Mosaic science

Mosaic Science Podcast

In-depth stories about the science of life.
Mosaic Science Podcast

Description

The Mosaic Science Podcast - audio documentaries and audio versions of our weekly longread. Mosaic is a digital magazine that publishes compelling stories exploring the science of life. Produced by the Wellcome Trust. More at mosaicscience.com.

Episodes

Doing disability differently

Jul 15, 2019 20:32

Description:

"I am so accustomed to thinking of wheelchair use in binary terms: you either use one or you don’t. Now I’m struggling to unlearn that notion."

In Canada, wheelchair basketball brings people together regardless of their abilities. Lesley Evans Ogden asks whether this kind of integration could help dispel stigma, discrimination and misconceptions about disability more widely.

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden, read by Kirsten Irving, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast.

How to survive climate change: a lesson from Hurricane Maria

Jul 8, 2019 31:29

Description:

The rest of the world can learn from Puerto Rican communities rallying together to recover from a natural disaster fuelled by climate change.


Written by Jane Palmer. Read by Michael Regnier. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the story online, head to mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, try Climate change is turning dehydration into a deadly epidemic by Jane Palmer, also available as an audio podcast.

Colour to dye for

Jul 1, 2019 20:33

Description:

The basic chemistry of hair dyes has changed little over the last century, but what do we know about the risks of colouring our hair, and why do we do it?

Written by Rebecca Guenard
Read by Rebecca McIntosh
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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To read the full story visit mosaicscience.com. If you enjoyed this story, try When cuteness comes of age by Neil Steinberg.

The hidden epidemic of compulsive hair pulling

Jun 24, 2019 38:21

Description:

Whether hair pulling, skin picking or cheek biting, body-focused repetitive behaviours blight many people’s lives. How can science help us understand and treat these distressing conditions better?

Written by Sara Talpos. Read by Kirsten Irving. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend My sudden synaesthesia: how I went blind and started hearing colours, also available as an audio podcast.

The 96th Street divide: why there’s so much diabetes in Harlem

Jun 17, 2019 48:41

Description:

In East Harlem, four times as many adults have diabetes as in the neighbouring Upper East Side. Meera Senthilingam meets the New Yorkers stopping poverty being a death sentence.

Audio producer: Meera Senthilingam
Fact checker: Laura Dawes
Editor: Mun-Keat Looi

See an accompanying photo tour of Harlem and read a full transcript for this story on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Voices in the dark: what it's like to hear voices, another Mosaic audio documentary also available on our podcast.

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Fake drugs: the global industry putting your life at risk

Jun 10, 2019 26:16

Description:

The manufacture and distribution of medicines is a global industry, tainted by fake and substandard products. Not only might these drugs not work as expected, but some are even contributing to antimicrobial resistance. So, what’s in your medicine cabinet?

Written by Srinath Perur. Read by Charlotte Hussey. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

Read the story at mosaicscience.com


If you liked this story, we recommend India is training "quacks" to do real medicine. This is why by Priyanka Pulla. 

The cost of pure water

Jun 3, 2019 37:05

Description:

Ghana has plenty of water. So why do its people buy plastic pouches from street vendors? Shaun Raviv investigates.  

Written by Shaun Raviv. Read by Pip Mayo. Produced by Barry J Gibb. Audio editing by Geoff Marsh.  

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic. For more stories visit mosaicscience.com  

If you liked this story, we recommend How menstrual taboos are putting lives at risk by Rose George, also available on our podcast.  

How HIV became a matter of international security

May 27, 2019 32:40

Description:

Governments around the world were slow to get to grips with HIV/AIDS. But a big change came when they started understanding it not just as a health issue but as a security threat too. 

Written by Alexandra Ossola. Read by Rebecca McIntosh. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

Read the story at mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend One virus, four lives: the reality of being HIV positive By Patrick Strudwick, also available as a podcast.

How malaria defeats our drugs

May 20, 2019 38:46

Description:

"The parasite has started to become resistant. The wonder drug is failing. It is the latest reprise of a decades-long theme: we attack malaria with a new drug, it mounts an evolutionary riposte."

In the war against malaria, one small corner of the globe has repeatedly turned the tide, rendering our best weapons moot and medicine on the brink of defeat. Ed Yong reports.

Written by Ed Yong, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend DIY Diagnosis: how an extreme athlete uncovered her genetic flaw by Ed Yong, also available as a podcast.

The DNA detectives hunting the causes of cancer

May 13, 2019 31:14

Description:

Cancer rates vary wildly across the world, and we don’t know why. To solve this mystery, scientists are tracking down causes of cancer by the fingerprints they leave in the genome.

Written and read by Kat Arney. 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com

If you like this story, we recommend Searching for a diagnosis: how scientists are untangling the mystery of developmental disorders by Linda Geddes. 

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How we became the heaviest drinkers in a century

May 6, 2019 26:58

Description:

Chrissie Giles on her generation’s climb to Peak Booze. 

"I didn’t feel that I had a problem with alcohol, nor did any of my friends. We got drunk, sometimes too drunk, and then suffered the consequences. We were just doing what young people did. But recently, with getting on for 20 years of drinking under my belt, I started to wonder if my generation’s relationship with alcohol was abnormal. When I looked into the numbers I realised that it was. I discovered that 2004 was Peak Booze: the year when Brits drank more than they had done for a century, and more than they have done in the decade since. Leading the way to this alcoholic apogee were those of us born around 1980. No other generation drank so much in their early twenties. Why us?"

Written and read by Chrissie Giles, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Breaking Bad News by Chrissie Giles, also available as a podcast.

Why are so many people getting a meat allergy?

Apr 29, 2019 40:31

Description:

Becoming allergic to meat turns your life upside down. Known as alpha-gal allergy, the condition dictates what you can eat, wear, how you relax, and even which medicines are safe. Is research finally starting to catch up?

Editor: Chrissie Giles

Copyeditor: Rob Reddick

Art director: Charlie Hall

Photographer: Daniel Stier

Fact checker: Francine Almash

For more stories and to read the original text, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story we recommend Sick building syndrome: is it the buildings or the people who need treatment? by Shayla Love.

Suicide of the Ceasefire Babies

Apr 22, 2019 24:42

Description:

In loving memory of Lyra McKee (1990-2019).

This episode was originally broadcast in April 2016.

In Northern Ireland, more people took their own lives in the 16 years after the Troubles than died during them. Why? Lyra McKee finds out.

Written by Lyra McKee
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Barry J Gibb 
Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com where you can also find more of Lyra's magnificent writing.

How a wooden bench in Zimbabwe is starting a revolution in mental health

Apr 15, 2019 36:55

Description:

In the early 2000s, when there were just two psychiatrists serving over 12 million people, Zimbabwe had to get creative to treat depression. Now, one bright idea – the Friendship Bench – is spreading far and wide.

Written by Alex Riley. Read by Kirsten Irving. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com

If you like this story, we recommend How To Get To A World Without Suicide by Simon Usborne. 

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Brazil’s billion-dollar gym experiment

Apr 8, 2019 33:29

Description:

Can a grand vision of 4,000 free public gyms overcome inequality and fight Brazil’s health crisis? Catherine de Lange reports.

Written by Catherine de Lange, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to City Cycling: Health Versus Hazard by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast.

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How big data is changing science

Apr 1, 2019 25:59

Description:

New biomedical techniques, like next-generation genome sequencing, are creating vast amounts of data and transforming the scientific landscape. They’re leading to unimaginable breakthroughs – but leaving researchers racing to keep up.

Editor: Rob Reddick Copyeditor: Tom Freeman Art director: Charlie Hall Fact checker: Francine Almash
Illustrator: Dávid Biró   To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com. If you liked this story, we recommend 'The DNA detectives hunting the causes of cancer' by Kat Arney.

The fight of your life

Mar 25, 2019 28:46

Description:

Boxers know they risk injury in the ring. But there’s a more insidious danger they don’t often talk about: the long-term brain damage that repeated blows to the head can cause. Lyra McKee meets the families who are breaking the silence.

Written by Lyra McKee. 
Read by Kirsten Irving. 
Illustrated by Gabby Laurent. 
Produced by Barry J. Gibb. 

To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com. 

 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'The Alzheimer's Enigma' by Michael Regnier.

The little yellow box that’s made thousands of operations safer

Mar 18, 2019 28:02

Description:

Millions of people are left dead or disabled by surgical complications each year when one simple piece of kit could have saved them. Jane Feinmann discovers how it has helped transform medicine in Mongolia.

Written by Jane Feinmann. 
Read by Rebecca McIntosh. 
Produced by Graihagh Jackson. 

If you liked this story, we recommend DIY prosthetics: the extreme athlete who built a new knee by Rose Eveleth, also available as a podcast.

Can meditation really slow ageing?

Mar 11, 2019 32:28

Description:

Is there real science in the spiritualism of meditation? Jo Marchant meets a Nobel Prize-winner who thinks so.

Written by Jo Marchant
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read this story, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Secrets-of-the-strong-minded by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Psychosis in Parkinson’s: now we can treat it without making other symptoms worse

Mar 4, 2019 21:37

Description:

Half of people with Parkinson’s disease experience hallucinations, paranoia and delusions. Mary O’Hara reports on a new hope.

Written by Mary O'Hara

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

India is training ‘quacks’ to do real medicine. This is why

Feb 25, 2019 32:11

Description:

Priyanka Pulla asks if there can ever be legitimacy in ‘quackery’.

