-Baer-Avatargoogle-plus Why use Google+ when there’s always a new social network? What are the benefits of using Google Plus?  What are the advantages of using G+?  And how, if at all, will Google+ impact Google search, if it’s successful?   Think about it.  Over the last 7 years, online conversations have moved from blogs to social networks. The most engaging status updates, tweets and shares generate conversations, edging them up to the top of the stream.   On the other hand web pages are ranked largely by inbound links. While these published, referring links are no less useful than they once were, there are also fewer of them today for Google to count.    Comments, likes and shares aren’t inbound links, but they have become important measures of influence.  It’s possible that if Google can’t figure out a way to integrate these signals into search, some day its ability to effectively rank online content could become obsolete.   Does Google+ potentially give Google search the social signals it needs to stay relevant?  Is the introduction of G+ Circles siginificant?  Should businesses be thinking about how to use Google+ in their social media outreach strategy?  Or are we essential just trading the measure of influence for the measure of popularity?   Social media and content strategist and President of Convince and Convert Jay Baer (@jaybaer), talks about Google’s new social web offering and tells you why to join the 10 million other who are currently figuring out how to use Google Plus.   Show Notes   1:55 - Online content has gotten smaller, with an activity stream of what’s happening now constantly changing. Are Facebook status updates, wall posts, tweets and shares the future of the web? Jay explains how Google+ could help Google stay relevant through the shift from pages to streams.   4:17 - With content creation moving away from page views to short, microbursts of information, Page Rank is becoming less useful. Jay talks about how the Google page rank algorithm has been the fundamental premise of SEO for years and the potential downfall of the page rank formula in the new world of social object oriented content.   5:53 - Who has more influence online: content creators or content curators?  Have we gone too far in the other direction by exchanging the more measured, foundation principle of Page Rank for the impulsivity of likes and comments? Jay cites Matt Riding, who mentions the pendulum swing where it may be the status updaters who receive a disproportionate amount of attention, rather than the writers of original content.  Jay explains how Google+ gives the search giant a way to bake social signals into its search algorithm.   7:48 - In a recent blog post about Google+, Jay says that Google swallowed it’s “we can do things different pride” and out the best of Facebook, Twitter and FourSquare in G+. The result: using Google+ may be better than other social media tools because it does less; it has a concise set of features and doesn’t try to bake a cacophony of features into a single interface.    12:11 - Jay talks about how to use Google+ Circles.  With the new drag and drop interface, using Google+ Circles gives you the chance for a “do over” to get your friends lists right. Eric mentions a recent episode of  Media Hacks #262 with Mitch Joel (@mitchjoel), Chris Brogan (@chrisbrogan), and Hugh McGuire (@hughmcguire)  where they discussed this new feature ad nauseum.   18:34 - Jay calls Google an algorithmic cake trying to add social frosting, while Facebook is a social cake trying to add an algorithmic frosting. The algorithmically based Google adds a social layer with Google+; while socially based Facebook tries to go algorithmic with Edgerank.   19:53 - Google already has a plethora of ancillary online services, like Gmail, Google Maps and YouTube.  Google+ gives it a chance to vertically integrate these services with a social wrapper and use them in a way that enhances the overall user experience.   22:48 - The nasty little secrets of black hat SEO and the question “Is Google Broken?” Jay discusses the shared characteristics of “Search” and shares ideas for shutting down the content farms and improving local search.   25:39 - Google, Adwords and G+.   27:56 - How should business take into account new social network when developing a social media strategy? Jay points out that you need to be clear that your business strategy is simply not about collecting “likes” or “fans”, but that you see a resulting behavior change – like buying the products.  If your strategic plan is how to use a tool, you will always be playing catch up. How should business use Google+ to support their social media strategy?   31:30 - What is happening to the trends of referral traffic? Jay’s blog has already seen more traffic from Google+ than Facebook.   33:58 – End   Recommended Episodes Is Google Broken? Is the dark art of black hat SEO winning the war against search? Best Facebook Wall Posts. Buddy Media shares research on the most engaging wall posts. B2B Social Media Keynote: Digital Impact 2011 – Why B2B social marketing is different. Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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How Black Hats Game Search

Jul 25, 2011

Description:

  doug-bwAre black hat SEO specialists getting better at outsmarting Google? And is Google Local Search particularly susceptible to gaming?

Earlier this year, JC Penny and Overstock.com had to be manually demoted by Google because they were paying for inbound links to artificially inflate their rankings.

Last month a Chinese start-up that uses illicit SEO tactics to outrank a number of major consumer brands for keywords like “summer dresses” secured a $15 million dollar investment from Sequoia Capital.

And credit card provider Capital One piggy backs off an online car dealership’s display ad widget to rank number one for the phrase “auto loans.”

Most recently, lead gen companies have gotten so good at gaming local search, it’s become exceedingly difficult, if not impossible for local locksmiths to get found by customers. Instead, the lead gen companies, or affiliate marketers, intercept the leads and sell them to the highest bidder, driving up the cost of service.

Online search expert Doug Pierce, available via LinkedIn, Twitter or email, who is the co-founder of Digital Due Diligence, which helps investors evaluate online business models, talks about the shady schemes of black hat SEOs, and whether or not they’ll ever gut Google search of its usefulness.

Topics Discussed: How national lead gen companies outranking local companies in Google Local Search. How lead gen sites use NAPs -- name, address and phone number -- to curry favor. Was including Local Search in its current state in Universal Search Results a bad idea? Inside the unseemly Chinese Internet web of inbound link purchasing networks. How to use ALT tags to give inbound links from JPEGs SEO relevancy. Did JC Penny know what it was doing, or was management digitally illiterate? What http://www.opensiteexplorer.org/  does that Yahoo! Site Explorer doesn’t.
Since this podcast was recorded, Google made significant changes to the Goolge Local search algorithm, promptomg Doug to write this blog post detailing what's wrong and what more can be done.
Podcasts Referenced in this Episode: Google Global Director of Communications and Public Affairs Gabriel Stricker Mobile Search Strategy - Part One                     Mobile Marketing Strategy - Part Two
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered regularly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Best Facebook Wall Posts

Jul 17, 2011

Description:

  Why is it some Facebook wall posts get likes and comments, while others get none?  When is the best time to post, how often should you post, are there certain words that generate a higher response rate?  What’s the science of procuring engagement on the world’s largest social network?  

In this episode, we explore what makes a great Facebook wall post?  The best shares aren’t random.  There is a method behind the madness.  Listen to this podcast with Buddy Media director of communications Joe Ciarallo (@joeciarallo) and find out how to create effective Facebook wall posts based on a research study his company did on the shares of 200 name brands over a 2-week period.

Joe also talks about how to optimize your status updates for Facebook’s Edgerank so fans see it their newsfeed.  

What Makes a Great Facebook Wall Post?Topics discussed: Optimum Facebook post character length Benefits and drawbacks of URL shorteners and the problem with long URLs Words that appeared most in top “liked” and “commented” shares Which words appeared most frequently in ineffective engagement in Facebook The impact of “likes”, “comments”, affinity and time on Facebook Edgerankings Why NOT to ask “why” in your Facebook wall posts Purchase intent and recommendation likelihood of Facebook Fans vs. Twitter Followers What’s the ROI of a Facebook fan? Niche marketing, B2B marketing and brand building on Facebook Shel Holtz’s recent interview of Brian Solis
In this exclusive interview, Buddy Media director of communications Joe Ciarallo (@joeciarallo) reveals

Podcasts Referenced in this Episode: Facebook Marketing Tips from Simon Cross Marketing with Facebook Like Buttons with Simon Cross                     Marketing with Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads with Xavier Leclerc Activity Streams Will Change Your Business with Chris Messina When to Facebook, When to Tweet with Dan Zarella MediaBistro.com founder Laurel Touby goes On the Record…Online 2011 Digital Impact Keynote State of B2B Social Media
Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline
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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs.  He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies.  Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered regularly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Social Customer Service ROI

Jul 11, 2011

Description:

Is there a way to reduce call center costs while improving the quality of customer experience?  

In this episode, former Forrester Analyst Natalie Petouhoff (@DrNatalie) discusses her ROI model for social customer service and the recent videos she produced on social customer service for Salesforce.com on building the business case with management for using social media in their customer service. departments.

Can social customer service protect brands against perceived and systemic product failures?  In markets dominated by companies that are too big to fail, do customer opinions matter?  Dr. Nat also discusses he method of calculating the ROI of social customer service interactions, the value of direct and indirect call deflection and why companies should align with their super users to lower their cal center costs while improving customer experience quality.

  Here’s Dr. Natalie’s list of monitoring tools. Chapter Six of my book also walks you through the process of building a social media monitoring dashboard with free tools and services:   Tool / Site PR, Marketing, Customer Service and Production Development Value www.search.twitter.com   Search on twitter to find people, topics, etc… http://www.boardtracker.com   Forum search engine, message tracking and instant alerts system designed to provide relevant information quickly and efficiently while ensuring you never miss an important forum thread no matter where or when it is posted. http://alltop.com/   See which blogs are prominent in which sector http://www.socialmention.com   Allows you to easily track and measure what people are saying about you, your company, a new product, or any topic across the web's social media landscape in real-time. Social Mention monitors 100+ social media properties directly including: Twitter, Facebook, FriendFeed, YouTube, Digg, Google etc. http://www.wordle.net/   Generates “word clouds.” http://www.google.com/trends Planning on launching an activity? Run a quick search to see which time of year the world is talking about that subject the most. http://www.bing.com/social   It features real-time snippets of the most shared links in relation to the subject you are interested in, in real-time. http://blogpulse.com/   See who is writing about your brand or subject of interest in a flash. http://www.alexa.com/   Get a handle on the DNA of a website or Blog; How much traffic a site gets, where that traffic is coming from, whether it is gaining more traction, here you need to focus more effort, check on the competition, etc… www.technorati.com/search?advanced   Search to see what blogs are writing about your brand or company http://swixhq.com/SWIX.html   Simple way of tracking activity across all of your social networks / platforms. http://backtweets.com   If you are running a campaign and want to see how much traffic has been driven to the 'target' of your activity, type it in here and you'll get an idea of how much that site address is being shared. www.addictomatic.com
    Instantly creates a web page with the latest news from various sources by typing in a key word. www.google.com/alerts Google Alerts are email updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, etc.) based on your choice of query or topic. Enter the topic you wish to monitor, then click preview to see the type of results you'll receive. www.google.com  


Other Podcasts Reference in this Episode: The Nitty Gritty on Online Community Management with Rachel Happe Driving Online Commerce through Customer Communities HOW TO: Build a Niche B2B Customer Community State of B2B Social Media


Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline


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About the Podcaster:
Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government...

Google Analytics Deep Dive with Justin Cutroni - Part 2

Jun 20, 2011

Description:

Google Analytics can show your ROI of your online and offline marketing efforts, as long as you know how to use it. Welcome to the second half part of our two part series on Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni. From paid search, to display advertising, to social media, to email, marketers are working in a variety of different channels. In this episode, we discuss how to use your web analytics to get actionable business intelligence beyond just the last page visited before the conversion. We also discuss segmenting direct traffic by geographic region to correlate offline marketing with web traffic, analyzing conversions based on referring domains, filtering reports in real time using Advanced Segmentation to identify which segments are performing best, using the “Visits with Conversions” and “Visits with Transactions” default Advanced Segments to see the effectiveness of your web content, looking beyond last click attribution modeling with the Google Analytics v5 multi channel funnels, now in limited beta release, to see what combination of channels work best together and understand every touch point on the path to conversion, campaign tracking or link tracking to identify traffic from individual tweets and Facebook status updates, Justin’s appearance on “Beyond Web Analytics 44” podcast hosted by Adam Greco and Rudi Shumpert, the significance of the release of Google Analytics v5, custom dashboards and custom reports, event tracking on page interactions and advanced visualizations with word clouds. Justin Cutroni is Director of Digital intelligence at Cardinal Path, an online marketing and analytics firm based in Phoenix. Justin prefers the term Digital Intelligence to web analytics, because he believes we need to focus on drawing actionable business intelligence from web data. That’s the direction he says web analytics is moving. Justin has written two books on web analytics: Google Analytics published by O’Reilly, June 2010. This book is for the advanced GA user. It dives into many advanced topics, like custom variables, that Performance Marketing does not cover. This book is all about GA. Performance Marketing with Google Analytics, Wiley 2010. This book was written for those just getting started with web analytics and Google analytics. It’s for the beginner that needs to understand how to do a basic setup of GA and how to do basic analysis. And his firm Cardinal Path is certified by Google to teach a series of workshop in using Google Analytics called Seminars for Success. Related Content: Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni - Part One How Johns Hopkins and Avery Dennison are using Private Social Networks State of B2B Social Media Fighting Digital Illiteracy with Boundaries Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Mobile Apps for Live Events

Jun 13, 2011

Description:

Want to launch a custom mobile app at your next event? Nervous about having to develop it from scratch? In this podcast Pankaj Prasad (@therealpankaj) from DoubleDutch, which has built apps for TED, Cisco Events and HP Events, shares best practices for creating branded mobile apps for live events. Double Dutch has skinnable geolocation apps for mobile devices that bring the functionality of Facebook, Twitter and FourSquare in a closed community, to the mobile device. The Double Dutch mobile app includes a portfolio of micro apps that can be branded and combined on the mobile desktop. It can be used to provide event attendees with the ability to social network with other event attendees in an exclusive environment without spamming or alienating their Facebook friends or Twitter followers. Mobile apps give event organizers a way to port their paper schedule or conference program to a mobile device so that attendees can search it by time of day, proximity, keyword or track and automatically add sessions to their iCal or Google Calendar. The activity feed in the Double Dutch mobile app can segmented to meet the needs of a particular event, so people can network around different topics, and this is important because the company believes that people are more responsive to focused feeds than broad ones, which is why they typically check email, Facebook and Twitter in that order from their mobile devices. The better an activity stream can give you social information from people from your community that are around you at that time, the more useful it is, which is why they built feed segmentation into their app. The Double Dutch app provides event organizers will a web dashboard that they can use to publish and edit the information in the app on the fly. Cisco uses DoubleDutch to power their Cisco Events app, which iPhone users can download and play with. Related Content: Mobile Search Strategy - Part One Mobile Search Strategy - Part Two Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni - Part One Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni - Part Two State of B2B Social Media Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Google Analytics Deep Dive with Justin Cutroni - Part 1

Jun 5, 2011

Description:

Google Analytics can give you real business insight into the effectiveness of marketing efforts, if you know what you’re looking for. Welcome to our podcast series on Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni (@JustinCutroni). In part one of our two part series, Justin talks about his favorite reports for measuring business outcomes (All Traffic Sources, AdWords Campaigns and Funnel Visualization reports), digging deeper with Advanced Segmentation, drawing strategic and tactical business insights from web analytics, using page views per visit, session length and return visits to measure the effectiveness on content marketing campaigns that are designed to inform rather than convert and the new Frequency & Recency and Engagement reports under the “Behavior” tab in Google Analytics v5. Justin Cutroni is Director of Digital intelligence at Cardinal Path, an online marketing and analytics firm based in Phoenix. Justin prefers the term Digital Intelligence to web analytics, because he believes we need to focus on drawing actionable business intelligence from web data. That’s the direction he says web analytics is moving. Justin has written two books on web analytics: Google Analytics published by O’Rielly, June 2010. This book is for the advanced GA user. It dives into many advanced topics, like custom variables, that Performance Marketing does not cover. This book is all about GA. Performance Marketing with Google Analytics, Wiley 2010. This book was written for those just getting started with web analytics and Google analytics. It’s for the beginner that needs to understand how to do a basic setup of GA and how to do basic analysis. And his firm Cardinal Path is certified by Google to teach a series of workshop in using Google Analytics called Seminars for Success. Part two of our series on Google Analytics with Justin Cutroni is coming soon. Subscribe now and don’t miss it. Related Content: Mobile Search Strategy State of B2B Social Media Fighting Digital Illiteracy with Boundaries Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Digital Illiteracy at Work

Jun 2, 2011

Description:

Despite the wide spread adoption of social media on a global basis, most companies today remain clueless about how digital technology is changing the way people communicate and share information. How else do explain Burson-Marsteller's email smear campaign against Google for Facebook, a famous British soccer player's lawsuit against Twitter to unmask his anonymous critics, or JC Penny and Overstock.com's decision to employ black hat SEO tactics, resulting in their websites being manually demoted in the search rankings. Chalk it up to digital illiteracy. In this episode, PR professionals from Martin Waymire Advocacy Communications in Central Michigan discuss overcoming digital illiteracy in the workplace: Roger Martin, APR, Partner (@advocateman) Andrea Ness, Director of graphic and new media services (@andrea_ness) Rose Tantraphol (“PH” is silent – TAN-tra-pole), Senior account executive (@rose101) Most people go to a few social media conferences and learn just enough to be dangerous. But the fight against digital illiteracy will not be won through keynotes or panel sessions. What's required is practical training and applied knowledge. This episode is about what it takes to build digital illiteracy in your company, with your managers and your clients as well. Andrea and Rose are both alumni of my Social Media Boot Camp, a small monthly workshop that provides hands-on training where you learn real skills and applied knowledge for social marketing. The next Social Marketing Workshop is June 30-July 1, 2011 in Los Angeles. Related Content: Three Video and Audio Recording Rigs for Content Marketers State of B2B Social Media Fighting Digital Illiteracy with Boundaries Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

When to Facebook, When to Tweet

May 24, 2011

Description:

When’s the best time to Facebook? When’s the best time to tweet? If you're a marketer, it's something you've probably wondered more than once. Until now, there has been very little research conducted to answer that question. In this podcast on the Science of Timing Facebook status updates tweets, social media scientist Dan Zarrella (@danzarrella) talks about his research on the best times to Facebook and tweet, using two-years of quantitative research as a guide. Dan, author of The Social Media Marketing Book, studies social media behavior from a data-backed position enabling him to teach marketers scientifically grounded best practices. Dan's research covers when to tweet, when to Facebook, when to email and when to blog. This podcast just covers when to Tweet and when to blog. Originally, we had planned a secoind episode on when to email and when to blog, but the quality of the interview was unaudible and unfortunately, despite a few too many attempts, we were unable to get Dan to agree to rerecord part two. I believe the audio problem stemmed from the fact that the recording was conducted via Skype Out to a VoIP landline in a room was extensive background noise. The resulting audio was thin, with the level going in and out, so if you're a podcaster, one more thing to think about when you record interviews over the phone. Avoid VoIP landlines. Cell phone is better. Even after significant filtering attempts, part two fo this podcast was unusable. In fact, this episode was recorded under the same circumstances and the audio -- which was filtered as well -- is less than stellar as a result. Still, the information is valuable, and I hope you enjoy it. Discussion Topics: The Unicorns and Rainbow’s Myth. Best time of day and day of the week to tweet for retweet and click-throughs Whether or users with @replies get more retweets and click-throughs Optimal number of tweets per day How many self-promotional vs. selfless tweets per day is the right mix Dan’s tool for when, historically, you gotten the most retweets: http://tweetwhen.com How many Facebook status updates per day is too many When Facebook status updates are most likely to get “liked” What days of the week, and what time of day are the best times to Facebook Do Facebook status updates with links, photos and videos attract more engagement Upcoming Episodes: Mobile Search Strategy Series with Rich Devine of ZAAZ When to Email, When to Blog with Dan Zarrella of HubSpot Community Management Deep Dive with Rachel Happe of the Community Roundtable Subscribe: iTunes: "On the Record...Online" twitter.com/ontherecord Facebook.com/ontherecordonline Other Recommended Episodes: Private Social Networking for Business Mobile Search Series - Part One Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

B2B Social Media Keynote

May 19, 2011

Description:

Thursday, Luncheon Keynote, 12:30–2 p.m. SNCR Presentation: "Social Marketing to the Business Customer: It's Time to Get Serious About B2B" With spending projected to grow at 21% a year through 2013, business-to-business social media communications is the place to be. In this session, you'll learn how to model winning B2B social campaigns, convince skeptics of social marketing's value, map out a well-defined business strategy, choose metrics that matter, optimize your visibility to search engines and take advantage of the latest social search category. Speakers: Paul Gillin, senior fellow, SNCR, and Eric Schwartzman, fellow, SNCR, are co-authors of the first book devoted exclusively to B2B social media, " Social Marketing to the Business Customer." Gillin is author of "The New Influencers and Secrets of Social Media Marketing." Schwartzman's podcast “On the Record...Online” looks at how technology is changing how organizations communicate. On Twitter, connect with Gillin at @pgillin and Schwartzman at @ericschwartzman.

Managing Online Communities with Rachel Happe

May 17, 2011

Description:

Not many organizations are brave enough to leverage communities to market themselves. Content marketing is still a safer, and easier to grasp approach, but for the organizations that can pull it off, generating leads, building awareness and making a market, particularly for considered purchases with longer sales cycles via social networks makes a lot of sense, because it’s a way for the market to come up to speed and self-educate, which is less expensive then direct sales and has the added credibility of learning through a peer, rather than through a sales person, where it typically takes longer to establish trust. In this episode Rachel Happe (@rhappe), principal and co-founder of the Community Roundtable, an online resource for community practitioners, discusses: Why B2B communities are more sustainable. Peers are more trusted than authority figures. Strategy for participating in someone else’s community versus your own. Value of differentiating service offerings through social networks. Using online social communities to prequalify prospects. B2B Online Marketing Linkedin Group managed by Kim Albee, president of Genoo What makes a good community manager. Community for information sharing versus engagement. Eric’s guest post on Scott Monty’s blog. Linkedin, Twitter and Facebook are important for awareness and consideration, but late stage buying decisions are more likely occur on niche networks. Should community managers be held to the same standards as community members? Is posting relevant links to a community a good way to stimulate conversation, or is requiring members to post only questions a better way to germinate discussion? Do communities with user ratings make it easier to assess the community without having to invest the time and learn first hand? Subscribe: iTunes Twitter Facebook Other Recommended Episodes: Private Social Networking for Business Interview with Mark Yoltan on the SAP Community Network Mobile Search Strategy Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

B2B Social Media Podcast - Episode 9

May 10, 2011

Description:

Our guest panelist is Allan Schoenberg (@allanschoenberg), director of corporate communications at CME Group (@cmegroup). We welcome your comments, criticism and feedback. Please send email with attachments of 5MB or less to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. In this episode: 1. Match.com Lawsuit Raises Key Issue: Who's Responsible for Truth? - Is it your responsibility to share relevant information with your customers, even if youíre not sure itís accurate? 2. Is Facebook ready for B2B? CME group is about to implement the new Facebook comment API into sections of its site. Traffic to our site from Twitter/FB has been going through the roof, Allan says. CME was initially skeptical about Facebook's B2B potential, but Allan is impressed with recent Is this a big new opportunity for B2B? 3. Google releases Analytics 5 and tests Multi Channel Funnel reporting Amy Chang, Director of Product Management, Google Analytics announced the new feature at AdTech SF last week. Justin Cutroni has a blog post on it, and we have a two part series with Justin coming up on this podcast. 4. B2B Daily Deals Site Launches with Business Publisher - Daily deals sites such as Groupon and LivingSocial already have significant scale in the consumer arena, and the former has already begun experimenting with B2B offers. Business-to-business daily deals platform RapidBuyr launched yesterday, aided by a close partnership with Advance Publications-owned regional business publisher American City Business Journals. 5. Upcoming a. Allan talks about how CME is integrating the Facebook API into its site and its potential to leverage events promotion. b. Paul will emcee the B2B magazine Social Media Awards breakfast in New York on May 24† present and present a pre-conference educational seminar at the BMA Annual Conference in Chicago on June 1. The topic: Unleash Your Inner Publisher c. Eric ís teaching the Social Media Marketing Workshop in Los Angeles, June 30-July 1. There are still seats left. Previous B2B Social Media Podcast Episodes: B2B Social Media Podcast #8 B2B Social Media Podcast #7 B2B Social Media Podcast #6 B2B Social Media Podcast #5 About the Podcast You've been listening to the B2B Social Media Podcast by Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer-- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. Join our community at www.b2bsocialmediabook.com and send comments to comments @b2bsocialmediapodcast.com. About our Guest Allan Schoenberg is director of corporate communications at CME Group, the world's leading and most diverse financial marketplace. His team oversees media relations, social media, crisis management, message development, international initiatives, and broadcast/digital communications. CME† is one of the financial industry's most active social media participants, with a Twitter following of more than 750,000 (@CMEgroup) and active presences on Facebook, Linkedin and a variety of other channels. He also has worked for Accenture, Edelman Worldwide, and Fleishman-Hillard. He is currently stationed in London. About the Podcasters Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman are coauthors of the book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B social media marketing. It's available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSAís top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) is principal of of Paul Gillin Communications.† Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and The Joy of Geocaching. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. Heís also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

How Bing Plans to Steal Market Share from Google

May 7, 2011

Description:

Search engine marketing remains a tough slog for Google competitors like Microsoft’s Bing, which, despite six straight quarters of market share gains, was still at just 13.9 percent as of March. Still, the only company in the space to achieve such a six-quarter streak before then had been Google. Social search, geolocation and digital video are among the hot frontiers at companies seeking to improve our search experience. Adam Sohn, senior director of public and influencer relations for Microsoft Corporation, believes Bing can gain ground on Google in these areas of search, with his proof coming in the form of a growing list of partnerships between Bing and companies like Facebook, Yahoo and Research in Motion. Adam sat down with “On the Record…Online,” the official podcast of the PRSA Digital Impact Conference in New York to discuss his keynote at the conference , which was titled: "Bing: Does the World Need another Search Engine?" Show Notes: 1:50 Search industry changes reflect profound shifts in how people are using the web, with the usage pattern shifting from searches for websites using keywords to attempts to complete complex and personal tasks and projects, Sohn argues. More than typing in a single term to find a web site, searchers are looking to book travel, make purchases or research health conditions, for example, and in a more relevant way. 2:30 Search engine industry analysis reveals that one in four searches fails, in that the user is not able to easily accomplish what they set out to do. Search engines, to reach the next level, will need to successfully analyze the intent of the searcher to make the search meaningful. 2:50 Search sessions are now lasting longer than ever, with more than half running 30 minutes or more. That suggests two things to Bing: people are seeking to complete more complex tasks online and may be having a harder time doing so. 3:35 Google search continues to dominant the search industry, with the competition composed of would-be challengers like Bing seeking to steel market share. 4:10 Search industry evolution is proceeding apace as new forces like social networking and mobile input have an ever greater impact on search. Once upon a time, search consisted only of a bunch of web sites and algorithms to find them. Now vast amounts of information are flowing into the web each second from Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare … user- generated video via YouTube, Quora’s conversations among experts, and mobile aps where location matters. 5:00 Geolocation search is an important aspect for the future of search engines because, with your permission, search engine companies will soon be able to use where you are to empower your searches. Mobile phones generate sensor data that can make search algorithms smarter in their offerings. In a future scenario, search engines may see that you are searching for driving directions, combine that GPS data from your phone indicating that you are moving 65 miles per hour, and then surmise that you need driving directions and freeway routing. If you were at moving 2 miles per hour, the same search would ideally yield walking directions. 5:55 Social search and mapping represent other near-future advances in search, Sohn says. Say you are using a search engine to find a place with good pizza. The search engine would then layer social networking on top of mobile searching, giving you note only the closest restaurant as you move, but an idea of which of your friends have already checked in there. Sohn believes people will interact with search on a digital map canvas in many cases, as well through voice-activated search. Mobile and mapping will remain areas of focus for search design because of their explosive growth. 8:50 Search continues to grow, and Bing sees it accelerating further still as generations of young people continue to graduate from high school and college who have never searched for anything without using the web. Other segments continue to increase their increase their use. Bing recognizes that it is a lesser player, but it does reach 30 percent of the market on its own and in combination with Yahoo, its strategic partner. 13:05 Social media marketing is clearly as vital to search companies as many others. Bing has success with contests featuring user-generated content (who can come up with the best Bing jingle) as well a partnership where Bing users could gain credits with the Farmville social media game. Bing’s marketing team is constantly trying to predict the direction that the search engine industry will move in, and social search was a trend they spotted a while back. This has its most impact when you can spot a trend in technology and match that with marketing strategies that meet a customer need. 14:08 Facebook search is obviously an emerging force online, and Bing is poised to take advantage, having announced last October a partnership with the social networking giant. Bing has been working hard to take Facebook information and merge it into Bing. Again with the user in complete control, and seeing only things you’re friends want to show you, you would know have a social signal in your search results. Not only would do you see ten blue links in your search results, but also notes on which links your friends have ”liked” one of those ten. Such personal search results help you separate the wheat from the chaff. Social search will be a huge investment area for Bing, which is the only search engine with a Facebook deal. Bing expects to announce related news in the next few weeks. 17:10 End About the Guest Host Greg Williams (@gregscience), an independent consultant specializing in public relations for medical science and technical companies. After beginning his career as an editor for the Associated Press, Greg has since served as a public relations strategist for two international public relations firms and two university medical centers, and as a writer for institutions including Eastman Kodak and the National Academy of Sciences. These show notes were search engine optimized by Greg Williams.

Social Networking for Internal Communications

May 3, 2011

Description:

Marcie Steerman from the technical communications group at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab and Heather Marks, Director, Interactive Communications at Avery Dennison talk about how their organizations are using private online social networking platforms behind the firewall as part of their internal communications strategy. Johns Hopkins is redefining internal communications practices with a social network that facilitates dialog among more than 4,500 staff members spread across a 300 acre campus. Their most dynamic platform is called the Cooler (as in water cooler) ans it’s powered by Elgg, an open source social networking engine. Because it's internal, staff members can discuss proprietary ideas without making inadvertent intellectual property disclosures. Avery Dennison is using Lotus Connections to power their social networking internal communications plan. It’s a global company with more than 32,000 employees at 240+ facilities in 60 countries, and they’re using their private social network to time-shift and place shift conversations. Neither Elgg or Lotus Connections appear to have the types of activity streams that has made Facebook and Twitter so popular. Elgg looks more like an online forum with user profiles and IBM doesn’t make it easy to find screenshots or samples of Lotus Connections online. Avery uses primarily the wikis, forums and blog modules to foster internal collaboration, rather than what Facebook or Linkedin users would recognize as a familiar social networking platform. But both organizations are realizing significant gains from their internal online collaboration initiatives, and in this episode they talk about: 1. How they’re using internal social networks at their organizations. 2. The benefits of social networking in a private environment. 3. How they achieved widespread adoption. 4. The importance of: a. Securing strong, executive sponsorship. b. Social media literacy among management. c. Comfort with social networking websites for external communications. 5. The benefits and drawbacks of open source vs. proprietary social networking software. it will come as no surprise to listeners of this podcast that social networks have value to internal communicators. We may see social media literacy become an integral part on most internal communications jobs in the future. This episode is a follow up to a previous show on Private Social Networks with Robin Daniels of Salesforce.com Chatter. Subscribe: iTunes Twitter Facebook Other Recommended Episodes: Private Social Networking for Business Interview with Mark Yoltan on the SAP Community Network Mobile Search Strategy Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

B2B Social Media Podcast 8

Apr 28, 2011

Description:

Should organizations discipline employees over their comments in social media? The pros and cons of using social networks behind the firewall. Is it time for B2B marketers to put a mobile marketing strategy in place? Our guest panelist is Chris Boudreaux (@cboudreaux), founder of Social Media Governance and Senior VP at Converseon. We welcome your comments, criticism and feedback. Please send email with attachments of 5MB or less to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. In this Episode: Time to Update Your Social Media Policy? Thanks to Erica Klein Vice President/Digital Sales at TargetSpot for the heads up on this topic. Reuters reprimanding of employee for Tweet my be unconstitutional (Apr. 6, 2011) Erin Kurtz (@eekurtz), Reuters Head of Publicity. Deborah Zabarenko (@dzabarenko). Steve Greenhouse (@greenhousenyt) of the New York Times. Company Settles Case in Firing Tied to Facebook (Feb. 7, 2011) Should your employer have access to your Facebook account? (Feb. 21, 2011) Social Networking Sprawl - is our network of connections getting too big and are internal or special-purpose social networks the answer? Salesforce.com Customer Survey: Productivity Gains of using Chatter for Internal Comms was the result of the best pitch Eric’s ever recieved for this podcast, and it was by Angela D’Arcy (@angelaDRC) of The OutCast Agency. Steve Rubel’s column on ‘Validation Era’ of online marketing Rise of Services like Path, Instagram, Beluga and GroupMe. Uniqueness of these services. Eric’s guest post on Scott Monty’s blog on B2B Social Network for Internal Comms Should B2B marketers have a mobile strategy? Christina Kerley (@christinakerley) has some compelling examples in this white paper. Also see: Tablet Device Usage Overtaking Print, Radio & TV. Upcoming Chris will speak at the School of WOM in May joining Susan Emerick (@sfemerick) and Bill Chamberlin (@horizonwatching) from IBM to talk about how Big Blue is enabling employees to speak in social channels. Paul will present the B2B Social Media Boot Camp in New York City on June 17 Eric’s anchoring the Social Media Boot Camp L.A. June 30-July 1. PRSA, City National Bank, J&J and Toyota. 19 seats left. Previous B2B Social Media Podcast Episodes: B2B Social Media Podcast #7 B2B Social Media Podcast #6 B2B Social Media Podcast #5 About the Podcast You’ve been listening to the B2B Social Media Podcast by Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. Join our community at www.b2bsocialmediabook.com and send comments to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com. About our Guest Chris Boudreaux (@cboudreaux) is SVP of Business Integration at Converseon, where he helps the world’s largest brands to achieve business objectives through social media by transforming business processes, data integration, and governance. Prior to Converseon, Chris created and led the Social Media Management offering at Accenture, where he also advised clients in digital marketing and online product development. His work has been featured by industry researchers and journalists including Forrester and Gartner, and he founded SocialMediaGovernance.com, the foremost resource on governance in social media. Chris is co-author of The Social Media Management Handbook, and he has helped leading global corporations including Bank of America, Boeing, eBay, IBM, Kodak, Kohler, Novo Nordisk and Microsoft. Contact Chris at cboudreaux@converseon.com or follow him at (@cboudreaux). About the Podcasters Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman are coauthors of the book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Mobile Marketing Strategy - Part Two

Apr 21, 2011

Description:

Mobile marketing is all about social, and all about local. But what about businesses with multiple locations? Or brands sold by resellers at locations that aren’t their own? How should marketers approach this type of scenario? And what mobile marketing trends should advertisers be paying attention to? And what about the user interface? It’s one thing to lead a horse to water. It’s another thing to get them to actually drink. We know, by now, that the user experience on a mobile device is very different than it is on the desktop. What’s the best way for mobile marketers to ensure a positive small screen experience, so that once customers find them, they stick around and convert. Rich Devine of Zaaz, a design, optimization and analytics agency specializing in mobile advertising, and one of the mobile marketing companies, discusses: Mobile marketing campaigns for impulse purchases vs. considered purchases. Using Google Webmaster Tools to localizes sections and pages on your site. Designing websites for the mobile user. How to convert websites designed for stationary computers to work for mobile browsers. Mobile browsers vs, mobile apps. How to decide which one is right for you? User agent detection and mobile agent detection. WordPress themes like Themedy and Thesis to convert your website to mobile. Microformats and hCards for geosegmenting different pages on the same site. How to generate Geocode http://www.geo-tag.de/generator/en.html Monetizing microconversions. This is the second part of a two-part series on Mobile Marketing with Rich Devine. Upcoming Epsiodes: Part One: Mobile Search Strategy with Rich Devine of ZAAZ When to Facebook, When to Tweet with Dan Zarrella of HubSpot Community Management Deep Dive with Rachel Happe of the Community Roundtable Subscribe: iTunes Twitter Facebook Recommended Past Episodes: Mobile Search Strategy - Part One Private Social Networking for Business B2B SEO Strategies and Tactics Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Mobile Search Strategy - Part One

Apr 16, 2011

Description:

Mobile search volume is growing exponentially. In 2009, there were around a billion monthly searches being made from mobile devices. Today, that number has more than doubled to 2.3 billion, and analysts predict there will nearly 3.5 billion mobile searches per month by 2012. Already, 80% of mobile searchers research their purchasing decisions within a 10 to 20 mile radius of their location. And if you think the future of the mobile web is going to be all about apps, think again. The #1 access method for local information is the mobile web browser, with nearly 21 million users per month. But with the use of maps and apps on rise for mobile search, and growing importance of mobile as a channel, where will tomorrow’s mobile search war be fought, who will be the winners and where are the opportunities for disruption? In this episode, Rich Devine (@richdevine) of ZAAZ, a design, optimization and analytics agency discusses: How is mobile search different from web search. Mobile site search and social optimization The difference between mobile local and hyperlocal search How universal search impacts SEO strategy Optimizing for Yelp filtering criteria Ford’s mobile search strategy In the second part in our two part series on Mobile Search, we’ll talk about how to optimize different pages on the same site for different locations, the benefits and drawbacks of mobile sites vs. custom apps and how to monetize more than just e-commerce transactions. Upcoming Epsiodes: Mobile Search Strategy with Rich Devine of ZAAZ When to Facebook, Tweet, Email Market and Blog with Dan Zarrella of HubSpot Community Management Deep Dive with Rachel Happe of the Community Roundtable Subscribe: iTunes Twitter Facebook Other Recommended Episodes: Private Social Networking for Business B2B SEO Strategies and Tactics SEO Tools and Tips with Danny Sullivan Embed this Podcast: About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@EricSchwartzman) provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

Social Marketing Research

Apr 15, 2011

Description:

Social marketing research and social media analytics have become essential tools for companies seeking to identify issues and correct misperceptions in real time and globally. Reputation management on global scale requires a combination of social media monitoring software (complex Boolean search strings) and well-trained humans to catch nuances in each local community. Online issues management and sentiment analysis may depend on instant analysis of Twitter conversations around keywords, but human common sense is needed to gauge gradations of, for example, sarcasm as companies fashion their responses and engagements. Social networking research tools represent the latest evolution in the offering of Dow Jones Enterprise Media Group, a descendant of the historically impactful Factiva media monitoring service, according to Martin Murtland, vice president and managing director of Solutions for Communications Professionals at Dow Jones Enterprise Media. Dow Jones today offers a suite of high-tech, customizable analysis function, including social media monitoring Issues management is also nothing new for Cindy Droog (@cindydroog), APR, senior public relations specialist in Corporate Communications at Amway, a Dow Jones client using its services to field an ongoing reputation study in 19 markets per quarter. Amway, along with other direct sales giants like Avon and Mary Kay, have long battled against misperceptions, including that they are akin to illegal pyramid schemes. What has changed is that Amway now instantly learns of negative conversations in the fifty countries it does business in, and engages with factual arguments in hopes of changing minds in a public forum. They also have learned the value of going beyond reaching out to “influencers” with 1,000 followers in Twitter to engaging those with ten followers, if they think they can win that person over. Cindy and Martin sat down with “On the Record…Online” in DC at the PRSA International Conference. Show Notes: 2:41 Media monitoring is just the first of four product elements built by Dow Jones for marketing and PR customers that fall under the acronym MADE (for communications success). M is for media monitoring (Factiva tradition), A for analysis (Dow Jones Insight, listening platform covers social media research and analysis), d for discover (research-on-demand services for issue discovery) and E for engagement via internal communications (a newsletter publishing platform called Editorial Workbench) and external communications (Dow Jones Media Relations Manager, a news-enabled media contact database). 4:39 Reputation management forms the core of Dow Jones’ value to its client Amway, which uses the Dow Jones product suite to run a reputation study based on real-time conversations in Russia, China, Japan and Germany. Social media strategy for the company is then shaped by observation of the human-technology mix and culture in each market. 5:54 Web 2.0 research now represents a main method by which Amway achieves opinion mining in the search for brand misperceptions. As the “grandfather” of direct selling, Amway and its PR function are continually grappling with the traditional misperception that the company represents a “pyramid scheme.” The later phrase continues to represent a central keyword in Amway/Dow Jones complex searches along with strategic qualifiers. 7:23 Sentiment analysis efforts must be efficient to be valuable, a fact that has required Dow Jones technologies to become ever better judges of relevancy. Without combining the technology with real people in each country, especially as a company seeks to listen to conversations in several languages, true relevancy cannot be measured. Google Translate and Tweetdeck’s translation tools have value for a topline read, but nuances will be caught by native speakers, Droog says. Social media engagement at Amway is shaped by its decision to empower affiliate PR staff within each market. In Russia, for instance, this approach has helped the company to temper its response to posts with negative, attention-grabbing headlines, but that then go on to praise the company. 8:54 Social medial monitoring achieves relevancy incorporating human intelligence, even within the tech-driven Dow Jones Enterprise Media Group. The company tailors each analysis program based on in-depth client conversations, analyst review of a clients’ business objectives, key issues, competitors and markets to determine what they want to measure and why. Text mining technology is then brought to bear as analysts create complex Boolean search strings in the native languages to catch local nuances. Media monitoring packages are then put through a quality assurance processes in Dow Jones labs, and finally, field tested by the client. Even then, quarterly updates often swap out search ideas, and situations call for on-the-fly searches. 10:46 Rich text analytics, when automated, can achieve no greater than 60 percent accuracy in terms of determining sentiment, according to some industry sources (see January 29, 2010, podcast featuring Converseon CEO Rob Key). Murtland agrees, but argues that automated analysis is good for is determining broad themes within sentiment and for identifying the highly positive or negative. Dow Jones helps clients improve on those results with services that let clients take and score their own random sample sets, or that enlist Dow Jones to do so when precision is a must. 14:25 Social media influence measurement is an emerging field, and Dow Jones is tinkering with how to help it mature, says Murtland. Influence measurement tools like Klout.com represent a good first step for the industry, but Dow Jones hopes to soon offer tools that navigate tricky questions like whether or the most chatty social media users are the most influential (mentions data from “E-labs.” Could not find). Under way in Dow Jones labs are efforts to incorporate context into measurement of a blogger’s influence, and to arrive at better measures of an outlet’s combined online and offline influence. 16:00 Social marketing research helps Amway make the most of its human capital, says Droog. The company began its social media analysis effort with the goal of unearthing global trends, but found it was more important to identify local trends. Social media communities form locally, and most effective conversations are held by real people sharing their passion in each market. Amway was able to steer some local reps away from one-way, declarative marketing messages (we are the best in the world) toward statements more likely to start conversations. 17:46 Social media policy and related training are among the biggest opportunities, and challenges for the companies. When effective, both elements can empower a local sales force, but policies crafted at corporate headquarters often do not translate perfectly for 50 local operations. As a result, Amway has moved toward “trans-creation” of training and policy, working with local offices to shape local versions. 18:50 Social media listening is the future of customer service, according a recent blog post by Jeremiah Owyang, an industry analyst at blog called Web Strategist. Companies will find clients with the problems and solve them long before they call customer service. Amway now fields joint PR/customer service teams that huddle to deal with problems in each market. What has changed is that the teams must solve within minutes customer service problems that they used to have days to think about. 20:23 Social media analysis tools enable Dow Jones’ clients to reduce signal-to-noise ratios in client monitoring efforts. This helps them to spot potential risks and opportunities more quickly, with algorithms that catch, not just keywords, but also temporal spikes in their use, and in context. 23:58 Social media monitoring and analytics are only useful in real time, which makes latency of information a serious challenge for companies like Dow Jones. Murtland’s team speeds things up by using algorithms that decide on which information should be processed at what speed. A...

Who Needs a Private Social Network

Apr 12, 2011

Description:

I know what you’re thinking. Private social networking is a stupid idea. Be open. Right? But there are plenty of situations where private social networking actually makes a heck of a lot of sense. Think about it. Today, we use activity streams on social networks for marketing, sales and customer service. But there’s nothing private about Facebook. How can businesses social network privately? In his keynote at Dell’s B2B Social Media Huddle in London last month, Brian Solis said that he never shares information that gives him a competitive edge. So what do you do if you want to use activity streams for collaborating with your coworkers and share proprietary information? Email is great for person to person communications, but it’s a lousy collaboration tool. Is there a safe way to build your own, private social network? Google Wave was an early attempt at private social networking, but it was before its time. Salesforce.com introduced Chatter, its exclusive social networking service as an extension of its SaaS CRM platform 2010. And in February 201, it made its private social networking service free. To listeners of this podcast, it will come as no surprise that access to a safe activity stream in a private social network behind a firewall can bring new efficiencies and added productivity to the workplace. In this epsiode Robin Daniels, (@robin_daniels) VP of Product Marketing, Chatter talks to us about: The results of their latest customer survey 28% fewer meetings 32% less email 50% said they could find information faster Why Google aborted Wave The Salesforce Chatter Community Etiquette Guide Overcoming internal adoption challenges How Chatter protects customers against hackers How Chatter compares to SharePoint Seesmic integration for easier engagement and an open question to Loic LeMuer Chatter’s biggest weakness This episode on private social networking advances a previous conversation we had with Chris Messina of Google on activity streams. If you’re interested in this topic, the epsiode with Chris is a must listen. Upcoming: Mobile Search Strategy with Rich Devine of ZAAZ When to Facebook, Tweet, Email Market and Blog with Dan Zarrella of HubSpot Community Management Deep Dive with Rachel Happe of the Community Roundtable Subscribe Now: iTunes Twitter Facebook Recommended Episodes: B2B Social Media Podcast - Epsiode 8 Activity Streams Will Change Your Business The Coca-Cola Company is Tweeting Smiles About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides social marketing services, social marketing research and social media training to businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He over 15 years experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs. He has served Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is also the instructor behind top-rated social media training seminars and the Social Media Boot Camp which are offered monthly in the US and abroad. Visit the social media training calendar for upcoming dates.

