Chris Masterjohn, PhD

Mastering Nutrition

Mastering Nutrition

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Hi, I'm Chris Masterjohn and I have a PhD in Nutritional Sciences. I am an entrepreneur in all things fitness, health, and nutrition. In this show I combine my scientific expertise with my out-of-the-box thinking to translate complex science into new, practical ideas that you can use to help yourself on your journey to vibrant health. This show will allow you to master the science of nutrition and apply it to your own life like a pro.

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Health

Episodes

Could an elevated BUN indicate protein malabsorption and low stomach acid? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #93

Mar 27, 2020 04:43

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Question: Could an elevated BUN indicate protein malabsorption and low stomach acid?

I get the Heidelberg test. That's the only accurate way to assess stomach acid. If you want to do something else, it would be better to use the kitchen techniques, like take half a teaspoon of baking soda and see how long you take to burp, or take HCl with your meal and keep adding capsules and see how many capsules you can take without reflux. That's probably both more accurate than using BUN.

I find it almost certainly the case that a slightly high BUN would never be a useful marker of low stomach acid and would never be a good marker of poor protein digestion. If you want to know if you have poor protein digestion, measure the protein in your stool. Get a GI stool test that looks at what you're not absorbing. That's how you test that.

The reason that this sounds nuts to me is maybe you are allowing the protein to ferment in your gut and generate urea from the microbes that you're absorbing, like maybe. But where does most of the urea come from that's in your blood? It comes from the urea cycle, which is how you get rid of ammonia. How do you get ammonia in your body that goes into the urea cycle? You digest protein into amino acids, you absorb the amino acids, and then you break them down so that you can either burn them for energy or turn them into glucose or turn them into certain neurotransmitters or whatever, and then you lose ammonia that you put into the urea cycle.

Why wouldn't the urea be a marker of having good digestion? I'm not even sure that we could say it could be an equally useful test of good digestion and bad digestion of protein. I don't know if it's as good a marker of bad digestion of protein as it is of good digestion of protein. But even if it were just as good a marker of bad digestion of protein as it is of good digestion of protein, something that's an equally good marker of two opposites is not a good marker of anything.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Are bilirubin and uric acid useful markers of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress? What are better markers? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #92

Mar 26, 2020 05:09

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Question: Are bilirubin and uric acid useful markers of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress? What are better markers?

I think intracellularly where most of antioxidant support is highly relevant, then they're not that big a deal. In the plasma, they can be a big deal. It's quite possible that uric acid is one of the most important antioxidants in plasma. But I would say it's highly debatable whether we put uric acid into the blood specifically to achieve that versus that happens to be an accidental sort of just incidental to making uric acid during the excretion of purines, which make up the building blocks of DNA and ATP and things like that.

I think the best marker of oxidative stress in plasma is the cysteine to cystine ratio. Cysteine is the reduced form of the amino acid cysteine. Cystine is the oxidized form. There are good studies at a general population level showing that that is the major specific indicator of oxidative stress that takes place in the plasma.

The glutathione couple, glutathione reduced versus oxidized, is probably the best marker in the blood of what's happening with oxidative stress intracellularly. Unfortunately, the only test that looks at this is HDRI. I feel very, very torn about whether we should be working with HDRI because I know a lot about measuring glutathione. I've had some clients who got their glutathione test. What you need to do to accurately measure glutathione to preserve the sample, according to my client who did the test, is not at all part of the instructions or process that they use, so I am very skeptical of using them. No one else offers the reduced to oxidized version of glutathione.

So, what I would recommend to assess oxidative stress would be Genova's Oxidative Stress 2.0 panel. It does give you the cysteine to cystine ratio. I'll put a note to put a link to that in the show notes. I think that's the best marker. They do have glutathione on there, and they do have a bunch of other things that can be useful in assessing oxidative stress. I would use that. 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Does it matter what form of B12 you take? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #91

Mar 25, 2020 09:27

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Question: Does it matter what form of B12 you take?