Written by Priyanka Pulla, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

If you liked this story, we recommend Can meditation really slow ageing? by Mary Rose Abraham, also available as a podcast.

The only emotions I can feel are anger and fear

Feb 18, 2019 27:39

Description:

One in ten people struggle to recognise their emotions. New research suggests a vital link between our ability to sense our physical bodies and knowing how we feel.

Written by Emma Young

Read by Charlotte Hussey 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Killer dust

Feb 11, 2019 34:44

Description:

Why is asbestos still killing people? Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

Written by Nic Fleming, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

The people who help you die better

Feb 4, 2019 28:21

Description:

A network of compassionate volunteers caring for their terminally ill neighbours is allowing more people in Kerala, India, to end their days at peace and at home. Jeremy Laurance meets the man leading the movement.

Written by Jeremy Laurance

Read by Graihagh Jackson

Produced by Graihagh Jackson 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'The sex workers who are stopping HIV', also available as an audiobook. 

Can America cope with a resurgence of tropical disease?

Jan 28, 2019 26:46

Description:

Having stamped out a number of tropical diseases – including malaria – decades ago, is America today complacent about a rising wave of infectious disease? By Carrie Arnold.

Written by Carrie Arnold, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

How to mend a broken heart

Jan 21, 2019 34:16

Description:

The need to mend broken hearts has never been greater. But what if we could simply manufacture a new one? Alex O’Brien studies the legacy of Texan surgeons and artificial hearts.

Written by Alex O'Brien, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Ellie Pinney.

What can we learn when a clinical trial is stopped?

Jan 14, 2019 38:15

Description:

An early halt to a trial of deep brain stimulation for depression reveals little about the treatment but more about the changing nature of clinical trials.

Written by David Dobbs

Read by Brian Yim Lim

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Why the calorie is broken

Jan 7, 2019 29:42

Description:

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod investigate.

Written by Cynthia Graber, read by Charlotte Hussey, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the original text, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend The fat city that declared war on obesity, by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast. 

Psychedelic therapy

Dec 31, 2018 39:51

Description:

Notoriously illegal and synonymous with hedonism, LSD and ecstasy started life as aids to psychotherapy. Sam Wong meets the band of psychiatrists who are looking to reclaim them for medicine again.

Written by Sam Wong, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Saved: How addicts gained the power to reverse overdoses, also available as a podcast. 

Light at the end of the scalpel

Dec 24, 2018 27:14

Description:

Telling cancer from non-cancer is tough for brain surgeons. Scorpions, Amazon.com and the legacy of a dying girl might change that, writes Alex O'Brien.

Written by Alex O'Brien, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Decisions on a knife edge, by Charlotte Huff, also available as a podcast. 

Abortion, contraception, pregnancy: how women’s bodies became a battlezone

Dec 17, 2018 29:13

Description:

Women’s reproductive rights are under attack across the globe. Sophie Cousins investigates the challenges women face in accessing abortion and contraception in two very different countries – India and the USA.

Written by Sophie Cousins

Read by Kirsten Irving 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

If you liked this story, we recommend Postpartum psychosis: "I'm afraid of how you'll judge me, as a mother and as a person", by Catherine Carver, also available as an audiobook. 

The fat city that declared war on obesity

Dec 10, 2018 22:31

Description:

Oklahoma has lost a million pounds of fat. Ian Birrell asks how – and whether declaring ‘war on obesity’ can really change a city’s infrastructure and encourage healthy living.

Written by Ian Birrell, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Brazil's billion dollar gym experiment by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast. 

Violent crime is like infectious disease – and we know how to stop it spreading

Dec 3, 2018 40:19

Description:

Headlines scream about “epidemics” of shootings and stabbings – but what if we took that literally? From Chicago to Glasgow, treating violence as a public health problem has produced great results.

Written by Samira Shackle

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'The women that kill, abuse and torture' by Katarine Quarmby, also available as a podcast. 

Can you supercharge your brain?

Nov 26, 2018 43:21

Description:

Applying mild electrical currents to your head could take away pain, help memory and improve attention – and the US military is very interested. Emma Young reports.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

If you liked this story, we recommend Can you think yourself into a different person? by Will Story, also available as a podcast.

Sick building syndrome: is it the buildings or the people who need treatment?

Nov 19, 2018 53:45

Description:

In Finland, people whose sickness is linked to certain buildings fear being labelled as mentally ill, while scientists search for evidence that their condition is ‘real’.

Written by Shayla Love

Read by Graihagh Jackson 

If you liked this story, we recommend Shayla Love's story 'Meet the dogs with OCD', also available as a podcast. 

 

Hacking the nervous system

Nov 12, 2018 20:27

Description:

One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.

Written by Gaia Vince, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Can-you-supercharge-your-brain by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

How the mafia is causing cancer

Nov 5, 2018 30:36

Description:

When doctors in rural Italy began to see a surge in cancer cases, they were baffled. Then they made the link with industrial waste being dumped by local crime syndicates. Ian Birrell learns about the tragic consequences. 

Written by Ian Birrell

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Brazil's cancer curse' by Sue Armstrong, also available as a podcast. 

Hungary's cold war with polio

Oct 29, 2018 50:44

Description:

"Polio was unpredictable. Often no more harmful than any other childhood infection, it could on occasion ‘turn’ with swift, inexplicable savagery, destroying a child’s nerve cells and leaving him paralysed for life. If it damaged the nerves controlling his lungs they could freeze up and György would either die or spend the rest of his life inside an iron lung that breathed for him."

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

Written by Penny Bailey, read by Pip Mayo, audio editor Geoff Marsh, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Prisoners-of-war, also available on our podcast.

The sex workers who are stopping HIV

Oct 23, 2018 31:03

Description:

Sex workers in Mozambique are providing health support to those at the margins of society. They face political and financial challenges, but against the odds they are helping thousands.

Written by Jules Montague 

Read by Kirsten Irving 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'How HIV became a matter of international security' by Alexandra Ossola, available to read here. 

What the nose knows

Oct 15, 2018 20:13

Description:

"Losing enjoyment of food and drink is a common complaint for people who lose their sense of smell. You can taste sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami with your tongue. More complex flavours – like grapefruit or barbecued steak – depend on smell. But for Nick, as for many people who can’t smell, there’s another category of loss altogether."

Losing your sense of smell can fundamentally change the way you relate to other people.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Why-do-we-have-allergies by Carl Zimmer, also available as a podcast.

 

This disease kills half the people it infects. So why isn’t more being done?

Oct 8, 2018 21:16

Description:

Melioidosis is a bacterial infection that quietly causes thousands of deaths each year. Meet the doctor who made it his mission to make the world take notice.

Written by Carrie Arnold

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Hunting the silent killer' by Patrick Strudwick, also available as a podcast. 

Facial discrimination

Oct 1, 2018 39:54

Description:

In a world obsessed with beauty, living with a facial disfigurement can be hard. Neil Steinberg explores the past and present to find out what it’s like to look different.

Written by Neil Steinberg

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Edited by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this podcast, we recommend, 'How far would you go to be able to smile' by Neil Steinberg. 

Staying awake: the surprisingly effective way to treat depression

Sep 24, 2018 26:50

Description:

Using sleep deprivation to lift people out of severe depression may seem counterintuitive, but for some people, it’s the only thing that works. 

Written by Linda Geddes

Read by Rebecca McIntosh 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Why we still don't understand sleep, and why it matters', also available as a podcast. 

Porklife: building a better pig

Sep 17, 2018 35:31

Description:

How have the farm animals of today been shaped by centuries of domestication and selective breeding? Sujata Gupta investigates.

Written by Sujata Gupta, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

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How far would you go to be able to smile?

Sep 10, 2018 32:53

Description:

Smiling is one of the fundamental ways people communicate, so what happens if your face can’t do it?

Written by Neil Steinberg
Read by Charlotte Hussey
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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Decisions on a knife-edge

Sep 3, 2018 26:35

Description:

Women predisposed to ovarian cancer can reduce their risk with surgery, but with it comes early menopause. To avoid this, some doctors propose delaying part of the procedure. But is this safe? Charlotte Huff explores the costs of buying time.

Written by Charlotte Huff, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If we can beat Ebola, why not sleeping sickness too?

Aug 27, 2018 33:28

Description:

A disease that killed millions in the 20th century still lingers – and with it the threat of a new epidemic. Why? The answer may have been staring us in the face all along, as Michael Regnier discovered when he travelled to Guinea with scientists searching for the key to a medical mystery.

Written by Michael Regnier, read by Michael Regnier, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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Why do we have allergies?

Aug 20, 2018 31:02

Description:

Allergies such as peanut allergy and hay fever make millions of us miserable, but scientists aren’t even sure why they exist. Carl Zimmer talks to a master immunologist with a controversial answer.

Written by Carl Zimmer, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

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How close are we to a cure for Huntington’s?

Aug 13, 2018 23:01

Description:

Twenty-five years after the discovery of the gene behind Huntington’s disease, Peter Forbes reports on the potential first treatment for this devastating condition.

Written by Peter Forbes, read by Brian Yim Lim, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com.

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People are animals, too

Aug 6, 2018 26:44

Description:

"We gaze into the eyes of a chimp and see a reflection of ourselves. We glance at a crow and see an alien being that under some jurisdictions can be exterminated with impunity - bringing a sinister second meaning to the phrase "a murder of crows". Such biases affect ordinary people and academic experts alike, skewing our understanding of what non-human intelligence looks like."

Do our thoughts and feelings distort the way we understand animal minds? Peter Aldhous argues that to grasp what intelligence is, we need to think differently.