B2B Social Media Podcast 7

Apr 6, 2011

Description:

B2B social media items discussed: Are social Q&A services worth your time, searching tweets by Linkedin profile data and how SXSW used social sync to make registration data useful. Our guest panelists are Jim Cahill (@JimCahill), Chief Blogger and Head of Social Media for the Process Group of Emerson (@EmersonProcess) and Vidya Shivkumar (@thelenticular) Director, Product Management @Janrain, a user management platform for the social web. We welcome your comments, criticism and feedback. Please send email with attachments of 5MB or less to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. In this Episode: Facebook Questions relaunched in limited public beta Will this service be LinkedIn or Yahoo Answers? Is it a threat/alternative to LinkedIn, which as made Q&A a strong point? Blog Post by Monique Neely (@inspiredmomma) on using Linkedin Signals for finding and analyzing tweets by industry, company and time frame. The Future of the Web is Data by Ben Parr: http://mashable.com/2011/03/30/reid-hoffman-data/ B2B Social Media Lead Generation Explained What’s new at Emerson? What’s new at Janrain? B2B Social Media Keynote at the Digital Impact, May 5-6 in NYC Upcoming B2B Social Media Boot Camp on May 16th in Chicago Previous B2B Social Media Podcast Episodes: B2B Social Media Podcast #6 B2B Social Media Podcast #5 B2B Social Media Podcast #4 About the Podcast You’ve been listening to the B2B Social Media Podcast by Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Post a comment to our show page at iTunes. Join our community at www.b2bsocialmediabook.com and send comments to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com. About our Guests Jim Cahill is the Chief Blogger and Head of Social Media for Emerson’s Process Management business. His blog, Emerson Process Experts, now 5 years old, connects the experts of Emerson with process automation professionals around the globe. His blog was honored by being named BtoB magazine's Best Corporate Blog for 2010. His 20+ year Emerson career spans sales support, product application specialist, alliance manager, product manager, marketing communications manager, and now social media leader. He has a University of Texas at Austin BSEE and University of New Orleans MBA and began his career as a Systems Engineer for Conoco responsible for their offshore oil & gas platforms. Vidya Shivkumar runs product management and product marketing for Janrain. She has launched SaaS based products such as email encryption and device reputation based fraud management to the B2B segment. Prior to that, she spent 7+ years at AOL working on AOL's web search based offerings as well as launching Safety & Security Products to the online consumer. About the Podcasters Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman are coauthors of the book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

B2B Social Media Podcast 6

Mar 29, 2011

Description:

Linkedin launches news crowdsourced aggregation service, Forrester predicts B2B spending to rise nearly 6.7% in 2011 and Chrysler’s reaction to a mistaken tweet with guest panelists Jeff Cohen (@jeffreylcohen) of SocialMediaB2B.com and Rick Short (@rickshort21) of Indium Corp. and its constellation of bloggers. Discussion Items: * Linkedin Launches a Social Aggregated News Service using its strength in professional profiling of its members. Are the opinions of other professionals more valuable than those of your immediate social circle? We don’t think so, but we’re nevertheless impressed with the longtail targeting of LinkedIn Today’s subtopics. * B2B Marketing Budgets will Increase 6.7% in 2011 according to research by Forrester principal analyst Jeff Ernst (@jeffernst). Really? No one on the panel can quite believe this number based on their experience. Rick notes that industry averages are almost meaningless these days, since marketing budgets are so focused on micro-categories. * Chrysler fired its social media agency over a misdirected, tweet with the “f” word in it by an employee at the carmaker’s agency New Media Strategies. Our panel discusses the company’s reaction and New Media Strategies public affairs person Lyndsey Medsker’s (@lmedsker) response Previous B2B Social Media Podcast Episodes: * B2B Social Media Podcast #5 * B2B Social Media Podcast #4 * B2B Social Media Podcast #3 About the Podcast You’ve been listening to the B2B Social Media Podcast by Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Join our community at www.b2bsocialmediabook.com and send comments to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com. About the Podcasters Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman are coauthors of the book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Social Media Marketing Travel in a Recession

Mar 23, 2011

Description:

Social media travel marketing has become more important to the hospitality industry, and the public relations firms serving it, since the economic downturn hit the travel industry in 2008. Social media PR in particular is also becoming more vital with consumers demanding incentives, requiring more online touch points to make decisions and deals in real time via social networking, says Karen Gee McAuley (@gemtweet), executive vice president of Blaze PR and a 25-veteran of the travel and tourism industry. Online travel agents like Priceline, Orbitz and Travelocity have grown dramatically through the recession, forcing consultants to promote discounts offered by these services on their client’s properties with Twitter-like speed. Karen sat down with “On the Record…Online,” the official podcast of the PRSA 2010 International Conference to discuss social media marketing for the travel and hospitality in hard economic times. This episode is guest hosted by Joanne Killeen-Furtney of Killeen Furtney Group. Show Notes: 1:11 Travel marketing has been shaped in recent by the recession that hit in 2008 and by the mistakes of insurance giant AIG, which achieved notoriety by holding a luxury event at a hotel just after it had received federal bailout funds. Hospitality public relations pros were left grapple with the “AIG effect,” with companies becoming wary of travel spending, just as leisure travelers were scared into staying home by the residential real estate crash. 5:10 Hotel marketing strategies to emerge during the recession included “keeping the guest dollar on property” with stronger promotion of in-house spas, restaurants and golf courses. 5:37 Recession marketing plans began to reflect a change of focus in the hospitality industry with marketers switching to a regional “drive-in” strategy to attract the “staycation” customers in their backyard who were now less willing to fly. 6:34 Recession marketing PR programs shifted as “the deal” became all important to consumers. Customers wanted a reduced rate, and at the luxury level, demanded extras be thrown in with the price of the room (a spa treatment or a round of golf). 8:02 Social media travel PR, more than ever, had to advance client priority metrics, whether it be message delivery, preserving the rate charged, driving click throughs to a website or capturing data to guide distribution of an e-newsletter. 9:06 Online travel marketing gained added credibility when a survey by the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International found travel consumers need seven online touch points to influence their travel decisions. If travel companies are not working online, they are failing to influence half of a given consumer’s buying decision. 9:45 Online travel marketing has grown dramatically on the backs of the online travel agents like Priceline, Expedia, Orbitz and Travelocity, but travel agents still play a key role for people who want more than just a room (packages, advice, personal service). 10:33 Social media travel marketing in the last three years has come to play a central role in outreach by public relations firms to media that customers consume, along with an upswing in direct communication to customers. 10:47 Social media travel PR includes the pushing out of promotions via Facebook and Twitter pages that the travel customer communities have learned to pay attention to, including online venues of major traditional media outlets. Every major daily newspaper now has an online operation that often offers content not available in that newspaper’s Sunday travel section. The Los Angeles Times, for instance, has the Daily Dish and the Daily Deal blog. Perishable product does well online, and this impacts media targeting. 13:09 Travel industry prospects should begin to recover shortly, but marketers need to focus on population segments that have continued to spend money on travel despite the recession, including baby boomers with intact nest eggs. 13:58 Travel PR has changed in recent years, but some basic elements remain central, including the need to craft messaging, and to choose the best strategic outlets for spreading the message. Also, PR firms need to continue to identify and influence key influencers as well as take mass approaches, depending on client priorities (less can be more). 18:01 Social media metrics can be captured by aps like Omniture and Google Analytics. The results of client social media campaigns can be measured daily or weekly, and should focus tightly on which sources drive most people to the website. Click throughs are to the key, and it may not be a mention in the Wall Street Journal that drives the most traffic. A niche online article may deliver more click throughs, and may keep delivering over time. 20:24 Social media travel PR jobs are available, and working at a hotel is often a good preparation when combined with a journalism or PR degree. An internship at niche travel PR firm is another good move because it provides exposure to the specific writing style used in the industry. Goal: learn the “experiential” writing captures and creates memories. 21:12 End podcast Recommended Episodes The Coca-Cola Company Tweets Smiles Social Media Advocacy Shapes AARP Healthcare Reform Outreach B2B Social Media Podcast – Episode 5 About the Guest Host Joann is an award-winning public relations executive with over 30 years of industry experience. Whether it is a strategic plan or a financial communications program, Joann is as comfortable with the language of numbers as she is with words. Her strategic mind is well-known throughout the industry. She has created award-winning strategic marketing communications and public relations programs for Union Pacific Railroad, California State Parks, Lifetime Corporation, DAKA International, Wal-Mart, Microsoft Corporation, Litton Industries, Blockbuster and OATH. Her industry experience includes assignments in technology, healthcare, recreation, food industry, education, investor relations, government, transportation and non-profit. About the Podcaster Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind the top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These show notes were search engine optimized by Greg Williams (@gregscience). ###

B2B-Social-Media-Podcast5

Mar 17, 2011

Description:

In this Episode: Twitter encourages the developer community to find new, useful ways to use their platform to do more than just share tweets; Twitter platform lead Evan Sanger says 90 percent of active Twitter users now use official Twitter apps on a monthly basis to access the service, but Marketwire’s Sysmos says 58 percent is a more accurate number; Spiceworks launches Vendor Pages; Ajilitee tries B2B marketing on Groupon, Paul is looking for B2B case studies to feature in BtoB Magazine and Eric’s controversial SXSW panel on outsourcing social media without selling your soul. Reference Link * Twitter Drops The Ecosystem Hammer: Don’t Try To Compete With Us On Clients, Focus On Data And Verticals by MG Siegler (@parislemon) * Non-Official Twitter Clients Still Widely Used by Marketwire * Spiceworks Launches Vendor Pages by Marie Griffin * Six Pixels of Separation with Seth Godin by Mitch Joel (@mitchjoel) * Ajilitee Tries B2B Advertising on Groupon by Kris Ashton * Chrysler Fires Social Media Agency by Chris Woodyard (@chriswoodyard) Previous B2B Social Media Podcast Episodes: * B2B Social Media Podcast #4 * B2B Social Media Podcast #3 * B2B Social Media Podcast #2 About the Podcast You’ve been listening to the B2B Social Media Podcast by Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Join our community at www.b2bsocialmediabook.com and send comments to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com. About the Podcasters Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman are coauthors of the book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

B2B-social-media-podcast-4

Mar 9, 2011

Description:

B2B Social Media Podcast #4 - Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Please send comments, criticism and feedback to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com In this Episode: A surge in LinkedIn integration by B2B membership sites indicates that its star is rising as the business social network of choice. A relatively new report says content marketing is growing in importance, but marketers are still struggling with creative issues. Traditional media like webcasts and even print advertising are called more effective than new social channels. Also, check out our FIR Live discussion with Shel Holtz and Neville Hobson from Feb. 16, 2011 and Eric’s discussion with Donna Papacosta on Trafcom News. Eric heads to SXSW for a panel Monday, March 14 at 9:30am with Nicole Simon, Kate Buck and Elizabeth Bellanti on Outsourcing Socail Media without Selling Your Soul. And on Monday in the SXSW Bookstore, Eric will be signing books at 11:30am. Hope to see you there! Related Links: The rise of self-publishing, and the quest for content Email secrets & lies: Creating fresh content) B2B Facebook pages... what drives and keeps fans? 2010 B2B Content Marketing Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends Recommended Episodes * B2B Social Media Podcast #3 * B2B Social Media Podcast #2 * B2B Social Media Podcast #1 About the Podcasters Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing, the Joy of Geocaching and Social Marketing to the Business Customer with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Social Media Advocacy Shapes AARP Healthcare Reform Outreach

Mar 1, 2011

Description:

Social media advocacy and social media activism are having tremendous impact on the national debate surrounding healthcare reform, with AARP serving as a case study for efforts to shape public policy in the age of web 2.0 advocacy. Paul Anderson, vice president for Communications Strategy and Public Outreach at AARP reports on fast-growing social media action and adoption by the AARP membership, and on the power of new media advocacy to drive engagement as part of a call to action. Paul sat down with “On the Record…Online,” the official podcast of the PRSA 2010 International Conference to discuss managing social media advocacy programs at AARP. At the conference, Anderson participated in a public affairs panel focused on public policy issues stemming from the health care overhaul. Anderson joined AARP after three decades in journalism and public service. He has worked for The Miami Herald, and in 2001, became deputy chief of staff and communications director for former Florida Sen. Bob Graham. Following Graham’s retirement, Anderson became managing director of public affairs for the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Show Notes: 2:10 Social media advocacy case study: senior citizens represent the fastest growing segment on Facebook. In response to growing adoption, AARP has moved aggressively into social media advocacy, social media activism, social media networking applications and blogs. 2:37 Social media advocacy drives community engagement more efficiently than ever before. AARP research determines which members will take suggested actions on the organization’s behalf and will follow relevant AARP social media campaigns. 3:02 Healthcare reform served as the perfect example of how AARP uses social media for geographical and demographic targeting. 3:56 Social media activism requires that advocacy groups find people that agree with an institutional position and ensure their members take the right form of action. 4:12 Multiple social media communications channels represent a strategic challenge for the AARP. Its leadership employs matrix management to integrate AARP channels and communities, and to ensure that its content can be repurposed regardless of medium. 5:54 Mobile social media communications enables organizations to create value for members through accessibility and ease of use. AARP just launched several IPhone applications that leverage its publications and services, including scan-able bar code ap that enables members to get AARP discounts at participating stores using their iPhones. 6:51 Social media content must be a balance of what is most useful to audiences and moves forward institutional priorities. The AARP editorial team offers a wide variety of guidance, news and information on everything from recipes to vacations to medication, but also seeks to lead the community as it engages around policy positions. 9:25 Social media listening supplies lobbying efforts with genuine conversations to buttress arguments. AARP seeks to start dialogues through its social networking sites, and listens closely to the comments on its blogs and articles. 10:09 Social media public affairs has come to depend heavily on social media as a lead vehicle for driving change. The change, however, requires a true commitment to real-time conversation monitoring, and to placing trust in members and staff. Set your social media policy, distribute your messaging priorities and be prepared to debate robustly. 11:15 Creating a social media organization requires the opening up of communications and the crafting social media policy. AARP staff in all 50 states are now empowered to blog, post their own comments on social networking sites and to run their own social networks. 12:06 Social media outreach fuels lobbying efforts by supplying personal stories from any given Congressional district to reinforce an argument made to that Congressman on a policy position. During the health reform campaign debate, AARP used social media to collect and vet 15,000 stories from AARP members that reinforced policy positions around insurance coverage. 14:19 Social media lessons learned for shaping public policy: organizations must build the capability to monitor comments on a web site and in social media applications, and of responding quickly and professionally. 16:35 End Recommended Podcasts * B2B Social Media Podcast - Episode 2 * Political News and Social Media with Politico Editor Jim VandeHei * Communications Strategy with Susan Neely of the American Beverage Association About the Guest Host Greg Reeder is the director of the Marine Corps Element at Defense Media Activity and Editor-in-Chief at Marines Magazine, USMC, Washington, D.C. About the Podcaster Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, US Embassy to Rome, United States Marine Corps and many other small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind the top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

B2B Socia Media Podcast 3

Feb 22, 2011

Description:

B2B Social Media Podcast #3 - Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- discuss developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Please send comments, criticism and feedback to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com In this Episode: FIR Live with Shel Holtz and Neville Hobson is up. Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt’s meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama about stimulating the economy and Fareed Zakaria’s story on restoring the American dream. The Watson Jeopardy Challenge, quite possibly the greatest B2B marketing campaign in history, and eWeek's coverage. Pete Blackshaw goes to Nestle. What, if anything, can B2B marketers learn from the revolutionary fever sweeping North Africa and the Middle East. Chris Messina’s SXSW presentation on activity streams and data visualizations. Overcoming B2B social media adoption challenges, and increasing social media literacy inside organizations. New features for administrators of Facebook Pages. Happy 2nd Birthday Social Media B2B and congratulations Jeffrey L. Cohen and Kipp Bodnar. Recommended Episodes * B2B Social Media Podcast #2 * B2B Social Media Podcast #1 * Facebook Marketing Tips - Graph API About the Podcasters Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing, the Joy of Geocaching and Social Marketing to the Business Customer with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

B2B Social Media Podcast 2

Feb 15, 2011

Description:

B2B Social Media Podcast #2 - Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing, present the second podcast in our series on the developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. We're giving away a copy of the book for free to the first comment we get on the show blog for this podcast #2, so please give us your feedback! In this show: Alibaba has invested in $4.5 billion in logistics. The exchange will take a cut of transactions brokered with its partners. This is a new role for an exchange and we wonder if it presages a new business model. Are you using Alibaba? We'd love to hear your experiences. LinkedIn has some new features, including a cool visualization tool that shows the relationships of people in your professional network. It's early stage and not very useful at this point, but it's another demonstration of how social maps can be applied to rich professional networks. Eric says it's a proof of concept at best. He doesn't see a lot of value in the visualization tool and doesn't have the time to figure it out. However, he does see a lot of value in combining relationships with geographic data to improve sales prospecting. A recent Wall Street Journal story documented the sometimes nasty surprise of session-based clicks. When buyers sign up for a pay-per-click campaign, they have the option of including session-based clicks in the mix. This option may serve their ads against different queries depending upon the user's previous behavior. Some buyers are finding that session-based clicks can drive up advertising fees without delivering much value. There's a simple way to avoid this problem: turn off the session-based click option. LinkedIn is also offering some intriguing new advertising options that enable advertisers to target all kinds of professional demographic and interests. Every technology has a downside, though. Eric notes that these new features can also be used for poaching employees by enabling recruiters to target advertising to specific companies. Do you use LinkedIn for professional advice and networking? It's the preferred social network for B2B professionals and we provide some examples of how it pays off. Eric has been spending time in the B2B marketing group on LinkedIn and is impressed by the moderator who gently but firmly guides the conversation. Please send comments, criticism and feedback to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com

Haiti Emergency Communications Case Study

Feb 3, 2011

Description:

Haiti Emergency Earthquake Communications Case Study. Organizations charged with responding to the earthquake that killed 300,000 people in Haiti last January faced tremendous challenges. Barbara Burfeind, chief of Plans and Integration for Defense Visual Information within the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs and Heidi Lenzini, lieutenant commander, U.S. Navy Southern Command Public Affairs, report on the interplay between disaster relief logistics, equipment and online crisis communications. SHOW NOTES 2:40 Haiti disaster online crisis communications lessons learned. Heidi describes her insights from manning the duty phone of the organization charged with keeping the world updated in the hours after a natural disaster. 3:33 Emergency communications obstacles include the onslaught of inquiries to the point that communications systems become overloaded and information flow ceased. 5:38 Conducting crisis communications online with tools like Twitter, Facebook, websites and voicemail, if continually updated with new information, can reduce paralyzing inbound requests and call volume. 6:17 Emergency response logistics are interwoven with post disaster communications, and limited by transport to the site, lack of infrastructure and for limited communications bandwidth. 8:00 Combat Camera photographers were on site and able to send images from the field. Barbara describes how planning processes need to take into account the need for image collection early on. 8:53 Haiti emergency communications logistics depended closely on post disaster planning. Communicators that collect information or images need to be as self-sustaining as Marines to avoid consuming supplies meant for disaster victims. 12:08 Damage to post disaster infrastructure defines an organization’s ability to capture and send images. Prolific smart phones become irrelevant if there are no cell towers to link them to satellites. 13:56 Internet and email capability after the Haiti earthquake were based on responding US military ships. Ship-based communications had limited bandwidth and public affairs often had to take second place to disaster communications necessary to recovery efforts. 21:20 Disaster recovery organizations must collaborate, accept help to staff up quickly, plan carefully and share resources. Heidi argues for putting in place online crisis communications systems to address the overload of requests for information after a disaster. 24:09 End Recommended Episodes * BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications * Crisis Communications Online: Virginia Tech Tragedy * Army Social Media Training About the Podcaster Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Greg Williams (gregwilliamspr@gmail.comcom), a marketing communications specialist focused on science and technology, wrote and search engine optimized these show notes. Greg is a veteran of journalism and public relations, having worked as an editor at the Associated Press, a manager at Fleishman Hilliard Public Relations in New York and as a science editor for two university medical centers.

Social Media Crisis Simulator FireBell

Jan 21, 2011

Description:

Social media crisis simulator Firebell, which was recently introduced by PR giant Weber Shandwick, is providing crisis communications training for companies keen to avoid critical missteps in an online brand crisis. In this installment of the On the Record...Online pr podcast, Weber Shandwick VP Brooke Worden joins guest host Sandra Burrowes to give us a glimpse of FireBell’s realism and effectiveness, attributes that recently earned the social media crisis tool a 2010 Digital PR Award for best new digital service/product/app. Creating a social crisis drill that replicates the urgency of an online attack has been a challenge for PR professionals. For this reason, FireBell’s social media attack simulator is intentionally designed to be stress-producing. Worden highlights the unscripted nature of a social crisis—real or simulated—and the choices companies are forced to make while such an event unfolds. Using FireBell, realistic scenarios compel company communicators to respond to a crisis in real time. Users are able to tweet, post to Facebook and post video to YouTube in response to unfolding events yet do so in a secure, off-the-Internet environment. A class-action lawsuit, a damaging video by an employee, product recall or a fatal accident at a company facility are real-world brand emergencies that happen every day and typical of a FireBell scenario. The goal following a social crisis drill is to debrief the event and combine it with post-drill feedback to forge a realistic, experience-based crisis communications plan. Brooke Worden, VP Financial Services with Weber Shandwick Minneapolis, led the recent U.S. Census Bureau public relations campaign, working with more than 50 employees in six Weber Shandwick offices nationwide. OTHER RECOMMENDED PODCASTS BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications: Inside the US Government's First Attempt at Using Social Media to Communicate a National Disaster Social Media Crisis Communications Strategy Deep Dive with FEMA Public Information Officer John Shea Crisis Communications Online: Social Media Usage during a Crisis with Leysia Palen ABOUT THE PODCASTER Based in Minneapolis/St. Paul, @SandraBurrowes is an independent marketing and public relations professional specializing in strategy, media relations and social media management for the business-to-consumer market. Sandra partners with companies and organizations to shape their brands, improve their reputations and maximize their relationships with target audiences. She is an associate with the Chartered Institute of Public Relations. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

B2B Social Media Podcast 1

Jan 19, 2011

Description:

B2B Social Media Podcast #1 - Eric Schwartzman and Paul Gillin, co-authors of Social Marketing to the Business Customer -- the first book devoted entirely to B2B social media marketing -- kick a special series on developments in and best practices for marketing to business customers online. Please send comments, criticism and feedback to comments@b2bsocialmediapodcast.com In this episode: B2B apps B2B social media effectiveness survey Linkedin marketing best practices Links B2B Possibilities of Mobile | eMarketer 9 Out of 10 Companies Don't Think They Use Social Media Effectively | Eric Sass Hoover's Brings Business Networking to Customers With LinkedIn Agreement 5 Ways to Use LinkedIn Groups to Build Influential Connections | Social Media Examiner Recommended Episodes Facebook Marketing Tips - Social Plug Ins Facebook Marketing Tips - Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads Facebook Marketing Tips - Graph API About the Podcasters Eric Schwartzman @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available atAmazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing, the Joy of Geocaching and Social Marketing to the Business Customer with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Facebook Marketing Tips

Jan 18, 2011

Description:

Facebook marketing tips and Facebook marketing strategies from Amazon, Spotify and Qype, presented by Facebook partner engineer Simon Cross and Qype Country Manager for France Vincent Wermus. These three companies are using Facebook to solve a longstanding problem marketers have had with social media: Most channels provide no demographics on who’s listening. Think about it. RSS is a great distribution tool. It’s effective, efficient and cheap, but you have almost no idea who’s reading your blog or listening to podcast, and no what they think about it. These savvy marketers are using Facebook’s Graph API to collect basic demographics on their visitors and request permission for extended demographics in exchange for premium services that improve the functionality of their websites. When you have a rich make a market for your product and services. This podcast explains why the power of the Facebook platform is not so much Facebook.com, but rather, the connections, identities and interests of the network’s users. Using Amazon, Spotify and Qype’s Facebook integration as case studies, the talk suggests the social networking giant is much more than just a as dotcom destinations. It is a non-technical discussion of the Graph API, which can be used to let visitors bring their Facebook friends and interests with them to a website. It is the second part of a presentation delivered at Le Web 2010 in Paris. The first part of the talk was gives Facebook marketing tips with Social Plug-ins. Prior to Simon, Facebook Account Executive Xavier Leclerc shared Facebook Marketing Ideas for using Facebook Pages and gave Facebook Advertising Tips. RECOMMENDED PODCASTS Marketing with Facebook Social Plug Ins Marketing with Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads Top Stories from Le Web 2010 SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Twitter Subscribe on Facebook Subscribe to RSS ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Marketing with Facebook Like Buttons

Jan 5, 2011

Description:

Marketing with Facebook “Like” Buttons If you’re scratching your head wondering how in the heck Facebook could be valued at $50 billion US dollars, or trying to figure out what the real significance of Facebook is on organizational communications, this podcast offers the social media training you need to come up to speed. I also have a detailed blog post on this as well at http://www.ericschwartzman.com/blog. It’s the second in a series of podcasts on Facebook Marketing, the first of which is about Marketing with Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads with Facebook account executive Xavier LeClerc. In this episode, you will learn: • The benefits of installing Facebook “Like” buttons • How to use Facebook “Like” buttons to achieve massive reach • How optimize Facebook “Like” buttons for maximum engagement • How to use the Facebook Activity Stream and Live Stream social plug ins. Join Facebook partner engineer Simon Cross for a riveting presentation on why and how to use the Facebook’s social plug ins to extend the reach of Facebook.com to your destination website using their social plug ins. Understand the benefits of inetrgating Facebook “Like” buttons into your site and how best to optimize them to engage then to reach and engage the largest number of users. Mr. Cross recent numerous case studies from well-known organizations like The Independent and The BBC and talks about which social plug ins to use based on your marketing objectives. Next week, we’ll release the third and final episode in our Marketing with Facebook series, featuring Mr. Cross discussing how to optimize your website using the Facebook Graph API. This presentation was recorded at Le Web 2010 in Paris on Dec. 9. 2010. RECOMMENDED PODCASTS Marketing with Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads Top Stories from Le Web 2010 Social Media Monitoring Expert Panel SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Twitter Subscribe on Facebook Subscribe to RSS ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. Technical Note: The content management system on which this blog is hosted does not support Facebook "Like" buttons or Twitter Tweet buttons. For this reason, the ones that appear below have been added at the end of the blog post where they appear with severe limitations. As a result, this blog is scheduled to be migrated to WordPress in 2011.

Marketing with Facebook Pages and Facebook Ads

Dec 21, 2010

Description:

What makes social media marketing so elusive for old school marketers is scalability. An individual’s social network is tiny compared conventional, mainstream media audiences. The prospect of going head to head with a million audiences of 12 seems impossible. In this special episode, recorded Dec. 9, 2010 at Le Web in Paris, Facebook account executive Xavier Leclerc explains how Facebook Pages are being used by brands to get fans to recommend their products and service to their Facebook friends, and there’s nothing more trusted than the advice of a friend. La Coste’s 3.8 million Facebook friends have 112 friends collectively and they’re combining Facebook Page publishing with Facebook Ads to continue to expand their social graph. Find out how they’re doing it, Facebook’s future plans for FBML, best practices for Facebook Page Marketing, best practices for Facebook Ads, Facebook’s own scaling challenges and the tangible business benefits of marketing with Facebook Pages. Subscribe at any of the links below to get Marketing with Facebook Connect, coming next week. RECOMMENDED PODCASTS Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing Measurement Standards Declared by Global PR Industry Listening to Social Media Conversations with Rob Key SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Twitter Subscribe on Facebook Subscribe to RSS ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

PRSA Tech Section Chair RickTeplisky

Dec 17, 2010

Description:

Social media effectiveness and crafting social media policies are based on the unique goals of your communications strategy, says Rich Teplitsky, Technology Section Chair for the Public Relations Society of America. Social media measurement is challenging unless an organization understands why it engages in social media and has identified the right tools for measuring social networking effectiveness. In this episode, Rich talks joins guest hosts Sandra Burrowes and Greg Reeder to discuss the challenges of social media measurement, trends in emerging technology and the art of setting social media policy. In September 2010, a Sysomos analysis of 1.2 million tweets from a two-month period reported that 71 percent of tweets did not stimulate a reply or a retweet on Twitter. Is this failure or success? That depends, says Teplitsky, on whether the individual, company or organization is using the channel to engage, inform, build brand or drive traffic to a web site, for example. Different tools are used to measure different social media goals and it takes a well-informed public relations professional to stay current with the best tools for the job. To create sound social media policy with organization-wide buy-in, public relations pros should gather representatives from every department that has a stake in social media and broker two sets of suitable policies—one for employees (or organization members) and one for the PR/marketing people who will communicate on behalf of the company. Teplitsky also discusses the challenge for PR professionals for staying on the “cell-dividing edge” of emerging technology and outlines three areas of rapid growth: cloud computing, wireless devices and content banking. Rich Teplitsky is also Vice President at Lois Paul & Partners in Austin, Texas. OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES Best Social Networking Dashboards PR Measurement Standards Declared by Global PR Industry Delegation Corporate Social Media Policy Development ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Le Web 2010 Social Media Update

Dec 12, 2010

Description:

If you couldn’t make it to Paris for Le Web on Dec. 8-9, 2010, this podcast gives you all the major announcements and insights in one, terrific, jam-packed episode I think you’ll enjoy. Andrea Vascellari and I recap the highlights and announcements made at Le Web 2010 in Paris, as well as some of the lessons we learned at the conference. Topics discussed include: • The latest statistics on Foursquare usage, growth rates and what they charge for custom badges from co-founder Dennis Crowley, as well as how they plan to compete against Facebook Places. • Facebook Connect usage, growth rates and installed base from Ethan Beard, Director of the Developer Network at Facebook, as well as Facebook’s number of users in the UK, France, Italy and Germany. • Marissa Mayer’s Android 2.3 Gingerbread demo of Google Maps on the new Samsung Nexus S • Pet Society’s sales volume and the free to paid social gaming conversion rates they’re seeing from Sebastien de Halleux, Co-Founder, Playfish & VP, Business Development & Strategic Partnerships, EA Interactive. • Number of paid and unpaid Angry Birds downloads announced by Mikael Hed, CEO of Rovio. • Gary Vaynerchuk and Loic Lemeur’s insights on how the velocity of social media interaction can be used to either escalate or diminish engagement levels, and what that means for organizations. • Matthias Lufkens on Twitter Diplomacy and how government officials with Twitter accounts are too often undiplomatic , and probably don’t even know it. • Gabe Rivera of Tech Meme’s insightful comment about what Wikileaks means for the #gov20 space. • The keynote by Carlos Gohsn, Chairman & CEO of Renault S.A. & Nissan on how the human desire for autonomy impacts the way networks evolve. Links Referenced: • Pew Internet Report - Multiple Identities Online: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Reputation-Management/Part-1.aspx?view=all • Jeremiah Owyang’s Keynote: http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2010/12/09/slides-social-business-forecast-2011-the-year-of-integration-leweb-keynote/ • Le Web Sessions in HD: http://www.youtube.com/lewebparis#g/u People and Concepts Mentioned in this Podcast: Brian Solis, Scott Monty, John Wall, Christopher S. Penn, Chris Brogan, Marissa Mayer, Robert Scoble, Bertrand Piccard, Ricardo Sousa, Adam Curry, Stephanie Booth, Gary Vaynerchuk, Veronica Belmont, Marketing Over Coffee OTHER RECOMMENDED PODCASTS • Le Web 2010 Survival Guide • Best Social Networking Dashboards • Social Media Monitoring Insights ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides social media training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Globalization Social Media Developing World

Dec 4, 2010

Description:

Globalization, social media and technology are marginalizing the importance of existing world powers. The Web breaks not just language barriers but economic and social barriers as well, says Edith Wilson, senior advisor for communications at the World Bank. The convergence of communications and social media is becoming familiar to everyone, but few people are aware—and even fewer take advantage of—an emerging multilingualism. New tools such as Google Translate, Global Voice and other translation services use the web to break communication barriers. These tools allow people with common interests but in different countries to connect with one another no matter what language they speak. Last year alone, Indonesia’s membership in Facebook grew 800 percent to 21 million people, while Mexico increased by 300 percent to 10 million users. Russell Southwood, an expert in the penetration of Internet and mobile technologies in Africa, tells of seeing children in Kenya’s internet cafes posting on Facebook. The internet embraces multiculturalism: despite a market’s status as developing, emerging or mature, people are adopting the internet in record numbers. Communicators can use these tools and trends today to begin reaching a global market easily and cost-effectively. The World Bank, for example, recently made available a comprehensive set of data about development in countries around the globe. Since its release, the data has been accessed by 1.5 unique visitors, most of whom never had access to it before. The World Bank has also mounted a global Apps for Development Competition, which provides incentives for the public to create innovative software applications that strive to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems. Edith Wilson has advised at the World Bank for the last decade, specializing in multi-stakeholder processes, governance and anti-corruption, and economic reform. She has also held senior positions in government, the private sector and civil society. OTHER RECOMMENDED PODCASTS * Le Web 2010 Survival Guide * Best Social Networking Dashboards * Social Media Monitoring Insights ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides social media training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Social Media Trends 2011

Nov 30, 2010

Description:

In preparation for his upcoming German-American Social Media Boot Camp 14-15 December 2010 in Frankfurt, Eric Schwartzman talks to internationally-renowned security and risk technologist, author and blogger Urs E. Gattiker (@commetrics) about what he expects will be the top social media trends of 2011. . Other topics discussed include high-profile cloud computing service failures, the impact of the mobile internet on education and learning, the recent Beatles catalog release on iTunes, whether or not Sahwn Fanning was right about data portability being a red herring, the Le Web 2010 Survival Guide, The Streisand Effect, Coke’s New Social Media Marketing Program and SAP’s B2B social network managed by Mark Yoltan and Social Media Week 2011. Urs is the inventor of the ComMetrics benchmark battery of tools. One of these, the FT/ComMetrics corporate blog index empowers the FT Global 500 companies to compare the value of their blogging activities against to that target information security prevention and safety, with other enterprises. OTHER RECOMMENDED PODCASTS Le Web 2010 Survival Guide Best Social Networking Dashboards Social Media Monitoring Insights ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides social media training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Water Usage in Las Vegas

Nov 27, 2010

Description:

Water usage in Las Vegas, who uses the most water per square foot and what Nevada State and Municipal Government are doing to promote water conservation with Bob Conrad, communications officer for the Nevada Department of Conservation of Natural Resources, which conserves, protects, manages, and enhances the state’s natural resources in order to provide the highest quality of life for Nevada’s citizens and visitors. Bob is also the author of “The Good, the Bad, the Spin” about the news media, public relations practices and crisis communications. He maintains a blog by the same name. SHOW NOTES 01:02 -- Appropriating water rights in the state of Nevada and the factors on which determinations are made for water usage in Las Vegas. 02:07 -- Water is not a finite resource. Groundwater in Nevada is recharged and replenished. Jurisdiction over household water usage is governed at the municipal level, but they can and do issue citations for in appropriate water use. 04:17 -- In Las Vegas, it’s not the fountain show at the Bellagio Hotel or the golf courses that use the most water. More than 50% of the water used in Las Vegas is used by households. Resorts use roughly 7% of the water and industrial entities use 13 to 14%. Also, most of the golf courses use treated effluence for irrigation, which is essentially decontaminated waste water. 06:04 -- Fight promoter Don King used and 385,000 per square foot, or more than 2,000,000 gallons at his 5,358 square foot property in 2008, according to Nevada State records [PDF]. 07:27 -- Prince Jefri Bolkiah of Brunei used 17.3 million gallons, more than any other property owner in the Las Vegas, and Ebay founder Pierre Omidyar used 13.7 million gallons, making him the second biggest consumer of water, according to Nevada State records [PDF], presenting a significant challenge to Clark County and the Southern Nevada Water Authority. 09:15 -- “Not a Drop in the Bucket,” an article by Henry Brean about water usage in Las Vegas which appeared in the Las Vegas Review Journal on March 22, 2009. 10:36 -- The third biggest consumer of water was Daniel Greenspun of the Greenspun Media Group, who used 8.7 million gallons of water at his 7-acre property in 2008. 14:30 -- Danny Gans, Fred Segal, Floyd Mayweather, Jack Galardi, Sheldon Aldelson, Celine Dion, Jerry Lewis and Garry Maddox are among the thirstiest celebrities in Las Vegas. 17:02 -- Dealing with the over usage of water by individuals with deep pockets is one the biggest challenges municipal authorities face because responsible use has not been defined. The current economic environment, which is resulting is less tourism to Las Vegas and more residents leaving the state though, is having the biggest impact on water conservation. 20:07 -- What has hurt gaming revenue in Nevada the most is that gambling has opened up in other states, particularly Indian Gaming in California. Reno has seen a huge hit to its gaming revenue, and the state is facing a budget crisis, primarily due to reduced casino and hospitality revenue. 21:03 -- Unemployment levels in Nevada are at the same rate as they were during the great Depression. The upcoming January 2011 citizen legislature meeting may result in increased taxes and the reduced services. 22:15 -- Nevada is in a severe financial crisis that is among the worst in the nation. The housing market was a big contributor, but the fact that Nevada has no state taxes puts it in a precarious predicament when tourism revenue dips, because there’s nothing for the state to fall back on. 25:22 -- Las Vegas hotel rooms and buffets used to cost almost nothing. To what extent do the higher prices give the industry something to fall back on when casino revenue is down? Do visitors need to gamble for hospitality concerns to make money? 27:15 -- End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Inside Entertainment PR with Stan Rosenfield * Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman * Google Global Director of Communications and Public Affairs Gabriel Stricker ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Coke is Tweeting Smiles

Nov 23, 2010

Description:

How does a company like Coca-Cola -- which for years plied its trade largely through 60-second spots with heart-warming narratives and catchy jingles -- transition into the age of social media, where the value of a brand is determined by what its customers say about it on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr? One of the things the beverage giant is trying is a novel program called Expedition 206. The Coca-Cola company is sponsoring three, hand-picked “happiness ambassadors” to travel to all the 206 countries and territories where Coke is sold to seek out what makes people happy around the world. The happiness ambassadors Blogging, Facebooking, Tweeting, YouTubing and Flickring their every step, equipped with iPhones, Laptops, air cards, external hard drives and SLRs. I caught up with two of the three happiness ambassadors Tony Martin and Kelly Ferris upon their arrival in Djibouti, Africa and we discussed what they’ve learned so far about gathering different media formats in different countries with different cultures, how they’re pulling it off logistically from a gear and gizmos standpoint and the foundation of authentic happiness. Photo Caption: Coca-Cola Company CEO Muhtar Kent with Kelly Ferris and Tony Martin in the company’s Atlanta headquarters prior to their departure. (courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company) RELATED EPISODES Le Web 2010 Survival Guide Best Social Networking Dashboards Drive Traffic with QR Codes ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides social media training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Le Web 2010 Podcast Preview

Nov 18, 2010

Description:

Each December, roughly 2,500 technology executives and Internet enthusiasts convene in Paris for Le Web, a two-day conference where start-ups pitch venture capitalists and emerging technology companies demo their wares. Founded by Loic Le Meur (the entrepenuer behind the social software application Seesmic) and his wife Geraldine, Le Web has grown in popularity over the years, and has come to be know as one of the European technology conferences to be and be seen at. I’m going as an official conference podcaster and continuing on to Frankfurt the following week to teach the first US-German Social Media Boot Camp which will be a two-day social media training on the 14th and 15th of December 2010. Complete details are at www.socialmediabootcamp.com I have been wanting to attend Le Web for a couple of years now, so I was excited when Andrea Vascellari (@vascellari), the CEO of itive.net, suggested to the conference organizers that I be invited as an official conference podcaster, and it dovetailed with my upcoming Frankfurt teaching dates. In this Le Web 2010 Preview Pocast, Andrea and I are joined by two other Official Le Web conference bloggers. Participating in the discussion are Tara Hunt (@missrogue), CEO/Shwowp, Author/The Whuffie Factor and blogger at http://www.horsepigcow.com and Algerian blogger Ismail Chaib (@iChaib) who currently lives in France where he is studying for his Masters while serving as co-founder of VC-funded start-up ASQ. Before we dive into a discussion of the agenda and survival tips for getting the most out of the conference, we talk about Facebook Messaging, the impact of globalization and technology on the economy and the world outside the tech bubble. I hope you enjoy it, and if you do, please consider sharing it with your network. At the conference, I’ll be talking to other Le Web Conference bloggers including Henriette Weber, Nebojsa Radovic, Erno Hannink and others. RELATED EPISODES * Social Media Monitoring Insights * Best Social Networking Dashboards * Drive Traffic with QR Codes ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides social media training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

US Department of Defense Social Media Update

Nov 16, 2010

Description:

With the social media policy prohibiting command from blocking access to social media indefinitely on their nonclassified network, the US Department of Defense made a public decision to embrace social media, the origins of which I profiled on my blog earlier this year. This podcast is about the shift from a command and control to a network hierarchy inside the US Military. “We’re in the churning point, [and we’re moving] from hierarchical to networked structured, says Jack Holt, director of emerging media at the US Dept. of Defense, who I sat down with at the PRSA International Conference in DC last month for this podcast. According to Jack, when it comes to social media, DoD is moving from command and control to a more distributed, network hierarchy, a move that depends heavily on teaching service members not so much about social media tools, but rather the path to peace in a networked world. Beyond public relations and public affairs applications of social media, the larger opportunity social media networked information technology presents is the ability to better manage knowledge inside to organization, and better preserve organizational intelligence in an organization where service members frequently transition in and out of different operations and commands. Other topics discussed include: The Blogger Roundtable at DoD Live, social media training, Al Qaeda’s online effectiveness, use of video at the Gaza Flotilla Raid and speed versus accuracy. Follow Jack Holt on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jack_holt. OTHER RECOMMENDED PODCASTS • US Navy Rear Admiral TL McCreary on Crisis Communications • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings • Social Media Training the US Armed Forces at DINFOS ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Social Media Monitoring Insights

Nov 9, 2010

Description:

Social media monitoring has emerged as the first step in any effective social media marketing or social media ROI initiative. Even traditional market research firms like Nielsen are offering integrated solutions for listening to online conversations. If you’re looking to update your understanding of sentiment analysis, social media monitoring ethics or natural vs. computational language processing, this podcast is for you. It is a recording of a panel that was titled “Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: The Nitty Gritty of Social Media Monitoring” which I arranged and moderated for the Market Research Association at their First Outlook Conference in Orlando on Nov. 3, 2010. The social media analytics experts I brought down were Christopher Ahlberg, Ph.D., CEO, Recorded Future; Barry de Ville, Analytical Consultant, SAS Institute; Rob Key, CEO, Converseon; and Valery Miftakhov, Associate Principal, McKinsey & Company NM Incite, which is providing consulting services in partnership with Nielsen BuzzMetrics. I led a social media training for market researchers the day before. Discussion topics include appropriate use cases for sentiment analysis where 60% accuracy is a best case scenario, natural language processing algorithms, computational language processing algorithms, analyzing non-text based online information, applying the prism of social science to social media measurement, the change management aspect of social media metrics and integrating it into the enterprise; influence mapping and computing power nodes within networks; Annie Pettit asks about the Nielsen BuzzMetrics “Patients Like Me” password protected data scrapping incident reported in the Wall Street Journal; imposing temporal logic over social media tracking; normalizing data; validity of online panels; RECOMMENDED PODCASTS Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing Measurement Standards Declared by Global PR Industry Listening to Social Media Conversations with Rob Key SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Twitter Subscribe on Facebook Subscribe to RSS ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online social media training, social media strategy and social media policy governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B social media marketing is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Rosanna Fiske PRSA

Nov 6, 2010

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PRSA CEO & Chair-Elect Rosanna Fiske joins guest host Sandra Burrowes to discuss the future of the public relations industry and to look at how the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) will support PR professionals in 2011. Throughout 2010, PRSA’s strategic planning team canvassed senior-level professionals in New York, Atlanta, Miami, Chicago and Los Angeles for their views on the future of the public relations industry and to identify the core needs of PR professionals. The new (draft) PRSA strategic plan emphasizes and expands on the organization’s five pillars--advocacy, the business case for public relations, community, diversity and education--and will put new focus ethics, excellence and society management. Social media continues to be a growing edge for the industry and while significant training and development opportunities are being offered by PRSA, Fiske cautions that social media is only one of many tools, and is neither a communications strategy nor a required foundation for a successful communications initiative. She also discusses the value of PRSA’s Accredited in Public Relations (APR) designation and the benefits of involvement in the industry generally. A 20-year public relations veteran and CEO and Chair-Elect of PRSA, Rosanna Fiske is also graduate coordinator and associate professor of advertising and public relations at South Florida’s largest public research university, Florida International University, in Miami, Florida. OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES Communications Strategy and Confirmation Bias Selling Social Media Strategy to Leadership with Charlene Li PR Measurement Standards Declared by Global PR Industry Delegation ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

How to Drive Traffic with QR Codes

Nov 2, 2010

Description:

QR Codes, or quick response codes, are huge in Japan, but even though they’ve been around for a while in the US, they’re only just beginning to gain adoption among marketers and public relations professionals. QR Codes let you download content with your cell phone camera. Instead of thumb typing on your mobile device, you snap a photo (or technically speaking “scan” a two-dimensional bar code) and you’re either directed to website, sent a file, text, calendar item or contact information. With the growth of location based social networking and smart phones, the possibilities for communicators to drive online traffic through QR codes are endless. QR codes are appearing on billboards, comic books, tombstones...even cup cakes! In this episode, Wayne Sutton (@socialwayne) business development and marketing specialist at TriOut and Master Sergeant Donald Preston of US Forces, Japan talk about their experiences using QR Codes for organizational communications. SHOW NOTES 01:26 Mark Sprague of Lexington eBusiness consulting’s recent Search Engine Land blog post “QR Codes: Are You Ready for Paper-Based QR Codes?” 02:53 Wayne Sutton’s experience with QR Codes involves their use posters to promote a city arts festival to driving traffic to the schedule of events online and the development of a mobile application QR code reader. His North Carolina-based start-up TriOut is developing what he calls “Quick Check In Codes” which are QR Codes that can be used to check into location based social networking services more effortlessly by simply scanning a code. 04:47 QR Codes can be measured either through the use of custom URL redirects or QR Code generators with built in measurement analytics including the date and time, geolocation data and the type of mobile device that scanned the code. Combining QR code measurement with standard website metrics and a conversion activity like a newsletter sign registrations, a Facebook “Like” or a Twitter Follow would offers the best of all worlds. 06:43 Popular QR Code generators include Qreatebuzz.com, 2DCode.com and Kaywa.com. 07:25 Tippinn in New York which helps agencies and brands market with QR Codes warns against customizing the aesthetics to much, because it can cause them to fail when scanned. A positive user experience with a QR Code is more important than clever visual styling. It needs to load quickly, transit the user to the designated website, transmit the right calendar item or contact info. 10:51 To celebrate the 50 year anniversary of the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation between Japan and the United States, US Forces Japan produced a Manga comic book about what the US Military is doing in Japan, and to drive traffic to a corresponding public affairs campaign website. QR Codes are already hugely popular in Japan. 12:30 The Magna generated 16,000 unique visits from mobile devices (of which 7,000 were from iPhones) to the public affairs campaign website and was not at all difficult to sell to command because of the widespread adoption of QR Codes in Japan, which appear are on billboards, bus shelters and subway advertisements throughout Tokyo. 16:10 The use of QR Codes in the offline world versus on websites. A new WordPress Plug-In that auto generates a new QR Codes for each post to give readers the opportunity to scan posts and read them later on a mobile device or email them to a friend. 18:28 Sean McGarry (@writeMcSean) asks what is the benefit of QR Codes versus bar codes? Is this the mobile version of VHS versus Beta? And is there a QR version of Sticky Bits? But since people associated bar codes with price information, it may be easier for people to adopt the new behavior of scanning a code with a mobile device if the codes are something new and different. Wayne thinks QR Codes are new, so they’re more likely to be associated with new behavior. 21:20 Whether or not it’s a good idea to write something like “scan this code” right under the placement of a QR Code on a billboard or in print. Examples of QR Codes include a recent Calvin Klein billboard on Sunset Blvd., on tombstones to retrieve information about the deceased and for micro payments at Starbucks. 27:28 End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Best Social Media Management Apps * Get Facebook Friends and Twitter Followers While You Sleep * Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing with Omniture ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

NASDAQ Launches PR and Reg FD Compliance Service

Oct 28, 2010

Description:

Demetrios Skalkotos, SVP for Global Corporation Solutions of NASDAQ OMX [NASDAQ:NDAQ], the world’s largest exchange company, sits down with guest host Mark Story (@mstory123), Director of New Media at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to discuss their new Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Platform, designed to make press release and regulation FD compliance self service for investor relations and public relations professionals. NASDAQ’s new DIY platform offers video, social media management and press release distributionon a single platform. According to Skalkotos, self-service content distribution tools have been more prevalent in Europe. NASDAQ introduces the tool in the U.S. market with a one-button option to wrap press materials with information that satisfies SEC disclosure regulations. The system puts NASDAQ’s GlobeNewswire distribution network more directly into the hands of public relations professionals. With enhanced search engine optimization capabilities and audience targeting options, DIY further distinguishes itself as a lower cost solution for traditional press release distribution. Skalkotos also discusses NASDAQ’s Social Stream, a video release service that aggregates a company’s social media content into single site to simplify the task of reviewing a company’s public profile. NASDAQ OMX is the world’s largest exchange company with trading, technology and public company service capability spanning six continents. NASDAQ OMX Global Corporate Solutions provides technology that powers global business communications. NASDAQ is on Twitter @NASDAQOMX and on Facebook. OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys * Truth through Numbers with former White House Economic Policy Advisor Todd Buchholz * B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender ABOUT THE PODCASTER This episode was recorded at PRSA International Conference 2010 in DC and was guest hosted by Mark Story, who you can find on Twitter, Facebook and Posterous. Regular episodes are hosted by @EricSchwartzman, who provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Best Social Media Management Apps

Oct 25, 2010

Description:

Over the past few months, the number of social media management applications to choose from has exploded. In addition to well known contenders likes HootSuite and TweetDeck, there are more than a dozen other new applications designed to help teams manage multiple social networking accounts and measure the ROI of their efforts. In this episode, you’ll find out which apps are the clear winners and what exactly makes them so much better. White Horse emerging media manager Jamie Beckland (@jbeckland) the lead author of a report that ranks 10 social media management applications against each other in three categories, shares the inside scoop on the winners and explains which features marketers should be looking for when they evaluate enterprise class software applications for social media engagement. White Horse calls them social media management platforms and ranks them for their ability to integrate with social networks, offer practical rules and permission-based team management and provide the best measurement capabilities. If you’re business is social media communications, this is an episode you definitely don’t want to miss. SHOW NOTES 01:18 Social media management platforms are web-based tools accessible via browser that let you manage your social networking engagement activities in a variety of popular and niche social networks in one, consolidated tool, gives teams a practical solution managing branded social networking accounts and provide integrated tracking and analysis of interactions that ensue. 03:11 Social media management platforms offer social media monitoring to varying degrees of success, but currently White Horse advises clients to keep social media monitoring activities separate in order to aggregate a more in depth perspective of who’s saying what where. While social media management platforms vendors claim robust monitoring, the solutions are not as comprehensive as those from vendors who specialize exclusively in social media monitoring. When it comes to monitoring, social media management platforms are weakest at tracking conversations on the blogosphere and in online forums. 04: 46 Social media management platforms make it easy to publish to variety of social networks from one place, but they don’t capture and display all the social interaction that may ensue in the social network to which they’re published. It’s a dynamic space and this is changing, but currently social media management platforms are better for talking that they are for listening. 05:44 The inability of social media management platforms to see and report back interactions that transpire inside native social networks is partly due to the capacity of the developers behind them, but also because Facebook may actually block some of that activity from being captured by third-party applications. Jamie Beckland calls these “growing pains for social media and corporate marketers in general.” 06:44 Jamie likens the rapid pace of innovation in the social media management space as the “Cambrian period” where things are moving so quickly, with many new entrants promising to be all things to all people, and marketers need to be careful not to rely too heavily on social media management platforms at this early stage. “You’re going to still need to use the native platform. You want to be able to have an authentic conversation on Facebook, you need to understand what the rules of engagement are on Facebook,” says Jamie. Having that first person experience in the native social network where the conversations occurs, rather than through a social media management platform, is critical. 07:35 Social media management platforms use two different presentation styles for their user interfaces. One is the inbox style, which consolidates all your activities into one central stream and the other is the channelization style, which displays the streams separately by social network, so you can appreciate how they interaction differs from social network to social network. The inbox presentation style requires the user to invest more attention prioritizing messages, according to Jamie, while the channel style provides a degree of segmentation that makes it easier to engage with a large number of people. 11:23 In a new report, White Horse ranked social media management platforms in three categories: social site integration in terms of what they offer today and what their roadmap is for staying up to date with the social networks of tomorrow, team workflow management and measurement analytics. 11: 48 HootSuite, Objective Marketer, Spredfast and Sprinklr scored highest for social site integration with 4 out of 5, but no one scored a perfect 5 because no social media management platform currently integrates non-text based information such as podcasts as online video, posing significant engagement challenges. Some of the tools do use the meta data or text comments associated with YouTube videos to find and display that content, but until they consider the actual video content, either by tracking closed captioning or by introducing an audio to text translation solution, this will remain a handicap of social media management platforms. 14:51 Spredfast and Sprinklr ranked highest for team account management because they had the most sophisticated understanding of how marketing teams are structure, and because they did the best job using analytics to help teams find those conversations most worthy of engagement at any single moment in time. These social media management platforms also do the best job integrating automated sentiment analysis and ranking which conversations are coming from the most influential online voices. Spredfast and Sprinklr also both offer the ability to set up rules, from a content management system perspective, to offer team members varying degrees of authority based on permission levels. 16:12 On the analytics side, the top scoring social media management platforms were Argyle Social, HootSuite, Objective Marketer and Sprinklr, primarily because they integrate with third party social media measurement platforms like Google Analytics and Omniture SiteCatalyst. Measurement is the basis of justifying social media marketing to the C suite, and those are the social media management platforms that do the best job tracking, incorporating and delivering that data. Argyle went live with Google Analytics support at the outset, integrating with Omniture and pulling conversion tracking data back into their platform. Argyle tracks on a per-tweet and per Facebook status update basis the monetary value of particular social media message. HootSuite and Objective Marketer both integrate with Google Analytics and HootSuite does a good job building their own analytics capabilities. HootSuite does a great job tracking short URLs, so if 10 different people create their short URLs using different services that all redirect to the same destination URL, HootSuite aggregates them as one URL and tallies up all the clicks. Spredfast does something similar. Sprinklr ranked highly for their ability to perform custom integration with whatever measurement package the client requests, a process which Jamie says Sprinklr has performed successfully for clients “a number of times.” 19:22 The White Horse social media management platform ranking study rates HootSuite, Spredfast and Sprinklr highest but the final decision should be based on personal preference with respect to how the application works, who within the organization will be using the tools because different business units have different needs and the management structure of the organization. If you have a very strong need to demonstrate ROI through conversion analytics tracking, that’s going to narrow down the field of choices considerably, so the choice should be made based on the objectives the marketer is trying to achieve. 22:30 End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Get Facebook Friends and Twitter Followers While You Sleep * Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing with Omniture ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online...