Cyanocobalamin is cheap and there's not really any clear evidence that it's harmful, but I just don't like the idea that it is cobalamin bound to cyanide. It's not found in the food supply. Forming cyanocobalamin and peeing it out is actually one of the main ways you detoxify cyanide.

Hydroxocobalamin is also relatively inexpensive. It's relatively easy to get as injections. It is not an end product of detoxification. It is found in very high concentrations in the food supply. The normal forms of vitamin B12 that you find in the diet from food are hydroxocobalamin and methylcobalamin in milk, and hydroxocobalamin and adenosylcobalamin in meat. Hydroxocobalamin is the most universal food form of cobalamin, and it is always a substantial part of the food supply. I'm pretty sure it's cheaper than methylcobalamin, so I would use intramuscular injections of hydroxocobalamin.

Most B vitamins start their absorption in the stomach and then mostly absorb in the small intestine. In the case of B12, when you're dealing with food, you're absorbing it in the small intestine almost exclusively with intrinsic factor that's produced in your stomach.

Start with a milligram of oral hydroxocobalamin. Test that against your serum B12. If it's not moving your serum B12, see if 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 milligrams do. Because if they do, then taking that every day is going to be probably easier. Well, I mean, it depends on what you like. But you're probably going to like taking oral B12 more than you're going to like getting intramuscular injections. I would see if raising the dose works first. I'd use oral hydroxocobalamin. Then if you have to use intramuscular, I will use hydroxocobalamin.

I guess you just have to judge it against from a medical perspective they're always worried about compliance, because unlike the people who are showing up to this AMA, the general population has very low motivation compared to us. Injection is preferable from that standpoint because there are fewer things to do. Plus, you have an accountability buddy because someone's got to inject you. You get an accountability buddy to do something once a month versus you have the personal responsibility to do something every day. From a compliance perspective, it's vastly superior, the getting injected. But if you're already taking 15 supplements every morning, then it's probably way easier for you to just add megadose of B12 in with those oral supplements than to get intramuscular injection. I'd prefer it.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Is it useful to measure urine pH? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #90

Mar 24, 2020 06:42

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Question: Is it useful to measure urine pH?

The urine pH is telling you the acid burden that your body has been subjected to. It's telling you, you can make an inference about the compensations that your body has had to engage in. You can also make an inference about the limitations of your body in compensating for that because even your urine pH should be buffered. It's not the case that you put a little bit of acid in the urine and then boom your pH is going to go down. It's the case that your body has a whole bunch of systems to buffer even the urine pH as you excrete acids from your body.

The system is, like in your blood, the tiniest, tiniest change in your pH is immediately going to set in motion a change in your breathing rate that is going to cause you to either increase or decrease the exhalation of carbon dioxide in order to adjust the pH of the blood. Then there's going to be a longer-term compensation where you're going to take some of those acids and pee them out. When you pee them out, your kidney is going to buffer those acids in the way of preserving the urine pH.

If your urine pH goes down from 6.5 to 5.5, it tells you that your urine pH is like ten times more acidic, but it doesn't tell you that your blood is ten times more acidic. The critics of using urine pH will point that out. But what it does tell you is that your body has been subjected to a rather enormous acid burden, number one; and number two, that you're even starting to overwhelm your kidney's ability to buffer the urine and prevent the pH of the urine from changing. And so it does tell you about the stress put on the system.

A high potassium intake would be the number one thing that would acutely affect it apart from taking the bicarbonate. By the way, always take bicarbonate on an empty stomach away from food.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Why AGEs and deficient insulin signaling are the main problem in diabetes. | Masterjohn Q&A Files #89

Mar 23, 2020 10:35

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Question: Why AGEs and deficient insulin signaling are the main problem in diabetes.

The reason that methylglyoxal, which I did my doctoral dissertation on, the reason that methylglyoxal, which is quantitatively the most important form of advanced glycation end products in diabetics, the reason that it is elevated is not because of hyperglycemia. It's because of deficient insulin signaling.