Written by Peter Aldous, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

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Spain leads the world in organ donation. What’s stopping other countries catching up?

Jul 30, 2018 34:44

Description:

More and more people are donating organs, but demand still far exceeds supply. What can the world learn from the country that does it best? https://wellc.me/2mIsHDt 

Written by Chris Baraniuk, narrated and produced by Graihagh Jackson. 

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Why we still haven’t stopped cholera

Jul 23, 2018 32:05

Description:

"Cholera has killed nearly 9,000 Haitians. More than 730,000 people have been infected. It is the worst outbreak of the disease, globally, in modern history. Hundreds of emergency and development workers have been working alongside the Haitian government for five years, trying to rid the country of cholera, and millions of dollars have been dispense in the fight to eradicate it. But it's still here. Why?"

Why have attempts to get cholera under control in Haiti failed? Rose George reports.

Written by Rose George, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend The cost of pure water by Shaun Raviv, also available as a podcast.

UPDATE: When we first published this story in July 2015, some people claimed that the United Nations was responsible for bringing cholera to Haiti in the 2010 outbreak – something that the organisation denied. However, in August 2016 the UN acknowledged that it played a role in the outbreak, which has since killed 10,000 people. You can read Mosaic’s shorter piece on the causes of the 2010 outbreak here.

Why good people turn bad online

Jul 16, 2018 27:42

Description:

Meet the scientists finding out how we can defeat our inner trolls and build more cooperative digital societies.

Written by , narrated by Kirsten Irving, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

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Can India’s urban future be a healthy one?

Jul 9, 2018 31:04

Description:

"As more Indians adopt more urban lives, chronic conditions like diabetes, obesity and heart disease are on the rise, replacing malnutrition and infectious diseases as the country’s most urgent health worries. Reddy doesn’t want to risk his family’s health. He has decided that being healthy and poor is better than taking their chances in the modern, more developed, more open India."

Ill-health is the price rural Indians have to pay for seeking a better life in the city. Twenty-nine villages near Hyderabad are helping to explain why, Michael Regnier discovers.

Written by Michael Regnier, read by Michael Regnier, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast.

 

Smart and smarter drugs

Jul 2, 2018 24:02

Description:

Cognitive enhancement drugs are usually depicted as a distinctly contemporary phenomenon, however none of these drugs are new. Are we asking the right questions about smart drugs? Marek Kohn looks at what they can do for us – and what they can’t.

Written by Marek Kohn, narrated by Brian Yim Lim, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the full story visit: mosaicscience.com/story/saved-how-…verse-overdoses/

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Saved: How addicts gained the power to reverse overdoses

Jun 25, 2018 23:54

Description:

Naloxone can reverse an otherwise fatal heroin overdose within minutes. Carrie Arnold meets the doctors who put this remarkable drug in the hands of the police, families and addicts—and saved thousands of lives.

Written by Carrie Arnold, narrated by Kirsten Irving, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the full story visit: mosaicscience.com/story/saved-how-…verse-overdoses/

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Climate change is turning dehydration into a deadly epidemic

Jun 18, 2018 25:50

Description:

A mysterious kidney disease is striking down labourers across the world and climate change is making it worse. Jane Palmer meets the doctors who are trying to understand it and stop it.

Written by Jane Palmer, narrated by Michael Regnier, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

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If you liked this story, we recommend reading 'How to survive climate change: a lesson from Hurricane Maria'

 

Brazil's cancer curse

Jun 11, 2018 25:21

Description:

"Gomez is one of Achatz's regular patients at the A C Camargo Cancer Center in São Paulo, Brazil. He is extraordinarily susceptible to cancer. So too are many members of his extended family; cancer is so common among them - and premature death so painfully familiar - that until they learned very recently of the cause, some believed their family was cursed. Gomez's is not the only family affected. The 'cure' afflicts hundreds of thousands of people in Brazil."

The startling discovery that hundreds of thousands of Brazilians have a genetic mutation that undermines their ability to resist cancer is helping labs worldwide in their search for new treatments for the disease. Sue Armstrong reports."

Written by Sue Armstrong, read by Pip Mayo, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

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Why the calorie is broken

Jun 4, 2018 29:42

Description:

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod investigate.

Written by Cynthia Graber, read by Charlotte Hussey, produced by Graihagh Jackson

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How a bee sting saved my life: poison as medicine

May 28, 2018 25:46

Description:

"She packed up everything and moved to California to die. And she almost did. Less than a week after moving, Ellie was attacked by a swarm of Africanised bees."

Ellie Lobel was ready to die. Then she was attacked by bees. Christie Wilcox hears how venom can be a saviour.

Written by Christie Wilcox, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Lovely grub: are insects the future of food? by Emily Anthes, also available as a podcast.

How to get to a world without suicide

May 21, 2018 34:26

Description:

After his son’s suicide aged 18, Steve Mallen sees the world differently. Along with a growing number of mental health experts, he wants to reduce the rate of suicide across the world, and is aiming for zero. 

Written by Simon Usborne 

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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Unspoken: the forgotten prisoners of war

May 14, 2018 53:39

Description:

They were the forgotten army. Taken captive during World War II, they lived lives of desperation and disease, internment and ingenuity. Long unspoken, their tale is now told through the voices of those who survived.

Audio producer: Chris Chapman
Sound designer: Eloise Whitmore
Assistant producer: Ellie Pinney
Fact checker: Laura Dawes
Editor: Mun-Keat Looi

Hear and read accompanying extras and a full transcript for this story on Mosaic: https://wellc.me/2wzmRfA 

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My many selves: how I learned to live with multiple personalities

May 7, 2018 21:19

Description:

Emma Young meets a woman with dissociative identity disorder and discovers what happens when you lose your sense of being an individual.

Written by Emma Young
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

To read the full story visit: https://wellc.me/2KqInpG

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The worst sound in the world

Apr 30, 2018 22:04

Description:

John Osborne has always hated the sound of whistling. But it wasn’t until a man whistling in a café infuriated him so much that he got up and left that he realised it was becoming a problem. Could he even be suffering from misophonia – a condition characterised by a strong dislike of certain sounds?

To get to the root of the issue, John embarks on a whimsical journey of self-discovery, diving headfirst into the worlds of professional whistling and psychology in an attempt to understand if he could ever learn to tolerate – or even love – the sound of whistling.

Narrated by John Osborne
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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The women that kill, abuse and torture

Apr 23, 2018 29:29

Description:

Marian Partington is working to forgive Rosemary West – one of her sister’s killers – because she thinks the only way to break the cycle of female violence is to understand it. 

Written by Katharine Quarmby

Read by Kirsten Irving

To read the full story visit: https://mosaicscience.com/story/women-kill-abuse-torture-female-violence/ 

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The troubled history of the foreskin

Apr 16, 2018 46:39

Description:

"Men have been circumcised for thousands of years, yet our thinking about the foreskin seems as muddled as ever. And a close examination of this muddle raises disturbing questions. Is American exceptionalism justified? Should we really be funding mass circumcision in Africa? Or by removing the foreskins of men, boys and newborns, are we actually committing a violation of human rights?"

Common in the US, rare in Europe and now championed in Africa, male circumcision is hotly debated. Jessica Wapner explores whether the gains are worth the loss.

Written by Jessica Wapner, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Mosaicscience – The-future-of-sex by Emily Anthes, also available on our podcast.

The uncertain future of genetic testing

Apr 9, 2018 21:26

Description:

Bringing genetics into medicine leads to more accuracy, better diagnosis and personalised treatment – but not for everyone. Carrie Arnold meets families for whom gene testing has led only to unanswered questions.

Written by Carrie Arnold
Read by Rebecca Macintosh
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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This is what happens after you die

Apr 2, 2018 25:58

Description:

Most of us would rather not think about what happens to our bodies after death. But that breakdown gives birth to new life in unexpected ways.

Written by Moheb Costandi
Read and produced by Barry J Gibb

This story was first published in May 2015.

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Why we still don’t understand sleep, and why it matters

Mar 26, 2018 28:39

Description:

For the first 20 years of his life, Henry Nicholls had a healthy relationship with sleep. Shortly after his 21st birthday, he began to experience symptoms of narcolepsy, a debilitating disorder that’s plagued him ever since. Sleep research is progressing, so why are he and others like him still waiting for a cure?

Written by Henry Nicholls
Read by Graihagh Jackson
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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Is your fear of radiation irrational?

Mar 19, 2018 24:45

Description:

Radioactivity stirs primal fears in many people, but Geoff Watts argues that an undue sense of its risks can cause real harm.

Written and read by Geoff Watts
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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This is what it's like to be struck by lightning

Mar 12, 2018 32:16

Description:

If you’re hit by lightning, there’s a nine in ten chance you’ll survive. But what are the lasting effects of being exposed to hundreds of millions of volts?

Written by Charlotte Huff.
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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Atul Gawande: death, end-of-life care and Being Mortal

Mar 5, 2018 18:55

Description:

In this special episode,Mosaic's Editor Chrissie Giles interviews the doctor and best-selling writer Atul Gawande about end-of-life care, the death of his father, and how we can create dignity for all of us as we age and at the end of life.

-

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Read the feature, 'Breaking bad news': mosaicscience.com/story/breaking-bad-news

Reinventing the toilet

Feb 26, 2018 31:29

Description:

Traditional flush toilets aren’t an option in many parts of the world, but neither is leaving people with unsafe and unhygenic choices. Now, one company is piloting a new loo that's waterless, off-grid and able to charge your phone. Lina Zeldovich travels to Madagascar to witness the start of a lavatorial revolution.