Igniting Movements with Geno Church

Oct 20, 2010

Description:

Igniting community movements of brand ambassadors involves tapping into what your constituents are truly passionate about. According to Geno Church, the charismatic Word of Mouth Inspiration Officer at Brains on Fire, it means rolling up your sleeves and discovering what will make your fans’ lives better. Why? Because a true fan will propell and defend your reputation, long after your marketing campaign has subsided. They have a sense of ownership and shared identity, and your success and their success is aligned. Drawing on his experience building a community of Fiskateers and reaching out to save teen smokers in South Carolina, Geno Church talks about igniting a community of brand ambassadors, the difference between passion conversations and product conversations and his new book by the same name, Brands on Fire. SHOW NOTES 01:37 Creating community among young people in order to combat teen smoking was a movement that changed Geno Church’s career 10 years ago. Today, his message is that communications strategies shouldn’t focus on social media tactics and tools, but instead on learning from people and empowering them to carry the message for your brand or organization. 03:31 A look at why it isn’t sustainable to approach social media like marketing. Traditional media messages don’t ignite communities--you have to go directly to the people to engage the conversation and they will discover how to become a brand ambassador. 05:11 A brand audit by scissors-maker Fiskars showed an emotional disconnect between the brand and its customer. Geno shares the out-of-the box approach used by Brains on Fire to ignite and engage the Fiskars’ community and the non-traditional involvement it required of the marketing team. 09:49 Understand the conversation going on in your community before you start thinking strategically or tactically. Why do your customers and employees value your brand? Before building online community, uncover everything you can about how your customers use your product in their lives. 11:06 The crucial differences between a campaign and a movement. 12:27 A discussion about drivers that can activate a community and talking with a target community to identify how to ignite that community. The importance of focusing on the human element in customer engagement whether online or off. 16:00 Discussion about the use of negative emotions to activate a community vs. positive emotions and the sustainability of both approaches. 17:17 How to build a sustainable online community that stays positive and is able to police itself. 18:55 The differences between activating communities around policies and ideas vs. igniting communities for selling product. A discussion of Love146, an organization devoted to abolishing child sex slavery and exploitation. 22:22 New report reveals how social media is being used and viewed in different countries. Geno and Eric discuss fear and greed as motivators in mature markets vs. developing ones, including a discussion about challenging circumstances in Johannesburg, South Africa. 28:57 The methods for tapping passion in developing and maturing communities are different, but igniting community always revolves around talking with people and walking with them in their lives to find out what they need and what value you can provide in their lives. 30:27 The role of community mentors and the value, importance and methods for keeping community mentors inspired, engaged and motivated. 33:23 Geno’s hard-won advice on how to prepare for the digital world of parenting. 37:19 End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Get Facebook Friends and Twitter Followers While You Sleep * Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing with Omniture * Location Based Social Networking at New York Fashion Week ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US.

SEO is PR

Oct 18, 2010

Description:

Search engine optimization is public relations, Rebecca Lieb of Econsultancy and author of The Truth About Search Engine Optimization tells guest host Sally Falkow (@sallyfalkow) in this special episode recorded today at the PRSA International Conference in DC. The next generation of PR professional will need be know SEO, data mining and how to think a publisher. Detailed show notes for this episode are not available.

Communications Strategy with Susan Neely of the American Beverage Association

Oct 15, 2010

Description:

Communications strategy and grassroots campaigns are key to the beverage industry’s ability to influence consumer attitudes says Susan Neely, President of the American Beverage Association (ABA). Susan will be part of a panel discussion at the PRSA International Conference in Washington D.C. called “Shaping the Debate: Public Affairs Strategies and the Health Care Reform Bill,” on Sunday, October 17, 2010. The American Beverage Association is the leading policy and public education advocate for the non-alcoholic beverage industry that employs nearly 220,000 people nationwide, generates more than $112 billion in annual sales and has a direct economic impact of more than $136 billion. Prior to leading the ABA, Susan Neely spent 3-1/2 years in the Department of Homeland Security managing threat announcements, branding, public-education campaigns and crisis communications. SHOW NOTES 1:00 Neely highlights the nature of her upcoming panel discussion on issue advocacy and parts of a comprehensive communications strategy used by the ABA surrounding the recent Health Care Reform Bill. 1:30 Her public service as a Congressional staffer, gubernatorial staffer and, for three and a half years, as Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. 2:00 The motivation behind her transition from White House staffer to trade association representative. 2:52 An overview of the work done by American Beverage Association and why Susan Neely enjoys the beverage industry’s grassroots advocacy and her work in this leading consumer products industry. 5:08 Childhood obesity and the beverage industry: Susan Neely looks at the impact the nation’s growing awareness of childhood obesity has had on the beverage industry. One in three children born today will develop Type 2 diabetes, which directly correlates to obesity. 6:25 She reflects on the use of corn syrup as a beverage sweetener and highlights initiatives by the beverage industry to help consumers watch their calories. These include a broader beverage selection, an industry-wide calorie reduction averaging 21 percent over the last 10 years and new beverage labeling. A discussion of beverages sweetened by sugar and those sweetened by corn syrup. 9:35 Coke Classic vs. Coke Zero and what led to Coke Zero’s introduction. 11:09 Neely responds to a UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Intake study that finds that pancreatic cancer cells use fructose to fuel their growth and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom’s call for a 2010 Soda-free Summer. 12:56 The use of social networking in an effective marketing communications strategy, as well as its rising importance in lobbying. Communications strategists utilize social media to engage consumers in conversation and as an effective tool to influence buyer behavior. 14:31 Neely predicts how social media will change the way traditional lobbying is done and how it already supports grassroots organizing and the public’s grassroots lobbying of the government. 17:11 How will social media influence advertising? Will the migration of advertising from traditional channels to social media outlets change the way issue advocacy gets done inside the Beltway? 19:20 End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Political News and Social Media with Politico Editor Jim VandeHei * White House Press Secretaries Panel * Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and search optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Location Based Social Networking at NY Fashion Week

Oct 11, 2010

Description:

Location based social networking at New York Fashion Week was all the rage, with more than 100,000 fashionistas checking-in, indicating clear winners and losers with respect to where the action and excitement was. In a report, Joost van Dreunen of SuperData Research analyzed the check-in data and shares his findings. Smart communications strategies embrace location based social networks as tools to drive customer retention, repeat visits and foot traffic, according to van Dreunen, who also did a second geo social networking study comparing Whole Foods to Trader, revealing significant insights about how each grocer’s customer base differs. Joost van Dreunen PhD is managing director of SuperData Research, a research firm focusing on interactive entertainment and technology industries. Prior to founding SuperData, he held senior analyst positions at Nielsen Online and DFC Intelligence. SHOW NOTES 01:05 Joost’s describes the experience that led to him to look for location-based social networking traffic patterns among the crowd attending Fashion’s Night Out, a promotional event held during New York Fashion Week 2010. 4:06 A closer look was taken at total Foursquare check-ins in the Village and Soho. Which fashion house had the biggest crowd and some of the opportunities location based networks present to event planners and communicators. 8:24 The Foursquare analysis reveals that 31% of geo-based check-ins by Fashion’s Night Out participants continued into the wee hours of the morning, long after the participating retailers had closed, indicating further opportunity for event planners. Top-ranking retailers from Fashion’s Night Out are listed, and s a discussion of why prominent fashion designer Marc Jacobs did not rank. 11:35 What promoters, event planners and participating vendors can learn about from the numbers behind the use of location based social networking apps on smart phones on Fashion’s Night Out. Why were certain retailers successful while others were not? Joost discusses the benefits of location based social networking to local businesses. 14:48 A seprate study of grocery store check-ins within a five-mile radius of a Whole Foods store. When were customers checking in? Were they at Whole Foods or at a competitor? Foursquare’s location based app allows Whole Foods to see who’s getting the lunch crowd, the after-work crowd, etc. and see where the opportunities are for the store to do better. Location based networking gives a point of comparison and a sense of market share. 19:53 The quantity of raw geo data generated by location based apps can be immense and that creates a barrier to meaningful analysis. Research firms like SuperData have the infrastructure to deal with the high data volume, however companies that aren’t in a position to hire a professional research firm to crunch the number can work directly with Foursquare. 24:57 End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Get Facebook Friends and Twitter Followers While You Sleep * Facebook Marketing Campaign Measurement Briefing with Omniture * Marketing Flight of the Conchords on the Web with Dave Fletcher ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Social Media Sound Bites, Communuications Strategy and Confirmation Bias

Oct 9, 2010

Description:

Communicating in status updates and tweets, the skills required to build an effective communications strategy and avoiding the confirmation bias trap with former PRSA CEO Cheryl Procter-Rogers, vice president, office of public relations and communications at DePaul University, America’s largest Catholic university. Prior to joining DePaul University, Cheryl was on the corporate affairs team at HBO and before that, she was director of public relations and advertising at Nielsen Media Research. On October 19, 2010, she presents “A Winning Approach to Advocacy Campaigns” at the upcoming PRSA International Conference in Washington DC. SHOW NOTES 2:15 – An effective communications strategy hinges on five key communications skills. 3:19 – How she balances a successful business career with a healthy home life. 4:17 -- The benefits of knowing who and where your resources are. 6:39 -- Tips for achieving work-life balance and the organizational systems that can help. 8:18 -- Can chess help you become a master of communications strategy? 10:21 – Cheryl shares her “Four Cs” of successful career development and the benefits of improving your listening skills. 12:52 -- She introduces the concept of confirmation bias and why diversity is a prudent business strategy. 15:19 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Facebook Campaign Measurement

Oct 4, 2010

Description:

One of the most commonly asked questions these days at my Social Media Boot Camps is how do you measure the ROI of a Facebook marketing campaign? With 500,000 million users and 11 percent of all time spent online, the potential of Facebook for public relations and public affairs professionals is huge. But given how basic the measurement options are at Facebook Insights, if you do hit it out of the park, how do you prove the impact of a Facebook marketing campaigns on the bottom line? In this episode, Jeff Jordan, product manager, social media and video measurement and Tim Waddell, director of product marketing for the Omniture business unit of Adobe talk about audience segmentation, sentiment analysis and having your Facebook page brandjacked. Through a global partnership with Facebook, Omniture SiteCatalyst, Discover and Search Center Plus report the ROI of Facebook marketing campaigns by monitoring activity on Facebook Pages, inside Facebook Apps, from Facebook Ads and activity through Facebook Connect/Open-Graph, which extends Facebook functionality to destination websites. SHOW NOTES 05:11 -- Omniture Discover, an advanced segmentation tool, which can be used to discover which of your Facebook audience segments generate the most revenue. 08:37 -- Omniture intends to launch an analytics component for monitoring sentiment by keyword. 10:38 -- In previous episode of this podcast with Rob Key of Converseon, he said beware of any listening provider that claims 90% accuracy with computers. A discussion of just how far off accurate sentiment analysis is, and using it as directional data and for spotting potential trends. 13:36 -- Earlier this year, Nestle had their Facebook page brand jacked by Greenpeace. People where flocking to their Facebook page in droves, posting their disapproval of the company’s use of palm oil, which they believe is helping to push orangutans into extinction. A discussion of how, if at all, Omniture might help a company protect its Facebook page from being brandjacked by grassroots activists. 16:11 -- In a previous podcast with US Navy public affairs officer Jim Hoeft, we learned that Operation Deepwater Horizon’s Facebook Page was literally overwhelmed with thousands of comments during the BP Oil Spill in the Gulf, which the page administrators had no practical way to export or analyze globally. How do communicators mitigate the risks associated with launching a social networking presence that can be impossible to manage in the event of a crisis? 18:43 -- Using analytics software to determine influence and analytics package rankings. 21:51 -- End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Earn Facebook “Likes” and Twitter Followers While You Sleep with Janrain * Social Media PR using Facebook Company Pages with CC Chapman * Selling Social Media Strategy to Leadership with Charlene Li ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Hone Your Media Relations Skills

Oct 1, 2010

Description:

Media relations skills are what employers want most from PR professionals, according to the 2009 Digital Readiness Report. But it takes a lot more than luck to land on the front page of a major print newspapers or the interview chair on broadcast television. It takes solid PR skills, communications skills and media relations strategies, and that’s what this podcast is about: building your media relations skills. The trouble is, newspaper and network TV audiences have been declining steadily for the last 7 years. And with lay-offs hitting newsrooms around the globe, the news hole has shrunk and there are fewer reporters to pitch. Those that remain are working longer hours and under more pressure than ever before. What communications skills are needed to capture their attention? Enter, Michael Smart, who specializes in teaching media relations to skills to PR professioanls. Michael is National News Director at Brigham Young University (BYU) and, in this episode, he shares his media relations skills top tips in an effort to help public realtions practioners adapt to the dramatic changes in today’s news media landscape, and the challenge and opportunities those changes require us to make to our media relations techniques. He outlines specific communication skills and techniques that can be used to build greater publicity exposure in a competitive news environment. In addition to his work with BYU, Michael is an independent media relations trainer and coach and a top-rated speaker at the PR-industry’s biggest conferences. He will present a session at the PRSA International Conference in Washington DC on Tuesday, October 19, 2010. His 2:15pm session is “New Rules of Media Relations: Pitch Overworked Journalists and PR-averse Bloggers and Come Out Unscathed.” SHOW NOTES 01:26 Dramatic changes in the media landscape can make it harder to connect with mainstream journalists than in the past, but once that barrier is cleared, it can actually be easier to place positive news than it used to be. But the basics, like press release writing skills, are still critically important. 02:18 Michael shares media relations techniques for landing positive media placements, including researching the five most meaningful media outlets, searching the archives of those publications for related stories and providing a journalist with credible third-party sources. 05:51 Today’s high media turnover can make it difficult to develop relationships with journalists, especially for PR professionals with clients across a range of industries. Michael shares tactics that can increase the chances for success. 07:50 PR research is done and you’ve identified the right journalist for a story. How do you decide how best to approach the journalist (phone call, email, tweet, Facebook post, etc.?) Michael shares his specific strategies as well as a few mistakes that drive journalists up the wall. 13:47 Media relations techniques to employ when a client announcement isn’t newsworthy—two strategies to employ. 17:41 The three variables that media relations experts can control (creativity, media relationships and perseverance) and a few they can’t. Which PR skills matter most. 21:26 Despite the decline of the traditional news media, there has been a sharp rise in the readership of newspaper content through the internet and mobile phones. Media relations skills will continue to be important to employers and clients. 23:44 Media relations are important to today’s PR professionals, yet the best communication strategies rely on sound social media skills, public affairs skills and even advertising skills. 27:25 End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * PR Measurement Standards Declared by Global PR Industry Delegation * Selling Social Media Strategy to Leadership with Charlene Li * Corporate Social Media Policy Development ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Marketing Flight of the Conchords on the Web with Dave Fletcher

Sep 28, 2010

Description:

Marketing Flight of the Conchords online, a new user management platform for the social web and how to build the right website for any organization with Dave Fletcher, founder and executive creative director, The Mechanism a multi-disciplinary design agency with offices in New York, London and Durban, South Africa. He will present a session titled “Compelling Social Media Strategies: Soaring With ‘Flight of the Conchords’” at the PRSA International Conference in DC on Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:45 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. SHOW NOTES 01:15 -- Flight of the Conchords website design and development process, managing the band’s online reputation and trying to maintain a direct connection with their fans while HBO was marketing their reality-based television show online as well. 02:24 -- Rationale for gathering all your various social media marketing efforts together in one easy-to-access place. 03:17 -- Janrain user management platform for the social web, which is used by the Lady Gaga website to allow fans to sign in. Accordingly to Janrain, the platform double the registration rate of the Lady Gaga website. The janrain platform also capture and stores registration data locally, so marketers are not reliant on Facebook for access their customer data. Janrain Demo: 06:20 -- How to pick a content management system based on specific requirements. 08:11 -- What makes a great interface and tailoring the design to the needs of your particular users. What does your audience need and how can you give it to them in as few clicks as possible? 09:57 -- The level of ease that users have come to expect from websites, whether Facebook has set the bar for ease-of-use and what the growth of social networking sites means for corporate web design. 12:29 -- Dangers associated with relying too heavily on any one social network like Facebook or Twitter for PR, marketing or corporate communications. 14:18 -- Dangers of relying on social networks as mobile devices, ipads and apps take off. 14:52 -- Steve Rubel’s comment on For Immediate Release Live #18 about approaching social media communications with a homeland/embassy strategy, whereas the homeland is the organization’s destination site and the embassies are its profiles on social networking sites. 17:58 -- Hicksdesign.co.uk has built a website that’s a single bit of CSS which is meant to work well on computers, mobile devices and ipad. The goal in the web design community is to develop ways to design single sites that operate effectively on different devices. 19:52 -- Tools that help us focus our attention or “apps”, as opposed to tools that help us hunt and peck, are driving the future of online communications. Wired’s proclamation “The Web is Dead.” 22:23 -- A bad customer experience in the mid-90s with AT&T that has kept Eric from giving them a nickle ever since, Apple’s anti-competitive business practices and the iPhone vs. Driod platform development strategies. 24:11 -- Risks of managing an unregulated platform that is truly open, from poor coding to malware, and Apple’s decision not to use Flash on ipad, because of concerns that poorly designed Flash files that crash a device reflect badly on the device developers, rather than the Flash programmer, who in fact IS responsible for the failure. 27:05 -- AT&T’s network can’t live up to the iPhone’s network demands, and other wireless carriers may soon encounter their own performance issues as smart phones become more popular and available on their networks. 29:03 -- End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Activity Streaming with Chris Messina * How to Achieve Social Media Rock Star Status with Ariel Hyatt * Web Usability Guru Jakob Nielsen ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Get Facebook Friends and Twitter Followers While You Sleep

Sep 24, 2010

Description:

Finally, there’s a way to grow your social network, increase engagement and site registrations without having to Tweet and Facebook 24/7. Through a relatively new type of service called a user management platform for the social web, you can invite visitors to your destination website to use their Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, MySpace or Open ID credentials to register or log in when they visit. So rather than have to fill out some lengthy form, they can log in with one click. When they do, you get the opportunity to capture and keep much of their profile data and check out their social graph. The result is a huge increase in site registrations, a much more engaged community and nine times the referral traffic. In this episode, Tore Steen, VP, Marketing and Business Development at Janrain and former VP of Business and Corporate Development for WebTrends explains the concept of a user management platform for the social web on non-technical terms, makes the business case for implementing the service and the future of marketing on the social web. SHOW NOTES 01:24 -- An explanation of the Janrain user management platform for the social media, which offers a way for visitors to your website to use their Facebook, Twitter and 14 other social networking credentials to register for your website. 03:03 -- The benefit of having visitors use Facebook or Twitter credentials to register when they visit an organization’s destination website. 04:14 -- The top three preferred identity providers today in order of importance are Google, Facebook and Yahoo, but business-oriented sites tend to draw more Linkedin registrations and visitors to consumer oriented-sites tend to use their Facebook identity to login. 05:24 -- The richest profile and social graph data that a website can receive is from a Facebook user, because Facebook has the most information because of their “like” button and the information user’s store on theirs profile page. Other identity providers are currently jockeying to find a way to capture and provide a more detailed portrait of their users. 06:43 -- There are ways to determine who the most influential people who’ve “liked” your organization on Facebook are. You can see what other brands they’ve liked and when they publish to your Facebook Page. On average, for every Facebook Page post that someone makes on your Wall, there are an average of nine inbound referrals generated to your Facebook Page from that person’s network of friends. Looking at whoever brings the most referrals to your website is a great way to see who your most influential Facebook friends are. 08:02 -- If you’re using a user management platform for the social web, every time someone uses their Facebook credentials to sign into your site, you get a list of their friends so you get an understanding of their social graph. On the Mahalo site, if you use Google to authenticate, you can bring your address book and invite your friends through an automated pick list. 09:18 -- Given that Facebook is known for random terms of service changes, organizations can mitigate the risk of relying solely on Facebook for access to their constituents by capturing and storing the registration data in their own contact management database as well. 11:48 -- Making it easy to share web pages or content was the rage a couple of years ago, but today, it’s about making it easy for users to share activities or the ways they participate online. CitySearch uses Janrain to allow visitors to post a link to the restaurant reviews they write to their Facebook newsfeed, driving richer engagement. Other activities that could become advocacy or public relations opportunities through integrated sharing include e-commerce transactions, white paper downloads, charitable donations or any other online activity that someone might want to share with their friends and followers online. 12:48 -- Responding to the growing interest of their customers in fortifying their presence in the mobile environment, Janrain optimized their user experience for a variety of mobile browers first, so smart phone users would have a positive experience logging in with a handheld device. They also released a software developer’s kit to embed the Janrain user management platform for identity management into custom apps. zoday, Janrain supports iPhone and will release support for Droid in the fourth quarter of 2010. 13:57 -- Because they’ve seen greater adoption of apps by Droid users, Janrain decided to offer Droid support next, though they intend to eventually support Blackberry as well. 15:24 -- The old metrics were quantity of site traffic, time spent on site and passive page views. But the new metrics on the social web are about quality of site traffic, interactions that occur and active sharing. it’s a shift from measuring traffic, to measuring actions. The easiest way to calculate the ROI of a user management platform for the social web is to compare the number of unique visitors that registered prior to deployment, to the number of registrations that occur after deployment. 16:25 -- The second new metric to monitor is the referral traffic from the social sharing feature and see how many of those referred visits result in some sort of transaction, be it a CPM, e-commerce or lead generation. 17:49 -- User management platforms do require a web developer to get up and running, but the products have thus far been largely embraced by web development community, because it solves a very specific need for marketers, and insulates developers from having to innovate a solution from scratch. 19:06 -- Janrain does have WordPress and Drupal plugins available, but they require some coding to get up and running. They’ve also partnered with Kick Apps and integrated their user management platform into that solution as well. 21:24 -- End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * B2B Social Networking: Lead Generation on SlideShare * B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender * Activity Streams Will Change Your Business ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Spokesperson Eliot Brenner

Sep 20, 2010

Description:

Social media for government regulators, web 2.0 for power plants and potential compliance issues surrounding the use of new media by energy companies with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission chief spokesperson Eliot Brenner, a presented at the PRSA International Conference in DC, Oct. 16-19, 2010 and the PRSSA 201 National Conference in DC Oct. 15-19, 2010. Eliot Brenner has been director of public affairs at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since April 2004. He began his career with 20 years in journalism, covering everything from sports to presidential campaigns and the first Gulf War for United Press International. He subsequently became a speech writer for Dick Cheney in his final year as Defense secretary, moving on from there to write speeches for two Clinton Administration Treasury Secretaries and then serving as Assistant Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration for Public Affairs. He has written and consulted for clients as diverse as the Nature Conservancy, Airbus and the American Trucking Associations, and directed the Boeing's award-winning public affairs program when it put explosives detection machines in more than 450 airports after September 11, 2001. SHOW NOTES 01:11 -- The Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s mandate, how it operate and Eliot Brenner’s work history prior to joining the NRC as director of communications in 2004. 02:41 -- “To what extent is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission using social media tools to engage with Americans?” asks Richard Perry, host of the 10-minute PR Podcast via Twitter. 03:58 -- “Given the sharp growth of social media, how is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission addressing oversight and compliance issues that may arise over these emerging media channels?” asks Steve Conroy, Corporate Communications Manager, Southern California Edison. 04:50 -- The single biggest public affairs challenge facing the nuclear power industry. 05:52 -- The single biggest misperception people have about the nuclear power industry. 07:27 -- “What is the ideal working relationship between Nuclear Regulatory Commission and plant Public Information Officers?” asks Gil Alexander, Senior Communications Project Manager at Southern California Edison. 08:50 -- How does the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approach media statements by plant critics that are false and potentially alarming to the public? 11:25 -- “What is the state of affairs surrounding the use of Yucca Mountain for the storage of spent nuclear fuel?,” asks Scott Thomsen, Communications and Public Affairs at Seattle City Light. 14:18 -- A discussion of an incident involving undercover agents tricking the NRC, and obtained a license to buy radiological material in March 2007. 17:58 -- “What is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission doing to support the efforts of the industry in new nuclear construction?,” asks William Labbe, Director, Nuclear Generation Services, TRC Companies, Inc. 21:07 -- Eliot Brenner will be presenting a session at the PRSA International Conference in DC on Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 titled “How to Build Trust in a Nuclear Environment” and a separate crisis communications session Sunday, Oct. 17, 2010 with Richard Levick at the PRSSA Conference. 23:31 -- End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * BP Oil Spill Crisis Special with US Navy Lt. Commander Jim Hoeft * Social Media Crisis Strategy Deep Dive with FEMA PIO John Shea * Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Political News Social Media Politico Jim VandeHei

Sep 16, 2010

Description:

Political News in the Age of Social Media with Jim VandeHei, the executive editor and co-founder of POLITICO, a nonpartisan media company covering national politics and Washington governance. The future if grassroots diplomacy, the growth of emerging communications channels like social and mobile for news consumption, finding an audience for political news beyond The Beltway and Politico’s appearance in columns by Howard Kurtz and David Carr are among the topics discussed. Jim VandeHei, along with John F. Harris and Allbritton Communications, launched Politico in early 2007 and his since established it as a leading US new media company. Vanity Fair recently named him one of the 100 most powerful Information Age thinkers for helping create the “model for the new media success story.” Mr. VandeHei is a keynote speaker at the PRSA 2010 International Conference, Oct. 16–19, 2010 in Washington, D.C. where he will open the general session on Sunday, Oct. 17 at 1 p.m. EDT. SHOW NOTES 01:56 -- Politico’s editorial personality, and how they carved out a niche in a category previously dominated by entrenched incumbents. 03:57 -- Politico’s content is distributed via print, website, social networks, RSS feeds, widgets and smart phone apps, and Jim discusses his growth expectation for digital distribution. 05:50 -- Joe DeMattoes, CEO of the Health Facilities Association of Maryland asks, “Getting to Politico and your core business, define the role of social media in your publication and business model?” 07:55 -- With Nearly 100,000 Twitter followers, Politico reaches double the number of followers of Roll Call and Congressional Quarterly. Jim responds to David G. Bradley’s quote in David Carr’s column media equation, which read, “I think that Politico’s entrance entirely changed what had been a pretty cozy market with a few incumbents — National Journal, CQ and Roll Call — and kudos to them for demonstrating there was a market beyond the Beltway.” A discussion of what Politico is doing differently to resonate with audiences beyond the Beltway. 10:10 -- How Politico amalgamates the old media values of fairness and accuracy with the speed and immediacy of new technologies. 12:00 - Don Kilburg, Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Dept. of State asks, “In this era of instant communication and grassroots diplomacy, we recently observed someone previously unknown hijack the national discourse by threatening to burn a Koran. We then observed high ranking public officials comment directly on this, including the President. Do you think we'll see more of this sort of grassroots diplomacy hijacking and where should high ranking officials and media editors draw the line in potentially adding fuel to the fire by covering it?” 14:10 -- A discussion of the media’s responsibility with respect to Wikileaks, and whether or not the government should be able to abdicate the public’s right to know in the interest of "national security.” 16:43 -- Jim responds to Howard Kurtz’s column about Politico blogger Ben Smith’s ability to draw vitriolic criticism with middle-of-the-road content and whether or not there’s anything that can be done to encourage greater tolerance for different points of view on the blogosphere. 21:30 -- At first, democrats were significantly better at using social media to their advantage, but we’re starting to see republicans do a much better job. Resonating with an audience is all about understanding what they need and giving it to them. 24:50 -- How to get an editorial board meeting with Politico and how to pitch news to reporters in the Politico newsroom. 28:16 -- End OTHER RECOMMENDED EPISODES * White House Press Secretaries Panel * Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings * Crisis Communications with FEMA PIO John Shea ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Selling Social Media Strategy to Leadership with Charlene Li

Sep 15, 2010

Description:

Selling social media strategy to leadership, Facebook vs. Google for decision-making and B2B B2C differences are among issues I discussed with Charlene Li, analyst and bestselling author of Open Leadership: How Social Technology Can Transform the Way You Lead. Charlene Li is a keynote speaker at the PRSA International Conference in Washington D.C., October 16-19, 2010 where she’ll talk about how social media is changing the way leaders lead. She is co-author of the book, Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies with Josh Bernoff, who has also been featured on this podcast. Charlene Li is the founding partner of the Altimeter Group, where she works with Jeremiah Owyang, a previous guest on this podcast as well. SHOW NOTES 1:37 Selling social media strategy to leadership remains a significant challenge. She wrote Open Leadership to help leaders better understand the difference between open source software, open systems and open decision making processes and to decide just how open they need to be. 2:10 How social engagement creates a power shift that redefines the techniques and characteristics of effective leadership. 3:33 The meaning of openness and its impact on information-sharing and decision-making. Defining the ways people can be open allows more rational discussion around how open an organization needs to be. 4:34 A “throw the doors open” approach to openness is unnecessary. Leadership goals, such as competition, employee engagement and a growing dialogue with customers, determine the degree of openness needed. 6:09 United States Army Public Affairs Specialist asks Don Manuszewski if it is necessary to maintain a website or is it possible to achieve one’s goals by eliminating a website and utilizing social media sites exclusively. 7:56 Facebook vs Google for decision-making. Google dominates quick, early stage research while Facebook social network queries are important as the decision point gets closers. We consulting Facebook vs. Google for information, it is critical to understand that Google helps you build the short list, and Facebook helps you make a final purchasing decision. 10:57 Whether Facebook is at a disadvantage because they hired out their hardware and infrastructure. A discussion of the different information-processing needs of Facebook, Google and Twitter. 12:58 Too often, business communicators sell social media to leaders who don’t understand the basics because they simply aren’t engaged. Charlene Li shares tips for selling social media executives are most likely to respond to. When you’re selling social media to the boss, steer clear of technology and focus on business goals. 13:32 Organizational challenges can be addressed through better dialogue, better listening and better innovation with the use of social networking tools. CEOs can learn to be more open and share more easily to achieve the business growth they need. 18:48 Engaging in social media involves embracing failure. Leaders can use social media engagement to prepare for and recover from the inevitable failures that happen in business. 21:05 The importance of using social media as dialogue and not merely for broadcasting. Lessons the brandjacking of Nestlé’s Facebook page by Greenpeace, and how they unwittingly aggravated the situation further, and played directly into the hand of their adversary. 22:59 Altimeter’s recent eport, Eight Success Criteria for Facebook Page Marketing, which guides organizations through best practices for marketing through a Facebook Page. 23:38 Dell, Comcast, United Airlines and other companies have adopted active social media strategies following huge online embarrassments. The best companies adopt a clear strategy and exhibit the willingness to be more open. 26:11 Market competitiveness can affect a company’s willingness to engage in social media. Altimeter’s Facebook study shows that companies often rely on older promotion-based models when greater rewards come to those who invest in open-ended relationships with depth and meaning. 28:43 B2B B2C differences with respect to social media marketing. 30: 49 How social media listening can be incorporated into the corporate structure and the productivity gains that can result. 33:55 Charlene Li talks about her influencers, which include Gabe Rivera’s Tech Meme and mainstream media outlets. 36:59 End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders. These podcast show notes were written and optimized by @SandraBurrowes.

Kodak after the Death of Film with Jeffrey Hayzlett

Sep 11, 2010

Description:

What’s the B2B B2C difference, how does an industrial giant like Kodak switch from consumer to business marketing and use tension to motivate net marketing strategies? What type of business to business research is required and what is the future of marketing to business customers? These are just some the questions we address in this episode. Kodak, once a huge consumer brand, has transformed itself from a business-to-consumer to a business-to-business focused company. Over the last five years, Kodak’s revenue from consumer film has dropped from $15 billion to $200 million, but the company still has sales of $8 billion annually through a portfolio of new products, most of which are less than two years old and 80 percent of that revenue comes from business customers. This is the story of reinvention. It’s about how an old guard stalwart picked itself up after the demise of Kodachrome, one of the world’s most iconic brands, and emerged from the rubble, staring obsolescence in the face. Rather than go the way of the buggy whip, Kodak shifted its focus and beat the odds. Learn how former Kodak CMO Jeffrey Hayzlett helped an analog titan become a digital powerhouse in this exclusive one-on-one audio interview. Named Business to Business Marketer of the Year by B2B Magazine in 2009, Jeffrey Hayzlett is the author of “The Mirror Test: Is Your Business Really Breathing?” and a keynote speaker at the PRSA International Conference in DC this Oct. 16-19, 2010. SHOW NOTES 01:01– Jeffrey Hayzlett’s upcoming keynote presentation at the PRSA International Conference in DC will include a discussion of how big and small business marketers are adapting to the digital world, communicating more effectively on a one-on-one basis with their customers and marketing strategies for a recession economy. 01:37 -- The importance of asking yourself the tough questions and the failure of many business marketers to do just that when in fact, that’s exactly what they should be doing. 02:24 -- The use of tension inside Kodak to re-energize the company, instigating change from the center and convincing the business customers that Kodak’s best days are yet to come. 04:09 -- The death of the consumer film business and Kodak’s efforts to reinvent its brand through new business-to-business products and services. 06:11-- Kodak’s leadership position in commercial ink jet product, its consumer ink jet technology which is experiencing triple digit annual growth and it’s new online photo sharing platform Kodak Gallery which is geared to take the world by storm, Hazylett says. 07:28 -- HP made $9 million in net profits last year just from ink jet cartridges, demonstrating that consumers are paying too much for printer cartridges and representing a market opportunity for Kodak in their B2C products business. 07:55 -- Marketing to the 30 to 48 year old female demographic in the US, which purchases 97% of Kodak’s consumer products. 09:02– The death of Kodachrome after 76-years and how supply and demand will impact the availability of photographic film in the future. 12:33 -- Film vs. Digital Movies. The impact of digital imaging on the motion picture business and whether or not the future of filmmaking and motion picture distribution is digital technology. 14:43 -- The issue of archivability and how and why digital images erode over time. 15:46 -- Todd Van Hoosear, who blogs about social media and the evolution of marketing and business at “More than Marketing,” asks where the next marketing war will be fought. The answer is mobile. Jeffrey discusses the future of mobile marketing, apps, trust and maintaining one-to-one, personable relationships. 18:14 -- The two biggest misconceptions business marketers have about assimilating social media into their existing marketing and communications apparatus: profitability and measurability. 19:44 -- Eighty percent of Kodak’s business today is B2B and B2B social media communications are different than B2C communications. Kodak released a B2B social marketing guide to help its customers promote the successes of their customers. 20:14 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

New York Times Social Media Editor

Aug 31, 2010

Description:

In this episode, Jennifer Preston, Social Media Editor at The New York Times gives the afternoon keynote at The Digital Impact 2010, a conference run by PRSA that I’ve been co-chairing with Elizabeth Albrycht for the last several years. This podcast was recorded on May 6, 2010 in downtown New York City. Jennifer Preston is also an Adjunct Professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism Technical Note: The fidelity of the audio has been compressed to minimize a low-end buzz which was present during the recording. ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin about B2B applications of social media communications is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Borders.

Google s Marketing and PR Strategy with Gabriel Stricker

Aug 21, 2010

Description:

In this episode, Gabriel Stricker, director of global communications and public affairs at Google, Inc. delivers the afternoon keynote address at The Digital Impact, a conference produced by PRSA, which I have been co-chairing with Elizabeth Albrycht for the last several years. Gabriel Stricker is author of the Mao in the Boardroom: Marketing Genius from the Mind of the Master Guerrilla. This podcast was recorded on May 6, 2010 in downtown New York City. Technical Note: The fidelity of the audio has been compressed to minimize a low-end buzz which was present during the recording of this podcasting Detailed show notes are not available for this podcast. ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book with Paul Gillin "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications will be published by Wiley & Sons in January 2011.

Facebooking Event Marketing

Aug 11, 2010

Description:

If you’re interested in learning how you can use Facebook to market local events, this podcast episode is for you. We cover event marketing on Facebook fan pages vs. event marketing through personal Facebook profiles. We also talk about what should be included in a Facebook event marketing status update, how frequently you should post and what might happen if you post too often. My guest is Paul Klink, an Oahu-based Philanthropy, Business and Marketing Consultant who has built multiple, successful communities on Facebook, many of which are maxed-out at the 5,000 Facebook “friend” limit. I am a friend of his Aloha lifestyle profile. Paul received the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for being as one of Hawaii's 100 High-Tech Executives. As one of his many Facebook friends, I can say that his newsfeed reflects what I consider to be the Aloha lifestyle. He joined me in the hospitality suite at the Hale Koa Hotel & Resort on Waikiki Beach in Hawaii for this discussion about Facebook event marketing. SHOW NOTES 00:58 – Paul defines the concept of “Living the Aloha,” shares advice with listeners about living the Aloha online and why attractions works better than promotion when it comes to Facebook status updates. 02:55 – Tips for effective Facebook event marketing, Facebook invitation posting frequency, the importance of keeping it simple, good Facebook event marketing language and what links to include in a Facebook event invite. 05:19 – How to market local events on Facebook. 06:12 – Ethical issues surrounding the practice of sock puppeting multiple Facebook profile pages. 07:42 – Facebook marketing challenges of Chris Pirillo and Paul Klink. Personal Facebook profile pages versus Facebook fan pages. Engagement levels and shortcomings of Facebook fan pages. 09:40 – Having conversations with Facebook fan page profiles versus Facebook personal profiles, and effective, appropriate uses of both. 10:47 – Dealing with spoofed Facebook fan pages. 11:40 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications is available for pre-order through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Borders.

Strategic Public Affairs at US Pacific Command

Aug 2, 2010

Description:

At the end of my Social Media Boot Camp with US Pacific Command, I sat down with US Army Lieutenant Colonel Daniel King, the command’s deputy director of public affairs, to discuss the major threats facing the US and its allies in the Pacific and what it means for the strategic public relations management approach of his team. LTC King is an experienced crisis communications expert who travels regularly to support Admiral Willard’s, PACOM’s ranking officer, in a public affairs capacity and to assist in the strategic planning of public relations. He and his team recently handled the communications for the United States response to the sinking of the Republic of Korea’s warship the Cheonan, allegedly by a North Korean submarine. He earned an advanced degree at USC in strategic public relations from Annenberg School of Communications. In this interview, LTC Daniel King goes on the record online about North Korea’s nuclear capabilities, Google’s defection from China, the use of video by the activists and Israeli Defense Forces Public Affairs detail throughout the recent Gaza Flotilla Raid (or the Gaza Flotilla Attack, depending on your politics) and where US Pacific Command is with respect to social media community relations strategy. The interview was recorded at US Pacific Command, or PACOM, which is stationed at a high-security facility at Camp HM Smith, situated on Oahu’s higher-ground with a sweeping view over Pearl Harbor. Guests must be accompanies by an escort, are required to remove the battery from their cell phone and must switch of their laptop wireless signal. SHOW NOTES 00:54 -- An overview of US Pacific Command, which is the US combatant command responsible for a geographic region that comprises 51 percent of the world’s surface, from the West Coast of Los Angeles to the West Coast of India and from the North Pole to the South Pole. The Pacific region is occupied by 36 nations and 3.4 billion people. LTC King characterizes the region as tremendously diverse and dynamic in its people, its economies, its politics and its diplomacy. 01:55 – US Pacific Command’s mission is to work together with US partners and allies to facilitate and improve the security of the Asia-Pacific region to continue the stability that has benefited the region for the last 60 years. Five of the 7 US international treaties apply to the Pacific. Over $1.3 trillion dollars of international commerce moves back and forth throughout the Asia-Pacific region, and all of that is facilitated by the security and stability factors maintained by PACOM and its partners. 03:17 – The biggest challenges facing the US and its interests in the Pacific are humanitarian, natural or military disasters are anything else that compromises “unfettered access to the global commons.” 04:31 – North Korea’s vow to respond to the US and South Korea’s Operation Invincible Spirit (exercises involving 200 sea faring vessels and 200 aircraft) with “powerful nuclear deterrents” and the United Nations Security Council’s reaction to the recent sinking of the Republic of Korea’s Choenan, which resulted in the death of 46 South Korean service members, allegedly by a North Korean submarine and PACOM’s response effort. 07:43 – How LTC King was informed about the explosion aboard the Cheonan, the course of action he and his team took as a result and the role of the mainstream news media during the initial period after the event. 11:05 – Reports of propaganda posters seen inside North Korea depicting a fist smashing an enemy ship in two. 12:04 – Whether or not the US military believes that North Korea has nuclear capabilities. 13:53 – A fake Facebook profile for Admiral Willard, the top ranking military official at US Pacific Command, which recently appeared online and how he and his team dealt with the commander’s spoofed identity. 16:03 -- The Gaza Flotilla incident as a case study of how a relatively small group of activists were able to leverage communications to get information into the public space very quickly, and how flat organizations will always be able to get information out quicker than hierarchical ones. 20:01 -- Accelerating the process of declassifying information and the recent Wikileaks incident involving the inadvertent release of 91,000 classified reports about the war in Afghanistan. 22:51 – The history of social media at the US Dept. of Defense and the role of images and video in military public affairs. 26:24 -- The impact of Google’s decision to pull out of China, and the impact of China’s censorship of the web on his efforts as a communicator. 28:34 – How the Social Media Boot Camp by Eric Schwartzman at NORAD US Northern Command helped LTC King and PACOM communicate more effectively on behalf of the US Armed Forces. US Pacific Command is engaged in Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Flickr. 31:34 – The challenges associated with integrating social media throughout US Pacific Command. 35:05 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications will be available in stores and online January 18, 2011.

White House Press Secretaries

Jul 24, 2010

Description:

The panelists, including a current White House Press Secretary and three former White House Press Secretaries discuss message development, learning to expect the unexpected and speaking truth to power. Moderator: Dan Schnur, Director of the Institute for Politics at USC Panelists (in order of introduction): * Camille Johnston, Director of Communications for First Lady Michelle Obama * Noelia Rodriguez, Press Secretary for First Lady Laura Bush * Shelia Tate, Press Secretary for First Lady Nancy Reagan * David Demarest, Press Secretary for President George H.W. Bush This panel was presented by PRSA LA and PRSA Western District. The Platinum sponsor was Golin Harris, the Gold sponsor was BusinessWire and the Silver Sponsor was VMS. Event sponsors were the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics and MWW Group. And special thanks went to Weber Shandwick and Korn/Ferry International. The panel was announced by PRSA LA Chapter president Eric Moses. The event, which occurred at the Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles on July 13, 2010, was produced by Denis Wolcott of The Wolcott Company. Technical Note: There is a low-level, audible hum in the background. Despite our best efforts, we were unable to eliminate the buzz which was coming through the media bus while the panel was recorded. SHOW NOTES: 02:30 -- Dan Schnur introduces the panelists, details their backgrounds and sets the stage for the panel discussion. 13:12 -- Proactive versus reactive communication in White House press affairs. Spontaneity is the enemy and the goal of staff is predictability. And what makes news. 17:48 -- How you respond when things don't go on plan as the true test of a White House communicator, says Bush White House Press Secretary David Demarest. A discussion of the military dictum, "No battle plan survives first contact with the enemy." The best laid plans get thrown astray when things happen. 19:02 -- The day president Reagan was shot and an exchange at the hospital afterwards between the president and members of his cabinet that taught Shelia Tate the importance of responding with grace under fire. 23:32 -- Communicating a leader's personality traits authentically under the news media's microscope and the importance of measuring your public relations activities with the true characteristics of the leader. 27:02 -- Helping First Lady Laura Bush build her skills as a public speaker through local market new media interviews. 28:01 -- Advertisement for the Social Media Boot Camp in Los Angeles on Aug. 18-19, 2010. Register at http://www.socialmediabootcamp.com. 30:59 -- Current White House Press Secretary Camille Johnston discusses First Lady Obama's speech to the NAACP, protecting the private lives of the president's daughters, the ground rules with the news media and how the press treated Sarah Palin's children. 36:00 -- Protecting a president Bush's teenage children from the scrutiny of the news media through surrogates and how that has changed in the age of social media. 38:25 -- Putting the president ideas into a proactive message that resonates with the American people. Demarest's Research --> Strategy --> Tactics --> Plan --> Budget methodology. 43:39 -- The benefit of working in The East Wing versus the working in The West Wing, First Lady Michelle Obama's garden at the White House, which serves as a symbol of developing healthy eating habits and the risk of starting garden on The South Lawn. What if it didn't grow? But today, the garden humanizes and symbolizes the values of the Obama administration. 47:28 -- Former White First Press Secretary Shelia Tate discusses First Lady Nancy Reagan's "Just Say No" campaign against recreational drug use, which shined the media spotlight on drug prevention programs. 51:04 -- First Lady Laura Bush's ability to overcome comparison's with her mother-in-law. 54:24 -- The panelists share advice to private sector public relations professionals who are looking to segue over to a career in government communications. But government communications is the work of young, because the White House Press Secretary Salary is much lower than private sector salaries. 01:03:03 -- Questions and Answers 01:14:26 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications will be published by Wiley & Sons in January 2011.

Social Media Boot Camp Drive

Jul 17, 2010

Description:

In this special episode two former Social Media Boot Camp attendees, Laura Meade Kirk of Amica Insurance and Angela Nebel of Summit PR Strategies, discuss where they were before they took the workshop, what they learned and where they are know. The next Social Media Boot Camp is Aug. 18-19, 2010 in Los Angeles. It is followed by the Social Media Master Class on Aug. 20, 2010 was is designed as a continuation of the Social Media Boot Camp. This is the longest-running, top-rated workshop of its kind, and the only recurring course that teaches practical, step-by-step guidance for integrating social media into business communications. Eric is currently completing a book on B2B applications of social media, so there are plenty of business-to-business uses presented as well. SHOW NOTES: 01:34 -- Laura Meade Kirk, a former Providence Journal reporter, discusses her transition from the newspaper business to the field of public relations at Amica Insurance. 04:24 -- How Amica Insurance is currently using social media for business communications, including the use of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. 05:21 -- What makes the Social Media Boot Camp different from other social media training courses, conferences and workshops. 07:37 -- Resources currently focused on social media communications at Amica and the biggest challenges she is currently experiencing with respect to leveraging social media at the company. 11:04 -- History of the Social Media Boot Camp, which was created five years ago for the Ministry of Information at the Government of Singapore, UCLA Extension and the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). It has also been presented privately for numerous organizations including Johnson & Johnson, Toyota, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, United States Marine Corps, US Dept. of State, NORAD NorthCOMM, US Pacific Command and many, many others. Read past attendees testimonials. 12:26 -- Angela Nebel, principal at Summit PR Strategies in Michigan discusses her professional background and what lead her to attend the Social Media Boot Camp. 14:45 -- The group dynamics of the Social Media Boot Camp and the benefits of networking with other attendees. 15:47 -- Challenges of using social media for clients, demonstrating value and how she's keeping up-to-date. 16:49 -- Importance of establishing social media fluency and how that accelerates the learning curve. 17:30 -- Maintaining ongoing relationships after the boot camp and using one another as resources moving forward. 19:25 -- End ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications will be published by Wiley & Sons in January 2011.

PR Measurement Standards Declared

Jul 13, 2010

Description:

It's been a hotly debated topic in the PR industry for decades. How do you measure the effectiveness of a PR campaign? Do you look at outputs like press releases and media coverage or outcomes like buyer behavior and attitude? And if you do evaluate outputs, what are the best practices for determining the value of PR? Over the past five years, I've asked that question to Katie Paine, Mark Weiner, Larry Gerbrandt, Michael Lavery, Pete Blackshaw and Rick Klau and got many different answers. In June 2010, the PR industry got together to try and unify the standards by which the trade measures the value of a public relations initiative. As a result, the widespread practice of using advertising value equivalency to try and determine the value of PR was denounced, and the Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles, endorsed by public relations agencies from 33 countries, were released to offer PR practitioners more substantial reasoning for gauging value. "The value of PR is not equal to the cost of advertising" says David Rockland, partner at Ketchum, who also serves as chair of the Association for the Measurement and Evaluation of Communication (AMEC) and who is the featured guest in this episode of On the Record...Online. According to the Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles, if clients insist on incorporating advertising value into their measurement of public relations, that value should not be called the value of the public relations campaign and should be based on wholesale advertising rates and adjusted for quality. Finally, the principles recognize the use of multipliers as fundamentally flawed in determining the value of PR. Collectively, the public relations industry voted to discard the practice of multiplying a standard retail advertising rate by a multiplier of 2.5 (pass-along rate) as a way of measuring the value of public relations. Instead, the principles says public relations practitioners should analyze the connection between PR placements and business results by measuring audience outcomes like changes in purchase behavior, awareness and attitude. While the principles put the importance of social media firmly on the measurement landscape by suggesting some of the factors that should be evaluated, they are yet to recommend specifically how to measure for this developing category. The principles were voted on and declared at a conference organized by the (AMEC) and the Institute for Public Relations with the support of PRSA, The Global Alliance, IPR Measurement Commission and ICCO. SHOW NOTES: 01:05 --How The Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles were created, the first globally accepted and endorsed attempt to standardize the measures of effective public relations campaigns. 02:35 -- For the first time, the global public relation industry rejected using media coverage as a method of determining the value of a PR campaign. 04:17 -- A discussion of the seven measurement principles adopted in Barcelona. 1. Goal setting and measurement are fundamental aspects of any PR programmes. 2. Media measurement requires quantity and quality – cuttings in themselves are not enough. 3. Advertising Value Equivalents (AVEs) do not measure the value of PR and do not inform future activity. 4. Social media can and should be measured. 5. Measuring outcomes is preferred to measuring media results. 6. Business results can and should be measured where possible. 7. Transparency and Replicability are paramount to sound measurement. 07:34 -- We the delegates rejected AVEs, and how disposing of them as a measure of PR effectiveness is in the best interest of the public relations industry. 09:17 -- Recommended alternatives to advertising value equivalency for valuing public relations campaigns. 12:01 -- How the Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles address social media. 13:37 -- The principle that it should be transparent how measurement results are calculated. Currently, Rockland says, some PR service providers hide behind "black box calculation" and that needs to stop. Calculations should be logical and replicable. 15:26 -- Industry feedback to date has been supportive of the principles, and in some cases, criticizes them for not going far enough, but if you're objective is to declare globally acceptable principles, you've got to start somewhere. 16:01 -- Rather than risk the possibility of the principles not being adopted my majority of the delegates, Rockland chose not to abolish advertising value equivalencies altogether, but rather, establish caveats by which they can be more accurately recognized. 17:23 -- Next steps for adopting and applying these measurement principles. 19:35 -- Why PR practitioners can't afford not to adopt and apply these measurement principles to the public relations efforts. ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US. His upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" about B2B applications of social media communications will be published by Wiley & Sons in January 2011.