Written by: Lina Zeldovich
Read by: Rebecca Mackintosh
Produced by: Graihagh Jackson   For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com   If you liked this story, we recommend 'Lovely grub: are insects the future of food?' by Emily Anthes https://mosaicscience.com/story/eating-insects/

Death in the outback

Feb 19, 2018 21:57

Description:

"Almost 30 per cent of children in care in Australia come from an Aboriginal background: 'The Stolen Generation - when Aborigines were forcibly taken away from their families - may not just be a shameful part of Australia's history...'. 'Is this seriously happening, in 2014?' I wonder. Most Australians are aware of the Stolen Generation, when it was legal for the government to take Aboriginal children away from their families. But this forced separation, I thought, had ended decades before."

Healthcare in Australia’s Aboriginal communities is hindered by a long history of racial discord between very different cultures. Georgina Kenyon discovers the story of one young woman who died in the 1980s, and asks whether anything has changed since.

Written by Georgina Kenyon, read by Pip Mayo and produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Blood speaks', Rose George's tale of menstrual taboo in Nepal and Bangladesh.

Homesick in the modern world

Feb 12, 2018 22:54

Description:

"What use, if any, is homesickness? 'It's purpose is the same today as it has been for millions of years - to deter us from leaving supportive groups and environments,' writes Mark Leary, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University in the USA, in Duke Magazine. 'Homesickness would have been relatively uncommon, occurring only when individuals were separated from supportive, familiar people.'"

What does it mean to be homesick in 2015, and does technology help or hinder us when we move to a new place? John Osborne revisits his past to find out.

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If you liked this story, we recommend listening to 'Secrets of the strong-minded' by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Postpartum psychosis: “I’m afraid of how you’ll judge me, as a mother and as a person”

Feb 6, 2018 37:19

Description:

After giving birth, Catherine Carver became convinced that her baby had been swapped and that social workers were plotting to kill her. She recounts her terrifying journey into postpartum psychosis, and how she found healing in unexpected ways.

Written by: Catherine Carver
Read by: Kirsten Irving
Produced by: Graihagh Jackson

To read the full story visit: mosaicscience.com/story/post-partu…l-health-babies/

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Better spaces for mental health', available here:mosaicscience.com/story/better-spa…s-mental-health/

Medicine's dirty secret

Jan 29, 2018 41:30

Description:

"Despite all the ridicule and aversion and shame, we can no longer deny the emerging power of poo. Perhaps it's time to push past the disgust and start giving a shit. And doing so proudly."

Brace yourself for the unbelievable next big thing in healthcare: faecal transplants.

Written by Bryn Nelson, read by Segun Akingbola, produced by Barry J Gibb.

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'This is what happens after you die' by Moheb Costandi, also available as a podcast. Link to the article: https://mosaicscience.com/story/what-happens-after-you-die/

My sudden synaesthesia: how I went blind and started hearing colours

Jan 22, 2018 22:06

Description:

Out of the blue, Vanessa Potter lost her sight. As she recovered, her senses mingled – hearing and touch changed the way she saw colours. Her quest to understand why introduced her to new tech that uses sound to help blind people see.

Written by: Vanessa Potter

Read by: Charlotte Hussey

Produced by: Graihagh Jackson

If you enjoyed this story, you might enjoy 'In the blink of an eye' by Bryn Nelson which you can access here: mosaicscience.com/story/severe-eye-pain/

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audiobook,brain,cognitive,deja,memory,mind,perception,philosophy,podcast,    

 

Secrets of the strong-minded

Jan 15, 2018 36:29

Description:

"By the end of that day the September 11th Fund had been established by two major local charities. Donations poured in. Money first went on immediate aid - hot meals for rescue workers, emergency cheques for victims and their families - and then funds were made available for programmes to help New Yorkers to recover. The damage wasn't only physical, but psychological. Counsellors set up services in local churches, and psychiatrists came from around the country to offer their expertise and their insights. Thoughts turned to the city's children - how would they deal with the stress and trauma?"

Can children be made more psychologically ‘resilient’ to traumas like 9/11 – as well as the stress of everyday life? Emma Young meets a former school principal who believes they can.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh.

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Now also available on Spotify. 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'Can meditation really slow ageing' by Jo Marchant, also available as a podcast. Read the full story here: https://mosaicscience.com/story/can-meditation-really-slow-ageing/

My déjà vu is so extreme I can't tell what's real anymore

Jan 8, 2018 22:43

Description:

When a brain tumour left Pat Long with persistent déjà vu, he began to question the very nature of reality. Here, he tells his story for the first time.

Written by: Pat Long

Read by: Brian Yim Lim

Produced by: Graihagh Jackson

If you enjoyed this story, you might enjoy 'Can you think yourself into a different person?' by Will Storr, which you can access here: https://mosaicscience.com/story/neuroplasticity

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Can you think yourself into a different person?

Jan 1, 2018 25:32

Description:

"Debbie’s not alone in her enthusiasm for neuroplasticity, which is what we call the brain’s ability to change itself in response to things that happen in our environment. Claims for its benefits are widespread and startling. Half an hour on Google informs the curious browser that neuroplasticity is a “magical” scientific discovery that shows that our brains are not hard-wired like computers, as was once thought, but like “play-doh” or a “gooey butter cake”. This means that “our thoughts can change the structure and function of our brains” and that by doing certain exercises we can actually, physically increase our brain’s “strength, size and density”."

We used to believe our brains couldn't be changed. Now we believe they can - if we want it enough. But is that true? Will Storr wades through the facts and fiction.

Written by Will Storr, read by Will Storr, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Can you supercharge your brain?' by Emma Young, also available as a podcast: https://mosaicscience.com/story/can-you-supercharge-your-brain

How the zebra got his stripes, with Alan Turing

Dec 25, 2017 33:31

Description:

Where do a zebra’s stripes, a leopard’s spots and our fingers come from? The key was found years ago – by the man who cracked the Enigma code, writes Kat Arney.

Read by Kat Arney
Produced by Jen Whyntie
Edited by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this story, we recommend our podcast 'People are animals, too' https://mosaicscience.com/story/people-are-animals-too

The Mind Readers

Dec 18, 2017 49:01

Description:

"Inside, there's plenty of time to think. At first, this feels like a game, even one that is strangely amusing. Then, reality sets in. You're trapped. You see and hear your family lamenting your fate. Over the years, the carers forget to turn on the TV. You're too cold. Then you're too hot. You're always thirsty. The visits of your friends and family dwindle. Your partner moves on. And there's nothing you can do about it."

Thousands remain trapped between life and death. Three scientists are working to free them.

Written by Roger Highfield, read by Segun Akingbola and produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Mosaicscience – Breaking bad news by Chrissie Giles: https://mosaicscience.com/story/bad-news also available as podcasts.

Virtually painless: how VR is making surgery simpler

Dec 11, 2017 30:06

Description:

Surgeons and their patients are finding that virtual reality can relieve the pain and stress of operations – and it’s safer and cheaper than sedatives. Travel to a Mexican mountaintop village to visit a clinic with a difference.

Written by Jo Marchant, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Ellie Pinney, edited by Graihagh Jackson.

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And also now available on Spotify.

One virus, four lives: the reality of being HIV positive

Dec 4, 2017 40:22

Description:

"It is clear that something has gone wrong in the UK, where HIV-positive people are shamed and ignored, and HIV-negative people uninformed. Assumptions abound. Infections rise. Asking an HIV-positive person today how they became infected so often elicits the following answer: "We didn't use a condom because I just assumed they were negative." People are still dying of ignorance."

What does it mean to be HIV positive in the UK today? Patrick Strudwick meets four people living with the virus to find out.

Written by Patrick Strudwick, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com.

This story won the Science Explained category at the 2015 Medical Journalists' Association Winter Awards.

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Cradle-of-resistance-how-malaria-defeats-our-drugs by Ed Yong, also available as a podcast.

A surprisingly good place to die

Nov 27, 2017 32:32

Description:

A campaigning doctor has helped make Mongolia a better place to die than many much wealthier nations. Andrew North met her to find out how.

Written by Andrew North
Read by Kirsten irving
Illustrated by Parkin Parkin
Produced by Barry J. Gibb

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The future of sex

Nov 20, 2017 34:35

Description:

"Technically, the female condom works. When used correctly, it reduces a woman's risk of contracting HIV by around 94-97 per cent each time she had sex, according to estimates. Studies show that making female condoms available alongside the male version increases the percentage of sexual acts that are protected, and decreases the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections."

Once derided as being like a plastic bag with the erotic appeal of a jellyfish, the female condom is being reinvented as the next big thing in safe sex.

Written by Emily Anthes, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J. Gibb

Read the full text original and find more stories on mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Mosaicscience – Sex-lives-and-disability by Katharine Quarmby, and Mosaicscience – The-troubled-history-of-the-foreskin by Jessica Wapner, also available as podcasts.

The fight for your life

Nov 13, 2017 28:46

Description:

Boxers know they risk injury in the ring. But there’s a more insidious danger they don’t often talk about: the long-term brain damage that repeated blows to the head can cause. Lyra McKee meets the families who are breaking the silence.

Written by Lyra McKee
Read by Kirsten Irving
Illustrated by Gabby Laurent
Produced by Barry J. Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'The Alzheimer's Enigma' by Michael Regnier.