Inside Entertainment PR with Stan Rosenfield

Jul 5, 2010

Description:

Entertainment public relations is a highly competitive industry. In this interview with entertainment PR powerhouse Stan Rosenfield who represents Robert De Niro, George Clooney, Danny DeVito and many others, you learn what it takes to make it as a personal publicist in the entertainment business and how to snag an entertainment PR internship. In addition to serving as president of Stan Rosenfield & Associates, a Los Angeles entertainment public relations firm, he teaches Strategies for Representing Talent in Agency Public Relations at UCLA Extension and is a frequent guest lecturer on Entertainment Public Relations at UCLA, USC and Loyola. 02:11 -- Entertainment public relations professionals who represent creative talent need to know these three things to be successful. 04:15 -- "A" list talent belongs on the cover of the magazine. "B" list talent gets featured in articles inside the magazine. If you're an "A" lister and you go inside the magazine, you've done damage to yourself. 04:52 -- How social media has changed the entertainment PR business. Some celebrities have over a million followers. 06:25 -- To keep up with where the entertainment PR Business is headed, you need to keep up with technology. 07:34 -- The importance of understanding mainstream news media and social media. 09:12 -- Entertainment PR Internships, and what it takes to snag one. 11:39 -- Paying your dues by serving as an assistant at an entertainment PR firm and tips for successful interviewing. 13:24 -- The famed Warren Cowan, and what made him such a great entertainment publicist. 17:04 -- Pitching the media for celebrity clients, issues oriented PR and introductions on talk shows. 18:58 -- Entertainment PR internships at Stan Rosenfield and how to be considered. 20:24 -- Where the entertainment PR business is headed. 21:44 -- End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications * Corporate Social Media Policy Development * Selling Social Media into the Enterprise ABOUT THE PODCASTER Eric Schwartzman (http://www.ericschwartzman.com) is a strategic corporate communications, public affairs and public relations consultant who has advised AARP, Boeing, Cirque du Soleil, City National Bank, Edison International, Environmental Defense Fund, Johnson & Johnson, LA Opera, LucasFilm, MGM Grand Casinos & Resorts, NORAD, Pussycat Dolls, Salt Lake Olympics, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, US Northern Command, US Pacific Command, the United States Marine Corps and other businesses, government agencies and nonprofits. He has extensive experience helping organizations leverage online communication technologies and platforms through digital strategy, policy development, media audits, pilot programs and social media training. He is a frequenter speaker at professional conferences and the creator of the www.SocialMediaBootCamp.com, the longest running, top-rated social media training seminar. His book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" with Paul Gillin will be published by Wiley & Sons January 2011.

Social-Media-USMC-public-affairs

Jun 28, 2010

Description:

Social media at the US Dept. of Defense with Gregory Reeder, Director, Marine Corps Internal Communications at Defense Media Activity and Editor-in-Chief at Marines Magazine, United States Marine Corps. * SHOW NOTES: 02:52 - Impact of Linkedin on the executive recruiting industry. 05:07 - How social networks solved the single, biggest challenge of recruiting, the hard lesson Korn Ferry learned with Future Step and Linkedin's ability to give recruiters and hirers access to passive candidates who are not actively searching for a job. 01:48 - How the USMC is coping with the shift from official to unofficial communications channels. 04:27 - Gregory Reeder clarifies the USMC's decision to block access to social media from the U.S. Department of Defense's non classified computer network. 06:14 - Gregory Reeder discusses how compromising Information for Official Use only could impact operational effectiveness, even thought he information is non classified. 07:41 - How the Defense Information School is preparing service members to use social media through regimented training. 10:02 - Selling social media to the command at the top of the Pentagon. 14:43 - The DoD's new social media policy. 15:58 - The www.marines.mil website and how the USMC is doing their best to develop a common online c9ommuity for Marines to network online. 17:26 - The recently established DoD new media cell and opening access. 18:51 - Arming Marines with weapons and cameras. 21:17 - Practicing maximum disclosure with minimum delay on internet time. 23:15 - Leveraging social media without jeopardizing operational security. 24:55 - End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications * Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore at SXSW * Why Doublespeak is Dangerous ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US.

Social Media Kills the Cold Call

Jun 22, 2010

Description:

Korn/Ferry International Executive Vice-President of Corporate Affairs Don Spetner talks about the impact of Linkedin on the executive recruiting industry, nurturing contacts using social media and the death of the cold call. This is Spetner's second appearance on this podcast. Last time, he discussed the public relations and corporate communications job market, the social media communication skills candidates need to compete, and strategies for job hunting in our current economy. SHOW NOTES: 02:52 - Impact of Linkedin on the executive recruiting industry. 05:07 - How social networks solved the single, biggest challenge of recruiting, the hard lesson Korn Ferry learned with Future Step and Linkedin's ability to give recruiters and hirers access to passive candidates who are not actively searching for a job. 07:35 - Impact of Linkedin on Korn Ferry's business. 12:45 - “We think the finding of candidates is becoming commoditized,” says Don. “The real value comes in helping clients assess the fit of a candidate and follow in services to help them retain and maximize the performance of the candidate.” Korn Ferry is the only search firm with an online assessment tool designed to analyze how candidates think, and their emotional make-up. 18:27 - The art of nurturing and maintaining contacts using social media. 21:04 - How Linkedin has replaced the cold call in the recruiting business. 24:20 - Where Korn Ferry is headed. 25:30 - Advice to those seeking high-profile jobs. 26:50 - Can job seekers use social media too aggressively? 31:19 - End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications * Building a B2B Niche Social Network * Selling Social Media into the Enterprise ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US.

BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications

Jun 5, 2010

Description:

BP Oil Spill Crisis Communications Special. On April 20, 2010, an explosion on an oil rig licensed to BP in the Gulf of Mexico triggered an oil spill that has resulted in an ecological and financial disaster of global proportions. United States Navy Public Affairs Officer Jim Hoeft who is coordinating communications at the Official Site of the Deepwater Horizon Unified Command for the Joint Command Center in Louisiana briefs on the process communicating the worst oil spill in history via social media. Show Notes: 0:55 The state of affairs at the Joint Command Center in Louisiana, and what’s being done to communicate the scale of the disaster. 2:30 The approval process for communicating what is happening operationally. 3:15 The National Response Framework chain of command and participating agencies. 4:15 The Official Site of the Deepwater Horizon Unified Command is being managed on the PIER Response System with outposts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and other social media sites. 5:37 How they are responding to feedback on Facebook and Twitter. 8:21 ”This is the first time that the Federal Government has tried to implement social media tools in a National Crisis,” says LTC Heoft. “We didn’t have this during Kartina. We didn’t have this during 9/11. We’re learning where online communications falls in the national response framework,” he continues, suggested that trending question occurring via social media can be used to help the Unified Command respond to issues that are most important to the public. 9:35 The challenge of monitoring social media manually, since no good measurement or sentiment analysis tools exist. 11:20 Using social media trend reports to provide feedback to command about the issues people are talking about most. 13:25 Resources required to staff the social media monitoring effort and the use of Cover it Live to live blog developments. 15:23 Prioritizing social media communications channels. 19:21 Which social media channels have been most popular for disaster response? 22:14 The shortcomings of Facebook as a Government crowd sourcing tool. 24:05 The LMRP cap containment strategy, the latest effort to contain the leak. 25:31 Online communications will definitely be part of the national communications framework moving forward. 26:47 Using www.youropenbook.org to monitor public Facebook status updates. 28:45 End RECOMMENDED EPISODES • Social Media Crisis Comms Deep Dive with FEMA PIO John Shea • Social Media Usage During the Virginia Tech Massacre • Activity Streams Will Change Your Business ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and social media governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, NORAD Northcomm, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Eric is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US.

B2B Niche Social Networks

May 29, 2010

Description:

FohBoh is a community for restaurant owners and their suppliers. Launched in late 2007 by veteran restaurateur and entrepreneur Michael Atkinson, it has built a base of 14,000 members, most of them restaurant owners. FohBoh’s core purpose is to help restaurant owners make more money during an economic period that has been dismal for their industry. That entails a core focus on operational excellence, but also on the art of social media promotion and online visibility. In fact, FohBoh’s novel monetization strategy is to sell conversation monitoring and consulting services, with advertising making up only a minority of the revenue. It’s been a struggle in this business environment, but FohBoh is growing and appears to have running room. “Some people say the best time to start a company is in the middle of an economic downturn,” Atkinson says. “We are a survivor. We grow our revenues every day and we're way past the point of validating our model.” Atkinson has learned a lot about business-to-business social communities from the experience. “Context and relevance sustains a community,” he says. “You have to understand the community before you figure out how to monetize. If you don’t have domain expertise, the membership will find out immediately.” This interview is guest hosted by Paul Gillin of Paul Giilin Communications and was conducted in association with research for an upcoming book on B2B applications of social media, to be published later thia year or early next year. 0:15 Where the idea for FohBoh came from. 2:20 The market for FohBoh. Restaurants are a highly fragmented and distributed business. Operators have few chances to connect with each other. The environment is ripe for a community. 3:15 “No vertical can be a pure advertising business and build a business that can scale.” 5:30 70% of the members are operators/owners and the rest are product/service providers. FohBoh doesn’t rigorously quality its members. Those who are interested will stay. 7:15 “A very interesting business model.” FohBoh has visitors from more than 100 countries and accumulates a wide range of content. It uses that knowledge about the audience to create products to sell to restaurant owners. The financial strategy is to help restaurants become more successful using social media tools. The company sells software for social media marketing and social marketing strategies for the business. Premier memberships are on tap. 13:00 Operating a bootstrapped b-to-b community in a market that isn’t conducive to advertising. “You can’t charge for content, so unless you can find another alternative, then you’re going to fail.” FohBoh is sustainable and “a good candidate for investment.” 18:00 Why the company started on the Ning platform and the challenges of scaling the business there. Drupal has been brought in to add utility and bridges built between the platforms. 20:30 How to drive engagement. “Social media isn’t a new thing; it’s what restaurant owners have been doing offline for years.” The challenge is attracting attention. “Old media is feeling very threatened and they’re not going to expose a direct competitor. We’ve had to resort to word of mouth.” 22:00 “We’re not building the community for today’s 15-year-old executive; we’re building it for tomorrow’s 35-year-old executive.” 24:00 “There is no rulebook on how to build a b-to-b community.” 25:00 Atkinson’s conversations with executives at Facebook and LinkedIn: “We have a lot of the same challenges. No one has cracked the code yet on how to manage a group and get beyond the 1:9:90 rule of engagement.” 26:00 “We’re very focused on quality content because it wins every time.” 27:00 Plans for a new service that invites contributions from professional journalists and rewards them for contributions. 30:00 What motivates the audience: It’s been a tough time for the food service industry. Understanding what the diner wants is critical. 33:15 The importance of social media and customer conversations to restaurant owners; value of understanding website activity 37:30 FohBoh’s membership statistics: About 14,000 members, average members visits twice monthly; about 70% are owner/operators 38:20 Advice for prospective b-to-b community organizers. “If you don’t have domain expertise, the membership will find out immediately.” 40:00 Importance of taking a disciplined approach to managing the community 43:30 How to monetize b-to-b sites: “You can’t monetize b-to-b from advertising.” 45:30 How a community is different from a publication 46:50 About Social Shock, Michael’s forthcoming book RECOMMENDED EPISODES • B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender • Social Media Investor Relations Special with Former SEC Attorneys • Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman About the Guest Host This episode was guest hosted by Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching and is currently co-writing a book with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Selling Social Media to Big Clients

May 13, 2010

Description:

Are you ready to learn the logic behind the argument that convinces companies to invest as much as six-figures into social media initiatives? If so, this episode featuring Nielsen Online Digital Strategic Services EVP Pete Blackshaw (@pblackshaw) is for you. You’ll learn: * How to position social media as an extension of existing corporate activities. * Which departments in the organization are spending the most on social media? * Selling social media in an apathetic environment. * Common red flags likely to sand bag the sales effort, and how to overcome them. * Shuffling the org chart for more effective social media engagement. * Analysis paralysis, word-of-mouth, Apple Computer’s marketing strategy and more. Pete is also cofounder of the Word-of-Mouth Markting Association and author of the book “Satisfied Customers Tell Three Friends, Angry Customers Tell 3,000” is about running a business in today’s consumer driven world. This interview was conducted as research for my upcoming book with Paul Gillin titled “Social Marketing to the Business Customer,” to be published by Wiley early next year. SHOW NOTES 01:35 – If you want to win buy-in for social media initiatives, don’t present it as something news. Instead, present it as a logical extension of what the organizations is doing already. Companies are already invested in public relations, customer service and investor relations. Show them how social media can help them conduct these processes more effectively and efficiently. 02:37 – Over 200 reporters at The New York Times have Twitter accounts. So if you’re already invested in resources in managing relationships with the mainstream media, then deepening those relationships via social media is a natural extension of what a company is doing already. Convincing a PR executive that they need apparatus to listen to what reporters are saying on Twitter, or a customer service executive that they need to be listening to what customers are saying is going to be the path of least resistance, since social media allows them to extend the reach of what they’re doing already. To appeal to a brand manager, you’d focus on how listening to social media can help preempt the brand from negative consumer generated content that could go viral. 06:58 – Originally, social media initiatives were driven by progressive public relations business units, but market research has become an advocate as well. In an effort to marry social media with customer relationship management, call centers have also become interested in listening platforms. 09:22 – Marketing is a key stakeholder for winning buy-in, because marketing is where the lion’s share of the budget lies, but marketing serves different masters in different organizations. One the places social media monitoring delivers the most value is during new product launches, and again because companies are so heavily invest in launching new products, this is also a great area to implement a social media initiative, because there’s so much money riding on product launches already, it’s going to easier to find budget. 12:10 – Apathy is one of the biggest challenges when it comes to implementing a social media initiative. When things are going well, people are less inclined to allocate budget. But the brand gets slapped around publicly, or there’s a recall or a crisis on some kind, that’s an opportunity for winning buy-in and resources. Negative conversations that go viral are a wakeup call to management. 14:22 – In regulated industries, winning buy-in and resources for social media can be particularly tough, because listening is a liability. 16:29 – It’s one thing to wax poetic about conversations and dialogue, but practicing what you preach involves collapsing the wall between public relations and customer relations, because the skills required to deal with volatile, emotional customers are, with training, transferrable to the company Twitter page. If you buy-in to the notion that customer conversations are influencing the purchase funnel, you need an organizational model that centralizes customer feedback so that all business units can benefit from it. The opportunity for public relations is enormous, because listening platforms provide early warnings that can be used to circumvent a potential catastrophe. If you have the tools to figure out who the real influencers are, you can use that information to develop customer advocacy programs. But the end of the day, you’ve got be able to package that data so it’s relevant to the different business units. 23:35 – Pete doesn’t see any real distinction between monitoring social media for B2C vs. B2B companies. He says the same rules apply. In his case, given the number of self professed “social media experts,” that’s become the B2B social media channel for a service like Nielsen BrandPulse. 24:29 – The internal use social media is promoting greater free flow of information inside the organization, fulfilling what we hoped to gain from intranets in the early days of web communications. 29:23 – CRM is the most important thing for companies to be able to do. It’s more important than blogging or tweeting, because it’s the key to maintain intimacy with customers. In the case of social media, you’re dealing with customers who bring a different value to the table, like influence with other customers via social media. 31:30 – There is also the danger of being overly analytical. Analysis can lead to paralysis, and brands can forfeit opportunities if they over analyze the data. 33:02 – Apple Computer understands how winning products and great experiences drive conversation. You can preach social media or pimp for followers until the cows come home, but if your product is lacking, or service under delivers. Apple uses their website to build anticipation and they create brilliant videos that people like to share. They understand how to create content that people want to share, so they get phenomenal pass-along. But they have the core product down. They’re great products that provide great user experiences. 35:04 – “Although we romanticize everything being open and free, the reality is a lot of word-of-mouth is also driven by mystique,” says Pete Blackshaw. We want what we can’t have, and exclusivity can be leveraged in social media to create demand as well. A new website called Secret Cincinnati amassed a huge amount of traffic in a short period of time by promising to tell you something you don’t know already. 36:54 – You can also use those conventional processes that the organization is involved in already which are inefficient as opportunities to secure budget for social media initiatives. For example, running focus groups is a very expensive undertaking. For the price of a focus group you could listen to the web for an entire year, and get a real time focus group that’s always there for you for the same investment. 38:27 – For Pete, in some cases, he may be selling social media listening platforms by undermining the value of conventional platforms. But Nielsen is more sophisticated than that, he says, and certainly weren’t willing to forgo modernization to protect their existing products. 40:31 – End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Corporate Social Media Policy Development * Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore at SXSW * What Makes Cool with Nightclub Impresario Ivan Kane ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps...

Activity Streams Will Change Your Business

May 3, 2010

Description:

Activity streams and data visualizations let us consume vast amounts of data in short periods of time. Together, they may just be the magic bullet for business to realize the true value of the social web. Welcome to the future of work and collaboration with Google open web advocate Chris Messina (@chrismessina), who explains how activity streams and infographics will revolutionize the way organizations perform and evolve, as well as how employees and project teams prioritize and manage work flow processes. Today, we think of a Facebook news feed as an activity stream. But we've only just scratched the surface of how activity streams integrated into work flow processes can fundamentally change the way we organize and collaborate. Using the open source community and Facebook's product development process as models, Chris makes it easy to understand how and why activity streams are central to online interactions, how they sharpen an organization's competitive edge and how they will yield better companies, products and services. Given the sheer volume of data that's out there now, information parsed in smaller, bite-size chunks is more valuable than gigs and gigs, because it's easier to digest in a shorter period of time. Like status updates, activity streams make data easier to appreciate. We have learned to attenuate ourselves to dropping in and pulling out of streams to prolonged state of "ambient intimacy." But currently, most organizations are not making their data available. They're hoarding their data, depriving employees and customers from using it to better understand how they can improve their business processes. This is a missed opportunity because data affords company's retrospective insight, intelligence about the nature of the way it's employee's collaborate, and the ability to maintain a faster, more responsive, healthier organization. If organizations do get over the hoarding hurdle, they're still going to need to find a way to make their data useful, and that's where data visualization comes in handy. Pictures are worth a thousand words, and realizing actionable business intelligence from raw data is significantly enhanced through infographics that make it easy to understand the meaning of the data. Yet even Facebook, with all the data it has about it's users, gives users very little in the way of visualization to better understand their online behavior. They hoard this data as well. Facebook could provide so much valuable intelligence about what motivates us online, but currently, they even struggle to present us with ads that are relevant to our interests. In all fairness, the same is true of Google. In fact, as popular as Google Analytics is, it really tells us very little about human behavior because it doesn't allow us to consider social signifiers against how people are spending their time online. Search is growing up. It's becoming about much more than just finding webpages. It's becoming about finding social interactions as well. Google is well aware of this and it appears as though this is one of the reasons they hired Chris Messina, who also believes that the businesses who will do well in this environment will be the one's who figure out how social interactions apply to the value proposition they deliver to their customers. In the 5 years I've been producing this podcast, this exclusive interview with Google Open Web Advocate Chris Messina, recorded at South by Southwest (SXSW) 2010 directly following his presentation on activity streams, is one of the most compelling interviews I've ever recorded. I expect to include many of the concepts in this interview in my upcoming book "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" to be published by Wiley early next year. SHOW NOTES 02:08 -- Research conducted by Leysia Palen at the University of Colorado at Boulder about how people exchanged information via social media on the day of the Virginia Tech massacre, where people predicted with 100% accuracy the names of 21 of the 22 fatally shot students. 03:53 -- Within organizations, there is a need for information to flow more freely. But often there are peculiar, archetypal boundaries inside organizations that restrict those flows. On the flip-side, in open source communities information flows much more transparently, making it easier for people to get their work done with fewer interruptions. 05:o1 -- There is a distinction between newsfeeds and activity streams. It is important to realize that channels such as Facebook messages, twitter direct messages and SMS, while part of the fabric of the social web, are point to point communications, like email, so they are invisible to most of us. E-mail was specifically designed as a point-to-point communication channel. You can add other people, but there's no way to send messages to everybody. That's is the problem that the social Web solves. Rather than force a message into everyones inbox, social media makes it possible for information to be discoverable, either through search or through modeling activity streams. Social media reduces the loss of fidelity and the friction associated with replicating information within organizations. 06:57 -- What's been most interesting to Chris about working on Google Buzz is how the social networking service is being used within the enterprise to keep people on the same page. Unlike e-mail, which requires significant effort for newcomers to speed on what transpired before they were roped in, Google Buzz makes it easier to bring people into a conversation stream that's been going on for some time with a format that is more intuitive and chronological than an email grist. 07:52 -- Activity streams are a better method of representing conversations because unlike with search, where the information you are get is based on a keyword you come up with, activity streams give you the opportunity to experience information serendipitously. And activity streams also give us the ability to monitor popular behavior and make decisions based on trends. So the notions of discoverability and trend watching are made possible by the activity stream format. In a B2B context, employees might use their activity stream to keep abreast of deadlines and stay on top of priorities by monitoring the actions of their colleagues. 09:06 -- Sourceforge, a website where open source developers collaborate to share and improve code, sets a good example of how organizations might use the social Web to improve their processes. Github.com is a newer alternative to Sourceforge that revolves around an activity stream. "So you can go in and follow different people's activities. Watch a repository of projects. For example, if Audacity was on Github, I could go in and I could watch it. If things were added to that repository, they would show up in my stream," says Chris Messina. "Watching is a way of tuning in or listening to updates that happen in that context." On the flip-side, if you subscribe to the edit history of Wikipedia page you can keep abreast of the changes, but there's no way to participate in an RSS feed. 10:35 -- In a B2B context, organizations could use activity streams to improve workflows. For example, if you were working on a project with others, project dependencies and milestones could trigger status updates to inform you that the project is ready for your contribution. You might have software agents looking for certain types of activities or patterns that trigger responses or alerts and make workflow processes more efficient. Or even on a much more basic level, if someone is out sick, rather than send an e-mail to their manager, they could post a status update to the company's activity feed and notify the enterprise instead of the old chain of command, the archetypal model, which is not necessarily the most efficient. 11:10 -- "The Starfish and The Spider" by Ori Brafman and Rod Beckman, which compares top-down, militaristic organizational hierarchies which define the industrial age to decentralized systems, which have the capacity to reproduce and self heal. The metaphor is that if...

Web Strategy Jeremiah Owyang

Apr 27, 2010

Description:

How social media has caused the scope of marketing to expand inside organizations, why customer service needs to pay attention to customer influence, the concept of relinquishing oversight as a way of regaining control, aligning social media policy with business strategy and integrating social media into destination websites featuring Jeremiah Owyang (@jowyang), who blogs at Web Strategy, is a partner at the Altimeter Group and is set to deliver the opening keynote at the third annual Digital Impact Conference May 6-7, 2010 in NYC. SHOW NOTES 01:03 -- A discussion of the different speakers lined up to present at the Digital impact conference in New York City May 6-7, 2010, now in its third year. * Shashi Bellamkonda, social media swami — aka director of social media, Network Solutions * Stacie Bright, senior communications marketing manager, Unilever * LaSandra Brill, manager, Service Provider Web and Social Media Marketing group, Cisco Systems * Scott DeYager, social media supervisor, Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. * Jason Forget, communications manager, GE Energy * Doug Frisbie, national social media and marketing integration manager, Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. * Andrew Lark, vice president, Dell * Jennifer Preston, social media editor, New York Times * Jeremy Rawitch, manager, corporate communications, Southern California Edison * Kevin Roderick, director of the UCLA Newsroom, University of California, Los Angeles * Colonel Bryan Salas, director of public affairs, U.S. Marine Corps Public Affairs * Katie Dowd, director of new media, Department of State, Bureau of Public Affairs * Gabriel Stricker, director, Global Communications & Public Affairs, Google, Inc. REGISTER 06:27 -- An overview of the broader trends in social media based on Jeremiah Owyang's research at the Altimeter Group. 07:41 -- Heather Armstrong's experience trying to fix a broken Maytag washing machine, and how she finally managed to get results by warning her twitter followers "so that you may never have to suffer like we have: do not ever buy a Maytag. I repeat: our Maytag experience has been a nightmare." Interestingly enough, Forbes.com story about the incident quoting Pete Blackshaw, the previous guest on this podcast, "The problem with call centers and consumer relations departments is that they tend to look at consumers in a vacuum, independent of influence," which suggests that organizations need to look beyond individual customer interactions to try evaluate the customer's social media influence, which is one of things that social CRM attempts to accomplish. The take away, according to Jeremiah, is that what happens in support can quickly become a marketing or public relations incident. 08:27 -- "Customers don't care which department you are in. They just want their problem fixed. The scope of marketing has grown significantly... Companies are siloed and it's very difficult [for them] to think holistically about their overall customer experience," says Jeremiah who will address this theme in his keynote at the 2010 Digital Impact Conference. 09:25 -- A discussion of analysts Charlene Li's upcoming book "Open Leadership," which explores the theme of how leaders can let go of control in order to gain more power back, because the power has shifted to those who are using social computing platforms and organizations need to acknowledge this. 10:24 -- Glassdoor.com, a new website where employees can rate their employers and Unvarnished, which allow you to rate your colleagues and the quality of their work, both reinforce the notion that there are no more secrets. 11:00 -- According to Jeremiah, social media policy is a key component of effective online organizational communications, and he says there are actually three different policies that organizations need to consider developing. The first is a corporate policy, which would address how to deal with the social Web, and in particular, during a crisis. The second is an employee disclosure policy, which would tell employees what they can say and what they can say in public spaces online. And the third one, which he says most companies don't have in place and which might have kept Nestle out of trouble, is a community policy, which would dictate how community members should behave and describe to dos and don'ts. 11:56 -- An example of a community policy Jeremiah's seen that he thinks is well done is Dogster's Community Guidelines. He also says early adopters like Intel, Microsoft and Sun have had community policies in place for some time now. 12:51 -- Best Buy's is good example of an organization that has an effective social media policy designed to work for employees who may not have advanced degrees. 13:20 -- Inside the enterprise, legal is a common pocket of resistance. Smart strategists should engage them early on. And their are often turf wars between corporate marketing and the social media team because they usually have different ideas about how to achieve their objectives. Also, product managers are typically inclined to approach situations differently from strategists, because they want to build online communities around products, and the strategists want to build community around a lifestyle or a brand. 14:01 -- When it comes to policing social media policies, Jeremiah suggests turning that over to the employees themselves and crowd sourcing those capabilities. Use an internal online community to allow people to call out when people are doing things wrong and doing things right. 15:27 -- There's nothing wrong with a measured, step-by-step approach to social media policy development. 16:10 -- Not all organizations should be rushing into social media. In Jeremiah's opinion, to mitigate risk organizations should approach social media when they have the right research and plans in place. Companies need to think through what it means to be social, and Jeremiah encourages a pragmatic approach. 17:01 -- Using mainstream media advertising to send people to their Facebook page without considering where the transaction occurs. "If you're making money through ecommerce on your corporate site, why would you be so quick to send traffic, whether it be from a chicklet or a Facebook advertisement, away from your site? Most companies say because I want to have trust or word of mouth, but they haven't thought it through carefully about the ramifications and what that actually means," says Jeremiah. 18:06 -- Customers visiting your corporate website may be further down the sales funnel, so you may not want to be so quick to send them away. The future of social engagement, as Jeremiah sees it, is integrating the social experience into your own destination website, and he's going to show a framework for achieving that at the Digital Impact Conference May 6-7, 2010 in NYC. 19:14 -- In terms of who Jeremiah Owyang looks to as thought leaders in the social media space, he mentions Steve Rubel, Charlene Li, David Armano, Jen McClure, Marshall Kirkpatrick, Ben Parr and Louis Gray because he sees them putting out new thoughts instead of just rehashing what's out there already. 21:30 -- End RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Twitter CEO Evan Williams Unveils @Anywhere at SXSW * Corporate Social Media Policy Development * Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore at SXSW * Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman ABOUT THE PODCASTERS @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United...

Corporate Social Media Policy

Apr 20, 2010

Description:

Corporate social media policy development has become increasingly important as organizations realize that social networking is more powerful in the hands of many than the hands of a few. In many cases, employees not serving in official spokesperson roles may, in fact, have more weight influencing corporate reputation than more conventional channels like public relations and marketing. Rather than ask, "Should companies use social media?" organizations are asking "What is the most responsible, effective way for us to use social media and should we house a set of social media corporate guidelines so that everyone understands what the boundaries are for social media usage as employees?" In this episode, we discuss many aspects of corporate social media policy, social networking policy, social media guidelines and best practices for social media policy development initiatives inside organizations. Our guest is Chris Boudreaux created socialmediagovernance.com to provide tools and resources to leaders and managers who want to get the most from their social media and social application investments. Chris is a consultant who works with business and technology professionals to improve their marketing, sales and customer service capabilities through social media governance. He is a former product development and business transformation specialists, and a former United States Navy officer. This is a joint interview by Paul Gillin and Eric Schwartzman, who are collaborating on a book about B2B applications of social media communications titled "Social Marketing to the Business Customer" to be published by Wiley in early 2011. SHOW NOTES 01:58 -- The business case for empowering employees to make smart decisions through social media policy. 03:34 -- How specific social media policies need to be. 05:06 -- Strategic approach to social media policy development. 07:13 -- Just because a company is blocking access to social media sites from its network does not necessarily mean that that company is going to take longer to develop a social media policy. If you are developing a social media policy for an organization, your first order of business is to understand why the company is blocking access, because it may be they are doing so because social media tools do not allow them to comply with laws or regulations. In the insurance industry, for example, many companies are simply on the lock down because the penalties for making mistakes are severe. 08:40 -- Organizations can and do turn on and off access to social media sites quickly, so don't assume that because a company may be blocking access to social media sites that they are in some way going to take a longer to educate and bring up to speed over the course of a social media policy development initiative. 09:27 -- Organizational complexity, rather than an organization's size, has a bigger impact on how long it takes to develop a social media policy for organization.The more business units there are, the variety of subcultures that exists, have the potential to exacerbate the development of a social media policy. 10:45 -- The concept of having more than one social media policy, the first being a broad policy that covers all employees in the latter being a more specific policy for employees focused on social media communications. 13:22 -- Just as no one department within the organization owns and polices all corporate policies, all managers responsible for a group within the organization that is using social media for unique purposes should also be responsible for providing guidance and oversight of how a corporate social media policy applies to those efforts. 17:44 -- It is leadership's responsibility to think ahead of its employees and to try and anticipate what kind of trouble they could get into so they can establish policy to protect them. Those protections are even more important if the employee is using social media as part of their primary job function. So leadership needs to establish clear-cut boundaries for employees and then make sure everyone knows about them. It's irresponsible for leadership to steer clear of providing guidelines because they don't know what they should be yet. At the same time, Chris Boudreaux does not advocate that all organizations should empower their employees to use social media, particularly financial services organizations and other regulated entities, because social media tools may not allow them to comply with the current regulations. 20:49 -- The biggest challenge that organizations face with respect to social media engagement is that many of the technologies simply do not comply with current regulatory requirements. So either the regulations need to be changed, the various social media channels need to be improved to support audit trails or regulated companies in particular need to be careful when they use social media for medications. 22:50 -- Like American linguist William Lutz, featured on an earlier episode of this podcast about the dangers of doublespeak, Chris Boudreaux agrees there's not much sense in a policy if the people it's designed to guide can understand, So policies should be written so that they can be understood without the aid of legal counsel. and since many companies make fair social media policies public it may also be a good idea for those charged with writing the policy to collaborate with the marketing or public relations departments to ensure its accurately reflects the characteristics of the brand. 25:03 -- Regardless of the nature or legalities of any social networking group or service in which a company employee they participate, such as racially insensitive or hate speech sites, employers do not necessarily have the right to dismiss employees for participating in these types of distasteful conversations, unless they are occurring in full public view. However, if the site in question was password-protected, invite only and employer obtained access through coercion and then discovered its employees were involved and fired them as a result, they could be guilty of wiretapping charges. So the method by which an employer discovers private information on the Internet plays a big role in to the legalities of the situation. 28:55 -- There's a big difference between laws that are permissible in a state and terms and conditions an individual migrate or bye-bye to do business with the company. Nondisclosure agreements provide a functional means for individuals to forfeit certain rights in exchange for the right to gain employment with the company and subject to the terms and conditions of what is and is not permissible in any of the 50 United States, is not necessarily unlawful for an organization to ask an employee to forgo certain rights to free speech exchange for a job. 33:31 -- Social media policy needs to support the leadership style of the organization. For example, if the organization is inclusive and collaborative in its management style, that will lead to one type of social media policy. On the other hand, if you're in station is commanding control, like say Apple Computer, that will lead to a different type of social media policy. It may be naive to think you can change an organization's leadership or management style through social media policy. It is the responsibility of those charged with developing a social media policy to create one that supports the company's objectives in a way that is compatible with their existing business. "You or I may not like a lot of the answers to a lot of leaders arrive at. But we have a choice to not work for those people," says Chris Boudreaux. 35:35 -- It is always helpful when social media policy initiatives are sponsored by upper management and here's why. "The best policies are born out of a desire to utilize social media in a way that advances the corporate objectives, and to both protect the employees as well as the company. And that takes an understanding of the business which is is usually strongest among the folks who are running the business," says Chris Boudreaux. 37:14 -- End RECOMMENDED EPISODES *...

Trust and Loyalty through B2B Social Networks

Apr 16, 2010

Description:

Scott Hanson and four other technologists manage the Dell TechCenter, an online community that helps enterprise IT professionals unravel the thorniest problems that occur when trying to integrate technology from multiple vendors. Dell conceived of the community in 2007 as a way to enhance loyalty among its largest customers. Members share advice and ask questions of Hanson and the other engineers, who dispense it for free. The community is open and fully searchable, although only registered members can submit articles and comments. The point isn’t to gain sales leads but to become an indispensable source of advice. And it’s working: In 2008, about 100 people visited the site every day. By early 2010, the count was over 5,000. Active members gain status in the community, and access to information about new products. A core group of 40 to 50 very active members have been designated "Masters," which means they get special recognition, advance information and even the occasional T-shirt. “What our users really want is to be noticed,” Hanson observed Hanson and colleagues Jeff Sullivan, Kong Yang and Dennis Smith are celebrities of sorts in the community of enterprise customers, who frequently seek them out for meetings at trade shows and during visits to the company’s executive briefing center. Their fame has paid off handsomely for Dell: Hanson won’t let us reveal specifics, but Dell has estimated that the TechCenter is indirectly responsible for many millions of dollars in sales each year. Suffice to say that Hanson’s job security is insured for years to come. That’s despite the fact that Dell TechCenter doesn’t sell anything. The site carries no advertising and the member list is never used for promotions. The Dell TechCenter team is adamant about that. “The last thing IT people want when they come to a technical resource is an ad asking them to buy a laptop,” Hanson says. In this interview, he talks about the philosophies that underlie the community’s success. This interview is guest hosted by Paul Gillin of Paul Giilin Communications and was conducted in association with research for an upcoming book on B2B applications of social media, to be published later thia year or early next year. SHOW NOTES: 3:30 Why Dell Tech Center was started 4:40 What’s unique about Tech Center; why customers would come there in the first place 7:30 How Dell built awareness for the community; adding Technology Center links into every product. 8:45 Why content is openly available and not hidden behind a registration wall: “We really don’t want to use this as a vehicle to collect sales leads.” 9:45 Growth: From 100 to more than 5,000 daily visitors 10:45 How monitoring conversations guides administrators toward appropriate content 11:30 The content that resonates well: ‘Anything that makes the IT admin’s life easier.” 10:00 The Dell Masters Program raises the visibility of the top 40-50 participants 15:40 Who are the characters on the site and why the chemistry is important 17:20 Calculating the ROI of the Dell Tech Center; the team touches a lot of customer spending each year (specifics withheld at Dell’s request) 19:10 The importance of personality in makin the Dell connection: “It’s probably the most important thing.” A single Dell Tech Center ID didn’t resonate as well as giving individual administrators their own presences. 22:15 The importance of not trying to sell to members of the community 23:30 The nature of customer relationships on Dell Tech Center: “These people a friends.” How business relations create personal connections. RECOMMENDED EPISODES • B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender • Social Media Investor Relations Special with Former SEC Attorneys • Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman About the Guest Host This episode was guest hosted by Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching and is currently co-writing a book with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

B2B SEO Strategy and Tactics

Mar 31, 2010

Description:

Sales cycles are different when we research purchasing decisions on behalf of companies and this podcast is devoted to explaining why, how and what it takes to search engine optimize content for business to business customers. You’ll learn about B2B keyword discovery, how B2B sales cycles impact search optimization strategy, aligning keyword selection with marketing strategy, how to leverage off-message search phrases and much more with Lee Odden, president of Top Rank Marketing. SHOW NOTES 01:37 – B2B SEO is quite different than B2C SEO, according to Lee Odden. The B2B sales cycle is often much longer than B2C sales cycles. When business buyers are researching an intended purchase, the keywords they search online tend to be much more exploratory, general and broad, as they educate themselves about the procuring a specific service, product or solution. And as they drill down and get closer to making an actual decision, their search queries get much more specific and focused. 03:32 – Attract customers at the beginning and end of the sales cycle by examining the marketing and public relations activities that are already underway, and look for opportunities where you can apply search engine optimization. For example, if a company identifies and creates original content on its website based on broader, research oriented terms, and starts to acquire inbound links embedded against those terms as anchor text on other websites, their website is more likely to get found through search when a potential customer starts getting educated to make a purchase and that’s how they’d SEO their website to get found at the beginning of the buying cycle. 04:40 – “At the same time, maybe that same company is publishing a blog, and there are a mix of keywords that represent more long tail or niche terms that are more specific. And the content strategy, or the content plan for the blog, can make sure that it creates content using those niche keywords over time. And, of course, each of those blog posts that’s about a niche topic would link back over to the product page so that people who discover that topic or that content through search can click-through and arrive over on a sales page to interact with a call to action like download a whitepaper, sign up for a webinar or contact us for a consultation,” says Lee. 06:14 – Keyword selection should be consistent with marketing objectives, messaging and demand. If a company’s marketing strategy is to undercut a premium brand on price, we might try adding modifiers like “cheap” or “discount” to the search phrase to see if people are actually searching those phrases and if they are, optimize the website content for those terms, get links and try to rank for those affordability-related versions of the more general, broader keywords. If a category isn’t well known, if there isn’t much demand for these types of keywords, that’s where companies might apply convention PR and advertising to generate more demand for those queries. 09:09 – Sometime the high volume keyword that people associate with a particular concept biased. For example, the impact of carbon emissions on the environment might be described as climate change or global warming. The demand for global warming versus climate change is more than two to one. But climate change is considered a more politically correct, safer phrase. Search engine optimization is about embracing popular language, but according to Lee, it’s very difficult to convince clients to embrace popular language when that language conflicts with their existing brand messaging. As I write these show notes, my thought is a company that cannot embrace the lexicon by which it has come to be known in popular language is a company in denial, because its image is misaligned with its perception. 09:15 – But if clients are adverse to embracing the terms by which they are known, incorporating that language in blogs, tweets and status updates that link to them is one way to SEO their website for alternative messaging that’s inconsistent with their existing brand message. In this type of scenario, the content on a blog might be intentionally written in a more informal tone, so as not to compete with the more formal brand messaging on the company’s corporate site. For example, you might create a blog post that’s an argument for the use of “climate change” over “global warming” which would require the use of both terms, and which could be optimized for the latter term. 11:07 – When you’re doing keyword research for search engine optimization, you use tools that quantify the search demand for and competitiveness of a certain phrase. But you also need to validate those keywords in social media, to see if the phrases people use when they’re searching for something are the same ones they use in social media when they conversing with others about that subject. Don’t assume those phrases are the same. 12:15 – Ultimately, keyword effectiveness is validated by the sites analytics. Are the keywords you’re working to draw traffic against listing on your web stats? Are people visiting your landing pages and tasking the intended action? 14:45 – SEO newbies tend to try and cram all the keywords they can into their text, thinking that by saying the same thing a bunch of different ways, their page will be seen as more relevant. But readability is more important than repetition. If you’ve keyword stuffed your document to the point that it reads silly, you’ve lost because even of that page does wind up ranking high, it’s going to have a very high bounce rate. Instead, Lee prefers to map keywords according to website categories. He creates a long list of phrases that’s organized according to popularity, competitiveness and relevance, and then decides which pages on the website those terms should be linked to. Then, he varies the usage of the those terms evenly across whatever content gets SEOed and that way he can still use all those terms, but without cramming them into a single document. Lee cautions users about going after just high volume keywords. Instead, focus of those words and phrases with the greatest probability of conversion. keyword-selection 17:59 – Matching up the keywords with the analytics is how you validate keywords and phrases. Analytics will also reveal trends and show you the seasonality of your phrases. And just as media relations pros attempt to position press releases as riffs off the popular news of the day, search engine optimization initiatives can take a similar approach, and your analytics show you were those potential opportunities are. If relevant terms lack significant volume, keep in mind there are other activities that can drive search demand, so when you’re launching a new product, use your mainstream sales and marketing to drive demand and be careful not to sacrifice relevancy for volume because you’ll be tapping into traffic that unlikely to result in sales. 19:16 – Ultimately -- and particularly in B2B SEO -- keyword relevance is more important than popularity, because relevant terms and phrases have a greater probability of conversion. 23:29 -- Enquiro research suggesting that while people may go move from broad phrase to niche phrase research as they progress through online buying cycle, they often go back to broad phrase research before they make their final decision, to confirm their intended purchase. And for this reason, Lee says you can’t base a B2B SEO strategy on just broad or niche terms. You need both. Follow up question: Is there any research out there suggesting that in the case of considered purchases, buyers are more likely to revert to broad phrase search at the end of their online research phrase? Also, are the broad phrases keywords they revert to the same ones they started with, or do those broad phrases tend to change as they become more informed about the category they’re researching? 24:05 – But website design and content strategy also impact purchasing decisions. More often than not, B2B products and services are not one-size-fits-all. The buyer may need technical information or...

How to Create Live Webcasts

Mar 27, 2010

Description:

What begins as a discussion about B2B applications of online video quickly spirals into a geek-out session about how to create live webcasts, online video streaming, production, editing, search engine optimization, archiving and file management. If you're interested in coming up to speed on the tools and technologies available for producing live video streams, this episode featuring online video specialist Steve Garfield, author of the new book "Get Seen" is for you. 01:04 -- Steve Garfield explains when it makes sense for B2B marketers to use video, and when doesn't it, and according to Steve, many organizations have become interested in the use of online video to introduce visitors to their websites to the people and culture inside companies. 02:11 - For watching larger news events, Steve still prefers television. But the use of short, bite-sized video clips on an organization's website can be very effective. In terms of the state of online video, Steve says we've come a long way from the days when excessive buffering caused such extreme latency that videos were unwatchable. 04:09 -- The majority of consulting work that Steve provides today involves training people within organizations to use online video equipment, editing software, streaming services and video aggregation services. In the past, organizations had brought in huge production companies to create their video but according to Steve, "It just became a huge production." Today, they are looking for solutions that will allow them to communicate autonomously with video. 05:05 – Common applications of online video for B2B marketers is the use of video to show what it's like at a product rollout or “about us” type of videos that seek to humanize an organization, but since it's easier to watch than it is to read, the use of online video on an organization's website can be a competitive differentiator. 06:50 -- Steve discusses how video could be used by doctors, professional service providers and even hairstyles on their websites to give you a chance to get a feel for their personalities when you're considering who to hire. 08:27 -- Steve talks about the concept of situating all the video in a specific section of an organization's website, using Channel 9 as an example, where Robert Scoble provided the video component of that early, branded social network. But he also mentions the Zappos website, which provides access to videos from product pages, rather than in a separate, video section of the website. Steve declined to give exact numbers, but suggested that the use of video can significantly increase e-commerce transactions. 11:53 -- Even enough your video is just talking heads, the benefit is that your audience gets the chance to attach a face to a voice. Initially, particularly online, someone may launch the video and just watch it for little while, and then put the window in the background and multitask while listening only to the audio. In retrospect, as I write these show notes, I can see Steve's point because particularly when it comes to business-to-business communications, there is real value in being able to recognize someone's face after you've been listening to them online. 12:37 -- Video is an excellent way to get to know someone a much deeper level than through just audio and certainly from their text. Businesses are looking for ways to try and connect with their customers and video provides a practical solution for making that happen. 15:03 -- A discussion about the benefits of live streaming online video, as opposed to video on demand, for extending the reach of live events. 16:39 -- At the bare minimum, all you really need is an Internet connection, a laptop with a built-in WebCam and a Ustream or LiveStream account. Steve talks about a new premium application from UStream called UStream Producer that runs locally on the Mac or PC which provides better streaming video quality which he used at WCBS-TV in New York to produce a live stream of his appearance on a recent episode of their Saturday morning show. The UStream desktop application also records and archives your video And provides options for live text chat and social media sharing. 19:13 -- From a gear standpoint when it comes to choosing a camera that can be mounted on a tripod and used for streaming, Steve recommends the Canon HV20 or Canon HV30 with a Manfrotto Tripod. For microphones, Steve likes the Audio-Technica AT2020 USB mic and lavalieres he recommends the Audio-Technica ATR3350. The reason Steve likes the Canons is because many of the streaming sites require a FireWire connection, and most cameras have essentially replaced FireWire with SD cards and USB 2.0 ports, which is a file transfer activity. 21:30 -- Using UStream Producer mentioned earlier, it is possible to set up multiple camera's and create a live stream that cuts seamlessly from one camera perspective to another, however the free version only accommodates a single camera, while the premium version of the app accommodates multiple cameras. If your computer has two FireWire connections, the recommendation is to install an external FireWire card to bring multiple cameras into your computer. 22:25 -- Using LiveStream, which is Ustream's competitor, multiple cameras on different computers can log into a master account which can be out a live stream from any video camera that is currently logged in to the master account. This service also allows you to bring in YouTube and other on-demand video sources. This can be achieved with the free version of LiveStream. 24:09 -- If you're using a Mac, and want to do screen capture, Steve recommends the new version of QuickTime screen capture that's built into OS 10. however, if what you wanted to is cut to a computer screen in the context of a live stream, that can be achieved with UStream Producer or LiveStream. 27:12 -- Steve and Eric have a pretty hard-core geek out discussion of how the logistics behind live streaming a panel with four people, all mike of wireless level layers, and multiple cameras. 28:52 -- Steve mentions NewTek's TriCaster, which is the coup de grace high-end solution used by a lot of professional production companies for producing live video feeds. 33:09 -- A discussion about the bandwidth requirements for sustaining a watchable video stream online. 36:29 -- Whether it's a live stream or more feature oriented video content, organizations have the opportunity to manage viewer expectations of production quality. Nevertheless, the dear required to produce an exceptional video stream online has come down in price so significant way that it is possible to create a video stream that is as good as could be produced with professional gear using store-bought, consumer grade equipment. 38:43 -- The great thing about the Mac, according to Steve, is that they will pretty much play in the light at it any video codec. For editing, Steve uses iMovie 09 which supports QuickTime and AVCHD. before you purchase a camera, Steve recommends opening the software on your computer and checking to see what type of video codec it supports. As a last ditch effort, it is possible to download applications which will convert codecs, but of course, that adds another step to the process and decreases productivity. 42:09 -- The real challenge of producing HD video at this point, is the file size and processing power required to edit HD clips. On cameras that provide an option, Steve typically sets his camera to shoot in 720P over 1080P, just to reduce the file size and make them easier to deal with. 44:29 -- Storage requirements for archiving online video. 45:38 -- Video archive management tips. 48:09 -- The use of titles, transcripts and metadata to search engine optimize online video. The use of MacSpeech Dictate to create text transcripts of video files. As a footnote, the show notes were written using MacSpeech Dictate, but rather than use the program to create a raw text transcripts of the actual words spoken, I prefer to editorialize and summarize what was said to make it easier for the reader to get the gist of the discussion...

Dominating the Information Spectrum

Mar 25, 2010

Description:

To get found online, organizations are using social media to engage in a war of information to win the trust and confidence of their constituents. Former DoD analyst Mark Drapeau, PhD., who is currently an online public diplomacy director at Microsoft, explains how to dominate your information spectrum with lethal generosity. This is a recording of a presentation he delivered at my Social Media Master Class on Jan. 29, 2010 in Washington, D.C.. To attend an upcoming social media workshop, visit www.ericschwartzman.com for dates and locations. SHOW NOTES 01:24 – Mark talks about his experience prior to joining Microsoft at National Defense University, which is affiliated with the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the U.S. Department of Defense, where he studied emerging technologies and their impact on national security. His mandate at Microsoft is to create “proactively social content” that engages communities, including state, local and federal government offices. 03:31 – “Nature abhors a vacuum.” Empty spaces will be filled by something. And so, if you work in fashion, or you work in IT, whatever you do, if there’s a niche, it will be filled by someone’s content. When you search for a topic, fashion, shoes, computers, is someone finding your stuff? That’s the premise I start with,” says Mark. There’s an information war taking place by organizations who want to get found online. But what’s more important than analyzing your traffic, according to Mark, is understanding your audience, what they want and how to engage them. In his case, if someone is searching “Government 2.0” he wants to make sure people are finding his content. 05:01 – For organizations, Mark sees new media communications as a form of public diplomacy that can be used to educate the marketplace and increase the receptiveness of Microsoft’s customers to their policies, products and services. Public diplomacy is the act of influencing, engaging and activating the public – softening the battlefield – and it is used by government agencies and companies to help their organizations achieve certain goals. 07:23 – The convention protocol by which information moves from organization to individual is inefficient, based on the various layers of approval corporate information needs to clear before it winds up reaching the customer. The press release is an excellent example of this. But what’s happening is by using social media to communicate with others, what’s happening is that a lot of people are bypassing official company channels in the process. They’re not official spokespersons, but they’re reaching people. So while organizations struggle to clear official information through the various layers of approval, unofficial voices in social media are filling the vacuum. Because in most cases, big organizations are slow, and cycling information through their chain of command simply can’t keep pace with open source information. And whenever there is a significant gap between information that can be crowd sourced via open source, and the organization’s own, online presence, that organization loses the trust of the community. 08:35 – People are sharing information and educating one another through Twitter and Facebook. Sharing information with your online social network has becomes a social norm, and by contrast, organizations that fail to behave this way are seen as antisocial. The important thing to understand about social media is that it’s more about being social than it is about understanding media or technology. It’s not about the tools; it’s about interacting with other people. 09:21 – “What amazing to me is that if you into the marketing department, or the PR group at a government agency and you ask them “Can you name 5 customers or 5 fans of our company?’ they will have a hard time answering that question. Because, at the end of the day, they are not being social with the kind of people that actually care about the organization,” says Mark. Being social means really caring about a community of people that care about your organization, or topics in which your organization has a vested interest, and that distinction is important because people are more likely to join an issue-specific community than they would be to join your company’s community. People are passionate about issues like sustainability and clean water, and they’ll follow a Facebook fan page about that topic, but they’re going to be much less enthusiastic about your company’s own Facebook fan page. 11:21 – Social media engagement should be proactive, not just reactive. Mark uses the Transportation Security Administration blog as an example of a social media program that is excessively reactive. It’s better than nothing, he says, but he’d rather see them blogging about broader issues like the future of transportation security and how the international community is addressing them. And Mark says, this is because big organizations are afraid to be the first to take a public position on issues, for fear of being wrong. So they’re always playing defensive rather than offensive. “The best offense is a good offense,” he says. “Be out there in front.” 12:38 – Mark acknowledges that being out in front is risky, but no risk, no reward, he says. As an example, Mark references Peter Shankman’s book “Can We Do That?” we contains a lot of good examples of various client engagements where his PR firm took a risk. Careful with the crazy ideas you come up with. You just might have to do one of them. 14:14 – Mark discusses the article “The Message is the Message” by Jennifer Senior which ran in Aug. 2, 2009 about the online ubiquity of Obama’s presidential campaign. He was everywhere, and the Republicans couldn’t keep up with him. “If you are filling those vacuums, and you’re dominating your community’s information spectrum -- everywhere someone’s looking for stuff there’s something by you: guest postings, you have an article in a magazine, video content, whatever it is -- if you can dominate that information spectrum, sometimes it doesn’t even matter what you actually say, because people will recognize you as thought leader if you just have a presence and it’s decent,” says Mark. “It’s got to be decent, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be outstanding if you’re a consistent contributor all the time.” Obama was perceived as dominating the presidential race and leading the news stories because he was everywhere. 15:32 – Mark shares Gary Vaynerchuck’s line “Content is king, but marketing is the queen, and she rules the castle,” meaning great content’s not enough. You also have to get it out there. You have to know where your community is and how to get to them. MySpace may be out of favor with social media pundits, but the research shows MySpace users tend to be in red states and less likely to be college educated, so trying to reach that audience through Facebook is going to be far less efficient. Figure out where you’re audience is and focus of those social media channels most likely to reach them. 19:53 – Rather than focus on solely on the numbers is an indicator of a social media program’s effectiveness, Mark gauges success by whether or not his efforts are delivering value to his community. He counts thank yous, not click throughs. He knows he did a job last year with socials media not by reviewing his bit.ly click-throughs, but by the number of Christmas cards he receives from people he originally met online than he did the previous year. 21:22 -- A course delegate tells Mark that the only thing that speaks to her superior is metrics, so she can say she’s adding value or getting Christmas cards, but at the end of the day, he approves here budget. Mark responds by saying that if your getting good content out through social media, it’s going to wind up reaching people over your superior, and it’s going to get back through their social network that you’re adding value by filling the vacuum with your organization’s messages. Focus on delivering genuine value to the community, and your superior will see that value through other channels. 23:50 – Determine who the experts...

Twitter CEO Evan Williams Unveils Anywhere at SXSW

Mar 16, 2010

Description:

If you sat out the SXSW Interactive Festival, this special episode, recorded at SXSW in Austin features Twitter founder Evan Williams announcing the new app platform @anywhere and Mashable Editor-in-Chief Adam Ostrow discussing the latest location-based social networking news, changes at Digg and what's coming for Google Buzz. SHOW NOTES 00:52 -- A summary of the news from this year's conference, including Twitter's @anywhere announcement, the rivalry between location-based social networking start-ups Foursquare and Gowalla, big changes in store for Digg.com and Google Buzz in the aftermath of the controversy surrounding their decision to integrate their new social network, a public facing system, with Gmail, a system that has always been very private. 01:31 -- At the Diggnation party, Digg CEO Jay Allison unveiled new.digg.com, a new alpha site available through invitation only, which expands trending news stories beyond just digs to include tweaks, Facebook status updates, personal preferences and your social graph. Mashable Editor Adam Ostrow calls it Digg's attempt to become the ultimate aggregator. 02:20 -- Google Buzz is in a tough position given the public and the media's reaction to their launch, but Adam has confidence that they will ultimately be able to overcome those initial missteps. He thinks Google Buzz will be a lot more exciting when they launch an official API so that third-party applications that already integrate with Twitter and Facebook will be available on the service. " I think the product might have been released a little too early in Gmail. I think there were a lot more things they maybe should have considered before launching it," says Adam Ostrow. But he also says don't count them out. Google has more than 20 employees devoted to developing their Buzz product. "It's clearly a very high-priority projects there," he says. 03:11 -- On the target market for Google Buzz, Adam Ostrow says, "The way they explained it to me, not dissimilar to Twitter and Facebook, they're really looking at both consumers and brands. Right now, I think there's a lot of issues that really make it prohibitive for brands and news organizations to really use the tool effectively. I think first off, it needs to be a standalone site, not just Gmail, which is in the works. So you'll be able to use it if you're a Hotmail user, a Yahoo user or whatever. But I also think they have some namespace issues. I think, obviously, if you've had your Gmail account for four or five years and your username might not be your business organization name, it's a very tough to transition accounts. So there's some issues they need to overcome. We've been using buzz pretty heavily at Mashable and I think it has the potential as a tool for brands and media organizations but they have a lot of work to do to get there." 04:07 -- In terms of hot new products this year at SXSW, Adam Ostrow says this year it's all about Foursquare and location-based social networking. But he thinks the imminent arrival of UK-based Spotify in the US market could make it a hot product at next year's SXSW. 06:01 -- A discussion of the panel session titled "How Not to be a Douche Bag at SXSW" featuring blogger Violet Blue who used "PR people" as stereotypical examples of how not to behave at this conference. According to Adam Ostrow, the key to not being a "PR douche bag" is simply being respectful of other people's time and, obviously, knowing who you're talking to and what they cover. Bue Ostrow has a positive attitude towards public relations. "PR people are important to what we do. They do provide us, sometimes, with relevant stories and people we need to talk to," says Adam Ostrow. 08:45 -- Eric Schwartzman tells Adam Ostrow about Jeremy Pepper's blog post entitled "I Don't Do SXSWi," recaps the conference highlights for him which includes Chris Messina's presentation about why activity streams need to evolve beyond the Facebook newsfeed, Danah Boyd's keynote on dealing with privacy in online spaces that are public, Joi Ito's talk about advocating intergovernmental information sharing and Kaiser Kuo's update on the trials and tribulations of Google in China. Eric asks for Adam's opinion as to how he derives tangible business value from a professional conference that is seen by many as nothing more than a debauchery fest. 09:48 -- Adam Ostrow uses SXSW mostly as an opportunity to cement relationships initiated online in the physical world. "I love to get that face time and really know who they are," says Adam Ostrow, who benefits from the personal relationships he develops at SXSW through as yet unknown story opportunities and potential business development deals. "For people in social media and the consumer facing web, it's the best place" to network. 11:09 -- The Mashable party at SXSW was intentionally designed to afford attendees the opportunity to network and party at the same time. The split level venue was divided into a section with a live bands and another section for networking. 12:51 -- Through a joint venture, Mashable is currently writing "B2B" content for American Express's OpenForum.com. They create similar coverage to what runs on Mashable.com, but for a small business community, primarily about how they can use social media to market to their customers, which may be other businesses, or which may be consumers. 13:06 -- When it comes to B2B applications of social media, how you set your organization's presence up online, how you respond to customers and devoting adequate resources to listening is key. "That's the point of being there. You can be there and just broadcast company news, and I don't think that's too interesting. It's a way for people to keep up with you. But the way we use it as a brand, and the way small businesses we like are using it, is to interact" with customers says Adam Ostrow. 14:50 -- Evan Williams announcing their new app platform @anywhere for integrating Twitter into websites. @anywhere will allow website visitors to follow Twitter users from any website. Hovering your cursor over a Twitter ID on any website using @anywhere will reveal a pop-up window that allows you to follow that account in just two clicks. You can also control how receive information from Twitter without every going to Twitter.com or a Twitter client. @anywhere can also be used to allow Twitter users to use their Twitter account to sign in to a website. Thirteen different websites have been selected to beta @anywhere, including Amazon, Ebay, Yahoo, Bing, YouTube, The New York Times, Digg, Salesforce.com and others. 16:30 -- "The main thing that @anywhere does is reduce friction," says Twitter founder Evan Williams, who admits he's not sure how developers will ultimately wind up using the new technology. One of the more obvious features include the ability to tweet links directly from a participating website. But a bigger advance is the ability to follow a Twitter account directly from a website, instead of having to click through to Twitter.com and log in if necessary to follow the account. Discovery is one of the hardest challenges because of the sheer volume of content that's out there. So putting the ability to follow in the context of the individual or organization your following reduces some of the friction that's currently present in discovery. 17:47 -- The benefits of @anywhere to website operators is a connection to users that you didn't necessarily have before and a way to keep them coming back. "We hear from sites all the time that Twitter drives them tons of traffic. It should result in more followers for a site just sending out links. It should also probably result in more people who are your fans, who are your audience using Twitter, talking amongst themselves and talking about your content, so hopefully it becomes a richer experience. 18:54 -- @anywhere also brings user tweets into your site and gives the ability to create a whole community or sub community in your own site. The goal of Twitter is to help people and organizations build stronger relationships, and @anywhere is about...

Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore at SXSW

Mar 16, 2010

Description:

Pete Cashmore of Mashable sat down with me yesterday that SXSW 2010 in Austin, Texas to discuss the rise of Mashable, how the iPad might affect the print publishing industry, CPMs for online display ads, burning the boats, Mashable's future ambitions and more. 00:45 -- Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore talks about his online social media guide, which is designed to provide information to those focused on social media marketing, individuals looking to get the most out of tools like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare hands how to use social media tools and services as utilities. 01:36 -- Mashable was founded in 2005 by Pete Cashmore at the age of 19 out of his house in Scotland. Fueled by his interests in the Internet and a hunch that blogging seemed as good a way as any to get started, he decided to launch the site with no real connections to anyone in social media at the time and the belief that he could run by doing. Since then, Nashville has grown to 20 employees and over 50 writers who work part-time basis. But Pete maintains a grounded perspective by spending most of his time out of the social media bubble in his home country, the UK, where he can focus on putting out great content. 02:52 -- Given the doldrums of the ad supported media business, Pete has managed to buck the trend by focusing on delivering niche content to a premium audience, which deliver high CPMs. As brands look for ways to get people to pay attention to what they're doing on twitter and Facebook, Mashable presents a highly targeted advertising opportunity. 03:22 -- Pete sees the iPad as a potential savior for the print publishing industry. By presenting publishers with a viable, practical alternative to the printed page, mash able CEO Pete Cashmore says that since people are somewhat comfortable paying for content on their mobile phones, he believes that comfort will extend to the iPad. "It's essentially a device that lets you package media. I think it might even break the cycle of people expecting news for free on the web. And I think we might see with devices like the iPad, like the iPhone, that people are used to paying for content. believes could be channels where people are actually prepared to pay for media," says Cashmore. 04:15 -- In terms of how much a magazine publisher might charge for an iPad subscription, Pete says the numbers vary widely. But his guess is, an annual subscription might go for around $10. 05:46 -- Pete Cashmore discusses what he considers to be a good CPM for online advertising, which is anything over $15 for online display ads and as much as $20 for online video at its. four publishers with really focused content, he has seen them get as much as $30 per thousand impressions. Google ad sense, on the other hand, provides much lower CPMs of $1-$2. 06:36 -- There's a cannibalization that needs to take place, says Pete. We are seeing traditional publishers resist the transition. They're trying to keep the cash cow alive. the written word in print may be more profitable currently that is online, but obviously, there's going to be a transition. On how the mainstream outlets are doing so far, Pete believes many of the major newspapers and magazines are making the transition to digital quite well. And to those who don't make the leap will disappear by attrition. 08:07 -- Commenting on Marc Andreessen's recent comment that mainstream media outlets need to "burn the boats" Pete says "The rule of cannibalization is you either cannibalize yourself or someone else is going to do it for you." 08:30 -- To drive his point home, Pete talks about how Apple cornered the music industry with iTunes by making it easier to pay for music instead of just suing people. Through ease-of-use and accessibility, they become major players in the music business, simply because the music business stayed focused on milking their cash cow, leaving themselves open to cannibalization, which is exactly what Apple did. And now, the same risk exists for print publishers. Blogs have sprung up, and if print publishers don't make the leap, they too are vulnerable to be cannibalized. In the tech space, where consumers are early adopters of technology, that cannibalization is well underway. 10:45 -- Pete thinks all media companies should be open to a variety of formats. But Mashable's expertise currently is creating great text. Rather than divert his focus at this point he is steering clear of audio and video. Nevertheless he can foresee approaching those opportunities through media partnerships. 12:16 -- Mashable does not currently cover B2B extensively. But an example of a company he believes is serving the interests of B2B marketers is CoTweet, which makes it easy for multiple authors to collaborate on a brand's Twitter account. The other area of B2B that Mashable covers are the analytics firms that monitor, measure and evaluate the effectiveness of social media marketing initiatives. 14:16 -- In terms of people who Pete associates with social media marketing, he mentions Chris Brogan who speaks about how brands can command and communicate well with audiences. 15:15 -- For those interested in having their social media products or services featured in actual, the best way to pitch is by sending e-mail to news@mashable.com which is staffed 24/7. For best results, keep it short and to the point. RECOMMENDED EPISODES * Getting Buy-In and Resources for Social Media with Brian Solis * Power Social Networking and the Real Time Web with Jeff Pulver * Twitter Strategy: Humanizing Brands and Building Loyalty with Shel Israel * Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2010 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord.

Getting Buy-In and Resources for Social Media

Mar 12, 2010

Description:

If part of your job involves building a business case and winning executive buy-in for social media initiatives inside organizations, you don’t want to miss this episode with Brian Solis, released on the eve of the SXSW conference in Austin, Texas. Over the last few years, Future Works founder Brian Solis has shot like a rocket to the top on the social media influence pyramid. His Conversation Prism has become the de facto graphic for appraising social media channels. His first book, “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations,” which he co-wrote with Deirdre Breckenridge made the argument for social media engagement, and his just released new book “Engage” provides practical guidance for piloting social media initiatives inside organizations. In this episode, which was conducted in association with research I’m currently conducting for a book on B2B applications of social media to be published by Wiley late 2010/early 2011, Brian reveals how he wins buy-in and acceptance for social media pilot programs with corporate stakeholders inside organizations. 01:24 – Brian talks about the “ah-ha” and “uh-oh” moments, which usually crystallize the perceived need for social media engagement inside organizations. 02:49 – Using the Conversation Prism to collect meaningful research by searching the each of the different social media channels to uncover where the hot spots are for any given organization. And based on the findings from those queries, Brian talks about designing social media initiatives that address tangible business needs. 03:31 – Without the research that comes from a thorough investigation of who’s saying what where about a given product, brand or service, there’s no way to ask the right questions to have the “ah-ha” moment. According to Brian, it is important to understand that conversations are constantly occurring online that drive all kinds of business decisions. And unless we actually seek out and gauge in the right conversations by listening through filters those decisions will be made without us. It’s the realization that there are not just conversations taking place across the social web. 03:46 – “There are not just conversations taking place across the social web. There are influential decision-making steps and processes and considerations that are taking place that are transpiring right now, without us. And when you can demonstrate the exact cause and effect of what’s transpiring and to what extent, then that “ah-ha” moment is pretty profound,” Brian explains. 05:54 – Successfully implementing social media initiatives inside organizations requires that the projects lead ultimately transition from champion to diplomat, because it is critical to raise awareness of what needs to be accomplished and the required resources to pull it off among the executives who can fund pilots, and who or may not be directly involved in the initiative. 06:33 – “What’s going to be important to these folks [decision makers with P&L responsibility] is that we apply information to them in a way that they’re used to measuring it. Even though this is new medium, we have to help them learn by speaking their language, and then ultimately teaching them something new, almost like learning a new language through immersion,” says Brian. 07:12 – Much as when ad agencies bid accounts on spec, in order to make the case for a social media initiative, it is necessary to invest the time and resources to figure out where the relevant conversations are taking place, and to try and determine which departments of the organization are most impacted by these conversations. Are the conversations surrounding customer service issues, engineering issues or marketing-related issues? The idea is to collect and attribute online conversations to the specific business units or departments inside the organization that they apply. For Brian, the key to winning buy-in is research, but once he’s got it completed, he’s still not done. 08:01 -- Brian takes all his research, puts into a snazzy PowerPoint deck and presents it to the C Suite business decision makers to win buy-in. It’s important that the presentation be distilled to the point where it’s not overwhelming. It must provide clear overview as to the opportunities that exist, and provide tangible suggestions of what can be done to address them and then how those efforts will be learned over time. 09:43 – When it comes to the argument about whether or not it’s necessary to justify the ROI of social media engagement, Brian takes the high road. “Change isn’t always something that’s easy to embrace. Maybe the demand for metrics or ROI is stall tactic, because there’s this fear of change or what have you. But whatever it is, don’t spend your energy and resources debating it. Just work with it,” says Brian. And social media can be measured more effectively than old school marketing and public relations. 11:21 – When it comes to measuring social media, Brian likes to establish the cost per action because in his mind, that’s the most tangible metric for determining the value of a conversation. In other words, what happened as a result of the conversation? Whether its click-throughs, links, registrations, shares, downloads or sales, cost per action focuses on the outcome of the conversations, rather than the conversation itself, but it’s important to note that sales are not the only measurable transactions that have real business value to organizations. 12:18 – The most common question Brian gets from stakeholders inside organizations about social media implementation is, “What is that we’re going to accomplish? How many people is this going to take? And what’s going to cost? And then, what does success look like? I hear that in every single conversation,” says Brian. And one way to get those answers is through research, which he has a blue print for conducting at www.conversationprism.com. 13:01 – By documenting, categorizing and quantifying the results of your research by issue and the part of the organization impacted, you build the business case. Based on the formula Brian lays out in his book Engage, finding relevant conversations, engaging whoever’s behind them, monitoring for their response and then following up takes roughly 25 minutes of someone’s time. So if you’re going to try and measure cost per action, it really comes back to the amount of time you’ve invested in a conversation to try and stimulate that action. So if it’s 25 minutes per action, you just look at the research and evaluate which conversations the organization has the organization has the most to gain by engaging, count up the number of conversations and multiply by 20 to 25 minutes per engagement, and that will give you some idea of what kind of resources you need to address that opportunity. 15:14 – In terms of where the pockets of resistance for social media engagement are inside most organizations, Brian says it’s different every time. But a lot of it has to do with where the champions for social media inside that organization are. “The thing that I’ve learned is this. If there aren’t already champions there -- and based on the research you will find that there are multiple opportunities, you just have to prioritize which one it is that you pilot based on the data that comes back – everyone has concerns, or they also have incorrect perspectives with respect to what can be accomplished through social media. So there’s a lot of education there. So having answers to all the skeptical questions that you could possibly get before you go into that meeting is going to be extremely helpful because people will ask you more questions that will postpone doing it the right way. So having those answers is what it’s going to take to get at least some, initial level of support,” says Brian. You might not get enterprise wide acceptance from the get go, but that’s okay. Focus on getting the resources for the pilot program and use that as an opportunity to demonstrate value to others inside the organization. 16:42 – When Brian is doing his research, his uses the Katie Paine method of coupling words indicative...

B2B Online Community Management

Mar 8, 2010

Description:

Social networks have been mainstream for less than five years, but HR.com has been delivering much of the same value to its members for more than a decade. Founded in 1999, the site today serves nearly 190,000 members, most of them human resources professionals. Its jewel in the crown is an active calendar of webcasts which attendees can attend to earn professional certifications. The site also has many contributions in the form of blogs and expert articles. Like any site that's been around that long, HR.com has had its share of twists and turns. Originally founded as an online magazine, its site was recast as a community when social networking became popular. Today, the Ontario, Canada-based company employs 32 people, is profitable and has a successful model in which all of the content is contributed by members. A diversified revenue stream includes advertising, events and webcasts; speakers pay $3,000 for a chance to get in front of the site's coveted audience. Debbie McGrath calls herself the Chief Instigator of HR.com. A serial entrepreneur with a background in computer science, she founded HR.com in 1999 after selling her previous venture, The CEO Group, to the Washington Post Co.. This interview is guest hosted by Paul Gillin of Paul Giilin Communications and was conducted in association with research for an upcoming book on B2B applications of social media, to be published later thia year or early next year. 0:35 How HR.com was started 1:05 The evolution from magazine to community 2:00 The most popular features with the audience are in learning and education. About 30 sessions are webcast each month with average attendance of about 400 people. Contributors can get certification credit for what they learn in the webcast. 3:00 Why experts pay to give webcasts: “They get to showcase their expertise, be a thought leader in the space and for lead generation in some cases.” 4:15 HR.com’s primary revenue sources include events, advertising and suscriptions 5:25 Requirements for registration. Anyone can register as long as they agree to receive one ad per week. 6:15 How forms are administered 6:50 Debbie had no prior experience in VB communities. She discusses how the characteristics of different professional communities makes the learning process a constant challenge. 7:20 Surprises of managing communities. “There seems to be no relationship between quality of content and attendance.” People who charge $60,000 for a one- hour keynote seem to draw no better than unknown speakers. 9:45 The role of HR.com's surveys and the goal of creating product and service guides. “We believe the Forrester/Gartner model is flawed.” 11:10 The upside surprises of running a community. "I'm shocked at how many people come to us from all over the world." 12:25 Guidance to would-be b-to-b community organizers: unique domain experts and it's really hard to get started in today's crowded market. 13:15 How HR.com runs virtual events 14:25 HR.com’s revenue mix: events, e-mail, PPC advertising, events 15:00 Memorable moments in HR.com’s industry. It was the first site in its industry to do webcasts. Internal resistance to the transition to a social network model. 17:30 Plans for the future: making events more self-service and profitable 19:30 Strictly regulating webcast content. “If presenters gave sales pitches, attendance wouldn't be as good.” 20:00 Gaining permission to work in the certification program. A large association charges for the same basic information HR.com gives away for free. RECOMMENDED EPISODES • B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender • Social Media Investor Relations Special with Former SEC Attorneys • Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman About the Guest Host This episode was guest hosted by Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching and is currently co-writing a book with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Mosaic of Trust with Richard Edelman

Mar 3, 2010

Description:

Richard Edelman discusses what the results of the 2010 Edelman Trust Barometer mean for B2B focused organizations. This interview was conducted as part of the research for an upcoming book about the B2B applications of social media that I am writing with Paul Gillin, which will be published by Wiley later this year. 02:14 - Richard Edelman on how broadly B2B marketers should be looking to engage stakeholders, who the most credible spokespeople and the new keys to corporate reputation. 03:02 - Disappearance of the boundary between brands and corporate reputations. 03:39 - Richard mentions how Edelman client ITT Corporation's Watermark marketing program is focused on a mosaic of stakeholders including state and local agencies, politicians, NGOs and end customers. 04:12 - Why B2B communications is no longer a "solitary soldier." 05:11 - Richard Edelman on how B2B focused organizations should go about selecting social media channels to engage through by focusing on issues that have a social impact, remaining conscious of government's increasing role in regulation and finding ways for your expert employees to be heard. 06:31 - Richard explains why trust in financial analysts remains high, despite the fact that they failed to accurately predict one of the most precarious financial situations in US history. 07:26 - Richard Edelman and Eric discuss Ken Auletta's new book "Googled," the importance of trust and the lesson for B2B marketers from the 2010 Trust Barometer. 08:32 - The importance of tracking more than just a company's financial data in the age of transparency. 09:10 - Employees as the new credible source versus the CEO. 09:47 - How realistic is it that businesses really will start putting purpose before profits? Richard uses Edelman client GE Ecoimagination as an example on an organization that is putting sustainability at the center of its product offering. RECOMMENDED EPISODES * B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender * Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys * Inside the Pentagon with Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2010 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord.

B2B Social Media Engagement

Feb 24, 2010

Description:

EmployeeScreen celebrated its 10th anniversary last August, making it a grandfather in the hotly contested market for employee screening services. The landscape is dotted with more than 1,000 companies, many of them specialized boutiques, according to Nick Fishman, chief marketing officer and executive vice president. EmployeeScreen has thrived in that environment in part due to a diversified set of social media programs that deliver education and insight that draws more than 3,000 visitors to its website each week. It was almost an accident three years ago that EmployeeScreen began to develop its social media presence. An early experiment with search engine optimization yielded a huge lift in traffic, which emboldened EmployeeScreen to go further. Today, its EmployeeScreen University draws thousands of human resources professionals each month to a slate of articles and audio/ video podcasts, with about one in four visitors clicking through to EmployeeScreen’s main website. Its active blog helps sustain its position near the top of search engine results. The success has enabled EmployeeScreen to reduce its dependence on advertising and to engage with prospects at a deeper level. It's also demonstrated a greater truth, says Fishman. “One small guy can make very big waves.” This episode is hosted by Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. 0:00 About EmployeeScreen 1:15 Competitive picture 1:45 Why using social networks to conduct background checks is a bad idea 5:15 How EmployeeScreen got into social media marketing by accident and the surprising early success the company had 7:30 The launch of EmployeeScreen University, a learning destination for HR professionals to learn all about background checks 9:30 Visitors grew to 5,000 to 7,000 per month, with 25% clicking to the corporate site 10:15 The move into social networks; HR people were early adopters of LinkedIn 11:00 Why Twitter hasn’t been a big business contributor 13:15 About EmployeeScreen’s all-time most popular blog entry 15:10 About adapting content for a b-to-b audience 16:15 Traffic to the blog averages about 3,000 visitors a week 17:05 How podcasts fit into the mix 17:30 Thematic programming: This Week in Background Checks; other uses for the podcast series 20:05 Which metrics matter most 20:45 How social media has reduced the need to advertise 21:15 Maintaining an early competitive lead; how search engine optimization keeps the site strong 22:15 Why you shouldn’t try to game search engines 23:00 Trying to keep up with social media evolution 24:15 How Nick and EmployeeScreen got into social media marketing 26:15 The need to stay on top of changing trends in Internet marketing 26:55 Landmarks in EmployeeScreen’s social media experience 27:50 “WordPress has been a godsend” RECOMMENDED EPISODES • B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender • Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys About the Guest Host This episode was guest hosted by Paul Gillin (@pgillin) of Paul Gillin Communications. Paul was founding editor-in-chief of TechTarget, one of the most successful technology media entities to emerge on the Internet. Before that, he was editor-in-chief and executive editor of the technology weekly Computerworld for 15 years. He wrote The New Influencers, Secrets of Social Media Marketing and the Joy of Geocaching and is currently co-writing a book with Eric Schwartzman about business-to-business applications of social media. Paul writes a regular column for BtoB magazine and contributes to various blogs and online publications. He’s also a Research Fellow and a member of the advisory board of the Society for New Communications Research.

Podcasting for Business Communications

Feb 20, 2010

Description:

Business benefits, audio and video production techniques, search engine optimization, a discussion of the latest gear and the future of podcasting in a world of attention deficits with Steve Lubetkin of Professional Podcasts. 01:35 -- Steve Lubetkin talks about his introduction to podcasting and his background using technology as a business communicator professional. 03:32 -- Eric mentions that this podcasts reaches almost as many listeners through the show blog as it does via RSS, and asks Steve if the same is true for him. 05:05 -- Steve Lubetkin builds a business case for RSS, by pointing out the many benefits of distributing XML with enclosures. 06:28 -- For Steve Lubetkin, the ultimate goal in producing and distributing podcasts from is to get his clients noticed, and for that reason, he prefers automated solutions that minimize his time investment in achieving that result. 07:13 -- Using podcasts to get clients noticed via search engines. 08:24 -- The distinction between HTML and XML measurement, and the importance of securing a measurement solution that records both. 09:02 -- The importance of parking your feed on iTunes, from a client satisfaction perspective and listener satisfaction standpoint. 10:06 -- B2B podcasting is, for the most part, not about reaching large audiences. It's about reaching individuals with an immediate need for the marketers product or service. So instead of getting in front of thousands of people who may or may not have a need, podcasting is about automating the awareness, consideration, research and evaluation phases of general buying cycles. 11:31 -- Steve Lubetkin discusses the benefits of communicating via audio and video, in both short and long formats. 14:17 -- Instead of producing original content, Eric and Steve Lubetkin discuss using podcasts to extend the reach of business and other corporate events that are occurring already. 17:29 -- The advantage of shooting events in video is that you can always use only the audio if you prefer, but you still get the ability to use the video as well. 20:33 -- Steve Lubetkin gives his tips on the best gear for producing business oriented podcasts today and talks about the importance of recording good audio versus good video. 23:49 -- Steve Lubetkin and Eric talk about mixing audio, HD and the flip. 35:23 -- A discussion of business-to-business podcasts it is the use of podcasts for internal communications. 38:12 -- integrating podcasts into corporate communications campaigns. 42:15 -- Ron Ploof's new book "Read This First," which was featured on Marketing Over Coffee. 43:47 -- A discussion of Steve Rubel's (who has been featured in a previous episode of this podcast) life streaming experiments on Posterous, which he covered with Shel Holtz and Neville Hobson on For Immediate Release, and how podcasting might adapt to attention deficits. 47:03 -- Eric talks about Andy Lark's keynote at the first NewComm Forum, at which Andy showed EPIC 2014 to the crowd and proceeded to blow everyone's mind with his presentation about social media. 48:07 -- News at Seven, the dynamically generated news program, which featured avatars posting an online news program edited by fact stripping robots. 49:17 -- The importance of text to the future of content marketing and in dealing with attention deficits if we move into a change of partial content consumption. 50:32 -- Unleashing the archival value of content through search engine optimized text notes. 53:13 -- You can find Steve online at http://www.lubetkin.net/blog and www.ProfessionalPodcasts.com RECOMMENDED EPISODES * B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender * Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2010 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord.

Why Doublespeak is Dangerous

Feb 17, 2010

Description:

Despite it's first appearance in George Orwell's 1984, the use of "doublespeak" is on the rise in the US. Whether it's euphemism, jargon, gobbledygook or inflated language, doublespeak is a serious problem in the US for individuals and organizations. In this episode, American linguist William Lutz, co-author of the SEC's Plain English Handbook, author 17 books on writing in clear language and professor emeritus at Rutgers University explains why doublespeak is counterproductive to democracy, why we need to stop being passive consumers of deceptive language and what we can do to fight back. 01:28 -- "Clear language is essential so that both parties understand what they are agreeing to. In any contract that you enter into, you have to understand what your obligations and rights are under the terms of that contract," says Mr. Lutz. If a company writes a contract in such a way that consumers think they understand what their obligations are, but in reality don't, they may agree to something they don't understood, and ultimately cannot fulfill. When companies use anything other than straight-forward clear language to describe the terms of an offer, they're not dealing honestly in the marketplace, In they are setting up consumers to fail. 02:47 -- After a career focused on the use of doublespeak -- a term coined by George Orwell in his book 1984, first published in 1949 -- Lutz says this practice is on the rise for the very same reason Orwell predicted in his book, which is that "You can get away with a lot of things in language. We talk about spin, and it's all right to be a spin doctor. But what are we really saying about a spin doctor? A spin doctor sits there and says, "Oh no, no, no, you didn't hear what you thought you heard. Let me tell you what you really heard, and proceeds to put a spin on. And the spin turns out to be something entirely different than what was said or what was written or whatever. This has now become a profession. if you can get away with things using just words, why not? And it's become, unfortunately, something of a growth industry," says Mr. Lutz. 04:12 -- Doublespeak poses a threat to the United States because it creates a buffer between what organizations are saying and what people are hearing. if you're entering into a credit card contract, or buying a home, and you're understanding of your obligation is not based on reality, that's problematic. The housing bubble was exacerbated by the fact that people thought they understood the mortgages they were getting, only to find out that they were in over their heads. In a democracy, we decide what policies and candidates to back by listening to the public discourse. If the discussion is carried out in doublespeak, organizations deliberately mislead the people so don't really know what's going on, and we wind up making decisions of social importance on the wrong basis. 05:41 -- "Doublespeak is a matter of intent. You can identify doublespeak by looking at who is saying what to whom, under what conditions and circumstances, with what intent and what result. If a politician stands up and speaks to you and says, "I am giving you exactly what I believe, and then turns around and does the opposite, then you've got a pretty good yardstick. She was pretending to tell me something, and it turns out it wasn't what she meant at all, she meant something different," says Mr. Lutz, in his doublespeak litmus test. 06:43 -- The first type of doublespeak is the euphemism. "We want to talk about something, but because of social conventions we don't use direct language, we use indirect language. you don't walk up to someone and say I'm sorry your mother died. You say I'm sorry for your loss, or I'm sorry she passed away. But no one is being misled. In fact, it's a mark of your concern for the other person that you use that euphemism. However when you start using a euphemism because you want to avoid the harsh reality, then you're engaged in doublespeak. For example, the State Department invented the euphemistic doublespeak term "unlawful arbitrary detention" or "unlawful arbitrary deprivation of life," says Mr. Lutz. "It basically means that the government was busy killing its own citizens without benefit of trial or or any other legal niceties, so [that's an example of where] euphemism moves into doublespeak." 07:46 -- The second kind of doublespeak is jargon, which usually centers around a particular industry or area of specialized knowledge. In the workplace, by the workers, jargon is fine because everyone understands it. But when you use it to mislead or obscure with someone who does not know that jargon then you've crossed the line into doublespeak. For example, "involuntary conversion," is a legal term which means the loss of use of your property due to fire, theft or public condemnation. If your car is stolen, legally that's an involuntary conversion of your property. However, when you talk, as one airline did, about the involuntary conversion of a 737, meaning that the plane crashed, then we've moved into using jargon is doublespeak. 08:57 -- The third kind of doublespeak is bureaucratese or gobbledygook, where we just pile words upon words that nobody can figure out. " I think the classic master of that was Alan Greenspan. I used to listen to his testimony before Congress just so impressed with his use of economic jargon, doublespeak, gobbledygook and it all sounded so impressive, didn't it? But it didn't mean anything that anybody could figure out," says Mr. Lutz. 09:29 -- The fourth kind of doublespeak is inflated language, which tries to make something impressive or important that really isn't. For example, "used cars" are now "pre-owned" or even "experienced." We have "previewed DVDs" meaning they're "used." The doorman on a building is the "access controller." And William's all time favorite, the "predawn vertical insertion" which was used by the Pentagon described the invasion of Grenada. 11:15 -- People are very good at recognizing doublespeak. The constant use of doublespeak has a hardening effect in that we come to expect it,which is unfortunate because we shouldn't. As an analogy Lutz uses air-quality. As long as the air quality is good no one is concerned, or pays much attention." But as soon as the air quality becomes bad, suddenly everyone's up in arms. He believes we should have the same concerns about the quality of language that is used in public discourse. And says that we need to voice our concerns to politicians who use doublespeak much as we would to manufacturers of products that malfunction. We'd return the product for refund and should do the same when we hear doublespeak by stopping to be passive consumers of language and demanding those who use doublespeak to rephrase themselves. 14:13 -- Using Enron as an example, Eric asks William whether or not the use of clear language can actually help investors detect fraud, because organizations can just lie in plain English. It's difficult to lie in plain English, cause it's easier for people to catch you. In the case of Enron, William explains that they used footnotes that were so cryptic they were incomprehensible, and that both journalists and analysts covering the stock could not find a single Enron representative who could explain them. It was not written in plain English. it was written in financial, economic jargon, bureaucratese, gobbledygook and it was done, to deliberately mislead and hide what was going on because if they wrote it in plain English, so that it was even moderately understandable, and people read it, they were going to ask questions. And they probably would have figured out that instead of running a profit, they were running a multibillion-dollar loss. And the other thing that's happened now is that if you've lie, the government can now prosecute you for fraud. So the folks at Enron had to write language that allowed them to pretend like it was all disclosed, but people just didn't understand it. So you see, "mandating plain language, that is plain enough so that any reasonably intelligent investor can understand...

Power Social Networking and the Real Time Web

Feb 12, 2010

Description:

I know. You've heard it a million times. The social web is not a vanity press. It's a place to develop relationships, where give and take rules and conversations thrive. Sounds great, right? But how does that work in practice? Just because you have a way to introduce yourself, doesn't mean people are going respond. What's the right way to use online social networks to get someones attention? So if you've ever wondered, "What do I do when my @replies and emails go unanswered?" then this episode is for you. I originally thought it was going to be pretty much just about the real time web, and the first half is, but you're going to hear some very useful, practical tips about how to actually break through and start conversations with people you may want to know -- even the ones who are so popular they're literally inundated with requests -- through social networks. You're going to learn about leveraging preferred communication channels, how to cross-pollinate social networks, where the VoIP industry is headed, whether or not government regulators should be look beyond net neutrality to search neutrality and what it all means to a 15-year old. It's the Social Networking Jedi Training episode with the father of the VoIP industry, Jeff Pulver (@jeffpulver) of JeffPulver.com and the 140 Character Conference. 01:00 -- In the financial markets, brokers and investors base their buying and selling decisions on real-time information, and in some ways, the real-time web offers us the same fast, breaking information, and its new found availability, thanks to Twitter, Facebook, Google Buzz and Google Wave, has a flattening effect on competitive markets, by democratizing information, giving everyone access to information at the same time. The archival web gave everyone greater access to information, but some people were still at an advantage because they got it first. But it is the real-time web, where individuals echo one anothers voices, which has had a leveling effect, in the transfer of power from the few to the many. 04:46 -- The 140 Characters Conference, its purpose and the rise of Twitter among individuals in the mainstream media, politics, entertainment and advertising. 05:15 -- Using the analogy of financial markets once again, Jeff Pulver uses the gap in time between an earthquake that occurred in Northern California and amount of time it took for that information to surface on Google as representative of an information arbitrage opportunity, reminding us that just as a 5-second advance on world events can and does constitute a significant trading advantage, the real-time web may afford us advantages in business, politics and culture that not all entirely known. 7:01 -- Tim Street (@1timstreet) asks via Twitter how Jeff manages his database of personal contacts, which is mentioned in the book "Trust Agents" by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith, though not in enough detail to be actionable. 11:48 -- Eric reads Jeff the following line from "Trust Agents" which says "The lesson Pulver told Chris at the time, was that one's personal database is an asset as valuable as gold, if nurtured and maintained" and then asks him specifically how one nurtures his personal database, which Jeff says is based on tailoring the message to the individuals preferred media channel. "If I understand that someones communication device is a Blackberry, then I make sure my subject of my e-mail is less than 16 characters. Some people, who will never respond to an e-mail, will respond immediately to a tweet. Some people who ignore e-mail, will respond to a direct message. There are people, who for some reason, will only respond to Facebook messages." Our default communications channels are different. The future of direct marketing rests in the marketer's ability to identify, remember and connect with each individual through their preferred communication channel, whatever that may be. 16:26 -- Jeff also says time of day when that person individual is active on a particular channel is also a determination. For example, if he is soliciting speakers for a conference, and he's unable to get a referral from someone, he may just contact that person on twitter. But before he dies, he'll go to their Twitter page and see if there's a time they're typically active, and contact them then. 16:46 -- if Jeff Pulver were designing a CRM tool today, the information he would record on each customer card would be: cell phone number, corporate e-mail, personal e-mail (Gmail, Yahoo, or Hotmail), Facebook ID, Twitter ID and preferred method of contact. 19:11 -- Eric tells Jeff about one of his favorite podcasts, Marketing Over Coffee by John Wall and Christopher Penn, and recalls a discussion in which they explained how to use a Gmail, Yahoo or Hotmail e-mail account address book to synchronize contacts in Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Flickr and other social networks, and asks whether or not Jeff has ever used this method. 20:46 -- The role of e-mail in promoting conferences hasn't really changed, according to Jeff, other than the fact that e-mail is no longer everyone's preferred communication channel. So effectively leveraging e-mail means knowing who prefers it and who doesn't. But when Jeff wants to build a list of current contacts, he'll start by exporting his Linkedin contacts, next export his Plaxo contacts and his Gmail contacts and put it all together in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. He'll also go on to Facebook and Twitter and promotional publish links to his events and conferences, noting that this is where your number of followers is valuable. He also creates Facebook events and groups and direct markets those who RSVP and join. 24:27 -- One of the primary reasons Jeff Pulver uses Microsoft Excel to build his lists is the issue of data portability, or the concern that if he is forced to rely solely on Facebook or Twitter to access his social network, it's possible those services might someday lock him out, restrict access because of a terms of service violation or even change to the terms of service someday and limit the number of contacts a user can maintain. 26:22 -- Eric recommends Shel Israel, featured in a previous episode of this podcast about Twitter Strategy, humanizing brands and building loyalty, as a speaker at Jeff's upcoming 140 Characters Conference. 26:56 -- Freedom Voice marketing communications manager John Lincoln asks via Twitter about the latest VoIP phones with video conference abilities, and what's on the horizon. And Jeff says what's next is high-definition voice, since currently, our voices are so filtered and under-sampled that we are required to spell out our names phonetically, and often struggle to understand speakers with heavy accents or small children, which is a direct result of poor quality audio. 29:17 -- Why VoIP conversations often have audio dropout or interference, what, if anything, individuals can do about it and why net neutrality is a key component to the future of VoIP. 31:16 -- Eric reads Jeff an excerpt from a guest column titled "Search and You May Not Find" by Adam Raff who runs a company called Foundem, that appeared in the opinion section of the New York Times, suggesting that regulators need to go beyond just net neutrality and insure search neutrality as well. "The need for search neutrality is particularly pressing because so much market power lies in the hands of one company Google. With 71% of the united states search market, Google's dominance of both search and search advertising gives it overwhelming control. One way that Google exploits this control is by imposing covert blank penalties that can strike legitimate and useful websites, removing them entirely from its search results or placing them so far down the rankings that they will in all likelihood never be found. For three years my company is vertical search and price comparison website found them effectively disappeared from the Internet in this way." 34:30 -- Jeff's 15-year old son Dylan, who Eric saw seated in the background during the interview conducted...

B2B Social Networking - Lead Generation on SlideShare

Feb 9, 2010

Description:

Lead generation through business with personality, shortcomings of star-ratings functionality, driving B2B social networking activity, making sharing beneficial to community members and encouraging responsible behavior by discouraging anonymity with Rashmi Sinha, CEO of SlideShare, which recently unveiled new, branded channels. If you're a regular listener of this podcast, you'll notice these show notes are different. They are more complete and more narrative. I am currently writing a book with Paul Gillin on B2B social media engagement, and will be incorporating insights from this podcast. There seems to be a great deal of interest in understanding how B2C might differ from B2B social media engagement. Paul and I are working to articulate the distinctions. This is one of many B2B oriented podcast interviews I will be releasing. Expect a few guest hosted episodes by Paul as well. Also, with the release of this podcast we have posted an audience survey link on our show blog and are asking listeners to please, take the survey. SHOW NOTES 00:47 -- Rashmi Sinha's previous appearance on the Supernova Podcast, hosted by Christopher Carfi on Blog Talk Radio, where much of the discussion focused on object-oriented social networking, and what makes these types of services different from more popular social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook and MySpace. 01:15 -- As in the real world, and particularly in a business-to-business context, interaction is usually focused around a particular activity, like a meeting, convention or demonstration. Popular social networks like Facebook and Twitter, when interaction is not focused around a specific activity, are sometimes awkward because there is no construct for that experience in the real world, where exchanges are organized around actions. 02:07 -- SlideShare branded channels, a new area of the site which allow organizations to establish a custom, micro-site with their own look and feel inside the service, so they can engage with the broader SlideShare community. Microsoft and Adobe have established their own branded channels, as has the White House and the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project. As part of the launch, SlideShares new branded channels are now open to other organizations and brands by request, which at the time of this podcast can made be submitting a form within that section of the website. 03:09 -- The majority of SlideShare's community members are business decision-makers. Community members use the service mostly in a business context, since the social network is designed to host, share and promote discussion around PowerPoint presentations, which are used mostly in business to help make a point. As a result, SlideShare is primarily a business-to-business social network. On Feb. 6, 2010, just days after SlidShare's branded channels launch, there were 11 featured business channels, 2 featured education channels, 4 featured nonprofit channels and 1 featured event channel. 03:54 -- The Slideshare Virtualization Channel, a new, curated channel put together by the B2B social networking service is one of many they intend to add over the coming months, to provide organizations with an opportunity to associate their product, brand or service with premium content appealing to a specific business audience segment by way of a sponsorship. 04:49 -- According to Rashmi, Facebook is a personal social network that has been edging towards business. Twitter is a social network that has always had a mix of personal and business applications. And Linkedin is a social network that is completely professional, with no room at all for personal interactions. She calls SlideShare a social network occupying the space between Facebook and Twitter. She acknowledges that SlideShare is very business oriented, but says that because it is such a visually oriented network where the most popular presentations usually incorporate a great deal of personality and flair, the service is conducive to interactions that are more personal than on Linkedin. 05:49 -- SlideShare may be business-to-business, but the service's real strength is its ability to promote business with personality. For example, on SlideShare's homepage, the presentations that tend to rank high, combine a great deal of personality with their subject matter, rather than more dry, reference-type presentations, which may be packed with relevant, useful content, but are often suffer from dense copy block, too few images and no real visual punch. 07:12 -- From a user-interface standpoint, there should be no difference between a B2C and B2B social networks, according to Rashmi. She reminds us that as is true in all forms of social media, ease of use drives adoption. And popular social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter are benchmarks for just how easy a social networking service needs to be to lure members. We have become accustomed to interacting with others online in a certain way, and if a B2B social network is going to be successful, it should be as user-friendly as popular online social media. 08:21 -- Connecting with perspective business customers in hopes of generating leads is the dominant behavior on SlideShare and Rashmi says her B2B social network is built around that purpose. Presentations are used to pitch products, brands and services. They support more extended, in-depth explanations. Display ads may work to entice you to click and go somewhere, but they can't walk you through the types of explanations that are typical of more complex products and services. It is the explanation that determines the length of a company's sales cycle. At this point, presentations are a good consultative sales tool, since they make it easier for marketers to incorporate the various business processes, case studies and best practices decision-makers like to appraise when evaluating business products that could be incorporated into a company's everyday processes. 10:17 -- Currently, from a measurement standpoint, Slideshare reports the number of views, embeds, favorites, comments and downloads. In the future, the company plans to report referrals as well and offer more in-depth reporting capabilities. 11:29 -- People upload their presentations on the site not just to share them with their existing business partners, but to get in front of other members they may not know, but who may have a need for their products and services. As is the case with popular networking services, if you see other members there who you want to connect with, it encourages you to join. So the network effect is just as important in a business-to-business social networking environment, as it is on Facebook and Twitter. For business-to-business marketers, niche networks may also have additional value by aggregating a more targeted, premium audience. 12:20 -- Rashmi reveals the typical pattern by which SlideShare embed codes wind up getting used to display member presentations. First, members tend to embed their presentations on their own sites Then they tweet it out or share it on Facebook. Next, people who find them on SlideShare may embed those presentations on other sites. The owner of the presentation tends to embed it only on their own side. But if it's good content it just takes off. Slide share offers numerous ways to syndicate presentations. But the quality of the presentation, as determined by the SlideShare community, determines how broadly it permeates online. In some ways, this makes it impossible to game SlideShare to generate leads. "Your content has to be good," says Rashmi. "We provide the tools for sharing, but if your content is getting distributed everywhere, it's because your content is good." 14:31 -- In a business to business social networking environment, the absence of spam is a key component of getting people to comment. The quality of conversation must be high. "People have higher standards for B2B sites than on B2C sites. They don't want to put up a professional conversation in a place where they might encounter trolls," says Rashmi. She also points out that...

Twitter Strategy Humanizing Brands and Building Loyalty with Shel Israel

Feb 4, 2010

Description:

Of all the great guests I've had on this podcast, I'm particularly excited about this one, who last appeared here in a joint interview with Robert Scoble. One of the best books I read in 2009 was "Twitterville" by Shel Israel (@shelisrael). I found it so riveting and packed with useful information, that I simply couldn't read it without a highlighter in hand. If you like this podcast, you've got to read this book. For a preview, listen to this in-depth, one-on-one discussion with Shel Israel about how organizations can use social media to sustain customer loyalty when things go wrong, human interaction as a replacement for the false image branding often conveys and the future prospects of Twitter as a company and a service. SHOW NOTES 01:30 -- Shel Israel agrees to let Eric Schwartzman publish his "Twitterville" book notes, the author's feelings about the book and whether the title sells it short. 04:45 -- At big organizations, employees are often encouraged to stay in their lane. From an operational standpoint, how does someone like Frank Eliason of @ComcastCares get the cable repair truck to show up on time, or get modifications made to someone's cable bill? Achieving buy in for social media customer service programs enterprise wide. 09:37 -- A discussion of the Motrin Moms backlash on Twitter prompted by Jessica Gottlieb in response to a commercial she found to be insensitive, and whether or not organizations are sometimes too quick to capitulate and rollover in response to customer protests, regardless of whether or not they believe the protests are reasonable. 13:06 -- The herd or pack mentality often pervasive when and where people congregate online, how it relates to individual and organizational behavior and what Motrin's real failure was in how they dealt with the #motrinmoms incident. 14:47 -- Frank Rose's article in Wired Magazine titled "Commercial Break" about the consumer generated advertising campaign for Chevy Tahoe, which is often hailed among social media pundits as a case study for what not to do, but which actually resulted in increased sales, market share and shorter sales cycles. Note: Frank Rose has been featured in a previous episode of this podcast. 19:17 -- Why and how the way organizations like @WholeFoods and @Starbucks approach to Twitter is more in line with the Land of Oz than with reinforcing and underscoring a commitment to transparency and authenticity. 21:17 -- Reconciling Julian Smith and Chris Brogan's claim in their book "Trust Agents" that organizations should "never leave an empty unused account anywhere because it's as much an indicator of neglect as a dirty desk" against the belief that logo Twitter accounts are, generally speaking, not as effective as individual accounts because who wants to talk to a Coke can? 22:31 -- Branding as a creative, false image that companies manufacturer to try to convince you that their products, brands, and services are something they're not, and how Twitter presents organizations with an opportunity to replace that model with a more authentic, legitimate experience based on human interaction. 25:08 -- Identifying the friction between subjective and objective Tweets, and whether or not some sort of distinction between the two could suggest a practical, reasonable governance policy for organizations that are on the fence about whether to Tweet under branded or individual accounts. 27:45 -- If organization's embrace a Twitter strategy that encourages employees to use their individual accounts, how can those organizations preserve the relationships employees establish on their behalf after they exit the company? 29:07 -- Shel Israel's experience working withThe MCI, which at the time was engaged in an aggressive telemarketing campaign, to explain why the effectiveness of organizational communications cannot be measured by raw data alone, and the notion that social media may, for the first time, present organizations with a more fiscally-responsible channel for expanding marketshare. 32:18 -- Customer service as the new PR and solving problems via social media in full view of everyone. 33:00 -- A discussion of how automaker Toyota has set up and organized their twitter presence under a branded, logo account @Toyota but with the employees tweeting on the companies that have listed in the sidebar are custom background JPEG. 34:29 -- Using Andrew Sinkov who tweets @evernote and Apple Computer as a backdrop, a discussion about the importance of good conversation versus product performance. 35:31 -- While superior product performance and qualified employees may render social media less important, sustaining customer loyalty when things break is going to be much more difficult for opaque, secretive organizations that have no goodwill in the online community. 38:08 -- The future prospects for Twitter as a company, micro-blogging as a communications channel and concerns about twitter as a single point of failure. 42:45 -- Shel Israel's new book, about the software company SAP, which he is co-writing with Mark Yoltan, SVP of the SAP community network. Note: Thanks to Shel, Mark Yolton to has been featured in a previous episode of this podcast on B2B Social Networking. 45:56 -- End BONUS CONTENT: * "Twitterville" - Eric's Notes * "Trust Agents" Eric's Notes RECOMMENDED EPISODES: * B2B Social Networks: Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender Social Media Crisis Communications Strategy Deep Dive with FEMA Public Information Officer John Shea * Online Newsroom Best Practices with Toyota Social Media Supervisor Scott Deyager ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the Social Media Boot Camp and the Social Media Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the2010 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord.