Hunting the silent killer

Nov 6, 2017 34:00

Description:

"Hepatitis C - dubbed the slow, silent killer because it can cause chronic liver disease that progresses insidiously, unnoticed for decades - is now within our sights. Just 25 years after the discovery of the virus, we have a cure. In fact, we have several."

Hepatitis C has a cure, but how do we find those who need it? Patrick Strudwick reports on one attempt to identify some of the estimated 100,000 undiagnosed people in the UK.

Written by Patrick Strudwick, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – One-virus-four-lives-the-reality-of-being-hiv-postitive by Patrick Strudwick, also available as a podcast.

Meet the dogs with OCD

Oct 30, 2017 40:55

Description:

Could understanding canine compulsions help find new treatments for people with obsessive–compulsive disorders too? Shayla Love investigates.

 

Written by Shayla Love
Read by Kirsten Irving
Illustrated by Clara Lacy
Produced by Barry J. Gibb

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Breaking Bad News

Oct 23, 2017 20:29

Description:

"Finding the right time and place to have conversations about things such as progression of disease can be challenging, and patients react in all sorts of ways. "Some people will want to have that conversation when they realise that they're unwell. Some people will strongly say, 'I've been in hospital before, there's no way you're sending me to [intensive care],'" says Smith. Some just don't want to know."

How do you tell someone that they’re seriously ill, or even dying? We explore how doctors learn and how they deal with the stress and trauma, for both their patients and themselves.

Written and read by Chrissie Giles, produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Mosaicscience – Atul-gawande-in-conversation. Chrissie Giles interviews the best-selling author and surgeon about end-of-life care, writing and how doctors can be better communicators. Watch the 10min video or downloadable extended audio interview.

How VR could break America's opioid addiction

Oct 16, 2017 27:04

Description:

Can virtual reality really soothe pain? Jo Marchant meets the doctors who say yes, and who hope this is a solution for the country consuming 80 per cent of the world’s opioid supply: the United States of America.

Written by Jo Marchant
Read by Barry J. Gibb
Produced by Barry J. Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Virtually painless: how VR is making surgery simpler' by Jo Marchant.

Blackness ever blackening: my lifetime of depression

Oct 9, 2017 32:43

Description:

"My most pervasive memory of young childhood, is of being in 'a mood', which really consisted of just the one mood in several shades of monochrome: a spectrum that ranged from a comforting solitary dreaminess inside a softly enclosing gentle shadow at one end to, at the far side of the continuum, the grimmest darkness in a hard-frozen, fractured icescape. Always it was me on the inside, them out there, beyond my enclosure, unable to reach in. And me, sometimes not wanting, sometimes not able, to reach out."

How do I explain an existence dominated by the bleakest, darkest moods? And do I even want to?

Written by Jenni Diski, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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Mental healthPsychologyMedicineHealthSciencePodcastSpoken wordAudio narrationAudiobook  

Is the dark really making me sad?

Oct 2, 2017 27:37

Description:

How do Scandinavians deal with long, dark winters? And what might this teach us about the relationship between our moods and sunlight? 

Written by Linda Geddes
Read by Nidhee Jadeja
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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The Alzheimer's enigma

Sep 25, 2017 31:56

Description:

"Your brain is a dark, damp maze. The 1.5kg or so of soft brain tissue that is folded and pleated in your skull holds within it another, more complex labyrinth of nerve cells reaching out to each other in the darkness, making electrical and chemical connections, forming pathways and circuits that somehow give rise to consciousness and cognition, the memories and thoughts that define you. In Deter's brain, that labyrinth had become a trap. Connections were lost, cells missing, memories wiped, intellect destroyed."

The cause of Alzheimer’s disease has troubled the science world’s best detectives. Can such a mystery really be solved if we gather enough clues?

Written and read by Michael Regnier, produced by Barry J Gibb

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Do you need to go to parent school?

Sep 18, 2017 27:20

Description:

Is there a ‘right’ way to bring up your child? Linda Geddes asks whether parent school is the answer.

Written by Linda Geddes
Read by Rebecca McIntosh
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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Life and death under austerity

Sep 11, 2017 29:34

Description:

In times of economic trouble, governments can choose to cut public services to save money. But at what cost? Meet those on the sharp end of austerity in the UK to find out what it means for mental health.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com
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Eat to treat

Sep 4, 2017 27:30

Description:

We know that our diet has a huge influence on our health, but is it possible to use food as medicine for a specific disease?

Written by Emma Young
Read by Charlotte Hussey
Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Porklife: building a better pig' by Sujata Gupta, available as a podcast here: https://mosaicscience.com/story/porklife-building-better-pig

Unspoken: the forgotten prisoners of war

Aug 28, 2017 53:39

Description:

They were the forgotten army. Taken captive during World War II, they lived lives of desperation and disease, internment and ingenuity. Long unspoken, their tale is now told through the voices of those who survived.

Audio producer: Chris Chapman
Sound designer: Eloise Whitmore
Assistant producer: Ellie Pinney
Fact checker: Laura Dawes
Editor: Mun-Keat Looi

Hear and read accompanying extras and a full transcript for this story on Mosaic. 

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Why we need to start listening to insects

Aug 20, 2017 29:41

Description:

You may not think of the buzz and whine of insects as musical, but the distinctive pitch of mosquito wingbeats could tell us how to fight malaria. Meet the researchers who are pricking up their ears.

Written by Daniel A Gross
Read by Barry J Gibb 
Produced by Graihagh Jackson 

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The man who gave himself away

Aug 14, 2017 28:15

Description:

How discovering an equation for altruism cost George Price everything.

Written and read by Michael Regnier
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend What is life? by Matthew Francis, also available as a podcast. 

Why are so many of us over-sensitive?

Aug 7, 2017 24:01

Description:

When a gentle glow feels like a spotlight and everyday sounds hurt your ears, life can get anxious and painful. But there may be an upside to being highly sensitive.

Written by Emma Young
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Geoff Marsh 

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If you liked this story, we recommend How the zebra got its stripes, with Alan Turing by Kat Arney, also available as a podcast. 

Voices in the dark

Jul 31, 2017 52:23

Description:

What’s it like to hear voices? Are they hallucinations or a normal human experience? Explore what they are, why they happen and how they are being understood.

Kangaroo care – why keeping baby close is better for everyone

Jul 24, 2017 27:52

Description:

A shortage of incubators and a hunch about marsupials inspired a Colombian doctor to try something radical to save premature babies’ lives: constant skin-to-skin contact with parents. It’s cheaper than high-tech neonatal care – and it may be better, too.

Written by Lena Corner
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend The baby MRI: shrinking tech to help save newborn lives by Michael Regnier, also available as a podcast. 

Doing disability differently

Jul 17, 2017 20:32

Description:

In Canada, wheelchair basketball brings people together regardless of their abilities. Find out whether this kind of integration could help dispel stigma, discrimination and misconceptions about disability more widely.

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Jen Whyntie

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast. 

 

Hard labour: the case for testing drugs on pregnant women

Jul 10, 2017 28:25

Description:

Traditionally, expectant mothers have been excluded from clinical trials, but could this practice be doing more harm than good?

Written by Emily Anthes
Read by Charlotte Hussey 
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Give and take: the ethics of donating breast milk by Carrie Arnold, also available as a podcast.

City cycling: health versus hazard

Jul 3, 2017 37:49

Description:

Are the fitness benefits of riding your bike worth the risk of an accident? Take a tour of seven cities on two wheels to find out.

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Made-for-a-marathon by Hayley Birch, also available as a podcast.

Colour to dye for

Jun 26, 2017 20:33

Description:

The basic chemistry of hair dyes has changed little over the last century, but what do we know about the risks of colouring our hair, and why do we do it?

Written by Rebecca Guenard
Read by Rebecca McIntosh
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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The 96th Street divide: why there's so much diabetes in Harlem (documentary)

Jun 19, 2017 48:41

Description:

In East Harlem, four times as many adults have diabetes as in the neighbouring Upper East Side. Meet the New Yorkers stopping poverty being a death sentence.

Written, read and produced by Meera Senthilingam. 

If you liked this story, we recommend Voices in the dark: what it's like to hear voices, another Mosaic audio documentary. 

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Science for the people!

Jun 12, 2017 28:33

Description:

In the 1970s, radical scientists thought they could change the world – if they could change science first.

Written by Alice Bell
Read by Nick Dent
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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Can you think yourself into a different person?

Jun 5, 2017 25:32

Description:

We used to believe our brains couldn't be changed. Now we believe they can - if we want it enough. But is that true? Will Storr wades through the facts and fiction.

 

Written and read by Will Storr

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Can you supercharge your brain? by Emma Young.

 

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The worst sound in the world

May 29, 2017 22:04

Description:

John Osborne has always hated the sound of whistling. But it wasn’t until a man whistling in a café infuriated him so much that he got up and left that he realised it was becoming a problem. Could he even be suffering from misophonia – a condition characterised by a strong dislike of certain sounds?

To get to the root of the issue, John embarks on a whimsical journey of self-discovery, diving headfirst into the worlds of professional whistling and psychology in an attempt to understand if he could ever learn to tolerate – or even love – the sound of whistling.

Narrated by John Osborne
Produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories, visit mosaicscience.com

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A grown-up approach to treating anorexia

May 22, 2017 28:32

Description:

Adults with anorexia often have distinctive traits that lock them into a destructive relationship with food. Discover how those same traits could help them escape it.