B2B Social Networks - Driving Commerce with Imperfection and Surrender

Feb 3, 2010

Description:

Considering launching a B2B social networking site for your organization? If so, you've come to the right place. In this podcast, Mark Yolton, Sr. V.P. of SAP Community Network tells you almost everything you need to know about what it takes to launch a successful B2B social network. The SAP community network -- a B2B social networking initiative nearly 2,000,000 members strong and growing at a monthly pace of 30,000 new members spanning 200 countries and territories worldwide -- has been recognized by the Altimeter Group and SiteIQ as one of the most successful business-to-business social networking sites in the world. In this episode Mark Yolton, senior vice president of SAP Community Network Global Ecosystem & Partner Group reveals the winning formula that has resulted in 6000 posts per day, 1 million unique visitors per month and 200,000 contributions by celebrating imperfection, profiting from surrender, improving product performance through user ratings and building deeper professional relationships through personal interactions. This interview will incorporated in a book I am writing with Paul Gillin on business-to-business social media engagement. If you are aware of other instances or case studies involving the successful use of social media for business-to-business online communications or social media, please leave a comment here and let me know. We are interested in interviewing others with experience deploying social media communications channels for measurable business gain. Paul has published a draft outline of our book, to be published by Wiley later this year, under the working title Social Marketing and the Business Customer. I'm particularly excited about this interview, and want to extend my thanks to Shel Israel for helping to arrange it. This podcast also marks a new chapter in the show's format. We have a new main title, a new closing title and a new sponsor. Looking forward to your feedback on these changes. SHOW NOTES 01:42 -- Using a social network to deliver value to different stakeholder groups including customers, partners, the sponsoring company and individuals. 03:54 -- Building brand loyalty through social networks and more compelling business benefits of sponsoring a social network. 04:20 -- Why customer-to-customer communications is a significant benefit of social networks for business-to-business applications and the key to stimulating peer-to-peer activity. 06:34 -- How to determine what type of information is appropriate for sharing within a B2B social network without compromising the sponsoring company's competitive edge. 08:42 -- Why a corporate social media policy tailored to the sophistication of the employee base is a critical component of effective business-to-business social networking. SAP has published their Forum Rules of Engagement and Blog/Community Guidelines. 11:21 -- Using a wiki to include employees in the development of a corporate social media policy. 12:24 -- The strategic criteria by which SAP decided between establishing a branded B2B social networking community versus a public B2B social networking community. Note: While SAP used their own software, branded communities can also be built using tools such as Ning, while public communities are commonly hosted on Web 2.0 sites like Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin. 15:35 -- Deepening business relationships through Twitter, Facebook, Flickr and B2B social networks as adjunct to a core, branded, B2B social networking site. 16:25 -- The advantages of branded communities over Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn and which companies are not candidates for managing their own branded, B2B social networking community. 19:04 -- The types of roles or job functions within the organization and generations predisposed to participating in a social networking B2B environment. 21:10 -- How to decide which sections of a B2B social networking site should be public, and which areas should be private. 24:33 -- Conducting edge work through mentors, who are nominated by the community and do not work for SAP. The use of exclusive access and private areas to seed information within the community through influential community members. 28:38 -- How active contributors benefit from participating in the SAP B2B social networking site through lead generation and reputation management. 30:28 -- The business benefits of relinquishing control of the conversation to your customers and exactly what it takes to drive active discussion amongst customers, resellers, partners, and other channel sales participants in a social networking B2B environment. 32:06 -- The intangible benefits of online social networking to B2B online social networking community members. 36:33 -- The use of friends or contacts in an online social network to filter important, relevant information through recommendations. 37:58 -- Staffing requirements for managing, weeding and farming B2B social networking sites. 40:29 -- Using star ratings and user reviews inside B2B social networking site to promote sales and improve product performance. 41:25 -- The specific skills that make for on exceptional B2B social networking community manager. 44:41 -- The relationship between a B2B social networking site community manager's willingness to reveal at least some aspects of their personal lives with their business colleagues, their effectiveness at shepherding conversations within a social networking B2B environment and why imperfections and human flaws are essential to driving conversations. 45:39 -- The use of Facebook, Twitter and object-oriented social networking sites to deepen personal relationships, which are sustained primarily in a branded, B2B social networking environment. 47:06 -- The relationship between user ratings and product sales within a B2B social networking site, why perfect ratings are not usually good for sales and how low ratings can be used to improve product performance. 50:03 -- Integrating proprietary and open source software to power a B2B social network initiative and dealing with potential tension between open-source platforms and licensed proprietary software. 55:39 -- End BONUS CONTENT AVAILABLE: • SAP Community Network External Briefing • SAP eBook: Driving Business Value through B2B Social Networking RECOMMENDED EPISODES: • Social Media Investor Relations Special with Former SEC Attorneys • Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State • Crisis Communications Online: Social Media Usage during the VT Shootings ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the New Media and Social Media PR Boot Camp and the New Media and Social Media PR Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2010 PRSA International...

Special Episode Listening to Social Media Conversations with Rob Key

Jan 30, 2010

Description:

Rob Key, CEO and founder of Converseon talks about becoming a listening organization, social CRM and mining actionable business intelligence from online conversations at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego.

Inside the Public Affairs Campaign of Barack Obama

Jan 26, 2010

Description:

Mike Smith (@smittypa) of Mike Smith Public Affairs talks about his work on the Obama Campaign and the months leading up to US presidential election at 2009 PRSA international Conference in San Diego.
Mike Smith of Mike Smith Public Affairs 01:01 -- How citizen journalism and viral communications worked to advance the Obama Campaign. A discussion of the boot camps which were held by the Obama campaign to energize the base, communciate the message and the campaign trail from Iowa to Virginia. O2: 07 -- His experience canvassing door-to-door in freezing cold weather in Iowa. The single biggest lesson this 27-year-old public relations person learned from the campaign and the importance of putting the voter first. 02:56 -- Sacrificing the niceties of PR and creating bonds with voters based on a working knowledge of each voter's background. 03:29 -- Rather than focus on communicating directly with everyone, the Obama campaign's strategy, which identified and focused on the influencers within their communities, and leveraged their support to achieve broader outreach. 04:33 -- Why the Iowa caucus is so significant in US presidential elections. 06:14 -- How the Obama campaign was able to attract and organize so many volunteers, and why the Des Moines Register was more important than The New York Times. 07:24 -- Working with field organizers and how the Obama strategy focused on getting college students back from Christmas break in time to vote. 08:24 -- Fifty million in one month was an all time record for fund-raising on the Internet, and since it came from mostly $100 donations, the campaigns populist message was drawn from the micro-payments story. Video excerpt from thhis audio podcast interview with Mike Smith 09:26 -- The role of Blue State Digital and the Web team on the Obama Campaign, and how they mobilized the enthusiasm of their social media followers. 10:16 -- Learning to Tweet from Craig Newmark (featured in a previous episode of this podcast) and integrating Twitter into the Obama Campaign. 11:04 -- Craig Newmark's advice on determining who to follow, and a little know fact about Craig's political allegiance. 13:13 -- Self-identification on social networks with respect to political affiliations and whether or not that is or is not a good idea from a professional standpoint for public relations and public affairs practitioner. 14:05 -- Determining how and when to disclose one's political preferences in an online social environment. Where does my life end and the corporate life begin? 15:11 -- Wrestling with how much disclosure and transparency is appropriate on the Internet with social networking tools. RECOMMENDED EPISODES: Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State Crisis Communications Online: Social Media Usage during a Crisis with Leysia Palen ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the New Media and Social Media PR Boot Camp and the New Media and Social Media PR Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter@ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Building a Social Media Policy with Rich Teplitsky

Jan 21, 2010

Description:

Rich Teplitsky, Director of Public Relations for KGB Texas in San Antonio discusses social media communications policies and governance inside organizations at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. Teplitsky is chair elect of the PRSA Technology Section and has served in senior roles at Alcatel-Lucent and Monster.com 01:14 -- Social media policy as an extension of an organization's professional code of conduct. A video excerpt from the audio podcast interview with Rick Teplitsky 03:46 -- Establishing the rules of social media engagement, the rules of self-identification and the importance of transparency. 05:11 -- The demographics and expectations of participation of today's work force and how that impacts corporate policy. 06:13 -- How our expectations of privacy have changed as result of social media and the responsibility of employees to limit their participation in activities that could result in digital images and other social media objects. 07:08 -- The regulatory challenges of corporate communications in the Conversational Era and how it impacts social media policy. 08:17 -- Dealing with issues such as competitiveness and rudeness of social media interaction in a corporate social media policy. 10:17 -- The importance of stakeholder relations, and ensuring that the right stakeholders have a seat at the table prior to the development of a social media policy. 11:27 -- Constantin Basturea's New PR Wiki as a resource for examining the social computing guidelines and blogging policies of a variety of organizations. 12:16 -- The PRSA Technology Section's Ning site as a resource for networking with other public relations professionals tasked with developing social media policies. RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Guantanamo PR Chief on Gov 2.0, Social Media Engagement and Mainstream Media Relations Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online U.S. Army Reserve Social Media Chief Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Ostlund @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the New Media and Social Media PR Boot Camp and the New Media and Social Media PR Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter@ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

US Navy Rear Admiral TL McCreary on Crisis Communication for 9/11 and the war in Iraq

Jan 18, 2010

Description:

TL McCreary, Retired Rear Admiral, US Navy An interview with 27-year retired United States Navy Rear Admiral TL McCreary, the former spokesperson for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and a former public officer in service to Army Gen. Dick Shelton, Gen. Dick Myers and the former Counter-terrorism Counsel and president of Military.com about handling crisis communications during the US incursion into Iraq, embedding journalists with military units, the biggest crisis communications mistake the US Military made during the Iraqi incursion and how former US Armed Forces service members can apply their public affairs skills to the private sector workplace. This interview was recorded at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. 01:43 -- How McCreary became an Admiral in the United States Navy and his experience as a public affairs officer in the United States Military. 02:26 -- Why informing military commanders what's going on in the public sector it's not just an issue of truth, but an issue of trust and an issue of transparency and why lawyers and public affairs officers are the two most important counselor's to today's senior leadership. 03:32 -- The importance of providing an accurate explanation of war time activities to the public. 04:01 -- A recount of 9/11, exactly what happened when the hijacked plane hit the Pentagon and what went through his mind on that day. 05:04 -- Working in the National Command Center in the Pentagon with Vice Chairman Gen. Myers, SecDef Rumsfeld and his spokesman Victoria Clarke after the plane hit the Pentagon. 06:02 -- The importance of good military training in preparing a public affairs officer how to communicate effectively during a crisis. 06:38 -- Letting the American people know that the US Military is still functioning and operating during a time of crisis. 07:02 -- SecDef Rumsfeld's presentation to the press from the podium in the Pentagon. 07:43 -- The main difference between handling crisis communications during 9/11 versus other national emergencies was one of scope, which directly involved the United States Vice President, the US Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff all discussing matters such as what to do if there were a second attack and whether or not to shoot down a plane with civilians aboard. 08:39 -- The use of a separate, off-site press center to accommodate media during a major crisis, and providing status updates to the public through Craig Quigley, Victoria Clarke's spokesperson at the Department of Defense, who ran the press center during 9/11. 09:36 -- The differences between 9/11 crisis communications and media relations during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. 10:06 -- Handling public affairs during the initial incursion into Iraq under a veil of secrecy. Devising the press plan, which was designed to embark pools of media without revealing our battle plans. And the use of embargoed information to communicate the scope of the incursion and the facts on the ground through the national and some international news media to the American people. 11:24 -- Dispatching journalists to aircraft carriers and other military staging areas to allow them to cover the Iraqi incursion, code named operation Iraqi Freedom, during its occurrence. 12:30 -- What it takes to be the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the United States Department of Defense. 14:27 -- the use of independent journalists in the first Iraqi incursion and router out of all my queries roll in drafting. The rationale for embedding journalists as a strategy for countering Saddam Hussein's propaganda campaign through transparency. 16:19 -- How Gen. Myers's experience in Vietnam impacted his communications strategy during the Iraqi incursion and the importance of distinguishing military policy from political policy so people understand that the US Armed Forces are not responsible for the decision to go to war, which is made by elected US civilian leadership. 18:17 -- Dealing with security breaches from reporters like Geraldo Rivera's sand drawings that leaked US Military positions during the Iraqi campaign. 19:14 -- The single biggest mistake that the US Armed Forces made in from a communications standpoint during the incursion into Iraq. 20:03 -- How and why the US Armed Forces lost the ability to tell their story after the embedded journalists program dissolved and journalists shifted their focus to other matters after the initial Military incursion was complete. 21: 23 -- Rear Adm. TL McCreary's top tips to United States Armed Forces service members who are approaching their discharge and transition to the civilian workplace. NOTE: Service Members are encourage to download a free copy of the Digital Readiness Report, which lists the key communications skills sought by corporate hiring managers in today's job market. 22:57 -- Why the US military public affairs community is better at crisis communications than most others 22:42 -- Why the US military public affairs community understands mainstream and trade media relations. 24:53 -- The one area military public affairs officers are least knowledgeable in is Sarbanes-Oxley law and other regulations governing the communications of public companies, but they are generally quick studies. 26:19 -- Whether or not members of United States Armed Forces are a better fit for transitioning to large organizations or small businesses. 27:19 -- Why former public affairs officers in the US Armed Forces are very self-sufficient and able to manage activities autonomously. RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Guantanamo PR Chief on Gov 2.0, Social Media Engagement and Mainstream Media Relations U.S. Army Reserve Social Media Chief Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Ostlund Inside the Pentagon with Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings Pentagon War Court Spokesperson Ann Peru Knabe on Afghanistan, Iraq and 9/11 Balancing Your Right to Know against Operational Security with US Marine Corps Public Affairs Officer Major Danny Chung Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff ABOUT THE PODCASTER @EricSchwartzman provides online communication training, strategy and governance to public relations, public affairs, corporate communications and marketing specialists. He has extensive experience integrating emerging information technologies into organizational communications programs through public speaking, hands-on training seminars, consulting and the development of corporate policies on social media usage. His clients have included Boeing, BYU, City National Bank, Environmental Defense Fund, Government of Singapore, Johnson & Johnson, Southern California Edison, Toyota, UCLA, US Dept. of State, United States Army, US Embassy of Athens, the United States Marine Corps and many small to medium-sized companies and agencies. Schwartzman is currently co-authoring a book on business-to-business social media communications with Paul Gillin, to be published by Wiley in Fall 2010. He is the instructor behind PRSA’s top-rated social media and emerging treads training seminars, the New Media and Social Media PR Boot Camp and the New Media and Social Media PR Master Class, which are offered monthly in the US through PRSA. Since 2005, he has been producing the weekly, award-winning public relations podcast “On the Record…Online” (@ontherecord) about how technology is changing the way organizations communicate, the official podcast of the PRSA International Conference for the past three consecutive years. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter@ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Communicating the Biggest Bank Failure in US History with Former WaMu VP Internal Communications Karen Horn

Jan 11, 2010

Description:

Handling corporate communications for the biggest bank failure in US history with Former Washington Mutual Vice President of Internal Communications Karen Horn of Horn Communication at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. Prior to her position at WaMu, she was the senior director of employee commitment at Cisco. Note: Alan Elias, senior vice president of corporate communications for Washington Mutual Card Services and Cisco executives Jeanette Gibson, New Media Manager and Maureen Casper, Senior Director of Corporate Communciations have both been featured on previous episodes of this podcast. 01:37 – A summary of why and how Washington Mutual became insolvent, the FDIC seizure and the sale of the failed financial services firm to JP Morgan Chase for $1.7 billion. 03:52 – What the sale of WaMu to Chase meant for home owners who had financed their homes with a home loan from Washington Mutual. 04:36 – What happened on Sept. 25, 2008, the day WaMu employees found out the bank had been seized by the FDIC, and the declaration of the sale to JP Morgan Chase, which came by way of their government relations team. 06:23 – The government relations team’s decision to communicate the declaration via telephone rather than email, since the initial accounts were speculative. 06:55 – Scripting the message to employees about the collapse and the FDIC seizure, so that if a seizure did occur, WaMu could inform employees before the mainstream news media, and the decision to distribute that communication via email. 08:05 – Coordinating the distribution of the internal communication to employees with the company’s external communications efforts to the news media and how they sequenced the news break strategically to control its release. 09:16 – The emotional reality of learning that the company you’ve been working for has gone belly up and that your pension and 401k are gone. 10:58 – At what point do you turn your back on your employer’s corporate reputation? Do you go down defending the brand, or do you surrender to trying to save the memory of a sinking ship? 12:31 – WaMu’s use of an internal leadership blog in their intranet, which was maintained by the bank’s COO, as a way of attracting criticism and indentifying friction points within the bank. 14:50 – Lessons learned and advice to financial services companies about how to integrate social media into a communications effort. 16:10 – Using an external social media channel like a blog to make a market for stock, sustaining a conversation over the long haul and making sure the organization’s reasons for blogging are realistic. 18:32 – Is internal communications more important in the conversation age, since we are migrating from a world where the center of the organization was the mouthpiece, to one where the center of the organization informs its edges, and its edges inform the world. 19:56 -- The single biggest corporate communications lesson learned from handling corporate communications during the collapse of Washington Mutual. 22:54 – How WaMu communicated with customer services representations in the days leading up to the failure, to motivate them to do their best to protect the banks interest, despite its precarious financial predicament. 20:59 – End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Inside the Online Video Business with Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online Jason Rosenberg, Online Communications Director for the Democratic National Convention Committee Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom and website design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

How to Build a Digital Strategy with Edelman Digital Vice President for Interactive Solutions Gary Goldhammer

Jan 5, 2010

Description:

Aligning digital strategy with business objectives, unique risks for public companies and engaging in controversial conversations with Gary Goldhammer (@g24khamr), vice president for Interactive Solutions at Edelman Digital at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. Gary has been blogging for five years about the convergence of journalism and new media at Below the Fold. 00:55 – Aligning digital strategy with business strategy by listening to what people are saying online, and creating an engagement strategy based on existing perceptions. 01:45 – What types of objectives cannot and should not be attempted with digital technology. What cannot be achieved? 02:30 – What are the risks public companies should be aware of when they create their digital strategy and what sort of guard rails should be in place before the launch a digital communications campaign? 02:47 – Adverse event reporting and what pharmaceutical companies are required by Food and Drug Administration to do if someone leaves a comment about an adverse reaction to one of their drugs on the manufacturer’s Facebook page. 03:25 – The duty to report the adverse effects of drug therapy extend beyond those pharmaceutical companies that maintain a social media presence. If a company is listening and engaging in any other social media channel, they may still be liable. 03:50 – Recent SEC Guidance on the Use of Company Websites to Satisfy Regulation Fair Disclosure and the notion that for public companies using social media, nonselective disclosure translates into nonselective engagement. 05:41 – How the online destination of a social media web presence impacts a public company’s duty to update, and whether or not hosting a corporate on a third-party service like Blogger at a BlogSpot domain is any safer than hosting the blog at your own domain. 07:11 – The duty to update as a strategic factor, rather than a legal factor, and the idea of looking at social media engagement as an ongoing conversation, rather than a one-time campaign. 08:03 – How to decide what social media channels are right for your organization based on where an organization’s most desirable community members are interacting already online and building strategies around inputs instead of outputs. 09:58 – The risks of segmenting communications by social media channel, saying one thing on Twitter and something else on Facebook and treating social media as a broadcast channel, versus an engagement channel. 12:05 – Is dealing with controversy about a company exclusively on their Facebook page instead of at your corporate domain protect the organization from tipping off those disengaged from social media about the controversy? 13:57 -- The web has not always been social, but has all media become social? A discussion of the Motrin Moms case study as an example of media that wasn’t intended to be social, and how it wound up provoking an adverse reaction via social media. 15:01 – Why using social media as a mass media channel is ineffective, and testing pilot projects internally as way of establishing a comfort level inside the organizations before launching initiatives in these channels externally. 18:29 – The 2009 Edelman Trust Barometer [PDF] rankings, which listed financial analysts and business magazines as the most trusted sources of company information, David Carr’s recent article about the state of the business magazine category, and whether or not business magazines will retain that level of trust on the 2010 Edelman Trust Barometer, which at the time of release of this podcast was not yet available. David Carr has appeared as a guest on this podcast before, and his keynote speech at the 2007 Digital Impact Conference was also podcast. 19:07 – The future of conventional journalism and the importance of niche and local news agencies. 20:59 – End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Inside the Online Video Business with Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online Jason Rosenberg, Online Communications Director for the Democratic National Convention Committee Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom and website design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

The State of Public Relations Association of America with Michael Cherenson president and CEO of PRSA

Dec 29, 2009

Description:

The business case for public relations, the results of the general assembly of the 2009 PRSA Assembly for Delegates and Leadership and delivering value with Michael Cherenson (@mcherenson), Chair and CEO of PRSA and Executive Vice President of New Jersey-based Success Communications Group at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. 01:21 – Steve Lubetkin (@podcaststeve) asks via Twitter, “What is PRSA going to do to persuade members to seek APR accreditation? Steve Lubetkin owns the firm in New Jersey Lubetkin Communications, which produces podcasts for clients. 04:55 – With communications migrating online and the rise of social media, what makes the APR accreditation relevant? 06:20 – Fran Stephenson (@fransteps), director of corporate communications at Rackspace asks via Twitter, “How will the board regroup after yesterday’s disappointing assembly results?” Fran Stephenson also oappeared in a panel at the conference with Kami Watson Huyse, Matthew Henry and Jason Avant on Building Relationships with the Digerati. 08:05 – On her Kicking Sand Blog, Nicole Jordan (@nicolejordan ) asks, “What do PR professionals think needs to be done to fundamentally change the way PR is perceived and practiced?” Nicole Jordan covered the conference for Webmaster Radio. Her audio coverage can be found at the Voices of PRSA Podcast Center. 11:01 – Is the definition of public relations too narrow to accurately describe where the business is headed? 13:28 – End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Inside the Online Video Business with Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online Jason Rosenberg, Online Communications Director for the Democratic National Convention Committee Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom and website design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Guantanamo PR Chief on Gov 2.0 Social Media Engagement and Mainstream Media Relations

Dec 23, 2009

Description:

Handling public affairs at the detainment facility operated by the Joint Task Force at GTMO “Gitmo,” the efforts of the Office of the US Secretary of Defense in establishing an umbrella social media policy and whether the US Dept. of Defense will publish data sets at www.data.gov, featuring Guantanamo Public Affairs Chief, US Navy Lieutenant Commander Brook DeWalt, APR and 2009 PRSA International Conference Honorary Co-Chair. 01:12 – Brook talks about his role as the liaison between US Armed Forces public affairs and the Public Relations Society of America, as the honorary 2009 PRSA International Conference Co-Chair. 03:18 – The controversy surrounding the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, preparations to close the facility by Presidential Executive Order on Jan. 22, 2010 and the mission of the joint task. 07:51 – Accommodating media at Guantanamo, who visit almost weekly to observe the conditions the facility and the treatment of the detainees. 10:27 – Managing public affairs maintaining transparency, providing access to information about the facility, the detainees and the personnel who serve there. 13:19 – Lt. Commander DeWalt responds to former Asst. Secretary of Defense Robert Hastings’s claim that Brook DeWalt was the brainchild behind the Department of Defense’s entrée into social media communications in his former role as Director of New Media for the US Department of Defense, and the Lieutenant Commander’s response that he was part of team with Jack Holt (@jack-holt) and others. 15:30 – The Department of Defense Bloggers Roundtable program, which DeWalt’s team launched, and other activities including working with the Pentagon Channel and www.defense.gov. 17:13 – A discussion of the umbrella social media policy, as discussed recently in the news media, that is being developed by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Offices within Joint Staff and an acknowledgement that technology is always in advance of policy. 19:29 – Whether the lack of social media policy a benefit or a detriment to implement social media communications within the U.S. Department of Defense, and importance of having policy moving forward. 21:31 – How public affairs within the US Armed Forces has changed in the age of the digital native. 22:20 – The unique demands of serving in a public affairs capacity with digital immigrants as opposed to digital natives. 23:40 – Applying the standards of responsible communications, which in the US Armed Forces means “staying in your lane,” to the business of social media communications. 26:10 – The absence of data provided by the US Dept. of Defense to www.data.gov, particularly given Joint Chiefs Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen’s speech at the 91st Annual American Legion Convention, in which he said that since the US presence in Afghanistan, 8 million children are in school, 2.4 million of which are girls, up from 800,000 prior to the US incursion. Couple this with the fact that the Citizen’s Briefing Book presented to President Obama said that in the area of Homeland Security, 38,250 people say that they do not support “wars on abstract concepts,” making it the number one issue in this area as far as the public is concerned. Whether or not the US Dept. of Defense will start providing more data about the impact of their efforts, and which government agencies should be responsible for making that data available. (NOTE: As of Dec. 10, 2009 DoD is currently offering six raw data sets at www.data.gov.) 29:54 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Rising to the Top of PRSA with Chair-Elect Gary D. McCormick, APR

Dec 21, 2009

Description:

How to become a PRSA board member, inside PRSA’s prestigious College of Fellows and judging the PRSA Silver Anvil Awards with PRSA Chair-Elect Gary D. McCormick, APR, Fellow PRSA and Director, Partnership Development at HGTV, Scripps Networks. 02:14 – What it takes to be inducted into the prestigious PRSA College of Fellows. 03:52 – What goes into vetting and recognizing PRSA a new Fellow. 05:04 – What does it take to rise to the top of a member-based organization like PRSA? 06:28 – What is the value of being active in PRSA? What do you get from being a member? 08:26 – What’s the benefit of judging the PRSA Bronze Anvil and PRSA Silver Anvil Awards? 10:03 – What does it takes to earn a seat on the board of directors and be elected the chair? 13:05 – How does PRSA control the quality of the professional development programs at the chapter level against those at the national level? 16:09 – What is PRSA’s biggest challenge moving forward? 17:40 – End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Inside the Online Video Business with Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online Jason Rosenberg, Online Communications Director for the Democratic National Convention Committee Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

On the Record Online with Deirdre Breakenridge

Dec 19, 2009

Description:

Managing social media engagement, the impact of social media on our intellectual development and what’s next with author and social media professional Deirdre Breakenridge (@dbreakenridge), president of PSFMarketwyse, recorded at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. 01:17 – Deirdre discusses the controversy surrounding her most recent book “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations,” which she and her co-author Brian Solis discussed with Neville Hobson and Shel Holtz on For Immediate Release. 02:34 – Deirdre discusses her other books, her personal brand, listening and becoming a social media resource. 04:48 – The cost of being a social media influencer, and balancing the time one spends using social networks against parenting. 05:49 – Being a committed mother and making a conscious effort to spend time off of email, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr as a way of rejuvenating. 07:44 – The impact of social media engagement on our intellectual development, and the potential drawbacks of living in a constant state of partial attention. 08:59 – How ready is public relations to inherit the social media communications mantle, engage with bloggers and start leveraging emerging online channels Google Wave? 10:18 – Does it make sense for public relations to lead in social media engagement at most organizations, or should social media be the domain of another department? 12:08 – Should PR oversee social media governance inside the organization, and is social media a horizontal business function? 13:32 – Deirdre talks about a panel of social media specialists she assembled for the 2009 PRSA International Conference which includes Joe Jaffe, Ariel Hyatt, Kami Huyse and Brian Solis. 14:30 – Now that so many organizations have Twitter accounts, Facebook fan pages, YouTube channels and Flickr feeds, what’s next? Looking ahead at conversation monitoring versus conversation mining, real-time collaboration and the shift of power from brands to communities. 16:25 – How will younger generations regard social media and online communities technology? Will they grow up with an inherent understanding of how to effectively apply these channels? 17:51 – What kind of information should public relations practitioners be looking to pull out of the mountains of online data being created that is relevant to their business category? 18:43 – End About the Podcaster: Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman also founded online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Pentagon War Court Spokesperson Ann Peru Knabe on Afghanistan Iraq and 9-11

Dec 17, 2009

Description:

Public Affairs during the wars Afghanistan and Iraq and at the War Court during Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s 9/11 confession with retired Pentagon War Court Spokesperson Ann Peru Knabe. Kanbe is currently an active Air Force Reservist and teaches public relations at the University of Wisconsin. 01:21 -- Gary Goldhammer asks what kind of food the detainees at Guantanamo are served. 01:56 – Comparison of the food quality at the McDonald’s in Guantanamo Bay versus the McDonald’s off of Red Square in Beijing and the PR101 of media relations. 03:30 – Handling public relations for the US Armed Forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom. 04:28 –How Joint Chiefs Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen’s assertion that the war in Afghanistan is a war for the “trust and confidence” Afghani people translates tactically into a day in the life of US Armed Forces public affairs officer, internal communications as a catalyst for external communications and handling international media relations. 06:56 – The challenge of dealing with journalists who try to get US Armed Forces to take a position on whether a war is right or wrong, since the decision to go to war is never made by the US Armed Forces, but rather by the President of the United States of America. 08:19 – In the conversation age, how do US Armed Forces staffers “stay in their lane” and participate at the same time? 08:52 – Participating in social media without compromising operational security. 10:06 – How does the slogan “Every service member a spokesperson” translates tactically with respect to social media engagement for the US Armed Forces? 10:47 – Social media governance for active US Air Force reservists who lead civilian and military lives. 11:38 – U.S. Air Force community building effort on Facebook. 11:57 – The location and organization of the Pentagon War Court, and whether or not it is governed by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. 13:41 – Her experience handling public affairs at the Pentagon War Court when Khalid Sheik Muhammad’s confessed that he -- along with two other detainees -- masterminded the 9/11 terrorist attacks in a hearing that was covered by 50 journalists and family members of those killed in those events. 15:27 – The importance of due process, that everyone is innocent until proven guilty and that even alleged terrorists are entitled to the same protections as anyone who accused of a crime. 15:54 – Major Danny Chung, United State Marine Corps assertion that the US Armed Forces fights for the freedom and liberty of the American people to express their opinions, and Marine Corps Captain Matthew Hoh’s resignation as a testament to that fact. 16:56 – The notion among civil liberty activists that U.S. legal matters should be prosecuted by the Dept. of Justice in the U.S. Courts, and that the Pentagon War Court is unconstitutional. 18:16 – The facts behind the Pentagon War Court and how it compares to the US Courts and links where people can research those comparisons in detail: • Military Commissions Act 2009 [PDF] • Military Commissions Manual [PDF] 20:01 – Getting Cuban cigars in Guantanamo. 20:37 – The war in Afghanistan, improvised explosive devices and whether or not the US can win an armed conflict in that country. 23:05 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the official podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them fresh.

Public Relations in Mexico with Marco Herrera of Grupo Public

Dec 14, 2009

Description:

Overcoming false stereotypes, the impact of the illegal drug trade on Mexican tourism and pitching journalists in a corrupt climate with Marco Herrera, president of Grupo Public in Mexico City, recorded at the 2009 PRSA International Conference in San Diego. 00:58 – The state of the public relations business in Mexico City, the types of clients they serve, the number of the PR firms competing for accounts and the number of Mexican citizens employed at these firms, according to the Mexican PR Association. 02:57 – Grupo Public’s client base, which includes Harley Davidson, MCI, Palm, the World Economic Forum and local organizations, and the services the firm provides. 03:43 – How government relations between the US and Mexico affects his firm’s ability to promote an American brand like Harley Davidson within Mexico, and whether unpopular US foreign policy can negatively impact an American brand’s reputation in Mexico. 06:48 – Whether Mexican PR Firms see Mexican expats living in the US as influencers, and try to relay their messages through them to appeal to Mexican nationals. 07:35 – Efforts of multinationals to market to Latinos living in the US, the evolving culture of this community and public relations agencies focused on serving this market. 08:32 – False stereotypes in the US about Mexican immigrants and Mexican citizens. 10:09 – How false stereotypes impact Grupo Public’s ability to serve US companies, lack of international cultural awareness among US citizens and the perception that Mexico is no more developed than Africa. 12:34 – News reports of excessive violence by the illegal drug trafficking trade on Mexican tourism and why the rule “if it bleeds it leads” has taken a heftier toll of revenues than warranted, according to Herrera. 13:45 – Pushing the Mexican Government to use public relations to be more transparent, as a way of counterbalancing all the illegal drug trade news with positive news as well, so people hear not just bad news about what’s happening in Mexico, but the good news as well. 14:48 – Practicing media relations in Mexico, pay for play and whether or not corruption in the news media is a factor in scoring ink. 18:27 – The Mexican Government’s President of Deputy Chambers recent decision to cease subsidies to newspapers. 19:02 – Best places to stay to Mexico City, the hot new neighborhood to stay in and the best Argentinean BBQs. 22:07 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Using Blogger Relations to Put Butts in Seats with Live Entertainment PR Specialist Andy Perez

Dec 9, 2009

Description:

Live entertainment marketing and public relations, the impact of the digital revolution on ticket sales and tips on beating the scalpers to good seats with Andy Perez, former west coast public relations chief for Feld Entertainment, producers of Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, Disney on Ice, Disney Live and Supercross. Prior to that he managed the Feld Entertainment account at Miller Pear Public Relations in Chicago. Currently, he is working as an independent public relations practitioner, handling PR or Star Wars in Concert and others. 01:24 – Using integrated communications campaigns to put butts in seats for live entertainment events in a down economy, branding, the precarious shift from a business where the majority of ticket sales were made in advance, to one where most ticket sales are now walk-up, and adjusting public relations campaigns to drive ticket sales during, instead before, the local dates. 03:54 – Defining a live show for marketing, public relations and advertising and the most common errors live entertainment producers make when purchasing ad time to promote touring arena produ tions. 05:57 – Competing for the attention of a value-oriented, family audience, the single biggest challenge associated with launching a new live show of any kind and Star Wars in Concert, an arena show that debuted earlier this year in Anaheim. 07:36 – Planning and organizing pre-publicity opportunities to promote live arena touring shows, and what live entertainment producers and promoters and really competing against when they launch new tours. 09:54 – P.T. Barnum as a public relations pioneer, the Ringling Brothers circus parade as a built in PR stunt and working with local agencies like the police force as a way of getting the word out that the circus is in town. 12:38 – Creating advance ground tours to raise awareness and generate word-of-mouth prior to a run in any given city. 13:21 – Zing Zang Zoom’s publicity junket at the Magic Castle, at which mainstream media and mom bloggers interviewed the show’s zingmaster Alex Ramon, the show’s director Shanda Sawyer (who I represented) and illusionist Jim Steinmeyer. 16:21 – How a blogger relations campaign used promo codes and special offers to sell 10,000 tickets online. 18:41 – Focusing a blogger relations campaign geographically, so that local blog coverage drives local ticket sales. 20:23 – The unique challenges of selling tickets to live family entertainment events on the west coast of the US versus the middle or eastern US, and the second biggest competitor that promoters of large scale arena performances face. 23:03 – The impact of the digital revolution on the category live entertainment as a whole, based on the mounting success of agent Tony Selznick (a friend and client) of McDonald Selznick Associates, which represents stage directors, choreographers and dancers. 23:40 – Is live entertainment impervious to being undercut by the Internet? 24:10 – Xanadu’s online Tony Award PR campaign, which used a fictitious press agent to create word-of-mount on the Net. 25:23 – Why do live entertainment producers have no photo policies, when photos taken and shared by audience members increase awareness that that show is currently in town? 27:03 – How live entertainment marketers can use YouTube to collect third-party endorsements from consumers. 28:26 – The advantages and disadvantages of working with Ticketmaster, which is currently being acquired by LiveNation, and online ticket sales versus phone ticket sales. 31:51 – Does StubHub present a considerable challenge to Ticketmaster/LiveNation? 33:15 – Why and how search engine optimization has created an opportunity for ticket scalpers to exacerbate the wedge between live entertainment producers and their ticket buying publics. 35:55 – How to beat the scalpers at their own game and get the best seats to any live entertainment event. 38:28 – Buying tickets online versus via phone, and adjusting your ticket buying strategy to the size of the venue where the live entertainment show will run. 40:55 -- End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: Inside the Online Video Business with Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan Securing Celebrity Endorsements for Public Relations with Rita Tateel On the Record...Online with LA Times Entertainment Writer John Horn On the Record...Online with Deadline Hollywood Columnist Nikki Finke Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. This episode was recorded on Cyber Monday (the Monday after Thanksgiving) in 2009. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Celebrity Endorsements and Social Media with Rita Tateel

Dec 7, 2009

Description:

How to book celebrities for special event appearances, making a paid celebrity endorsement authentic and the impact of social media on the culture of celebrity with Rita Tateel, president of The Celebrity Source at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. 00:54 – Past projects with The Celebrity Source include securing High School Musical star Ashley Tisdale for the Girls Day San Diego and Hayden Pannettiere for GenCon Indianapolis, two special events. 01:41 –Achieving measurable business objectives through celebrity appearances and the most commonly asked questions public relations practitioners have when they are investigating the possibility of booking a celebrity for a special event or product launch. 02:01 – Choosing celebrities based on a target audience and why a one-size fits all strategy never works. 02:56 – Matching celebrities to campaigns based on key messages, so the endorsement is authentic. 03:38 – Celebrities may be a great way to get people’s attention, but can they ever be more influential than one’s online social network? 04:40 – How the clothing line Von Dutch was able to launch based on a few well placed celebrities who were seen wearing those baseball caps and t-shirts, scoring influential brand recognition. 05:35 – Can celebrities influence more than just style-related brands? Do people trust celebrities when it comes to considered purchases, likes health care, financial services or politics? 07:35 – How the world of celebrity endorsements has changed in the age of social media and transparency. 8:12 – Joe Jaffe’s prediction that Twitter is a bubble waiting to burst, the Edelman Trust Barometer [PDF] ranking on the influence of celebrities and whether or not the emergence of micro-celebrities who find fame with a smaller audience online will change the way we regard pop culture celebrities. 09:50 – How Twitter is enabling pop culture celebrities to directly engage their fans, build a more passionate fan base and establish greater influence than disengaged celebrities. 10:36 – Does the fact that a celebrity is paid for an endorsement automatically cancel out their credibility? 11:24 – Using celebrity endorsements for corporate cause-related marketing initiatives. 12:43 – Does Twitter and social media make it more difficult to keep a celebrity on message? 13:23 – How to effectively brief a celebrity on your key messages prior to a special event appearance. 14:01 – At what point do you monitor social media before, during or after a celebrity appearance? 15:23 – How to maximize the impact of a celebrity appearance and the most common mistakes organizations make when book a celebrity for public relations event. 17:29 -- End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: On the Record...Online with Fame Formula author Mark Borkowski On the Record...Online with Deadline Hollywood’s Nikki Finke On the Record...Online with Richard Johnson of Page Six Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Joe Jaffe Bursts the Twitter Bubble

Dec 5, 2009

Description:

Why Twitter’s a bubble waiting to burst, inside-out social media marketing and the sweet spot between branding and online communities with Joseph Jaffe (@jaffejuice), president and chief interrupter at Crayon, recorded at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Jaffe recently released his third book “Flip the Funnel” about harnessing the power of your existing customer base as a source of recommendations and referrals. He has a blog, made his initial foray into podcasting with Steve Rubel on “Across the Sound” is now a solo effort renamed “Jaffe Juice.” 01:10 – Why it’s dangerous to measure and judge the effectiveness of social media by old media standards, how podcasts generate business opportunities, and reaching the right people versus a lot of people. 02:34 – Jaffe talks about his three books, the conceptual thread that binds them and building businesses from by marketing from the inside out. 06:16 – The sleaze factor associated with incentivizing people to recommend brands to their online social networks, how recommendations can determine the degree of trust, credibility, authority and consistency we have for someone, and how “street cred” or social currency is starting to become a factor in keeping people honest. 08:55 – Erik Deutsch asks via Twitter, “How should clients balance corporate branding with personal style in social media.” 09:30 – A discussion about personal branding, repositioning and controversy, and why putting too much value in your own self-worth can side track you from achieving real business objectives. 11:11 – Trolling for criticism, the importance of self-confidence and standing for something you believe in, even if it is just giving away a free iPhone. 13:09 – Being first, taking risks, experimentation and analysis paralysis. 14:42 – Giovanni Rodriguez asks via Facebook, “Is social media up-leveling or marginalizing people in the PR profession?” 15:51 – Applying the skills of public relations, such earned media through media relations and nurturing relationships, to social media communications, and the mad dash among PR agencies, ad agencies and clients to lead in social media engagement. 18:04 – If you thought Second Life was the be all end all, here’s why Twitter is a bubble just waiting to burst. Looking at the finger instead of where it’s pointing. And how to effectively leverage Twitter in organizational communications. 22:18 – Why PR agencies, ad agencies and clients should NOT lead in social media engagement, and how to realign the corporate org chart to join online conversations. 24:19 – The findings of the Digital Readiness Report, by Tom Smith, Don Spetner, Barb McDonald and myself, and which department inside the organization is leading social media engagement at most companies. 26:15 – The difference between consumer generated content and consumer generated media. 27:16 – The difference between viral campaigns and memes. 29:22 – Whether or not marketers can and should actively engage in social media, or if they’re better off focusing on building an environment in which communities can grow organically. 31:39 -- End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: The Death of Marketing with Ad Industry Pundit Bob Garfield Social Media Strategy for Nonprofits with Beth Kanter How People use Social Media during a Crisis with Leysia Palen Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online is the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Social Media Strategy for Nonprofits with Beth Kanter

Nov 26, 2009

Description:

Social media strategy for nonprofits specialist Beth Kanter on nonprofits that are using social media effectively, why research from Weber Shandwick and Philanthropy Now about the ROI of social media at nonprofits misses the mark and leaving social media ant trails. Featured Guest In 2009, Beth Kanter was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the most influential women in technology and one of Business Week's "Voices of Innovation for Social Media." In March, 2009, she will serve as the 2009 Visiting Scholar for Social Media and Nonprofits for the Packard Foundation. 01:05 – An explanation of the visiting scholar program at the Packard Foundation and her upcoming book with Allison Fine tentatively titled “The Networked Nonprofit” to be published by Wiley in 2010. 03:05 – The threats and opportunities that self organization via social media presents to nonprofit organizations. 04:28 – Leaving social media ant trails online so people who have an interest in your cause can find you, and start leaving their own ant trails online to create a network effect. 06:24 – The work of self-organizing, online collaborative activity specialist Eric Eugene Kim and the impact of leaving digital ant trials over time. 07:59 – How the social media strategies of nonprofits differ from those of commercial organizations and government agencies and a discussion of how Dr. Richard Leakey, chairman at Wildlife Direct, is using a blog community of conservationists to leave ant trails that eastablish relationships among passionate wildlife conservation, and generates significant funds through online donations. 09:45 – Delivering value to the community before asking for money and a discussion of how the March of Dimes Share Your Story online community for parents of babies born prematurely, or who have spent time in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), rallied around the family of a child that died, covering the the family’s funeral expenses and sending proceeds for the March of Dimes. 11:54 – A discussion of Chris Brogan and Julien Smith’s give-to-take ratio, as prescribed in their book Trust Agents. 14:40 – A discussion of how to effectively promote the new Facebook page launched by the US Dept. of State to extend the reach on the delegation’s participation at the COP15 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. 16:29 – Partnering and connecting with like-minded influencers as a way of proliferating a message through peers via social networks and using print collateral and signage to recruit online friends offline. 18:58 – Cross promoting your Facebook badge on your blog and using conventional promotions to encourage social media engagement. 19:54 –Weber Shandwick’s Social Impact Survey which is somewhat misleading, because it asks the wrong the questions, and which is also quite helpful, because it suggests that social media is less about building visibility and more about engaging communities. 22:37 – Beth Kanter’s reaction to the results of Philanthropy Action’s report on Social Networking and Mid-Size Nonprofits. 23:33 – Beth Kanter responds to Alison Noonan, who asks, “I’m currently working for a children’s charity. Any suggestions how we can make up for lost funding with social media?” (Sorry Alison but I couldn’t find the roiginal tweet, or your Twitter ID, to link to. Please send it to me again and I will add it.) 26:07 – Translating the donor pyramid into a practical social media strategy for nonprofits and a study by Pew Internet which found that large charitable donations are more likely to occur online. 27:03 – Beth Kanter responds to Kevin Skerrit, director of new media at EduGuide.org, who asks via Twitter, “If resources are available, should NGOs create their own social networks, or only participate in other big ones like Facebook?” 27:50 – How websites are becoming more social and content is getting a social life through outposts like Facebook and Twitter, and your home base, such as your own website or blog. 28:51 – How Planned Parenthood has reorganized their internal structure to form a content department, which manages content on their own website, and repurposes that content through social media channels. 29:42 – A discussion of the Social Media Game created by David Wilcox and Beth Kanter, designed to take people through a simulated process of mapping a social media strategy to specific organizational objectives. 38:51 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online communications strategy and implementation, Schwartzman leads a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the development of social media communication skills within organizations. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. Special thanks to the Austrian Club in Melbourne for reminding me to get this done. Apologies Bob Crawshaw, but I didn’t receive your question until after the interview was complete.

US Embassy Press Officer Karin Czerny on Social Media Communications in Vienna

Nov 25, 2009

Description:

Dr. Karin H. Czerny, Head of the Press Section at the United States Embassy in Vienna and Eva Muhm, Director of the American Reference Center at the United States Embassy in Vienna talk about communicating US interests via mainstream news media and social media in Austria. 00:34 – An introduction to the featured guests on this podcast, and the context of the conversation. 00:49 – Internet penetration and blogging culture in Vienna, Austria compared to other countries. 01:21 – The use of the social web during political campaigns and political bloggers. 03:53 – The conference on The Future of Journalism, organized at Amerika Haus by the US Embassy in Vienna. 04:39 – Use of the US Embassy in Vienna’s website to post press releases and announcements. 05:36 – The solvency and reach of newspapers versus online news in Vienna, and who reads what. 07:57 – Using a recent student protest as an example of how people are organizing and communicating online, the guests discuss the use of emerging media channels to communicate effectively on behalf of the US in Austria. 08:44 – How the US Embassy in Vienna is using social media to communicate such as Facebook page, YouTube, Flickr and Twitter, and what they hope to achieve through these channels. 10:46 – The social media strategy driving the US Embassy in Vienna’s engagement, and how they decide what information should be distributed through their different online communications channels. 11:41 – The biggest challenges associated with communicating on behalf of the US Embassy in Vienna. 13:49 – Unique characteristics and requirements of communicating with the Austrian mindset. 17:02 – Whether or not the mainstream news media coverage and online discussion of the US domestic health care reform debate has impacted the credibility of our foreign policy decisions in the international community. 18:49 – A discussion of the types of topics and speakers that the US Embassy is hosting in Vienna. 21:15 – Hopes and expectations for the UN Copenhagen Climate Change Conference. 22:10 – The social media readiness of Vienna compared to other European Countries. 23:29 – End Other Recommended Podcasts: The State of Social Media in Europe with Top Austrian Bloggers Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. This episode was recorded at the US Embassy in Vienna. Special thanks to Greg Goble and Brigitte Pressler for their support with this episode.

Using Social Media to Fight Global Warming at the US Dept. of State

Nov 24, 2009

Description:

U.S. Dept. of State Foreign Service Officer Liz Murphy and Public Affairs Specialist Billie Gross of the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs discuss using social media to stop global warming, rebuilding bridges with the international climate community and extending the reach of the UN Climate Change Conference via Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Featured Guests: Liz Murphy -- Prior to this assignment, Liz Murphy served as a Public Diplomacy Officer in Baku, Azerbaijan and as a Consular Officer in Monterrey, Mexico. She has an A.B. degree in history from Harvard. Billie Gross -- In addition to her work at the State Department in 2006, Billie Gross also serves a public relations specialist at BRG Public Relations. Before joining the State Dept, she worked at the U.S. Dept. of Energy as an assistant human resource specialist. 01:03 – How the US Dept. of State Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs promotes transformational diplomacy by advancing global environmental stewardship, encouraging economic growth and promoting social development. 03:03 – Facts about global warming: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world’s authoritative scientific body’s consensus on climate change is indeed occurring. The IPCC shared the Noble Peace Prize with Al Gore in 2007. 04:06 – How the Bureau responds to the claim that U.S. carbon emissions on a per capita basis are among the world’s highest. 04:58 – The international community’s response to renewed efforts from the US to play a role in capping carbon emission after the Kyoto protocol. 06:19 – Preconceived notions of developed and developing nations in the international climate community towards the US and hard emissions targets, emissions trading, financing objectives and securing room for future growth. 07:24 – What the US Dept. of State’s diplomatic delegation hopes to achieve at the COP 15 UN Copenhagen Climate Conference. 08:46 – The impact of recent article in the New York Times titled “Leaders Will Delay Deal on Climate Change” on the US Dept. of State delegation’s morale and momentum. 09:56 – Propel Media Events (@propelmedia) asks via Twitter, “Where did you begin? What type of social media plan did you start with? What are the key metrics to ensure success?” 10:31 – Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s attitude toward social media engagement and the various social media channels the US Department of State has established, including the DIPNOTE blog, to extend the reach of their activities online. (The State Dept also has a presence on Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and Twitter.) 11:57 – Can the U.S. Department of State effectively achieve global electronic engagement in the age of social media without violating the Smith-Mundt Act, as discussed with Mountain Runner public diplomacy blogger Matt Armstrong in a previous podcast. 14:32 – What was involved in establishing a Facebook Fan Page to extend the reach of the U.S. delegation’s activities at the COP15 conference and how the Bureau plans to use the Facebook presence at the conference. 16:08 – How the Bureau is working to draw fans to its new COP15 UN Climate Change Conference 2009 Facebook page, and a discussion of the US State Dept’s Facebook page and the Office of Global Women’s Issues Facebook page. 17:25 – A discussion of where climate change ranks in importance in terms of global issues, and whether or not the number of fans attracted to the COP15 Facebook page could have an impact on the legislative process. 19:48 – The different panels, speakers and other live events that will be occurring at the COP15 conference and simulcast on the Bureau’s new website at http://www.COP15.state.gov, the centerpiece of the State Dept’s social media strategy at the conference. 22:01 – The social media strategy by which the Bureau will determine what kind of content to release through which online media channels, and in what sequence. 24:58 – The bureau’s online video strategy for simulcasting live and serving up video on demand. 27:01 – The schedule of events will be posted online here, via Twitter and Facebook. 28:28 -- George Clark (@RasoirJ) asks via Twitter, “How will they use State's field network, embassies, consulates, etc., to enhance their approach to social media?” 29:30 – Tapping into US Embassy networks and regional offices worldwide to stimulate participation in live online chats to solicit questions and feedback on a global basis. 30:32 – What foreign policy changes the US could make to lessen domestic carbon emissions and how to get actions at home into an enforceable, international agreement. 32:33 – Liz Murphy and Billie Gross discuss lessons learned as professional communicators that could be applied to the private sector like building consensus and tailoring messages to different audiences. 35:20 – The US Dept. of State is challenging participants to win an all expense paid international exchange program in the “Change Your Climate, Change Your World” video contest. Complete contest details here. 36:49 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

How to Achieve Social Media Rock Star Status with Ariel Hyatt

Nov 17, 2009

Description:

Indie Music Online PR Specialist Ariel Hyatt on using social media to get signed to a record deal, how P. Diddy tweets without ruining the mystique of his stardom and using social media engagement to empower fans to promote their music organically online. 01:07 – Ariel Hyatt of Ariel Publicity and author of “Music Success in Nine Weeks” describes her journey from conventional mainstream public relations executive to promoting musical artists exclusively online. 03:07 – Ariel Hyatt talks about immersing herself in social media by launching a blog, podcasting, hosting meet-ups, going to Podcamp and becoming a contributing member of the community. 04:17 – Candace Joy asks Ariel Hyatt via Michael Butler of the Rock ‘n Roll Geek Show, “How would you get someone signed?” 04:30 – Creating a groundswell social media movement online by building a vibrant fan base community as a proof of concept to lure record labels to sign you to a record deal. 05:50 – The Marie Digby online promotion scandal. 8:50 – Just how long it takes to build trust, learn to communicate authentically and actually see the benefits of social media engagement. 10:30 – In a question submitted via Twitter, Rick Goetz asks, “What’s more important for blog love: doing newsworthy things or knowing people?” 11:43 – Is the transparency of social media stripping away the mystique of the rock star? 12:28 – Finding out that Henry Rollins was never on Twitter. 13:31 – Musicians Pete Wentz, Dave Navarro and John Mayer’s use of Twitter and Mylie Cyrus’s recent decision to quit Twitter. 14:24 – How P. Diddy repeatedly captures popular interest and taps into the popular nerve and why talent alone may not be enough to ascend to rock star status. 15:45 – P. Diddy’s now famous Popeye’s vs. KFC chicken TwittyTV online video. 17:09 – Inside the social life of Ariel Hyatt, a massive Ska, Punk, Rock indie music fan. 18:38 – A DIY recording artists’s career defined. 19:13 – The ascent of blues guitarist Kelly Richie, who learned to leverage social media to connect directly to her fan base and scale the pyramid. 22:25 – Why jam bands like the Grateful Dead and Phish represent social media in the real world. 23:46 – Translating musical like-mindedness into social media connections. 25:36 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. This episode of On the Record…Online, the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, was recorded live at the conference and released on Veteran’s Day. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

U.S. Army Reserve Social Media Chief Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Ostlund

Nov 12, 2009

Description:

A conversation with U.S. Army Reserve Social Media Chief Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Ostlund about empowering service members to use social media as unofficial spokespersons, the use of social media during the Fort Hood shootings and what U.S. citizens can do to show support for members of the U.S. Armed Forces. 00:59 – Gerald Ostlund defines his areas of responsibility as social media chief at the U.S. Army Reserve, which includes social media strategy, social media policy, social media content development and quality control. 2:01 – Operational security as the core concern the U.S. Army Reserve has about social media engagement, and protecting against operational security violations by making sure that reservists understand not to divulge where they’ve been or where they’re going via social media channels, particularly when they’re deployed down range. 02:21 -- Soldiers as unofficial U.S. Army Reserve spokespeople, whether they’re on duty or off. Just as public relations practitioners teach their clients that there’s no such thing as going off the record, the U.S. Army Reserve teaches their soldiers that there’s no such thing as “off duty” when they’re using social media. 03:03 -- Importance of staying within the bounds of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, not disparaging the President of the United States, members of U.S. Congress or other elected Government leaders, which may be punishable violations of the code. 03:47 – Whether or not being a member of the U.S. Armed Forces means you must sacrifice your Constitutional Right to Free Speech. 04:27 – The litmus test for whether or not the Uniform Code of Military Justice extends to social media. 05:36 – How the U.S. Army Reserve is approaching the unique challenge of managing decentralized communications via social media among an army of reservists who are continuously rotating in and out of active duty, and how U.S. Army Reservists are balancing their online civilian persona against their online military persona. 06:35 – Staying in your lane by personalizing your experience as a way of empowering soldiers to serve as unofficial spokespeople, while ensuring they don’t step on the toes of the U.S. Army Reserve Public Affairs detail, who fill the official spokesperson role. 07:44 – Advice to U.S. Army Reservists who tweet and use other social media channels on how to differentiate their personal opinions from the official policies of the U.S. Army Reserve. 09:14 – The use of disclaimers such as “Although I am an officer or soldier, I don’t speak for the U.S. Army Reserve” on blogs and in the profile sections of social networking services. 10:21 – Media relations and crisis communications lessons learned from the Fort Hood shootings and the use of social media to get the word out quickly during the tragedy. 13:03 – Leysia Palen’s analysis of official and unofficial communications during the Virginia Tech shootings and the prospect of socially distributed problem solving. Ms. Palen is a past guest on this podcast. 14:57 – Most of the victims of the Fort Hood shooting were revealed through mainstream and social media prior to the U.S. Army’s ability to release an official statement, due to the legal responsibility of notifying next of kin prior to making official announcements. 15:42 – The prospect that General George W. Casey, Jr., Chief of Staff at the U.S. Army, would revisit the way they make use of communication channels to distribute information during good times as well as bad. 16:54 – How U.S. Army Reserve Public Affairs Officers -- who may be required to go in front of the news media and discuss the details surrounding the deaths of soldiers who they’ve trained with, and who may be their personal friends -- control their emotions under the spotlight in times of crisis. 18:18 – The real sacrifice U.S. Armed Forces service members make for choosing a life of military service. 20:24 – The call of duty, obeying the oath to serve and defend when the U.S. President calls and leaving the policy and the politics to elected, civilian leadership. 21:31 – Whether or not the U.S. Armed Forces could effectively to use social media to win trust and confidence in Afghanistan or Iraq, and why we need to be ones mentoring and enabling them to spread the word themselves. 25:35 – The relationship between Iraqi and Afghani nationals and their ex-pat community in the U.S., and utilizing the latter as a resource to get the word out to nationals. 27:08 – His experience working directly with Iraqis and the sacrifices they are making to try and build a better Iraq. 27:53 – What motivates people to set off bombs and plot terrorism against civilians inside Iraq. 29:27 – What U.S. citizens can do to support the troops and to promote a peaceful resolution to armed conflict. Ideas for showing support: • Say thank you to a soldier. It means a lot. • Volunteer for a family readiness group at your local Army Reserve. • Whether you’re left or right. VOTE! Put representatives in office who you think will better the USA, so the policies our service members are defending are worth the sacrifice. 32:08 – Whether or not young people are getting more or less engaged in the political process. 33:52– End MORE MILITARY PODCASTS: • Inside the Pentagon with Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings • Balancing Your Right to Know against Operational Security with US Marine Corps Public Affairs Officer Major Danny Chung • Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. This episode of On the Record…Online, the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, was recorded live at the conference and released on Veteran’s Day. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Inside the Pentagon with Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Robert Hastings

Nov 9, 2009

Description:

A conversation about the chain of command inside the Pentagon, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates and caring for wounded warriors with Bob Hastings, vice president communications Northrop Grumman Information Systems and former acting assistant secretary, Defense for public affairs who presentes a case study about Wounded Warrior Care: Practical Applications in Strategic Communications. 01:23 – An explanation of the civilian oversight of the military, the reporting structure within the US Department of Defense and what it’s like inside the control center at the Pentagon. 03:26 – Just how advanced IS the technology inside the US Department of Defense? 04:28 – Why some US Armed Forces service members are more guarded than others when talking to the new media. 07:40 – Secretary of Defnese Robert Gates’s observation of the tension between “exquisite systems” we may need to win the war tomorrow versus getting the gear we need to win the war today. 09:37 – How the SecDef cut through the bureacracy to improve the quality of treatment for wounded warriors, faster MRAP requisitioning and the procurement of faster and better intelligence on the battlefield. 10:53 – How the Department of Defense secures and develops intelligence. 11:29 – The Wounded Warrior Care case study that Robest Hastings is presenting at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. 12:58 – The most important lesson learned from the Wounded Warrior Care case study. 15:17 – How Robert Hastings came to be appointed as an Assistant Secretary of De fense. 17:24 – What it was like interviewing at the Pentagon with SecDef Robert Gates for the job of Assistant Secretary of Defense. 19:24 – A discussion of a strategic communications intiative undertaken by the US Dept. of Defense 20:25 – Which branch of the US Armed Forces officer’s dining room at the Pentagon has the best food. 22:25– End RECOMMENDED PODCASTS: • Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons • Balancing Your Right to Know against Operational Security with US Marine Corps Public Affairs Officer Major Danny Chung Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. This episode of On the Record…Online, the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, was recorded live at the conference. Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

Balancing the People s Right to Know against Operational Security with USMC PAO Major Danny Chung

Nov 7, 2009

Description:

United States Marine Corps Major Danny Chung discusses his role as a public affairs officer, pulling Geraldo Rivera out of the desert during Operation Iraqi Freedom and balancing the American people’s right to know against operational security during combat situations. 00:56 -- Why Major Chung decided to enlist in US Marine Corps in 1990. 02:07 – What it was about the Marine Corps versus the Army, Navy and Air Force that attracted him. 04:00 – How he wound up in media relations, which was certainly not his intention when he originally joined. 04:48 – Major Chung discusses his experience managing media relations in Iraq before and after former president George W. Bush command the US Armed Forces to invade Iraq on March 19, 2003. 06:05 – Major Chung talks about his experience getting the USMC story out to professional journalists in today’s highly polarized news media environment. 07:41 – Major Chung’s opinion of Fox News. 09:22 – Using access to newsmakers and other military public affairs officers as a way to influence the media coverage that gets generated. 11:44 – The mandate of a United States Marine Corps public affairs officer. 12:41 – Pulling Geraldo Rivera out of the desert during Operation Iraqi Freedom for compromising operational security and the more difficult aspects of balancing the American public’s right to know against operational and national security now and in the distant future. 14:41 – The single biggest lesson that all Marine officers learn. 16:06 –How a conservative, command and control style organization like the US Marines Corps is approaching social media engagement. 18:34 -- Casey Peterson asks if social media has replaced the letter home and if the Marines are monitoring that information for loose lips. 20:06 – The role of a public affairs officer and leadership in monitoring social media conversations, the pervasiveness of digital media in lives of service members today and the Abu Ghraib prison photos scandal as a case study for when things go wrong. 22:18 – Getting the good and the bad news out as quickly as possible. 23:12 – The prospect of living up to the motto “every Marine a spokesperson” by making laptops and handhelds standard issue. 24:14 – How the USMC public affairs staff mitigates risk be briefing their fellow Marines on dealing with the press. 25:39 – How to convince a commanding officer who may be older and less engaged that things like search engine optimization and social media matter, when they don’t even know what these channels are. 31:02 – Should the US Marine Corps acknowledge Matthew Ho’s resignation at www.marines.com? 33:03 – Fighting to preserve the right of people to freely protest and express their opinions. 34:02 – Erik Deutsch asks about the US Military’s social media strategy in the Middle East, to which Major Chung responds that print and radio are more of a factor in those theaters. 36:16 – The notion of using social media for information operations and the use of handheld devices to Tweet during the Islamic Republic of Iran’s recent electoral protests. 38:56 – Major Chung responds to a passage from a feature story in Wired Magazine about how Secretary of Defense Robert Gates is focusing on winning the war today and his decision to ramp up production of armed transports deployed in Iraq. 41:28 – Major Chung talks about driving around Bagdad in a soft skinned Humvee. 44:05 – Major Chung shares his personal perspective on the effectiveness of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates versus former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. 46:41 – End BONUS PODCAST: Social Media Training the US Armed Forces Public Affairs Staff at DINFOS with Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online returns as the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, which will be in San Diego, Oct. 7-10, 2009. Other US Armed Forces public affairs officers who will be interviewed at the conference include: • Lt. Col. Ann Peru Knabe, APR, public affairs officer, Pentagon War Court Spokesperson, U.S. Air Force Reserve • Col. Rudy Burwell, director, Army Reserve Communications Subscribe via RSS or follow us on Twitter @ontherecord and get them as soon as they’re released.

State of Social Media in Austria and Europe with Top Austrian Bloggers

Nov 4, 2009

Description:

Austrian bloggers Helge Fahrnberger, Michael Vaccaro and Matthias Wurz discuss the development of social media in Europe, cultural differences between Europe and the US, and what Austrian’s really think about Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Kerry and Bruno. 00:58 – Helge Farhnberger talks about his experience blogging in Austria, his blog, his work as a social media and social software consultant and a major sociological condition for human cooperation. 02:45 – Michael Vaccaro talks about his blog which is a platform for promoting unknown, indie artists -- primarily in Austria and Germany -- to help them snag record deals and talent representation. 04:02 – Matthias Wurz talks about his experience blogging, his blog and his objective of explaining Austrian affairs to an international audience. 05:19 – Austrian bloggers share their opinions on Arnold Schwarzenegger as an actor, a politician and an Austrian and why Austrian’s call him the man without a mother tongue. 06:43 – Why Austrian’s stripped Arnold Schwarzenegger’s name from a football stadium in the city of Graz that had been named after him. 08:27 – How Austria’s right wing conservative voters felt about the US Supreme Court’s decision to recognize as president George W. Bush over John Kerry, who was of Austrian decent. 08:58 – Austrian bloggers react to Sasha Baron Cohen’s portrayal of a fictional Austrian character in the motion picture Bruno. 10:10 – Austrian bloggers discuss the motion picture “The Sound of Music” and how many Austrians have seen the film. 11:23 – Austrian bloggers discuss Viennese coffee house culture versus American coffee house culture, Starbucks and talking your coffee to go.. 16:45 – Working hard, hardly working and living to work versus working to live. 18:02 – Austrian bloggers discuss Austria’s ranking as the best place to live in the world. 21:34 – Austrian bloggers debate whether or not a clearer delineation between work and play is causing the use of social media to develop differently in Europe and Austria. 22:17 – Helge Farhnberger on the social demographics of Austria, which has 8 million people: 20 to 30 thousand Twitter uses, he guesses, making the point that Twitter users are influential. There are 1.2 million active Facebook users in Austria. And he talks about why innovations are more likely to come out of the US than Europe. 24:31 – Michael Vaccaro talks about mixing social life and work, social media usage among younger people in Europe, the role social media users play as cultural sign posts and how Austria’s listing as the best place to live reinforces that behavior. 27:26 – Matthias Wurz offers a counter perspective to Michael Vaccaro’s assertion that laziness is at least partially to blame for social media apathy in Europe and how he uses Facebook both professionally and personally. Matthias is on Twitter at @matthias_wurz. 29:34 – Michael Vaccaro is on Twitter @clstrfck 29:42 – Helge Fahrnberger is on Twitter @muesli 30:17 – Austrian bloggers discuss the differences and similarities between US and Austrian bloggers. 32:45 – The state of the newspaper business in Austria, whether or not Austrian’s are becoming less interested in newspapers, and the reach and impact of mainstream news media. 34:43 – How Michael Vaccaro started securing MP3s from labels that he could make available at clstfck. 35:48 – Matthias Wurz gives us the state of the news media business in Vienna, from the perspective of an officially accredited Austrian journalist who has been writing at a magazine for many years. 39:12 – Which mainstream media channels are most under pressure from advertiser’s defections in Austria and how the advertising spend is changing in Austria. 40:34 – German start-ups developing products that involve search engine optimization and mapping: People123, TripWolf, Bikemap (Helge’s) and soup.io. 43:42 – How people find clstfck. 45:30 – Michael Vaccaro shares the hottest three (3) Austrian recording artists he’s blogged in the last three months: MMM Matthias, Database and Micro Trauma. 46:23 – Matthias Wurz on whether Austrian journalists are considering writing for search and Steve Lohr’s article “The Boring Headline Is Written for Google.” 50:07 – Austrian bloggers discuss the recent student protest that completely clogged the streets in central Vienna, which was organized entirely through Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #unibrennt. The demonstration was estimated to be 20 to 40 thousand students large. 59:02 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is an independent new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom. On the Record…Online returns as the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, which will be in San Diego, Oct. 7-10, 2009. We’ll be talking to other conference keynoters in the weeks leading up to the event, and interviewing many of the presenters and panelists on site.

Social Media Investor Relations Special with former SEC Attorneys

Oct 24, 2009

Description:

This is a special episode on investor relations in the age of social media, releasing corporate disclosures on Facebook company pages and via Twitter, the legal risks that CEO bloggers pose to public companies, Regulation Fair Disclosure compliance with company websites and more. Featured guests are Brain Lane, a partner at Gibson Dunn and Crutcher and the former Director of the Division of Corporate Finance at the US Securities and Exchange Commission and Broc Romanek, the Editor of TheCorporateCounsel.net and a former counselor to SEC Commissioner Laura Unger. Special thanks to Dominic Jones of the IR Web Report and Mark Story, director of new media at the SEC for providing supporting information and research that was instrumental in the development of this podcast. Michael Decker who is the disclosure expert at BusinessWire, a press release distribution service, was also scheduled to appear on this podcast, but was dropped from the call. He will be invited to appear on another podcast. Request for Feedback: This podcast breaks from the program’s original format. There is no sound bite or set up. Instead, it moves straight from the opening main title to the interview. What do you think about this format change? Should we keep it, or revert to the previous format? 2:46 – An explanation of what Regulation Fair Disclosure is, whisper numbers, why the regulation was enacted and how public relations and investor relations officers at publicly traded companies comply with it. 4:56 – An explanation of what selective disclosure and insider trading are, and why it is considered unfair for a publicly traded company to disclose material information in a way that could give some investors an unfair trading advantage over others. 5:55 – How the NASDAQ bubble of the 1990s lead to enactment of Reg FD. 7:40 – Addressing the question of whether or not press release distributions services are the only sure way to satisfy Regulation FD in light of new guidance issued by the SEC. 8:09 – How the SEC’s view of push technology, like email, versus pull technology, like company websites has changed over the last nine years , which channel dominates today, and the use of pull technology to satisfy Reg FD. 10:21 – How to comply with the SEC’s new Reg FD guidance and how to satisfy Regulation Fair Disclosure with the use of company websites, or online newsrooms. “When the SEC first adopted Regulation FD in mid-2000, it acknowledged that companies may be able to rely on the web to disseminate disclosure at some point in the future, but emphasized it was not likely to be considered sufficient yet. Now, that day has come.” 11:01 – The eight factors for companies to consider when they want to go the online only route for releasing material information that could affect their trading value, and the challenge and irony of satisfying those factors for large and small companies. 11:55 – An explanation of what SEC Commission guidance is and a discussion about the August 7, 2008 Commission Guidance on the Use of Company Websites for Corporate Disclosures [PDF]. 13:27 – A confirmation that public companies can satisfy Reg FD by introducing material information first on their own website, as long as they comply with SEC’s guidance. 14:05 – Considering the following language (which appears on page 18, paragraph 2 of the guidance in the above PDF link) what determines whether or not a company’s website is a recognized channel of distribution. “In order to make information public, it must be disseminated in manner calculated to reach the securities marketplace in general through recognized channels of distribution and public investors must be afforded a reasonable waiting period to react to the information. Thus in evaluating whether information is public for the purposes of our guidance, companies must consider whether and when (1) the company website is a recognized channel of distribution…” 15:05 – Whether or not search engine optimization can play a role in helping companies comply with Reg FD. 16:03 – The shortcomings of investor relations website outsourcing services and the NYSE’s decision in May 2009 eliminate requiring listed companies to announce corporate disclosures with press releases. 17:32 – A second confirmation that companies can sequence the release of corporate disclosures on their own website first, if they follow it up with push technology release as well, and the commission’s guidance that “if you put something on your website, even if it wasn’t deemed to be public disclosure, they wouldn’t deem it to be a violation of FD if that’s what you did.” 20:08 – Using the press release to alert investors in advance that a company intends to release earnings information on its website at a specific time. 20:36 –The rationale for moving press releases on corporate websites first: search engine optimization specialists Danny Sullivan and Lee Odden agree that companies are best situated to improve the search visibility of their corporate website by collecting inbound links, and therefore, it’s in a company’s best interests to encourage inbound links to press releases at its own domain, versus links to a paid or legit newswire, which may have distributed or aggregated that press release. 22:30 – The growth of shareholder activism and how that may put pressure on public companies to more actively manage the investor relations section of their corporate website. 24:35 – The importance of accessibility from the SEC’s standpoint, and whether or not regulators are coming after companies with sloppy, difficult to navigate websites. 24:54 – SEC staff guidance that reference hyperlinks must lead directly to the pertinent content, rather than to the homepage or directory of the IR website. Permalinks are required. 26:31 – The use of Facebook company pages as IR websites, and a blog post by Dominic Jones of the IR Web Report about companies that are actually using Facebook pages for general business purposes, and IR specific purposes and which business sectors are the early adopters. 27:42 – Whether or not it’s legal to release corporate disclosures first on a company Facebook page. 29:25 – Whether or not Sun Microsystems Chairman Jonathan Schwartz, who pushed the limits of Reg FD on Jonathan’s Blog, would meet the same degree of resistance today. 31:26 – The legal challenges of public companies whose CEO blogs such as tipping off investors selectively, the duty to update and why nonselective disclosure means nonselective engagement in social media communications. Also, the type of corporate disclosures that belong in a press release rather than a blog post. 34:55 – The risk of blogs at company websites: “If you sponsor a blog on your website, there’s an inherent belief that somehow you’re endorsing that what’s on the blog is accurate.” 36:39 – Circumventing risk by blogging about nonmaterial corporate information. 37:39 – The risk of corporate blogs being seen as semi-private conversations by the regulators, and as such, selective disclosures, and just how easy it is to break the law under Reg FD. 39:10 – The opinion that all CEOs and all IR Officers should be blogging, as long as they are properly trained in what to say and what not to say. The Dell Shares blog is used as a good example of an effective IR blog that did not result in any regulator violations. 40:25 – The number of companies twittering about financial issues and a study by Q4 Web Systems about showing that 8 public companies have Twitter accounts 4 of those use Twitter for IR. (Seems to be the number must be considerable higher). 40:43 – The challenge of putting financial information in proper perspective in just 140 characters. The example of EBay live Twittering earnings calls. 41:57 – A confirmation that public companies bear greater responsibility for the accuracy of content situated at their own web domain than they would for content they create on a third party social network. 43:08 – Whether or not investors relations officers and attorneys are really ready to act on this guidance. The legal department at Microsoft’s blog as an example of a...

US Army Public Affairs Social Media Strategy and Tips on Speaking Truth to Power

Oct 17, 2009

Description:

US Army Public Affairs Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons, who coordinates internet-based capabilities training at the Defense Information School (DIFNOS) on getting the United States Army public affairs staff up to speed on social media public relations, speaking truth to power and advocating decentralized communications in the command and control world. On the Record…Online returns as the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. We’ll be talking to a good number of military public affairs officers who handle public relations for the US Armed Forces at the upcoming event. Subscribe via email, RSS or Twitter to get all the 2009 PRSA International Conference podcasts. Or register to the conference attend the event here. 3:01 – Integrating social media training into the curriculum at the Defense Information School (DIFNOS). 4:28 – How the US Army’s senior leadership uses public affairs and information operations in battle to manage public perceptions, and the fundamental policy that every service member is a spokesperson for the US Armed Forces. 6:53 – How US Military senior leadership is responding in principal to the risks and opportunities of new media engagement, and how middle leadership is applying social media on a tactical basis. 8:52 – The seriousness with which General Berger and General Casey, as well as the US Air Force, US Navy and US Coast Guard’s senior leadership are acting to make sure that the US Armed Forces gets social media right. 9:34 – Specifically what the US Armed Forces are doing at this point in time with social media. 10:09 – How the media and blogosphere got the news about US Marines Corps social media policy all wrong. 10:23 – Select US Dept. of Defense social media communications programs by the numbers (as of Oct. 15, 2009): • US Marine Corps Facebook Followers – 98,945 • US Army Facebook Followers – 65,268 • US Air Force Facebook Followers – 8,125 • US Coast Guard Facebook Followers – 7,420 • Pentagon Channel YouTube Subscribers –140 11:20 – Social media as an information battlefield tool where public opinion is won and lost. 12:12 – Tia Nelson asks if the US Army is actively nurturing relationships gained in social, and if service members are having conversations with civilians? 14:16 – US Dept. of State foreign service officer and former US Army infantry reservist Don Kilburg III asks if the US Army is systematically listening, and if information coming in is being used to drive outgoing information. 16:40 – How Jack Holt, the US Army’s new media guy, is exploring the tactical value of social media tools. 17:37 – Theresa Christianson ask how the military monitors pictures that personnel post to social media services , given the potential security risks and the “grisly quotient.” 18:20 – How the US Army is using training and education to curtail and mitigate the security risk of social media, and why misuse should never be used as a justification for inaction. 20:08 – US President Barack Obama and Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen recognize the risks of social media, but they see the benefits of establishing a secure, trusted communications channel as well worth that risk. 21:11 – The US Army’s operational security (OPSEC) strategy and training to offset the risks of cyber warfare and cyber terrorism. 24:07 – Whether or not social media could be used as a tool for winning the trust and confidence of the Afghani people in the current conflict. 26:08 – The attitude inside the US Dept. of Defense about the social media review that is expected to conclude this month, and whether it will form the basis of an umbrella social media policy for al branched of the military sometime in the future. 27:12 – Mr. Price Floyd, asst Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs is a great advocate of social media and has talked about using past guidelines and widely moving forward. 29:37 – Tips on speaking truth to power. 32:13 – Advocating for a decentralized communications model inside the ultimate command and control organization. 33:51 – Balancing social media communications against national security. 37:00 – Will social media become a core component of the US Armed Force training regiment? 39:10 – The use of Twitter, possibly by the Basaji riot police during the recent electoral protests in Iran to trick Mousavi supporters into showing up at fake protest sites where they would be arrested. 40:58 – Will laptops and handhelds devices ever be standard issue for service members? 42:40 – Reclassifying “social media” and “internet-based operations” to better communicate it value to all facets of the military complex. 43:29 – Empowering all service members to tell the military story themselves directly to their peers via social media. 45:20 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

PR Measurement Best Practices with Mark Weiner

Oct 9, 2009

Description:

A discussion with Mark Weiner, CEO of PRIME Research in North America, about why PRSA formed the Measurement Working Group, measuring social media engagement and the pros and cons of advertising value equivalency (AVEs). Weiner will present a session at the 2009 PRSA International Conference entitled “Proving the Value of Public Relations” on Sunday, November 8, 2009 at 4:45 pm, and was a member of the PRSA Measurement Working Group with David Rockland of Ketchum, Pauline Draper-Watts of the IPR Measurement Commission Chair, Katie Paine of KD Paine & Partners and Don Wright of Boston University. Prior to PRIME, Mark Weiner was the Global Director and Senior Vice President of Ketchum Research where he led an international team of analysts. Before joining Ketchum, he Weiner was the CEO and president of Delahaye, a corporate communications and public relations research and consulting firm founded by Katie Paine, who has also appeared on this podcast, and who provided research support for this episode. On the Record…Online is the official podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. Register to attend here. 1:01 - @ericschwartzman gives Mark Weiner’s background, a brief introduction to the PRSA Measurement Working Group and an overview of what Mark will cover in this podcast. 4:35 – How Mark Weiner will the help PR practitioners overcome the challenge of communicating the value of public relations at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. 5:50 – Mark Weiner on his participation in the PRSA Measurement Working Group, which brought together thought leaders to explore how public relations impacts business, and which published a “Business Outcomes” deck to help practitioners communicate the value of public relations to clients and managers. 7:05 – Why PRSA created a Measurement Working Group and a clarification for anyone who heard about this effort first on episode 484 of “For Immediate Release” The Hobson & Holtz Report.” 9:12 – PRSA’s intention of providing a solutions agnostic approach and the Measurement Working Group’s pooling of measurement intelligence. 11:14 – Based on his experiences traveling the globe consulting on public relations measurement, Weiner explains the common misconceptions about PR measurement outside the US. 12:32 – The purpose of public relations search and evaluation in business and translating public relations performance through data. 13:33 -- Whether or not communicating through numbers is more objective than communicating through language, as per 2009 PRSA International Conference keynote speaker Todd Buchholz’s appearance on this podcast. 14:29 – Minimizing misinformation through transparency. 15:23 – The percentage of PRSA Silver Anvil Award applications that are eliminated each year because of they lack measurement data and use purposely vague language. 18:06 – The pros and cons of using advertising value equivalency to communicate the value of public relations to managers and clients. 19:37 – The most meaningful measures of public relations value. 21:20 – Advertising value not as a dollar value, but as a measure of relative value. 22:12 – 2009 PRSA International Conference Keynoter Bob Garfield’s dire prediction on the future of ad-support media and building the business case for social media engagement. 24:20 – The importance of measurement standards, and how measurement standards for social media engagement will evolve. 26:57 – Overcoming the challenges associated with interpreting the sentiment of an avalanche of user generated content in real time. 30:59 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

Truth through Numbers with former White House Economic Policy Advisor Todd Buchholz

Oct 3, 2009

Description:

2009 PRSA International Conference Keynote Speaker, Former White House economic policy advisor Todd Buchholz talks about whether numbers are inherently more objective than language at communicating facts, communicating through raw data and number crunching truth in the digital age. On the Record…Online returns as the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference. We’ll be talking to other conference keynoters in the weeks leading up to the event, and interviewing many of the presenters and panelists on site in San Diego as well. You can register to attend the event here. 1:20 – Former White House economic policy advisor Todd Buchholz, who is confirmed to keynote the upcoming Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) International Conference in San Diego, November 7-10, 2009 shares a glimpse of what he’ll talk about in his presentation. 4:08 – How James Carville exploited what Buchholz said was a fairly mild recession in 1991 during US President H.W. Bush’s administration on behalf of the Clinton Campaign. 4:52 – How and why US Federal Bank Chairman Alan Greenspan’s monetary policy resulted in a global economic meltdown. 6:32 – How US Banks can regain the American people’s trust. 8:28 – The sustainability of outsourcing as a business strategy, and how it will impact the American economy. 9:50 – Todd Buchholz shares what worries him most about the health and welfare of the American economy. 11:36 – Why critical thinking skills and an understanding of statistics will be essential to the professional success of future generations. 12:42 – A recent New York Times cover story on the hot job for college graduates today. 13:05 -- How statistics are often used by government to mislead voters. 14:47 – Todd Buchholz responds to the following passage from Anand Giridharadas’s recent New York Times opinion piece “Athens on the Net,” “The headlines from Washington today blare of bailouts, stimulus, clunkers, Afpak, health care. But it is possible that future historians, looking back, will fixate on a quieter project of Barack Obama’s White House: its exploration of how government might be opened to greater public participation in the digital age, of how to make self-government more than a metaphor.” 15:21 – Whether or not numbers are inherently more objective than language at communicating facts. 15:45 – How Washington budget cuts result in the release of inaccurate, financial market driving information, and why we need to upgrade our statistics capabilities. 17:11 – Todd Buchholz’s responds to another passage from Anand Giridharadas’s piece: “If the Internet needed a further nudge from its pedestal, the health care debate obliged. From the administration’s point of view, the Web arguably proved better at spreading deceptions about “death panels” than at spreading truth, and at turning town halls into brawls than at nurturing the unfettered deliberation that some imagine to be the hallmark of the Internet.” 18:03 – Number crunching truth in the digital age. 21:08 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

The Death of Marketing with Ad Industry Pundit Bob Garfield

Sep 26, 2009

Description:

2009 PRSA International Conference Keynote Speaker Bob Garfield, author of “The Chaos Scenario” and co-host of NPR’s “On the Media” talks about the imminent fate of the mass media business, why the insatiable quest for quarterly profits spells death for the old media guard and what the collision of our TV sound bite culture and the Net means for so many Americans who are chronically disengaged from credible sources of news and information. On the Record…Online returns as the Official PR Podcast of the 2009 PRSA International Conference, which will be in San Diego, Oct. 7-10, 2009. We’ll be talking to other conference keynoters in the weeks leading up to the event, and interviewing many of the presenters and panelists on site in San Diego as well. You can register to attend here. 3:12 – Bob Garfield on what he’ll discuss (*explicative*) at the 2009 PRSA International Conference. 3:34 – How the web empowers those of us formerly known as the customer, the electorate or the congregation to make life miserable for organizations. 4:39 – Why the digital revolution, which allow us to aggregate the energies and combined passions of the entire world, means utter catastrophe for the media and marketing industries. 6:02 -- The imminent fate of the fabled symbiosis between advertising and media as a result of the digital revolution. 7:02 – Why the public financial ownership model, which demands increased quarterly net profits, promotes status quo by restricting the mainstream media business from experimenting with new media and social media channels that could have long term benefits at the expense of short term gains. 10:03 – Stakeholder relations as the future of marketing and advertising online. 13:40 – The dangers of living in a US without a vibrant mainstream news media complex serving as a proverbial fourth estate, offering another set of checks and balances against the executive, legislative and judicial branches. 14:34 – The difference between the psychology of the crowd and the aggregated wisdom of the crowd. 16:35 – Cable news puts sensationalism before journalism by serving up a continuous feed of lies, half-truths and demagoguery that corresponds with the world view of its target audience, but the Internet hosts an endless number of points of views, so there will always be a greater number of moderate, rational thinkers on the web then in the polarized world of cable news, says Garfield. 20:01 – Whether or not trusted journalism brands will ever enjoy their day on the sun again. 21:17 – How and why unchecked power, as demonstrated by the careers of Kevin Costner and Eddie Murphy, rarely results in quality products. 21:55 – The severity of the digital revolution will not allow old media to adapt to the new media landscape. Garfield says this shift is on the scale of the industrial revolution, collapsing entire business models. Shel Holtz take note. 22:31 – Why the advertising industry cannot and will not adapt to the digital revolution. 24:39 –Transferring one’s knowledge of mass media to the business of new media engagement and what the convergence of the sound bite and the internet means for a large number of American who are chronically disengaged from accurate, balanced news and information. 26:38 – Some journalism brands will survive, but while the imminent “Chaos Scenario” that Garfield predicts is underway, many purveyors of mainstream news media will disappear. He shares what the media and democracy landscape might look like in 20 years. 28:04 – The impact of the rise of social media on television spot advertising, Madison Avenue’s mad dash to reinvent itself in the digital world and why online display advertising is so ineffective. 29:54 – Garfield’s investment advice to shareholders of Interpublic Group [NYSE: IPG] and Omnicom [NYSE:OMC]. Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

Social Media Crisis Communications Strategy Deep Dive with FEMA Public Information Officer John Shea

Sep 21, 2009

Description:

Public information officer John Shea goes On the Record…Online about strategically leveraging social media for crisis communications, the credibility gap between social media communications and your own website, and why press releases are ineffective for direct communications during times of crisis. FEMA Public Information Officer John Shea talks about how the Federal Emergency Management Agency is using social media to conduct crisis communications. FEMA is currently using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Widgets and RSS to amplify potentially lifesaving information on a local and incident basis that may be available at FEMA.gov. 1:39 – How online newsrooms from iPressroom help public relations practitioners us the web as a primary stakeholder relations channel. For more information tweet @ipressroom, send email to info at ipressroom dot com or register for a demo. 2:47 – Why FEMA sees social media as an effective crisis communications channel. 3:41 – How FEMA is leveraging social media regionally and geographically by working with state and local partners during emergencies like earthquakes, fires and tornados and to provide disaster relief and promote disaster preparedness. 6:01 – FEMA’s Regional Twitter (Example: Region 9) and RSS strategy, social media account management policy, who decides what information moves via Twitter on a region by region basis, and coordinating the national and regional message. 10:12 – How FEMA is using an automated, decentralized social media crisis communications model to empower experts, state and local officials with preconfigured social media footprint, standard operating procedures, and training and support to integrate social media into existing job processes and minimize staffing requirements. 11:12 – How FEMA external affairs -- which includes public affairs, congressional affairs, intergovernmental affairs and community relations -- uses tool-based standard operating procedures as guidelines for experts, state and local officials who may be using FEMA’s social media websites during a disaster or to promote crisis readiness. FEMA has standard operating procedures for using Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. 14:17 – How FEMA is leveraging off-network solutions (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, etc.) to extend the reach of its on-networks resources (information available through FEMA.gov), as well as to navigate IT security, privacy and legal issues. 15:06 – Why creating and hosting content on-network is critical to maintaining the credibility of FEMA’s off-network social media communications efforts. 15:33 – How FEMA sequences the release of information during a crisis incident on-network and off-network. 17:22 – How and why social media has marginalized the effectiveness of press releases. The benefit of amplifying on-network information via Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites to reach individuals with potentially live saving information. 18:05 – Making social media status updates more credibility by back-ending them with links to on-network information, so recipients can verify information by means of the authority of the FEMA.gov domain. 19:08 – Instead of only pushing out safety alerts, FEMA is using social networking sites to search for and connect people looking for disaster relief, safety and security information with links to potentially lifesaving information at FEMA.gov. The sequencing of on-network versus off network information distribution, and the value of presenting content at your own domain versus a third-party social media site. 20:53 – Managing information security concerns when communicating about potentially vulnerable communities during times of crisis. 22:56 – The tools FEMA is using to crowd source the kind of crisis communications people need most during emergencies, and natural disasters, as well as the benefits of using web-based tools or software as a service at organization’s with stringent network security demands. 24:16 – What skill sets and staffing levels are required to manage media monitoring during a crisis, and how FEMA is using social media to listen proactively as a way of indentifying and distributing the information people need most. 26:24 – Why compatibility is critical to the effectiveness of America’s disaster response systems, and why interoperability and compliance are critical to FEMA’s social media communications strategy. 28:16 – What FEMA is doing to make disaster relief information available via mobile devices, and the notion of FEMA evolving into the public steward of raw disaster relief data, which could be repurposed and visualized by the public with open source tools like Google Maps. 30:42 – The network infrastructure required to respond to significant spikes in traffic, which customarily arise during times of crisis, and the content delivery network FEMA uses to help respond to increases in page requests. 33:05 – The legal guidelines that mandate what types of features government agencies can and can’t take advantage of when setting up and customizing various social media accounts. 35:11 – How FEMA is using internal communications to replace command and control style communications, with a more scalable model that lets the center of the organization inform the edges, and the edges inform the world. 37:02 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications consultant, the creator of the top-rated New Media and Social Media Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills, as well as social media strategy and campaign support. Schwartzman is also the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom.

Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy is at Odds with Social Media and What to Do about It

Jul 18, 2009

Description:

Public affairs blogger Matt Armstrong of Armstrong Strategic Insights Group, LLC discusses U.S. Public Diplomacy, repairing America’s image abroad and whether or not the U.S. Department of State will ever be adequately resourced to lead the nation’s global engagement efforts through social media. Mountain Runner is a blog on the practice and structure of public diplomacy, public affairs and public relations. It is read by senior government officials, practitioners, trainers, academics, and analysts from the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, the United States Congress, related institutions, think tanks, and government agencies around the globe. 1:46 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 2:09 – Public diplomacy definition from Mountain Runner blogger Matt Armstrong. 4:05 – Why social media is a critical component of public policy, public affairs and public relations. 4:54 – How public policy can be used to dispel inaccurate information being promulgated by extremist groups online, by highlighting the differences between what an organizations says and what it actually does. 6:06 – Matt Armstrong’s gives his report on how the U.S. Department of State is doing in the area of social media engagement and web-based communications, relative to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Department of Defense, and what could be done to improve the State Department’s global engagement strategy. 8:20 – Matt Armstrong opines on how the U.S. Dept. of State is using Dipnote as an extension of their public diplomacy, public policy and public affairs efforts. 9:30 – Matt Armstrong shares has strategic communications approach to Facebook for U.S. Embassies. 10:31 – Matt Armstrong talks briefly about Exchanges Connect, which was set up by the U.S. Department of State on the Ning white label social networking platform. 13:54 – Matt Armstrong gives his advice to Secretary of State Clinton on how the U.S. Department of State can effectively achieve global electronic engagement in the age of social media, cutting the red tape between public affairs and public diplomacy and the problem with the Smith-Mundt Act. 17:18 – How the U.S. Department of State International Information Program website America.gov defies the Smith-Mundt Act, according the Matt Armstrong. 18:15 – Why broadcasting in Spanish in the United States is one of the easiest, most effective ways to convey public policy and conduct public affairs with Latin America, by leveraging foreign nationals and foreign media operating within the United States. 21:25 – Why open and honest online communications that acknowledge bad news as much as good are the only way to win what Presidents Truman and Eisenhower called the “struggle for the minds and wills” of the global populace. 21:47 – The origins of public affairs, public diplomacy and public relations, and why openness, honesty and the frequency of engagement is even more important in the online communications and social media space. Why web-based communications frustrate segmentation. 24:25 – Social media engagement for government communicators debunked by Matt Armstrong. 26:40 – Whether or not the U.S. Department of State will ever be adequately resourced to lead in global engagement online. Matt Armstrong grades the performance of senior advisor on innovation to secretary Clinton Alec Ross and the institutional hurdles that the U.S. Dept. of State will need to clear to practice successful global engagement in the social media age. 29:10 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications specialist and founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

Online Reputation Management on Twitter with #journchat Founder Sarah Evans

Jun 27, 2009

Description:

Corporate reputation management, identity management and social networking on Twitter with public relations pro Sarah Evans, who established #journchat, a popular, weekly, three-hour chat that occurs on Twitter every Monday at 6pm Pacific Time – 8pm Eastern Time between journalists, bloggers and PR professionals. To participate in #journchat on Twitter, all you have to do is follow the conversation, which Sarah moderates, by monitoring the keyword #journchat in Twitter search or using Twitter apps Tweetdeck, Tweetchat or Tweetgrid. By posting comments with the #journchat keyword, or hashtag as they are known by Twitterers, you can add your remaining 129 characters (140-11 to accommodate the hastag) into the online conversation. In this interview, Sarah talks about why #journchat took off, the Twitter apps she likes best for moderating her weekly chat on Twitter, best online reputation management practices for tweeting on behalf of brands and how early adopter brands can use micro blogging for corporate reputation management, crisis communications, social media optimization and lift search engine rankings. 1:46 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 2:49 – Sarah Evans on Twitter apps Tweetchat and Tweetgrid, two online social networking services designed for participating in group discussions on Twitter, which one she likes better and why? 3:42 – Sarah Evans on using Twitter apps for group messaging to block spammers from Twitter chats. 4:15 – Sarah Evans reveals her biggest surprises about moderating her weekly Tweet chat. 5:34 – Sarah Evans on the size of the community she’s built from moderating #journchat weekly. 6:43 – Sarah Evans on how and why #journchat grew so quickly on the Twitter instant messaging platform. 8:02 – Sarah Evans’ top three tips for leveraging social media to launch a successful, recurring online social media PR event. 9:15 – Sarah Evans on the level of support she received through the Twitter social networking platform when she first introduced #journchat, and how it served to validate her social networking event. 10:21 – Sarah Evans on social media strategy considerations for organizational communicators, branded Twitter accounts and personal Twitter accounts. 12:37 – Sarah Evans on best online reputation management practices for disclosing who the organizational communicator(s) behind a branded Twitter account are. 13:48 – Sarah Evans on the risks associated with letting an employee build their personal brand at the expense of a corporate brand. Eric mentions a previous episode in which Toyota revealed their social media strategy for putting their brand first on Twitter, while still acknowledging each employee’s contribution. 15:40 – Sarah Evans on pitching news stories to journalists and other media relations techniques via Twitter. 16:52 – Sarah Evans on her role as a guest writer at Mashable, the social media marketing tactics, social media SEO and social media marketing blog. 17:05 – Sarah Evans discusses Media On Twitter, a free, user-generated contact record database of journalists on Twitter which provides Twitter IDs for reporters and bloggers, much as Vocus PRWeb. 18:42 – Sarah Evans on social media PR strategy and social media engagement. 19:45 – Sarah Evans names the companies she thinks are doing a good job leveraging social media for communications. 21:15 – Sarah Evans on where we’re headed and future growth prospects for social media and online social networking. 22:57 – Sarah Evans gives out her Twitter ID and shares the best way to reach her. 24:04 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications specialist and founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of social media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

Crisis Communications Online - Social Media Usage during the VT Shootings with Leysia Palen

Jun 5, 2009

Description:

Crisis communications used to be the handled exclusively through official channels like press releases, spokespeople and media relations. But today, through the power of socially distributed problem-solving, a first draft of history more nuanced and accurate than ever before is emerging from social media, and increasingly, people are turning to unofficial sources first, particularly in times of crisis. In this episode, social media crisis communications researcher at the ConnectivIT Lab at the University of Colorado at Boulder Leysia Palen shares what she has learned about social media usage during a crisis, assessing the credibility of citizen journalism and user generated media during a crisis, and how organizations might align with unofficial back channels in the future. Show Notes: 1:45 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 2:56 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen, an assistant professor of the Department of Computer Science at the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder and lab director of her research group, ConnectivIT, which focuses its research on social media crisis communications, shares her social science perspective on the differences between crisis, disaster, and emergency. 6:02 - Social media crisis communications researcher Researcher Leysia Palen on how accurate social media research is conducted, on the potential problems in social media crisis communications research, and on how these potential problems in social media communications research are tackled. 7:55 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen shares her experience on the use of software tools for measuring conversations. She shares her knowledge on what tools are most useful and productive and what tools are being built. 9:58 - Social media crisis communications researcher Researcher Leysia Palen gives her insight on which of the readily available tools like Google are the quickest in indexing and delivering the most useful information during times of crisis. 12:37 - Eric Schwartzman comments about social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen’s report, “Crisis in a Networked World: Features of Computer-Mediated Communication in the April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech Event,” published by the Social Science Computer Review. 13:13 - Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen shares crisis communications and emergency management advice on how to incorporate social media into how they manage emergencies. 15:45 - Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on what she learned about how people used social media during the Virginia Tech tragedy, on what she found surprising, on what the event shows from a social media emergency management point of view. She refers to the ethnographic work of one of her graduate students, Sarah Veiweg. 20:24 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on whether she thinks distributed problem solving is more reliable than top-down, commander control style problem solving during the inventory stage of a crisis. She talks about the difference between a disaster and an emergency. 22:42 - Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on how most Virginia Tech students were made aware of the shootings. 23:24 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on what students did once they were informed of the shootings, on Virginia Tech’s crisis communications throughout the day. She talks about how social media communications and online social networking sites were used for student-to-student communication and discovery of information throughout the day. 25:28 – Social media crisis communications researcher Palen on emergency management. She talks about backchanneling communications and the importance of frequent updates. 27:47 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on accuracy of information, on why we have to be critical consumers of information we receive, on making decisions with the information we are given, and on whether to trust pieces of information under uncertain situations. 29:56 - Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen talks about whether or not a website is important for organizational communicators as source of crisis communications. She talks about whether or not she would advise that most websites be mobile-friendly as well 31:25 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on whether she thinks the violent nature of the Virginia Tech tragedy and helplessness of the victims is what compelled so many volunteers to accurately self-police their list-building activities. She talks about whether or not she thinks there would be a same level of accuracy in a political crisis. 34:45 - Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on what she thinks about timelines and visualizations of data and why their impact is appreciated. She refers to the research work of another one of her graduate students, Sophia Liu. 36:50 – Social media crisis communications researcher Leysia Palen on what type of policy changes she hopes her social media communications research on the use of social media during crisis will prompt. 39:04 – End. Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is a new media and social media communications specialist and founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

Online Newsroom Best Practices with Toyota Social Media Supervisor Scott Deyager

May 22, 2009

Description:

Online newsroom best practices, online newsroom design and social media communications with Toyota Social Media Supervisor Scott Deyager, who discusses online newsroom strategy, online newsroom software, online newsrooms and social media, online newsroom PR and the future of social media communications. Show Notes: 1:45 –Online newsroom services from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. Insure online newsroom best practices by using iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 2:48 – Toyota Social Media Supervisor Scott Deyager shares his experience as a member of the Toyota family and his transition from traditional media relations to the social media communications team. 4:18 – Online newsroom access to the 2010 Pruis reveal at the Detroit Auto show which was simulcast live without password protection in Toyota’s online newsroom, and how live video streams are becoming an online newsroom best practice. 5:47 – The importance of maintaining open access as an online newsroom best practice, why Toyota chose not to use password protection for its online newsrooms, and why the loss of password protection has become an online newsroom best practice. 7:55 – How Toyota decides what press releases, press kits and other press materials goes in their online newsroom and what press kits and related content go on their social media sites and how Toyota uses different channels for different purposes. 9:17 – Toyota Social Media Supervisor Scott Deyager on people and process, on how Toyota decides who does what, and how the decisions to post content that insure online newsroom best practices are made. 10:20 – Note: At this point in the interview, the MP3 file ended abruptly and Scott Deyeger agreed to schedule a second interview, essentially rerecording the second half. Audiophiles may be interested to know that the first portion was recorded via Skype, the the second portion was recorded on a Telos One digital to analog bybrid device. 10:53 – How Toyota evaluates online newsroom best practices and the success of its social media outreach efforts. 11:47 – Toyota’s rationale for outsourcing its online newsroom to an online newsroom software provider instead of building a custom content management application or skinning an open source platform and having to instill online newsroom best practices autonomously. He talks about why Toyota selected the iPressroom online newsroom software. 12:57 –Toyota’s experience transitioning to the iPressroom online newsroom service 13:41 – Twitter integration in online newsrooms, Toyota’s communications objectives for Twitter, managing corporate and personal brands responsibly as communicators, and online newsroom best practices for Twitter integration. 16:28 – Putting the Toyota brand first, the use of signatures in tweets, and Toyota’s Twitter strategy of maintaining branded communications without sacrificing personal transparency. 18:00 – Toyota’s decision to establish branded Flickr and YouTube accounts instead of personal, employee accounts, and still maintain the peer-to-peer influencer advantage, and integrating these account into online newsroom best practices. 20:17 – The rules of engagement for social media interaction at Toyota. 21:10 – Eric Schwartzman brings up his past experience with podcasting and how thinks having last word as an interviewer is inappropriate. He asks whether or not Toyota is comfortable letting its critics have the last word in their online pressroom or social media sites. 22:20 – What’s next for Toyota in terms of social media communications. He talks about how the company is now “waking up” to social media technology. 23:01 – Eric asks for Scott’s job-seeking advice to Eric’s intern, Jessica Shu who wrote and search engine optimized these podcast show notes. Scott Deyager advises job-seekers who would like to secure a position in social media communications at a major organization like Toyota. 24:31 – The future of Toyota hybrids. He talks about the 2010 Toyota Prius and when it will be available. He gives insight on why now is a good time to buy a car. He mentions that more information can be found on Toyota’s online newsroom, youtube.com/toyotausa, Toyota Flickr and Toyota on Twitter. 25:56 – End. Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

SEO for PR Tools and Tips from Search Engine Land editor Danny Sullivan

May 15, 2009

Description:

Online Newsroom SEO and Press Release SEO Best Practices Profiled SEO for PR is the subject of this interview with Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan, who talks about online newsroom SEO, press release SEO, inbound links, his transition from traditional journalism to the internet, and what he thinks about Google and other tools. Show Notes: 1:45 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard to conduct SEO for PR. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact info at ipressroom dot com. 3:01 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan talks about what Search Engine Land is and what it covers. 3:47 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on his background and how he transitioned from traditional journalism to the internet and Search Engine Land. 5:02 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on what he knows about the Google algorithm and major search engines like Yahoo and Microsoft. He talks about what he thinks are the key factors that are important for most successful SEO for PR. 7:05 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on what he thinks is the order of importance of the different factors in SEO for PR. He talks about search on the Pinkberry website. 8:55 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on what his favorite tool is for measuring inbound links that are coming in. He talks about different tools and about what he likes and what he doesn’t like about the different tools that different companies use to cinduct SEO for PR. 11:25 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on the variety of strategies for building inbound links and the importance of having great content. 12:35 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on whether or not he agrees that some inbound links are more influential than others. He talks about the “secret formula,” about whether the domain of the link plays an important role, and about the two key things Google looks for in a link. 14:55 - Eric Schwartzman shares a story of how one power inbound link can play a huge role in either helping or hurting an individual and an organization’s reputation. 17:12 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on likely factors other than a powerful link that may come into play. He talks about Google’s Query Deserves Freshness initiative, what it does, and how it plays a role in SEO for PR. 19:41 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on whether he thinks Google is indexing news quicker than regular web content. He talks about Google’s dedicated news crawler system, what it is designed to do and what that means for SEO for PR practitioners. 20:11 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on what opportunities press releases sent over a newswire provides to companies that want to get news information about their products, brands, and services out there, on whether a certain format is necessary, on why he thinks the real opportuity oif press release SEO is not necessarily SEO for PR. 22:17 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan talks about why he doesn’t use tools for benchmarking site rank and what he advises people doing SEO for PR to measure instead. 24:15 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on whether he thinks external key words or ad words tool are good indicators of clusters or themes and on whether or not he thinks these clusters are indicative of the types of words that would figure into Latent Semantic Indexing. 26:18 – Search Engine Land Editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on whether or not he is concerned about the potential loss of investigative journalism, on the newspaper industry business models, on what he thinks the newspaper industry is wasting time on, and on what he thinks makes the online industry unique. He talks about the Digg tool. 29:23 – Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Danny Sullivan on what he thinks about Google, on whether he is worried that Google is the one company that is becoming a single point of failure for too many web activities. 32:33 – End. Related Episodes: • SEO maven Russell Wright goes On the Record...Online with Eric Schwartzman about the future of SEO services • On the Record...Online with SEO Guru Lee Odden • On the Record...Online with Expansion Plus President Sally Falkow, APR Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsrooms software as a service provider iPressroom, SEO for PR advocate and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard and conduct SEO for PR by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Wired Magazine Contributing Editor Frank Rose

May 9, 2009

Description:

Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose and author tips off media relations practitioners on how he decides what to write about, what he expects to find in the online newsrooms of the companies he visits online and whether or not the quest to write the great American novel or spec screenplay may someday be displaced by the quest to write the next great iPhone app. Show Notes: 1:45 – How online newsrooms from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 3:22 – Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose and author of West of Eden: the End of Innocence at Apple Computer gives insight into what he thinks makes a great magazine article. He talks about the necessary ingredients of a feature story in Wired Magazine. 4:22- Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose talks about his interest in pop culture and what he has written about throughout his career. 5:25 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose talks about how the internet has changed the way he covers and consumes news. He talks about his book called The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business on the William Morris Agency. 7:31 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on online newsrooms and on what he expects to find on a company’s website. He talks about how missing information and clumsy user interfaces in a company’s online newsroom can frustrate his efforts. 9:40 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on media relations and whether or not public relations professionals should be using social media to directly engage the public and the relationship of social media to online newsrooms. 11:00 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on the importance of ease of use in online newsrooms and why the user interface in your online newsroom directly impacts corporate reputation. 13:10 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on whether or not content is still king, and if it could be displaced by a good user interface. 15:15 – Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on the allure of the latest, greatest, shiny, new technology. 19:35 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on what makes Apple stand out from the rest. 21:25 - Wired Magazine contributing editor Frank Rose on the state of artificial intelligence, and whether or not we’ll every be able to build a computer that can truly mirror human behavior. 23:25 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. Another Interview with a Wired Magazine Journalist: On the Record...Online with Wired Magazine Senior Editor Jeffrey O'Brien PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Blip.TV Co-Founder Dina Kaplan on the Explosive Growth of Online Video

Apr 30, 2009

Description:

Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on the growth of online video, measurement challenges and how much her top showrunners earn from distributing their online video programs on her network. Show Notes: 2:10 – iPressroom, Trend Stream, Korn Ferry International and PRSA announce the 2009 Digital Readiness Report to determine what digital communication skills employers want and PR job candidates need in today’s competitive PR job market. If you’ve hired a PR or marketing employee in the last 12 months, or expect to in the next 12 months, please fill out the survey at http://www.ipressroom.com/ready by May 28, 2009. 4:00 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 5:45 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on what makes Blip.TV different from other online video, what kind of shows Blip.TV focuses on, mainstream television versus viral video, and how Blip.TV reaches its audience. 7:12 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan talks about where Blip.TV’s traffic comes from. 9:28 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on whether or not Blip.TV shows cater to the Long Tail. 11:18 - Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on the importance of marketing to the different kinds of audiences, and the difference between reaching a large audience and reaching the right audience. 13:53 - Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on the cost of advertising on Blip.TV. She shares information about the CPM and discusses the different kinds of ways a brand can buy ads, the difference between advertising on web video and advertising on TV, and gives her rationale for the reason behind the price difference. 16:56 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on what should an independent producer should be looking for, on measurement options Blip.TV provides to its showrunners. 20:27 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on how much show content creators are making, on which kinds of web videos do best with advertisers, and what top earners can make running online video programs on her network. 23:40 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on what it took for Blip.TV to win the support of investors. 26:55 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on recent news about Youtube’s impending site redesign. She talks about how people’s online viewing habits are changing, and how the line between web and TV is blurring. 30:41 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on audio versus audio content. She talks about the importance of marketing in building audience for video content and gives examples of successes such as Gary Vaynerchuck’s Wine Library TV. 33:03 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on the production value of web shows, the culture of authenticity, and why feedback is so important. 36:09 – Blip.TV co-founder Dina Kaplan on recent the comSCORE Top U.S. Online Video Properties rankings, the challenges of tracking views, the different ways of measuring online viewership, and why it’s tough to compare views on one video platform to another. 38:04 - End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Social Media Marketing and PR using Facebook Company Pages with CC Chapman

Apr 25, 2009

Description:

Social media marketing, social media optimization and social media PR using the newly upgraded Facebook Company Page features with co-founder and managing partner of The Advance Guard, C.C. Chapman, who recently released the free white paper “About Face [PDF],” which discusses how new changes in Facebook increase the social media marketing and social media PR capacity of the popular social network, and how a organizations can leverage social media optimization to achieve tangible business goals. Show Notes: 1:45 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 4:09 – Social media marketing is changing the ways brands interact. New media maven C.C. Chapman shares his thoughts on how the changes in Facebook impact social media optimization. 5:45 – Social media PR can be practiced on Facebook, says new media maven C.C. Chapman, who discusses the new ways that brands, businesses, and organizations use the social network for online PR. 6:40 – New media maven C.C. Chapman explains how to create Facebook pages and shares which companies he thinks are the most effective in using Facebook as a social media marketing tool. 8:15 – New media maven C.C. Chapman discusses specific Facebook changes and how organizations are utilizing the new features and applications for social media optimization. 12:49 – New media maven C.C. Chapman discusses which Facebook tools and applications he thinks still have room to grow. 14:20 – New media maven C.C. Chapman shares his insight on whether or not he thinks Facebook could replace online newsrooms. 16:38 – New media maven C.C. Chapman stresses why it is so important in today’s world to use Facebook as a social media marketing tool. 19:28 – New media maven C.C. Chapman discusses the relationship between a Facebook page and a company’s online newsroom or corporate website. He also shares his tips as to how The Advance Guard uses Facebook as a social media optimization tool, how the company determines the effectiveness of tools and applications, how the company figures out what is working and what is not. He reveals the easiest Facebook social media optimization application to use. 23:25 – New media maven C.C. Chapman tells us what an “fmbl” is and gives guidance to where to find out more information about them. 27:03 – New media maven C.C. Chapman discusses the differences between managing a personal brand and managing a company brand and how to use Facebook as a social media marketing communications tool for each. 29:13 – New media maven C.C. Chapman talks about why it is important to build trust with the Facebook community and shares his insight on whether or not it is tougher for social media marketers to build trust on Facebook fan pages or their online newsrooms. 30:37 – New media maven C.C. Chapman talks about dealing with potential challenges that may arise with Facebook and social media PR. 33:20 – New media maven C.C. Chapman shares what he thinks is the two most important pieces of advice for being building a successful online community. 35:35 – New media maven C.C. Chapman shares what personal sacrifices he makes to be the social media marketing and social media PR specialist. He talks about the importance of prioritizing and being passionate about social media and how this passion can help a company be the most successful in social media optimization. 38:13 – New media maven C.C. Chapman discusses why he thinks not all companies are ready for social media and what all companies should do before committing to social media. 40:00 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Former Director of Online Communications for the Democratic National Convention Committee Jason Rosenberg

Apr 17, 2009

Description:

Former Director of Communications of the Democratic National Convention Jason Rosenberg Online newsroom and blogger relations advocate Jason Rosenberg, Director of Communications at the 2008 Democratic National Convention discusses his involvement in changing the dynamics of online media relations at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, setting up the DNC’s online newsroom, and establishing criteria for credentialing bloggers. Show Notes: 1:45 – Online newsrooms from iPressroom help public relations professionals leverage new media to generate more news coverage. Use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. For a free trial of iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard tweet @chrisbechtel or email info at ipressroom dot com. 3:18 – Jason Rosenberg on handling online communications at the Democratic National Convention. He talks about being hired as the second online communications director in the party’s history and working to build the most open convention in the Democratic party’s history. 4:00 – Jason Rosenberg discusses how he worked on leveraging online newsrooms and other online communications tools so that users would be able to get a view of the convention as if they were present. He talks about the impact of blogging during the convention and the challenges of convincing other communications staffers that bloggers should be credentialed to cover the event. 6:45 – Jason Rosenberg describes what the qualification process was for selecting bloggers for the national convention. He talks about the two different pools bloggers were selected from and about what he looked for in determining a bloggers’ credibility. 9:00 – Jason Rosenberg gives his perspective on how 2008 has changed the view of the online community’s role in media relations and discusses whether or not he thinks DNC’s online newsroom strategy was successful. He talks about how he called on the history news media to build a business case for blogger relations among senior level party communications staffers. 12:00 – Jason Rosenberg further describes his goals as director of online communications, using their online newsroom to dis-intermediate the mainstream media’s previous lock on distribution, and on making the national convention as open as possible. He talks about how making the maximum use of online resources and tools such as Twitter, Blip.tv, Flicker, and YouTube helped him in accomplishing these and other online communications goals. 16:00 – Jason Rosenberg further describes the challenges he faced with his role as director of online communications. He talks about how he was able to deal with the difficulties and about the evidence he found that helped convince skeptical national convention lawyers and communications staff that despite potential problems that may arise, the online community and bloggers were “ready to play the game.” 19:55 – Jason Rosenberg discusses the changing dynamics in media relations and how despite their novelty, blogs are now increasingly accepted and considered as an important channel for political strategists. He talks about how the results of the DNC have become instrumental in cementing these changes and why he believes they forever change the future of media relations. 21:17 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Korn/Ferry International EVP of Corporate Affairs Don Spetner Advises PR Job Seekers on Job Hunting in a Recession

Apr 14, 2009

Description:

Korn/Ferry International Executive Vice-President of Corporate Affairs Don Spetner talks about today’s job market for public relations and corporate communications professionals, the new media communication skills you need to compete in today’s job market, and strategies for job-seekers to cope with the current down economy. Spetner is among the prestigious presenters at the upcoming PRSA Digital Impact Conference April 30-May 2009 in NYC. Show Notes: 1:50 - Online newsrooms from iPressroom help public relations professionals leverage new media to generate more news coverage. Use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. For a free trial of iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard tweet @chrisbechtel or email info at ipressroom dot com. 3:49 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner gives a preview of what he’s planning on talking about at the PRSA Digital Impact Conference April 30-May 1, 2009 in NYC. 4:25 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on current executive hiring trends in PR and corporate communications, which communication skills are becoming less important, which communication skills are becoming more important, and what business wants from a new media specialist. 5:49 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on the new media training communication skills employers themselves often lack, the importance of new media training, and effective job interviewing skills for public relations, corporate communications and marketing professionals. 7:25 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on hiring trends, the new media training gap between junior and senior job-seekers, the new media communications skills prevalent among junior and senior job-seekers and why improving communication skills in the area of new media and social media are critical in today’s PR job market. 8:43 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner gives insight into how the quickly-developing new media world is redefining the specific business communication skills that Korn/Ferry International is looking for in executive recruitment today. 9:45 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on how different kinds of organizations are integrating new media into their public relations campaigns and who generally controls mew media communications in the organization today. 10: 37 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on best practices for new media communications management. 11:15 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on what he thinks are the best sectors to be working in from a hiring standpoint and on which fields are staying strong and which fields are suffering in today’s economy. 12:21 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on where he thinks the new media world is in relation to today’s government, Obama’s new media communications campaign, and PR job opportunities for government communicators. 13:25 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner on the impact of the US government bailout on the PR job market. 14:12 – PR jobs expert Don Spetner advises senior level communicators on learning from younger generations on new media communications and driving change within their organizations. 16:11 - PR jobs expert Don Spetner on philanthropist and financial services titan Eli Broad, Eli Broad’s art collection, and working with Eli Broad. He shares his experiences working with him and about whether or not Eli Broad is as difficult as his reputation suggests. 19:07 - End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Benefits of social media and the benefits of blogging with John Cass

Apr 11, 2009

Description:

Benefits of social media, the benefits of social networking and the benefits of blogging explained by Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass, who talks about building profitable online communities, the differences between Linkedin and Facebook for business to business marketing, mapping objectives to social media channels and more. Show Notes: 1:45 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used for new media marketing to help public relations practitioners better engage their publics. How to use iPressroom to leverage the benefits of social media and the benefits of blogging, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 3:25 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass shares why he originally started blogging, how he discovered the benefits of blogging. 4:35 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass discusses the quantitative benefits of blogging, the benefits of social media, and how corporate blogs can help businesses engage with their community. 6:25 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass gives insight into the benefits of social media, and the strategy that was used for building an online community at Forrester Research. He talks about the benefits of social media tools such as blogs, Twitter, and interactive marketing forums. 7:50– Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass explains how online communities for business to business users are different than online communities for consumers and why users are more concerned about privacy in a B2B setting. John also reveals the specific benefits of social networking for business-to-business marketing. 8:51 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass on how online communities do not necessarily have to be free to be successful. He talks about the Blog Council and how other successful subscription-based online communities can actually be easier for people to get involved with, despite the fee. 11:50 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass discusses more ways to make an online community profitable. He talks about how the pharmaceutical drug-safety regulators leveraged the benefits of social media by using social networks for stakeholder relations. 15:30 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass discusses how to match the benefits of social media to specific communications objectives, the benefits of social media research, the benefits of online community management, and why he likes the book Building Community on Web by Amy Jo Kim. 20:00- Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass discusses the benefits of social networking by brand. He shares his thoughts on what changes he thinks would be of benefit to the social networks. 22:40 – Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging author John Cass gives a preview of what he will be talking at the Digital Impact Conference presented by PRSA like sustainable online communities, how to be successful in social media networking and how online communities can be built with blogs, forums and other emerging social media channels. 24:05 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Los Angeles Times Veteran, Author and LAObserved.com Blogger Kevin Roderick

Apr 4, 2009

Description:

Veteran reporter and author Kevin Roderick goes On the Record…Online about saving the Los Angeles Times, how daily newspapers can leverage social media and how institutions are grappling with the news media vacuum created by the Web. Native Angeleno Kevin Roderick spent 25 years as a reporter at the Los Angeles Times, authored two books about Los Angeles, publishes LAObserved.com and serves as the editor-in-chief of the UCLA online newsroom. Disclosure: The UCLA online newsroom is host on the iPressroom online newsroom management service. Show Notes: 1:47 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used in concert with social media to help organizations reach broader audiences online. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s new online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact info at ipressroom dot com. 3:17 – Kevin Roderick discusses the challenges facing The Los Angeles Times, how the only daily newspapers in the US nation’s second largest market might regain its relevancy and community-based journalism as an alternative to ad-supported media. 7:07 – Kevin Roderick on which editorial news beats at the Los Angeles Times have the greatest likelihood of success, competing with the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Nikki Finke on the entertainment business news beat and the challenges of providing depth of coverage in the future. 11:38 – Kevin Roderick on how newspapers can compete with Wikipedia and news aggregators, the differences between news and feature coverage, The Los Angeles Times recent efforts to map the geography of the city and what that says about the newspaper’s grasp of Los Angeles. 16:36 -- Kevin Roderick compares the data desk at the Los Angeles Times to the newspaper’s now defunct political polling department. 20:42 – Kevin Roderick on hyper local media. 22:44 – Kevin Roderick on the Michael Hiltzik sock puppeting scandal, how The Los Angeles Times dealt with it, and whether or not that decision was just. 25:51 – Kevin Roderick on Pasadena Now, their outsourcing reporting to India via Craigslist Bangalore [correction] and whether or not the current economy represents an opportunity for news media upstarts to displace entrenched brands. 27:34 – Kevin Roderick on niche new media outlets like DailyCandy.com and the dangers of a polarized news media landscape. 31:21 – Kevin Roderick on the lessons institutions are learning with respect to negotiating their way through the world of new media and social media communications, and how UCLA specifically is integrating these emerging channels into their outreach efforts. 33:39 – End More Interviews with LA Times Staffers: On the Record...Online with Los Angeles Times Editorial Writer Jon Healey On the Record...Online with LA Times Entertainment Writer John Horn On the Record...Online with Los Angeles Times Columnist Joel Stein On the Record...Online with Los Angeles Times Interactive General Manager Rob Barrett Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

NY Times Sunday Styles Reporter Allen Salkin

Mar 27, 2009

Description:

NY Times styles reporter Allen Salkin on what he expects to find in your online newsroom, why he trusts your online pressroom more than your Facebook page and why you need to Google whatever it is you’re pitching before you contact him. Show Notes: 0:49 – Online newsroom specialist Eric Schwartzman discloses his partiality for The New York Times. He offers his perspective on why he likes the daily print news format better than online news for broader fare, and echoes EPIC 2014’s concerns regarding the internet’s impact on media and democracy in the US. 1:45 – Eric Schwartzman characterizes the Sunday Styles section of the newspaper and the Thursday Styles section, with was more recently introduced. He also talks a bit about the types of stories Allen Salkin has written in the past. 3:10 – Chris Bechtel of online newsroom provider iPressroom on why job security for PR people today means securing a reliable way to post text, images and video to your organization’s online newsroom without requiring the help of IT. For info on iPressroom’s online newsroom service, tweet @ipressroom or email info at ipressroom dot com. 4:36 – Allen Salkin on best media relations practices for public relations professionals looking to submit news for editorial consideration to The New York Times style section. 5:23 – Allen Salkin shares his favorite magazine and television news programs for trend spotting. 7:12 – Allen Salkin on how Google helps him distinguish actual news trends from hype, and why you need to search whatever it is you’re pitching before you call or email journalists, and consider how those search results weigh in on your argument. 8:06 – Allen Salkin on “PR websites,” what he likes about him, what he dislikes about them, and his bias against public relations agency websites that post reviews and other editorial coverage about their own clients online. 9:14 – Allen Salkin discusses social networks, and why he finds them even less credible than PR agency websites as a credible information source. He also shares his disdain for street teams who stage “happenings” and any other marketing tactics that attempt to co-opt the “organic” to stir up word of mouth. 10:43 – Allen Salkin’s attitude toward “PR websites” that he perceives as being transparent about their mission. 11:26 – Allen Salkin on what he expects to find first in a company’s online newsroom and how a poorly designed user interface can negatively affect your reputation. 12:59 – Allen Salkin on why ease-of-use and user experience are central to effective online newsrooms, and what to avoid putting in them at all costs. 13:22 – How a media person’s experience in an organization’s online newsroom affects their ability to do their jobs, best practices for showcasing media contact information and why flash online pressrooms and PDFs are less useful to reporters. 14:30 – Allen Salkin on the difference between advertising photography and photojournalism, and the type of photography he finds most useful in a company’s online newsroom. 14:57 – Allen Salkin on having video in a company’s online news room versus on YouTube, where he’d tend to trust it most, as well as the type of video content he’s most likely to watch. 15:35 – Allen Salkin on why it’s a good idea to make sure your photos are in the online newsroom section of your organization’s website, rather than somewhere else. 16:01 – Allen Salkin responds to Eric Schwartzman’s claim that the more control an organization exercises over the content on its website, the less credibility it has, by likening one-sided websites to PR people who only tell reporters the rosy side of a story. Both, in his view, are unethical and untrustworthy. 17:50 – Allen Salkin talks about social media, acknowledging that while services like Twitter and Facebook have personal benefits, they pose challenges for reporters, because they could be seen by others as representatives of their employer even though they’re using them for social purposes. 20:27 – Allen Salkin on where The NY Times sits in the larger new media ecosystem, and the difference between primary news sources and the online news echo chamber. 22:49 – Allen Salkin points out NY Times Executive Editor Bill Keller’s recent Talk to the Newsroom feature and discusses the economics of the newspaper business. 24:28 – Allen Salkin on staff cuts at The New York Times, what makes The New York Times different from other online news websites, the challenges of news content deliver in the digital age and why he thinks The New York Times is more relevant today than ever before. 31:46 – End Other New York Times podcasts: On the Record...Online with New York Times Columnist David Carr On the Record...Online - David Carr of NYT's Keynote at PRSA On the Record…Online with New York Times Exec. Dir. Customer Insight Jeffrey Graham On the Record...Online with NY Times Technology Editor Steve Lohr On the Record...Online with John Markoff of the New York Times On the Record...Online with New York Times Personal Technology Columnist David Pogue Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Daily Candy Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy goes On the Record…Online

Mar 21, 2009

Description:

Email newsletter publisher and adored public relations target DailyCandy.com’s founder and Editor-in-Chief Dany Levy and CEO Pete Shienbaum discuss getting acquired by Comcast for $125 million, using email newsletters as a new media distribution channel, why their email newsletters are a valuable new media marketing opportunity and how public relations professionals looking to score coverage should approach their editorial staff. Show Notes: 1:45 – How an online newsroom from iPressroom can be used to help public relations practitioners generate more news coverage for their clients. How to use iPressroom to distribute press releases, biographies, fact sheets, publicity stills, video, audio, and more, and how to measure downloads and generate activity reports. Plus, how to get free access to iPressroom’s online newsroom SEO wizard. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or contact cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 2:59 – New media mogul Dany Levy shares where she was raised, where she went to school, where she lives and whether she’s single or taken. 3:54 – New media executive Pete Shienbaum on how he thinks a down economy will impact the lifestyle news beat and dealing with consumer’s changing media consumption habits. 5:09 – Dany Levy on the unique advantages of email newsletters as a distribution vehicle versus other new media channels, and how to adapt news and information to take best advantage of bulk email as a communication vehicle. 7:17 – Dany Levy on balancing the needs of marketers against the expectations of subscribers by helping marketers develop messages most likely to resonate with their nearly 2.8 million subscribers. Pete Shienbaum discusses the relationship between editorial and advertising at DailyCandy.com. 8:51 – New media mogul Dany Levy talks about her background in mainstream print news journalism, and how she governs the relationship between editorial and advertising at DailyCandy.com. 9:54 – Dany Levy on the impact of aesthetics on the DailyCandy.com brand, and just how far she’ll go to help a new media marketer engage her subscribers. 10:46 – How new media mogul Dany Levy uses the domestic and international mainstream news media to keep DailyCandy.com relevant, but not repetitive. She also tips off media relations specialists on which European and Asian countries she’s watching closest to trend spot. 11:25 – New media executive Pete Shienbaum talks about Twitter, and the importance of emerging technologies on staying relevant to consumers in today’s news media marketplace. Dany Levy shares her Twitter ID, which you’ll never be able to guess. You can find Pete’s Twitter ID by checking Dany’s followers. 14:46 – Dany Levy reveals how her editorial strategy for her city editions differs from that of the Everywhere, Deal and Travel editions. She tips off public relations people on which ones she needs something cool to hyperlink to, which ones she doesn’t, and the relationship of a website to what makes cool lifestyle news. 16:22 – Pete Sheinbaum on the future mainstream print news media brands, the importance of trust and credibility, and whether or not perennial the fashion magazine category is impervious to online delivery. 18:57 – Pete Sheinbaum on why new media marketers pay a premium to run display ads with DailyCandy.com. 20:50 – Pete Sheinbaum reveals DailyCandy.com’s advertiser attrition rates over the last several quarters. 21:58 – Pete Sheinbaum talks about email open rates and email click-through rates in relation to industry averages for traditional internet media. He also discusses the impact of the creative, the subject line and promotional incentives on the numbers. 23:37 – Eric Schwartzman shares the name and number of the hot new Chanel lip gloss color, according the make-up specialist at the Chanel store on Robertson in Los Angeles, and where actress Scarlett Johansson recently spotted him lunching. 24:21 – Dany Levy on how the economy’s impacting the jet setters, and DailyCandy.com’s target audience. 26:01 – Pete Sheinbaum on how they grew DailyCandy.com, how their business plan differed from a typical Silicon Valley start up and how the timing of the last dotcom bust affected their efforts. 27:34 – Pete Sheinbaum on whether or not the economic downturn represents an opportunity for start-ups to displace entrenched, category leaders. 28:49 – Dany Levy on the formula for the perfect PR pitch to DailyCandy.com, and the best email address to send pitches to. 30:03 – Dany Levy talks about the Daily Candy Dossier, which reports on the fashion runways of the world, where the DailyCandy.com editors sit in the fashion news media pecking order, the old guard fashion media’s attitude towards DailyCandy.com, and why. 31:46 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info@ipressroom.com or tweet @ipressroom.

Social Media Marketing Expert Tom Smith on Why We Trust the Opinions of Strangers More than the Media

Mar 13, 2009

Description:

Social media marketing expert Tom Smith on global social media penetrations rates, what types of products and services are most talked about online and why we trust the opinions of total strangers more than the mainstream news media on the Net. Trend Stream CEO Tom Smith is author of “When We Start Trusting Strangers [PDF],” a global social media study quantifying adoption and trust level by channel, country and product category. Tom will present new social media research at The Digital Impact Conference in NYC April 30 – May 1. Show Notes: 1:28 – How to use the iPressroom to host and engage in online conversations. With the iPressroom you can easily and reliably add and manage RSS feeds, blogs, streaming video or a custom online pressroom to your organizational communications efforts. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or email cbechtel at ipressroom dot com. 3:56 – Tom Smith on his Power to the People Social Media Tracker, a global web usage tracking program he devised for Universal McCann, and how that led to the Strangers Report. 5:46 – Tom Smith on the methodology of the Strangers Report, which involved interviewing 17,000 people around the world, and on the differences between conducting online and offline research, and the statistical relevancy of his data. 6:50 – Tom Smith’s new online market research company Trend Stream, which offers global research studies on web usage trends to corporate clients. 8:09 – Tom Smith on the global trends revealed by the Strangers Report, including higher levels of adoption and content contribution in Asia and India, the explosive growth of online video and the widespread international growth of social media. 9:49 – Tom Smith on the global and regional levels of trust people have for consumer opinions online, whether they know the person responsible for posting those opinions or not, and the fallacy that social media is popular primarily among younger audiences. 10:45 – Tom Smith on how cultural traits impact social media trust levels and the correlation between adoption rates and trust levels region by region. 11:54 – Tom Smith ranks online passive consumption channels and online content creation channels by popularity. 12:38 – Tom Smith on how the average size of an individual’s personal online social network varies worldwide, which user groups by country have the biggest and smallest networks, and the impact of Facebook on average network size in those markets where it has achieved penetration. 15:14 – Tom Smith contrasts social media marketing against mainstream marketing, likening the former to direct marketing, and lists the defining criteria by which successful social media marketing programs should abide. 16:36 – Tom Smith on digital friendships and how the internet has expanded the number of connections people have, albeit in a digital format, and how the opinions of digital friends impact corporate reputations. 18:36 – Tom Smith on the myriad of ways people are sharing opinions online and how self publishing tools have lowered the barriers to entry for influencing opinions via the Net. 19:54 – Tom Smith on peer reviews as the most trusted source of information for consumers making purchasing decisions. 20:31 – Tom Smith defines the levels of trust people have for different sources of consumer opinion, ranking Amazon and other consumer rating sites against blogs and online media sites, and describing how user generated content hosted by branded online offerings is considered more trustworthy than content hosted by unbranded online sites. 22:00 – Tom Smith on the product and service categories that are most talked about online, the biggest surprises his research revealed about discussion levels by product and service category and the excessive online chatter he found about products that are not ecommerce purchases. 25:25 – Tom Smith defines “super influencers” and their role in creating online social phenomena. 27:18 – Tom Smith on why marketers need to be very wary about how they approach social media channels, and the importance of using transparency to govern their social media strategies. 29:32 – Tom Smith on selling social media marketing initiatives to organizations through research and the danger of not participating in online conversations about the categories in which you compete. 31:46 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills. PROMO Get a 60-day free trial to online newsrooms provider iPressroom's Press Release SEO Wizard by calling 310-499-0544 ext. 504 and mentioning that you heard about it on this podcast. Or send email to info at ipressroom dot com or tweet @ipressroom.

On the Record...Online with Marketing Over Coffee

Mar 5, 2009

Description:

Christopher Penn, Eric Schwartzman and John Wall present a special mash-up episode of Marketing Over Coffee and On the Record…Online about online PR, social media communications and the upcoming Digital Impact Conference in NYC April 30 – May 1 organized by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Show Notes: 1:07 – Digital Impact Conference co-chair Eric Schwartzman on how this year’s event is designed to equip public relations professionals with the knowledge and tools to advocate for PR-led social media communications. 2:56 – John Wall on Korn Ferry CMO Don Spetner’s upcoming presentation on the skills public relations professionals need in the current job market, and Christopher Penn asks about the state of PR job market. 3:44 – Eric Schwartzman shares where the job opportunities are for PR people and what types of jobs recruiters are still trying to fill, according to Don Spetner. 4:23 – John Wall asks what percentage of a public relations program should be digital, and what part should be old guard. 4:43 – Eric Schwartzman on the downside of being an early adopter, and his view on where PR practitioners who can’t communicate autonomously online and who don’t develop new media communication skills may be headed. 5:15 – John Wall and Christopher Penn discuss the importance of keeping track of everyone you interact with through social media, and whether or not PR is making use of the same tools as marketers to build stronger relationships with larger networks via the web. 7:42 – Eric Schwartzman on the economic drivers that lead to PR shoot gun distribution tactics, and his discussion with PR Week editor Keith O’Brien about whether or not this will change anytime soon. 9:19 – Christopher Penn on the importance of building your own personal network and making sure you don’t mismatch communications and contacts. 10:12 – Eric Schwartzman talks about the new Toyota online pressroom that iPressroom recently launched for the world’s largest automaker so they could live stream the reveal of the new Prius at the Detroit Auto Show to the news media, automotive enthusiasts and the public simultaneously, in their own, branded online newsroom. 12:14 – Christopher Penn wonders how organizations are going to acquire the necessary content creation skills to populate their online newsrooms with compelling content and Eric Schwartzman predicts where companies may find them. 12:51 – Eric Schwartzman on the hidden risks of using Web 2.0 services like YouTube, Blogger and Facebook for organizational communications campaigns, and where he thinks market demand for new media services will come from. 13:56 – Eric Schwartzman talks about the online newsrooms his PR software as a service company iPressroom built for UCLA, which is more than just a media relations resource, and the online newsroom iPressroom built for Target, which he says demonstrates best practices for online PR. 14:23 – John Wall talks about Tom Smith, author of “When We Start Trusting Strangers [PDF],” who will be flying in from London to present a special session with all kinds of valuable, quantitative research on why new media communications should play a role in any integrated marketing or public relations plan. 15:04 – Christopher Penn on the market dynamics of social media communications and why you can’t cost effectively generate your own momentum. For listeners with no macroeconomic training, he recommends Economics for Dummies. 16:22 – Eric Schwartzman on why PR is more about what you do then what you say in the digital age of transparency and authenticity. He discusses the challenge of confronting serious product or service issues with communications alone, citing examples from Comcast and AOL. 17:01 – Eric Schwartzman on how commonly asked questions at his New Media PR Boot Camp training courses led to the idea to invite Trend Stream CEO Tom Smith to present at the Digital Impact Conference in NYC. 18:39 – Eric Schwartzman on super influencers online, word of mouth marketing, and the dangers of judging new media by old media standards. 19:52 – Disney’s podcasting strategy, and why Duncan Wardle says he considered their initial 80,000 downloads a success, despite the fact that the reach of mainstream media dwarves that number. 20:57 – Christopher Penn on the multiplier effect of social media, and how an online newsletter of a blog can reach much further than you might think. 21:31 – Search engine optimization expert Lee Odden, Edelman futurist Steve Rubel, social media expert Brian Solis and many others will also be presenting their latest findings and on best practices for new media communications at The Digital Impact Conference April 30 through May 1 in NYC. 22:14 – Eric Schwartzman on why online newsrooms, email newsletters and search engine optimization are the meat and potatoes of online PR. 23:34 – The Digital Impact Conference as an opportunity for social media PR gurus looking for new business, and for public relations pros looking to develop new media communication skills. 24:24 – Christopher Penn on the digital marketing opportunities social media presents public relations agencies. 25:10 – John Wall and Christopher Penn talk about their session on avoiding PR disasters, which will be presented with Eric Schwartzman at The Digital Impact Conference. 27:42 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

On the Record…Online with MediaBistro.com founder Laurel Touby

Feb 27, 2009

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New media communication skills and training courses aren’t all that MediaBistro.com offers. Listen in as MediaBistro.com founder and cyber hostess Laurel Touby goes On the Record…Online about the importance of social media lingo, how to build a profitable, sticky online community and what color to paint your nails in a down economy. Show Notes: 1:23 – New media communication skills and training courses are important. But effective online communications require appropriate infrastructure. Online newsroom management services provider iPressroom gives nontechnical personnel an easy way to manage content inside a custom internet pressroom. With integrated social media outreach components, the iPressroom online newsroom platform can also be used to execute any social media campaign you can dream up. No technical training is required to master the iPressroom online newsroom content management service. 3:09 – Laurel Touby discusses how she guided MediaBistro.com from start-up in 1994 through its acquisition by Jupitermedia Corporatation [NASDAQ: JUPM] in 2007 for $23 million. 3:36 – Communication skills, training courses and job listings, and how they helped make MediaBistro.com profitable. 4:37 – Why marketing, PR, corporate communications, advertising, graphic design, photography and news media professionals come to MediaBistro.com, according to Laurel Touby. 5:05 – Laurel Touby on how MediaBistro incorporate word of mouth marketing into its new media business strategy 5:50 -- Laurel Touby on sticky websites, consumer trust, customer loyalty, staying close to the customer, maintaining an air of exclusivity and providing services like training courses to news media clientele. 6:34 – Training courses offered by MediaBistro.com, the communication skills they help members develop, and why the last recession in 2001 created a favorable market environment for launching career training courses, writing training courses and other professional training courses. 7:26 – Online training courses are also now available through MediaBistro.com, and Laurel Touby explains how using online training digital solutions fit into her broader business strategy. 8:55 – Laurel Touby advises professional organizations and trade associations on how to effectively migrate their legacies online through networking opportunities, training courses, ways for people to develop the critical new media communication skills they need in the network age, offline events like the upcoming MediaBistro Circus 2009 this June 2009 in NYC and up to date job listings and news. 9:47 – New media communication skills, social media training courses and press release search engine optimization are the types of skills people are most interested in developing now, according to Laurel Touby. 10:43 – Digital skills and online fluency Laurel Touby looks for when considering new hires at MediaBistro.com, and why getting your new media lingo right is critical. 12:02 -- Laurel Touby on the right color to paint your nails in a down economy. 13:01 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

On the Record…Online with Jon Greer: PR Agency Buyer Guide

Feb 21, 2009

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Online Newsroom specialist Eric Schwartzman presents a special episode of On the Record…Online: Client’s Guide to Hiring a PR Firm with Jon Greer of Catching Flack, interviewed at the PRSA International Convention 2008 in Detroit. Jon Greer is a senior communications strategist with more than 20 years in media and communications, including over 12 years in public relations, who has been an independent consultant since 1997. Before that, he served as a vice president of Edelman Public Relations Worldwide. He began his career as a business news reporter and columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News. Show Notes: 2:17 – How to use the iPressroom online pressroom management service to easily and reliably manage, distribute and measure audio and video podcasts. Sample online podcast centers include the LA Opera and the California Endowment. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or email info at ipressroom dot com. 3:31 – Jon Greer discusses the level of trust people have for PR firms, and how that impacts the PR Agency hiring process. 4:59 – Jon Greer reveals the most important questions to ask a PR firm when they’re pitching you their services. 5:41 – Jon Greer on the most important thing to look for in any PR firm you’re considering hiring. 6:22 – Jon Greer on what clients want most from PR Agencies. 7:05 – Jon Greer on how to deduce the health and well being of any public relations agency by asking a few, simple questions. 8:09 – Jon Greer on how to secure senior level counsel. 8:59 – Jon Greer on what to look for in a PR Agency retainer agreement, and the types of changes to negotiate to strike the best deal. 10:08 – Jon Greer on what client’s need to do to get the highest level of service from a PR Agency and how to become the client that PR practitioners want to spend their time on. 11:39 – Jon Greer tells future PR Agency clients what they should and shouldn’t expect from a PR Agency. 13:24 – Jon Greer talks about pricing PR services and how to make sure you are charged a fair price by a public relations agency. 14:57 – Jon Greer walks us through price ranges for retaining boutique PR firms, mid-size PR firms and large PR firms. 17:24 – Jon Greer on the number of press releases a client should expect to receive for varying monthly retainer levels. 19:09 – The economic challenges of PR measurement, what makes it relatively expensive and how to manage those costs. 21:04 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

On the Record...Online with Sound Bite Specialist Andy Gilman

Feb 13, 2009

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Online Newsroom specialist Eric Schwartzman presents a special episode of On the Record…Online: The Public Relations Practitioner’s Guide to Crafting Effective Sound Bites, featuring Commcore Consulting Group CEO Andrew Gilmam, who was interviewed following his master class at the PRSA International Convention 2008 in Detroit. Mr. Gilman is also author of the book “Get to the Point” and also post a sticky message of the month.. Show Notes: 1:59 – How to use the iPressroom online pressroom management service to easily and reliably manage, distribute and measure online public relations and corporate communications campaigns with a branded online newsroom inside your corporate website. For more information tweet @chrisbechtel or email info at ipressroom dot com. 3:57 – Andrew Gilman on the objective of the sound bite, and on what it takes to craft a sound bite that gets picked up. 4:22 – Andrew Gilman discusses weaving sound bites into difficult interviews. 4:40 – Andrew Gilman on the best sound bite to come out of the recent US Presidential Election. 5:40 – The importance of analogies and visualizations in crafting memorable sound bites. 6:30 – Andrew Gilman shares one of the best sound bites he ever created. 7:57 – Andrew Gilman uses the WIIFM messaging factor to craft a memorable sound bite on the benefit of car doors that open wider. 9;30 – Andrew Gilman on how the LAPD, LAFD, Teacher’s Union and other California State Employees used carefully tested sound bites to defeat Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s attempt to eliminate Defined Benefit Contribution Plans. 10:39 -- Referencing Wired Magazine’s June 2008 cover story on The End of Science, Eric Schwartzman asks Andrew Gilman whether or not the availability of data will change the way sound bites are created. 11:29 – Andrew Gilman discusses the shortcomings of data and the importance of tapping emotional sentiment when designing a sound bite. 12:20 – Andrew Gilman on putting a sound bite to the “Hey Marge” test. 12:58 – Andrew Gilman on the optimal duration of the quintessential sound bite, and why effective sound bites are always longer than what actually get picked up. 14:45 – Andrew Gilman on the impact of sound bites on our collective IQ as a populace. 15:09 – Leveraging sound bites to drive web traffic. 15:41 – Andrew Gilman on the impact of the sound bite on media and democracy, and some of the most damaging political sound bites of modern history. 16:20 – Andrew Gilman on advocating for your interests with sound bites. 17:05 – In addition to his book “Get to the Point” and his online sticky message of the month, Andrew Gilman’s recommends the book “Made to Stick” about how to create memorable sound bites. 17:36 – Andrew Gilman on how top political messaging gurus on the left and the right use sound bites to frame debates of national and international interest, and the power of well chosen words in striking popular sentiments. 18:10 – Karl Rove’s use of sound bites to promote policy. 19:33 – End

On the Record...Online with Seesmic Founder Loic LeMeur

Feb 10, 2009

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Seesmic founder and popular blogger Loic LeMeur talks about how he mobilized the blogosphere in support of President Nicolas Sarkozy’s election campaign, how social media has changed public relations and the impact of transparency on personal privacy. Seesmic recently entered a closed Beta on a new version of the Twitter social media client Thwirl. Show Notes: 2:36 – Loic LeMeur talks about how he became one of the most widely read blogs in France. 3:24 – Loic LeMeur on the cultural differences between writing a blog that resonates with the European community versus the American online social media community. 4:37 – Loic LeMeur discusses the blogosphere’s and news media’s reaction to his podcast interview with Nicolas Sarkozy. 5:41 – Loic LeMeur shares the biggest lesson he took away from his work on the Sarkozy campaign. 7:03 – Loic LeMeur talks about how the Sarkozy campaign was able to leverage the blogosphere to drive news media coverage. 9:14 – Loic LeMeur on why disagreed with Brian Solis’s guest post on TechCrunch about the secrets of PR. 11:20 – Loic LeMeur’s opinion of Seth Godin’s newest book Tribes and the concept of managing communities instead of brands. 12:57 – Loic LeMeur on how organizations that provide necessary products that don’t always breed enthusiasm should approach social media communications. 14:02 – Loic LeMeur on why cell phone providers and utilities should be on Twitter, and how customer service can propel positive word of mouth. 16:01 – Loic LeMeur on Twitter’s response, or lack thereof, to hacked celebrity accounts. 18:04 – Loic LeMeur on the expectation management trap of over transparency. 19:42 – Loic LeMeur on the single, biggest challenge government communicator’s face with respect to social media engagement. 22:29 – Loic LeMeur on sustaining the momentum of social media communications campaigns beyond an election cycle. 23:52 – Loic LeMeur on how he used social media to solicit input for his session on privacy at the World Economic Summit (#davos). 24:43 – Loic LeMeur on personal privacy and the prospect of segmented communications in the social media age. 27:47 – Drawing a question from an interview by Brooke Gladstone’s with Nicolas Carr, author of The Big Switch on the NPR program On the Media, Eric Schwartzman asks Loic LeMeur if he is concerned that companies may someday use personal information to manipulate behavior. 32:15 – Loic LeMeur on the potential cultural threats of a world without physical media. 35:04 – Loic LeMeur on the social benefits of MMOGs 36:25 – Loic LeMeur on his online video social networking service Seesmic. 41:24 – Loic LeMeur on how video can be used to build more meaningful relationships online. 43:53 – Loic LeMeur on how genders dress their Seesmic shots differently. 46:08 – Loic LeMeur on how Chris Pirillo and Leo LaPorte are using video to create a personal brand online. 50:14 – End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroom software as a service provider iPressroom (www.ipressroom.com), and creator of the New Media PR Boot Camp, which has been attended by more than a thousand public relations and marketing executives from the private, public, government and nonprofit sectors. In addition to advising clients on best practices for online newsroom design, deployment and management, Schwartzman offers a portfolio of new media training courses to accelerate the acquisition of social media communication skills.

On the Record...Online with PIER Sytems Founder Gerald Baron

Feb 7, 2009

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Online newsroom specialist Eric Schwartzman puts PIER Systems Founder & CEO Gerald Baron On the Record...Online at the PRSA International Conference 2008 in Detroit about trends in online crisis communications, public relations software and the insatiable quest for speed in the media relations business. Like public relations software provider iPressroom, PIER Systems is on-demand, information management software. PIER systems differentiates their software by tailoring their offering specifically to the crisis communications objectives of public relations and media relations. PIER unifies innovative technology and tools in one web-based application to help organizations maintain business continuity, while making organizational communications simple and easy. SHOW NOTES: 1:23 -- How to SEO press releases using iPressroom’s SEO wizard with trackable hyperlinks, part of the iPressroom online newsroom public relations software package. For more info tweet @chrisbechtel. 2:54 -- Gerald Baron outlines his presentation on handling crisis communications with public relations software titled “Building Trust in a Threatening Media Environment,” which was delivered at the PRSA International Conference 2008 in Detroit. 3:42 -- Gerald Brown on the disappearance of news cycles in a hyper competitive environment based on immediacy. Gerald talks about a reporter who broke news about Hurricane Ike, a Los Angeles Fire Department distributing fire safety information on Twitter and what it all means for crisis communications. 4:49 -- Gerald Baron on the impact of the news media, and people’s insatiable quest for up-to-the-second information, on the business of crisis communications, public relations, and media relations and the inherent risks associated with letting others tell your story for you. 5:43 -- Gerald Baron shares his for “Ps” of effectively online communications, which are: Policy, Plans, People and Platform. He also discusses why communicating with incredibly speed, and directly to constituents, are critical components to telling your own story in a world without news cycles. 6:36 -- Gerald Baron uses the Virginia Tech massacre as an example of why organizations need the ability to handle direct to the public crisis communications with incredible speed, and the role of public relations software in that process. 7:23 -- Gerald Baron reveals the key features that a public relations software package should have: single online control platform; be entirely web-based; exist independent and outside of the organizations IT infrastructure; and be completely controlled by public relations professionals. 8:35 -- Gerald Baron discusses the lessons he learned from the Virginia Tech Shootings, one of which is raised expectations for rapid communications directly from organizations. He says the VT shootings underscore that we no longer live in a world in where people can depend on the media for urgent information during an emergency. 9:39 -- Gerald Baron explains why stand alone text notification systems that are not integrated public relations software platforms are potentially dangerous to PR professionals, because they attempt to substitute notifications for communications. He cites research [PDF] from PIER Systems that he says show outbound notifications drive demand of inbound requests for additional information. 10:53 -- Gerald Baron lists the additional modes of communications, like your website or online newsroom, RSS and email, which are just as important as the instant notifications people now expect to receive from organizations during a catastrophe. He paints a hypothetical crisis scenario where students get a text message to their phones about some kind of disaster or emergency, jam up the phone lines in search of more information and then go to the school’s website, which is hopefully built to handle huge numbers of simultaneous incoming requests. He says the system breaks down when organizations deploy a notification system without fortifying their ability to respond to the increased incoming requests for additional information. 12:02 -- Gerald Baron talks about the importance of integration when selecting public relations software to support external communications, and on the need for effectiveness and efficiency, particularly at a time when staffing level are being reduced, and individuals are being asked to do more with less. He also discusses the cost benefits of an integrated public relations software platform. 15:49 -- End Eric Schwartzman (@ericschwartzman) is the founder of online newsroo