Written by Carrie Arnold
Read by Kirsten Irving 
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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The male suicides: how social perfectionism kills

May 15, 2017 26:48

Description:

In every country in the world, male suicides outnumber female. Will Storr asks why.

Written and read by Will Storr
Produced by Barry J Gibb

Read the full text original published on Mosaic.  

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, check out Samaritans: the art of listening, a 4 minute film showing how the Samartians are meeting the near 50 per cent of callers to their helpline who are male.

 

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The superhero in your vagina

May 8, 2017 31:16

Description:

While it’s healthy to have a variety of bacteria in our guts, there’s one place where a single dominant type is best: the vagina. Meet the researchers trying to make the world healthier, one vagina at a time.

Written by Kendall Powell
Read by Kirsten Irving 
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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The baby MRI: shrinking tech to help save newborn lives

May 1, 2017 25:28

Description:

Premature babies are at high risk of brain damage – but many are too fragile to make the journey to an MRI machine for a clearer diagnosis. Soon, thanks to the world’s first mini scanner, they may not need to.

Written and read by Michael Regnier
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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How maggots made it back into mainstream medicine

Apr 24, 2017 20:37

Description:

A writhing mass of maggots in a wound might seem like a good reason to seek medical help. But sometimes it’s the doctors who have put them there, adopting an ancient treatment to help heal painful infected injuries.

Written by Carrie Arnold
Read and produced by Barry J Gibb

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How should you grieve?

Apr 17, 2017 37:03

Description:

The pain and sorrow of bereavement is supposed to get easier to bear as time passes. But what if it doesn’t? Psychiatrists call it ‘complicated grief’ – and it can be treated.

Written by Andrea Volpe
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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Terror, shipwreck, guns - 24 hours in a Karachi ambulance (live studio audience recording)

Apr 10, 2017 34:53

Description:

Who would risk their own safety tending to the injured and recovering the dead in one of the most violent cities on earth? Samira Shackle rides along with a driver from the world’s largest voluntary ambulance service.

This episode was recorded at the Wellcome Trust in London in front of a live studio audience as part of Mosaic’s third birthday celebrations.

Written by Samira Shackle
Read by Michael Regnier 
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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How much does it hurt?

Apr 3, 2017 38:21

Description:

Aching, throbbing, searing, excruciating – pain is difficult to describe and impossible to see. So how can doctors measure it?

Written by John Walsh 
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Graihagh Jackson


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What the Amish can teach the rest of us about modern medicine

Mar 27, 2017 29:46

Description:

When healthcare is expensive, the Amish culture of autonomy and thrift may be a way to balance communal support and individual responsibility.

Written by Sara Talpos
Read by Kirstin Irving
Produced by Ellie Pinney
Edited by Geoff Marsh

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World TB Day - The animals that sniff TB, cancer and landmines

Mar 20, 2017 35:41

Description:

Rats can smell tuberculosis. Dogs can smell cancer. Now they're being trained to save your life. Emma Young reports. A special rebroadcast for World TB Day on 24 March.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Jen Whyntie.

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Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

Mar 13, 2017 26:23

Description:

In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. Emma Young finds out how they did it, and why other countries won’t follow suit.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

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Blood speaks

Mar 6, 2017 33:41

Description:

"In Jamu, Radha's village in western Nepal, her status is lower than a dog's, because she is menstruating. She is only 16, yet, for the length of her period, Radha can't enter her house or eat anything but boiled rice. She can't touch other women - not even her grandmother or sister - because her touch will pollute them. Here, menstruation is dirty, and a menstruating girl is a powerful, polluting thing. A thing to be feared and shunned."

What is life like when having your period puts your health at risk and means you are shunned by society? Rose George reports from Nepal and Bangladesh on menstrual taboos.

Written by Rose George, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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The Mirror Man

Feb 27, 2017 27:09

Description:

"An amputee's pain can persist long after the limb has gone. It can be harrowing and difficult to treat with medication or surgery. Stephen helps people deal with their phantom pain, and he does it with mirrors."

Phantom pain, experienced in missing limbs, tortures amputees and puzzles scientists. Cycle round Cambodia with a man who treats it with mirrors.

Written by Srinath Perur, read by Segun Akingbola, produced by Barry J Gibb

Read the full text original and accompanying 'DVD extras', on mosaicscience.com

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Arrested Development

Feb 20, 2017 45:20

Description:

"The young Walker relished the culture of exultation, of joie de vivre, and yet was also acutely aware of its passing. He was haunted by the knowledge that ageing would eventually steal away his vitality - that with each passing day his body was slightly less robust, slightly more decayed. One evening he went for a drive in his convertible and vowed that by his 40th birthday, he would find a cure for ageing."

A handful of girls seem to defy one of the biggest certainties in life: ageing.

Written by Virginia Hughes, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

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When cuteness comes of age

Feb 13, 2017 37:15

Description:

“Society’s embrace of cuteness leads academics in gender studies to wonder whether cute culture is the sugar pill that sexism comes in – training women to be childlike – or could it instead be a form of empowerment?"

Discover Japan - a country and culture conflicted over cuteness. 

Written by Neil Steinberg
Read by Kirsten Irving
Produced by Barry James Gibb

Don't forget, for more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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The man who grew eyes

Feb 6, 2017 28:10

Description:

"Cells can be directly democratic, and don't need a special governor or president to orchestrate them. In a village of several hundred, the people can probably get together and decide what to do, but a country would be a total mess without a government. 'Self-organisation is so mysterious. We still can't explain why the cells come together to make an eye. It's something that makes me completely in awe of life.'"

Growing nerve tissue and organs is a sci-fi dream. Moheb Costandi met the pioneering researcher who grew eyes and brain cells.

Written by Moheb Costandi, read and produced by Barry J Gibb

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Why being bilingual helps keep your brain fit

Jan 30, 2017 25:28

Description:

Most people in the world speak more than one language, suggesting the human brain evolved to work in multiple tongues. If so, are those who speak only one language missing out?

Written by Gaia Vince

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry James Gibb 

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The engineer who fixed his own heart

Jan 23, 2017 27:29

Description:

When Tal Golesworthy was told he was at risk of his aorta bursting, he wasn’t impressed with the surgery on offer – so he came up with his own idea.

 

Written and read by Geoff Watts

Produced by Barry James Gibb 

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Why are we still waiting for the male pill?

Jan 16, 2017 26:50

Description:

Despite decades of promising research, the many men who want their own contraceptive pill still have nothing. One of them, Andy Extance, looks at the obstacles – practical, political, economic – and meets the people hoping to make male birth control a reality.

Written by Andy Extance

Read and produced by Barry James Gibb 

 

 

Messing with our heads

Jan 9, 2017 29:52

Description:

Like many balding men, Rhodri Marsden has learned to accept losing his hair. But male stoicism and other coping strategies – from hats and wigs to dark humour – often mask deep distress, and even suicidal feelings. Will modern medicine ever find a ‘cure’ – or does the solution lie elsewhere?

How we became the heaviest drinkers in a century

Jan 2, 2017 26:58

Description:

Chrissie Giles on her generation’s climb to Peak Booze.

This episode originally aired in Dec 2015

Written and read by Chrissie Giles
Produced and edited by Barry J Gibb

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Why do we have blood types?

Dec 26, 2016 21:24

Description:

More than a century after their discovery, we still don’t really know what blood types are for. Do they really matter? 

This episode originally aired in May 2015. 

 

Written by Carl Zimmer
Read by Segun Akingbale
Produced and edited by Barry J Gibb

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A plutocratic proposal: what if billionaires could buy their way onto drug trials?

Dec 19, 2016 57:09

Description:

If mega-rich people could buy places on clinical trials, would this help drive forward the development of new treatments that could benefit everyone? Alexander Masters thinks it might just work.

This episode originally aired in Nov 2015.

 

Written and read by Alexander Masters
Produced and edited by Barry J Gibb

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The big sleep

Dec 12, 2016 25:41

Description:

The extreme survival tricks of hibernators could help us overcome life-threatening injuries.

Written by Frank Swain
Read by Michael Regnier
Produced and edited by Barry J Gibb
Mosaic jingle composed by Mark Richardson

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Why a ‘miracle’ drug exists but you can’t have it yet

Dec 5, 2016 30:26

Description:

It’s supposedly getting easier for innovative drugs for rare diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy to reach the market. So why is hesitancy still proving devastating to desperate families?

Written by Andy Extance
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced and edited by Jennifer Whyntie
Mosaic jingle composed by Mark Richardson

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The one-armed robot that will look after me until I die

Nov 28, 2016 27:58

Description:

As old age approaches, Geoff Watts confronts an inevitable future in the care of robots. But that doesn’t mean he likes it.

Written and read by Geoff Watts
Produced and edited by Barry J Gibb
Mosaic jingle composed by Mark Richardson

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Hazed by the smog: where does Asia's air pollution come from?

Nov 21, 2016 30:45

Description:

A haze has periodically wafted over Asia for 20 years. But despite rising public health concern, the pollution remains as opaque as the smoke itself, Mike Ives reports.

Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Jen Whyntie
Edited by Barry J Gibb
Mosaic jingle composed by Mark Richardson

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The man who gave himself away

Nov 14, 2016 28:15

Description:

How discovering an equation for altruism cost George Price everything.

Written and read by Michael Regnier.
Produced by Barry J Gibb

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How the zebra got its stripes, with Alan Turing

Nov 7, 2016 33:31

Description:

Where do a zebra’s stripes, a leopard’s spots and our fingers come from? The key was found years ago – by the man who cracked the Enigma code, writes Kat Arney.


Read by Kat Arney
Produced by Jen Whyntie
Edited by Geoff Marsh

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Give and take: the ethics of donating breast milk

Oct 24, 2016 30:39

Description:

Written by Carrie Arnold, read by Pip Mayo. 

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Life and death under austerity

Oct 17, 2016 29:34

Description:

In times of economic trouble, governments can choose to cut public services to save money. But at what cost? Our podcast meets those on the sharp end of austerity in the UK to find out what it means for mental health.

Written by Mary O'Hara, read by Pip Mayo. 

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My life with hypospadias

Oct 10, 2016 14:14

Description:

In this audio piece, three men talk about living with a condition that affects how the penis looks and works.

Hypospadias occurs when the opening that is usually at the tip of the penis is found on the underside. It affects between 1 in 200 and 1 in 300 male babies – yet many of us have never heard of it.

In this audio piece, Chris Chapman meets three men living with hypospadias. James, Paul* and Wilf describe the confusion and shame of growing up different, and the physical and psychological difficulties they continue to face. They also explain how supportive relationships with family, doctors and people on online forums have helped them live better with the condition.

For more information, see:

Hypospadias UK CDC facts on hypospadias Great Ormond Street Hospital page on hypospadias  

Warning: This piece contains graphic description of penile surgery. 

*Paul’s name has been changed.

Audio producer: Chris Chapman

Art director: Peta Bell

Illustrator: Travis Bedel

Welcome to the cyborg fair

Oct 3, 2016 27:07

Description:

‘Cyborg’ is a loaded and attention-grabbing term, bearing associations from sci-fi novels and Hollywood, and whether it’s an entirely accurate label for these activities is up for debate. Some commentators broaden the definition to include anyone who uses artificial devices, such as computer screens or iPhones. Others prefer to narrow it. As early as 2003, in an article entitled ‘Cyborg morals, cyborg values, cyborg ethics’, Kevin Warwick, the professor who pioneered the cyborg movement in the academic sphere, described ‘cyborgs’ as being only those entities formed by a “human, machine brain/nervous system coupling” – essentially “a human whose nervous system is linked to a computer”.

 

Written by Frieda Klutz, read by Kirsten Irving. 

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Brazil's Cancer Curse

Sep 26, 2016 25:27

Description:

"Gomez is one of Achatz's regular patients at the A C Camargo Cancer Center in São Paulo, Brazil. He is extraordinarily susceptible to cancer. So too are many members of his extended family; cancer is so common among them - and premature death so painfully familiar - that until they learned very recently of the cause, some believed their family was cursed. Gomez's is not the only family affected. The 'cure' afflicts hundreds of thousands of people in Brazil."

The startling discovery that hundreds of thousands of Brazilians have a genetic mutation that undermines their ability to resist cancer is helping labs worldwide in their search for new treatments for the disease. Sue Armstrong reports."

Written by Sue Armstrong, read by Pip Mayo, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Decisions-on-a-knife-edge by Charlotte Huff, also available as a podcast.

 

#brazil #cancer #mutation #genetics #disease #health #society #saopaolo #genes

DIY diagnosis: how an extreme athlete uncovered her genetic flaw

Sep 17, 2016 24:47

Description:

"Kim is unique. Throughout her life she had built up a constellation of values and impulses - endurance, single-mindedness, self-reliance and opposition to authority - that all clicked in when she was confronted with her twin diagnoses. She was predisposed to win. Not everyone is. But as genetic information becomes cheaper, more accessible and more organised, that barrier may lower."

When Kim Goodsell discovered that she had two extremely rare genetic diseases, she taught herself genetics to help find out why.

Written by Ed Yong, read by Segun Akingbola and produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Cradle-of-resistance, Ed Yong's report from the Thai-Myanmar border, one of the last bastions in the fight against malaria drug resistance.

 

DIY prosthetics: how an extreme athlete built his own knee

Sep 12, 2016 26:35

Description:

"The best way to get Brian to do something is to tell him that he can’t. Within a year of the accident, Brian was back on the slopes, skiing with disabled ski teams. In his first year he made it to the International Paralympic Committee’s Alpine Skiing World Cup, and came in seventh in the world. But it wasn’t enough. It wasn’t the same."

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.

Written by Rose Eveleth, read by Kirsten Irving and produced by Jen Whyntie.

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Made for the marathon?

Sep 5, 2016 37:32

Description:

"By the time you read this, I’ll be recovering from the Brighton Marathon. What I’ve learned is that running a marathon isn’t about running a marathon. I mean, it is and it isn’t. I’ll explain what I mean later. But I began by asking what it takes to run 26.2 miles – are hard work and determination enough, or is there something else? Something you’re born with?"

 

What drives people to run a marathon? Join Hayley Birch as she tackles 26.2 miles, aided by science.

 

Written by Hayley Birch, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend Brazil's billion-dollar gym experiment by Catherine de Lange, also available as a podcast. 

 

Doing disability differently

Sep 1, 2016 20:32

Description:

"In Canada at least, wheelchair basketball is a chance for disabled and able-bodied athletes to compete with and against each other. I knew in advance that some of the players I was watching do not use wheelchairs off the court, and that these chairs are sporting kit like hockey sticks or bicycles. Yet seeing those players stand up still profoundly challenged my preconceptions. I am so accustomed to thinking of wheelchair use in binary terms: you either use one or you don’t. Now I’m struggling to unlearn that notion."

 

In Canada, wheelchair basketball brings people together regardless of their abilities. Lesley Evans Ogden asks whether this kind of integration could help dispel stigma, discrimination and misconceptions about disability more widely.

 

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden, read by Kirsten Irving, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast. 

 

Unspoken: the forgotten prisoners of war (documentary)

Aug 16, 2016 53:39

Description:

They were the forgotten army. Taken captive during World War 2, this is a tale of detainment and disease through internment and ingenuity long unspoken and told through the voices of those who survived.

Audio producer: Chris Chapman
Sound designer: Eloise Whitmore
Assistant producer: Ellie Pinney
Fact checker: Laura Dawes
Editor: Mun-Keat Looi

Hear and read accompanying extras and a full transcript for this story on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Voices in the dark: what it's like to hear voices, another Mosaic audio documentary also available on our podcast.

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Sex, lives and disability

Aug 15, 2016 28:32

Description:

"Research has shown that disabled people are less likely to have a long-term partner or marry than non-disabled people, although this is very dependent on impairment type. When a 2014 newspaper poll asked Britons if they had ever had sex with someone who had a physical disability, 44 per cent said ‘No, and I don’t think I would’.  

So how can we shift the negative images of disability and sexuality that still dominate society’s attitudes? Disabled people and their allies have been campaigning for change for decades. While it is not going to be easy, change is on the way, but with it comes new controversies."

 

What can disabled bodies teach us about sex, and why should we listen? 

 

Written by Katharine Quarmby, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original and accompanying 'DVD extras', published on Mosaic.

 

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend The future of sex by Emily Anthes, also available as a podcast. 

 

 

Brazil's billion-dollar gym experiment

Aug 8, 2016 33:29

Description:

"For almost an hour, the residents of this neighbourhood will stretch, balance, sweat and lunge. It's hard to spot the instructor through the throng, wedged in as she is between the church wall and a parked mini camper van, her disembodied voice counting down the exercises above and around the crowd. Children, parents, grandparents - most of them in lycra shorts and trainers - have gathered today, as they do five days a week, not to pray but to work out."

 

Can a grand vision of 4,000 free public gyms overcome inequality and fight Brazil's health crisis? Catherine de Lange reports.

 

Written by Catherine de Lange, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb.

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast. 

Reservoir dogs and furious rabies

Aug 1, 2016 23:49

Description:

"Rabies is a vicious killer, a virus transmitted through saliva. Any warm-blooded mammal is susceptible. Dogs can become infected through a bite by a rabid wild animal or fellow canine; in turn, a bite from an infected dog is the most common method of human infection."

 

The WHO wants to eliminate rabies in Asia by 2020. But how, when rabid dogs are running India ragged? Mary-Rose Abraham reports.

 

Written by Mary-Rose Abraham, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Jen Whyntie, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend Can India's urban future be a healthy one by Michael Regnier, also available as a podcast.

192 Days as John Doe

Jul 25, 2016 40:01

Description:

"Pontoon boats were enlisted. Donning an orange life jacket, the Monroe County medical examiner boarded one, along with a gaggle of sheriff’s deputies. They hoisted the kayaker’s gruesome find from the chilly lake into the vessel and noted the meagre facts: Adult white male. No ID. Wearing an overcoat, even though it was 26 June."

 

 

For decades, unidentified bodies have been consigned to the back rooms of morgues and all but forgotten. Now a handful of campaigners are on a quest to find out who they are and where they come from. Deborah Halber reports.

 

Written by Deborah Halber, read by Pip Mayo, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend This is what happens after you die by Moheb Costandi, also available as a podcast.  

 

Dead man's sperm

Jul 18, 2016 39:40

Description:

"There are several main ways that sperm are harvested, including needle extraction. As the name suggests, this method involves inserting a needle into the testis and drawing out some sperm. It’s often used in live patients but, because minimising invasiveness does not matter the same in dead people, doctors tend to use other methods post-mortem."

 

What drives the partners of men who have died to try and have their babies? Jenny Morber delves into the legally and ethically fraught world of post-mortem sperm donation.

 

Written by Jenny Morber, read by Pip Mayo, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend This is what happens after you die by Moheb Costandi, also available as a podcast.  

 

 

Doing disability differently

Jul 11, 2016 20:32

Description:

"In Canada at least, wheelchair basketball is a chance for disabled and able-bodied athletes to compete with and against each other. I knew in advance that some of the players I was watching do not use wheelchairs off the court, and that these chairs are sporting kit like hockey sticks or bicycles. Yet seeing those players stand up still profoundly challenged my preconceptions. I am so accustomed to thinking of wheelchair use in binary terms: you either use one or you don’t. Now I’m struggling to unlearn that notion."

 

In Canada, wheelchair basketball brings people together regardless of their abilities. Lesley Evans Ogden asks whether this kind of integration could help dispel stigma, discrimination and misconceptions about disability more widely.

 

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden, read by Kirsten Irving, audio editing by Jen Whyntie

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend City Cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast.  

Making sense of a miscarriage

Jul 4, 2016 21:45

Description:

"Today, after just one miscarriage, the statistics tell me that I have an 80 per cent chance of my next pregnancy being successful. Regardless, I have been worrying that my miscarriage was the result of something that might make me prone to it happening again. I simply don't know, and it's the same for most women experiencing miscarriage, whether their first or their fifteenth."

 

Holly Cave wants to know why her pregnancy ended at nine weeks. There are no easy answers, but talking about miscarriage could help us change the way we think about it.

 

Written by Holly Cave, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Jen Whyntie.

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend On menopause by Rose George, also available as a podcast. 

 

 

The animals that sniff out TB, cancer and landmines

Jun 27, 2016 35:41

Description:

"Charles is an African giant pouched rat, a species endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. He's also a pioneer, one of 30 of his species that live and work here in Morogoro, a few hundred kilometres west of Tanzania's largest city, Dar es Salaam, on a programme to sniff out tuberculosis (TB)."

 

Rats can smell tuberculosis. Dogs can smell cancer. Now they're being trained to save your life. Emma Young reports.

 

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Jen Whyntie.

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend What the nose knows by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Fear and loathing in Thet Kal Pyin: Myanmar's healthcare crisis

Jun 20, 2016 26:49

Description:

"In Myanmar healthcare and politics are inextricably linked. The repressive military junta that took power in the early 1960s choked off funding for health and other social services, and even though its ruling generals ceded power to a nominally civilian government in 2011, experts say the health system will take years - probably decades - to recover from half a century of neglect."

As Myanmar prepares for a historic election on 8 November 2015, its leadership is rolling out plans for dramatic health sector reforms. But there are enormous obstacles, including the legacy of war and a rising threat of drug-resistant infectious diseases in restive border areas. Mike Ives reports.

Written by Mike Ives, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Jen Whyntie. 

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If you liked this story, we recommend Cradle of Resistance: How Malaria defeats our drugs by Ed Yong, also available as a podcast.

What is life?

Jun 13, 2016 24:01

Description:

"Below the surface, the bottom of Pavilion Lake is dotted with something resembling coral reefs: domes and cones and weird shapes much like artichokes. These are not corals, though, which are colonies of tiny animals: they are rock formations called microbialites, made by and coated in cyanobacteria. Sometimes misleadingly referred to as 'blue-green algae', these bacteria probably even made the rocks they live on, absorbing nutrients from the water and leaving stone behind. Like plants, they live on sunlight, and they thrive in shallow waters down the steep underwater slope to the point where sunlight fades to gloom.

They are the reason for NASA's interest, and my visit. The people I've come here to see have even bigger things in mind. They want to know what the rare formations in Pavilion Lake might tell us about the origins of life on Earth, life on other worlds and, indeed, what life is, exactly."

If we met new life – on this planet or the next – would we know it when we saw it? Matthew Francis investigates.

Written by Matthew Francis, read and produced by Barry J Gibb.

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If you liked this story, we recommend People are animals too by Peter Aldous, also available as a podcast.

You can train your body into thinking it's had medicine

Jun 6, 2016 37:11

Description:

"The results were part of a well-known and seemingly mundane phenomenon that has been driving a quiet revolution in immunology. Its proponents hope that by cutting drug doses, it will not only minimise harmful side-effects but also slash billions from healthcare costs, transforming treatment for conditions such as autoimmune disorders and cancer. The secret? Teaching your body how to respond to a particular medicine, so that in future it can trigger the same change on its own."

Jo Marchant asks if we can harness the mind to reduce side-effects and slash drug costs.

Written by Jo Marchant, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

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If you liked this story, we recommend Hacking the nervous system by Gaia Vince, also available as a podcast.

India is training ‘quacks’ to do real medicine. This is why

May 30, 2016 32:11

Description:

Priyanka Pulla asks if there can ever be legitimacy in ‘quackery’.

 

Written by Priyanka Pulla

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Reservoir dogs and furious rabies by Mary Rose Abraham.

 

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In the blink of an eye

May 16, 2016 33:34

Description:

Some people suffer eye pain so excruciating they feel suicidal, yet ophthalmologists see nothing wrong. Meet the 82-year-old doctor whose radical idea about the real source of this pain is turning heads.

 

Written by Bryn Nelson

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend The man who grew eyes by Moheb Costandi, also available on our podcast.

 

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Killer dust

May 9, 2016 34:44

Description:

Why is asbestos still killing people? Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

 

Written by Nic Fleming

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend In conversation with...Harold Vamus by Alok Jha, also available on our podcast.

 

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Can America cope with a resurgence of tropical disease

May 2, 2016 26:46

Description:

Having stamped out a number of tropical diseases – including malaria – decades ago, is America today complacent about a rising wave of infectious disease? By Carrie Arnold.

 

Written by Carrie Arnold

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend How malaria defeats our drugs by Ed Yong, also available on our podcast.

 

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Can India's urban future be a healthy one?

Apr 25, 2016 31:04

Description:

Ill-health is the price rural Indians have to pay for seeking a better life in the city. Twenty-nine villages near Hyderabad are helping to explain why, Michael Regnier discovers.

 

Written by Michael Regnier

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden. 

 

 

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Mosaic Extra: Gaia Vince on hacking the nervous system

Apr 21, 2016 14:45

Description:

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March 2016. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

 

Gaia Vince discusses the remarkable nerve that connects our brain to the rest of our vital organs. If we can learn to control this, the future of medicine could be electric. You can find her story Hacking the nervous system on Mosaic and its podcast.

  Gaia Vince is a journalist and broadcaster specialising in science and the environment. She has been the front editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature and online editor of New Scientist. Her book Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made won the 2015 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books. Her work has appeared in the Guardian, The Times Science, Scientific American, Australian Geographic and the Australian. She has a regular column, Smart Planet, on BBC Online, and devises and presents programmes about the Anthropocene for BBC radio.   

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Psychedelic therapy

Apr 18, 2016 39:51

Description:

Notoriously illegal and synonymous with hedonism, LSD and ecstasy started life as aids to psychotherapy. Sam Wong meets the band of psychiatrists who are looking to reclaim them for medicine again.

 

Written by Sam Wong

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Britain's patient outlaws, by Katherine Quarmby.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Mosaic Extra: Alexander Masters on billionaires, greed and drugs for rare cancers

Apr 14, 2016 16:07

Description:

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March 2016. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

 

In the final talk, Alexander Masters describes his personal journey setting up an unlikely 'dating agency' to match neglected research for desperately needed drugs for rare cancers with the mega rich that might just fund it. You can find his story A Plutocratic Proposal on Mosaic and its podcast.

 

Alexander Masters is the author of Stuart: A Life Backwards, the critically acclaimed book about a homeless man called Stuart Shorter who he met while studying at Cambridge University and working in a homeless shelter. It won the Guardian First Book Award and was chosen as a World Book Night Title. He wrote the television adaptation of the book — a joint BBC/HBO venture from Sam Mendes’ studio. His latest book is The Genius in my Basement, an intimate portrait of one of the greatest mathematical prodigies of the twentieth century.  

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Suicide of the ceasefire babies

Apr 11, 2016 24:42

Description:

In Northern Ireland, more people took their own lives in the 16 years after the Troubles than died during them. Why? Lyra McKee finds out.

 

Written by Lyra McKee

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend The male suicides: how social perfectionism kills by Will Storr, also available on our podcast.

 

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Mosaic Extra: Charles Fernyhough on hearing voices

Apr 7, 2016 16:45

Description:

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

 

Here, Charles Fernyhough explores what he has learned in over a decade of study on auditory hallucinations - people who hear voices. You can hear more from him in the Mosaic radio documentary Voices in the dark on Mosaic and its podcast.

  Charles Fernyhough is the author of Pieces of Light and The Baby in the Mirror, as well as two novels, The Auctioneer and A Box of Birds, and has contributed to the Guardian, TIME Ideas, Sunday Telegraph, Financial Times, Sydney Morning Herald, and Focus Magazine. He has published many scientific articles on the relation between language and thought, and his ideas on thinking as a dialogue with the self have been influential in several fields. He is a part-time Professor in Psychology at Durham University, where he directs Hearing the Voice, a project on inner voices funded by the Wellcome Trust. His latest book, The Voices Within: The History and Science of How We Talk to Ourselves, will be published by Profile in April 2016. 

 

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Blocking the high: one man's quixotic quest to cure addiction

Apr 4, 2016 33:43

Description:

If you could take the high out of drugs, what would be the point in taking them? Sujata Gupta meets the unorthodox doctor who thinks he can block some of the world's most addictive pills.

 

Written by Sujata Gupta

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Saved: How addicts gained the power to reverse overdoses by Carrie Arnold, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.