That is for two reasons. One is that you can derive methylglyoxal from glycolysis. You can derive methylglyoxal from ketogenesis. You can derive methylglyoxal from protein, specifically from the amino acid threonine. Insulin prevents you from making methylglyoxal in the glycolytic pathway no matter how high the glucose level is. Insulin, what it does in glycolysis is at the step where the intermediates spill out to generate methylglyoxal, insulin stimulates that enzyme that sucks the intermediates down.

Diabetes, you have lower expression of that enzyme, and you have greater spillover out of glycolysis into forming methylglyoxal. In untreated diabetes, you can have blood glucose that goes up five times normal. That will be a factor that is influencing you to make not just five, maybe ten or far more times methylglyoxal on glycolysis. But the reason the glucose is elevated is because of deficient insulin signaling. No matter how much glucose you have or don't have, once the glucose gets into the glycolytic pathway, insulin is protecting against methylglyoxal by clearing the glucose down.

The role of methylglyoxal starts at the first instance of hyperglycemia to cause the development from an acute first ever instance of hyperglycemia through the pathway of developing diabetes. Then in diabetes, methylglyoxal is overwhelmingly responsible for causing the cardiovascular complications, the complications in the eyes, and the neurological complications of diabetes, cataracts, all of these things. And so I think it's a huge mistake to think that the spiking glucose is the thing going on rather than the deficient insulin signaling.

Now, if you want to use a rule of thumb that is not individually tailored to you, then the answer is use the 140 limit. But you follow that up with, is there evidence to support this? No, I think the evidence says that this is a mediocre approximation of how to identify whether there's a problem. But a good way to try to identify whether you're having a problem with glucose spikes is the GlycoMark test.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Nutritional recommendations for MTR and MTRR polymorphisms. | Masterjohn Q&A Files #88

Mar 20, 2020 11:20

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Question: Nutritional recommendations for MTR and MTRR polymorphisms.

In the methylation cycle, I've talked a lot about MTHFR, which helps finalize the methyl group of methyfolate. But then folate has to donate that methyl group to vitamin B12 in order for vitamin B12 to donate it to homocysteine. In that process, that's how you clear homocysteine primarily in the fasting state rather than the fed state. It's also how you recycle homocysteine to methionine to use for methylation, again, primarily in the fasting state rather than the fed state.

If your MTHFR is working fine, then the creatine is much less relevant, and the glycine really isn't that relevant. Glycine is still important for everyone, but it's not specifically relevant because of the genetic variations. With that said, I do think that because some tissues rely more on folate and B12 than they do on choline that there might be some tissues that would benefit from supplementing creatine, so you could play around with it. I supplement creatine, and I don't have any problems. I mean, there's no harm in trying out the creatine.

In my view, there's no blanket recommendation for someone with MTRR polymorphisms. What I say is because in theory you will be bad at repairing B12 when your B12 gets very damaged, you should thoroughly look at your B12 status at least once. Then every time you enter a new health era, you should monitor your B12 status again.

What I mean by health era is your health changes or your developmental stage changes in a way that could impact your health. So, change in health eras, and I'm making this term up, this is not a medical term, but the change in health eras means you get sick with a sickness you never had before. That's a change in your health era. Or you go through puberty. That's a change in your health era. You go through menopause. That's a change in your health era. Or you go on birth control. That's a change in your health era.

Look, my MTRR, as I said before, looks terrible on paper. I measured everything I could think of about my B12 status, and everything looked fine. I'm not talking about just serum B12. I'm talking about all the functional markers too. They looked just fine. That just reinforced my belief and the observational data that these things are so common.

If these things dramatically impacted your B12 status in a very negative way most of the time, not many people would have the polymorphisms. And yet, they're very common. Those are huge reductions in activity. They're very, very common. So, I think it's ridiculous to make a generalized nutritional protocol around either of those. MTR, it gives you a couple ideas you can experiment with. MTRR, be proactive about monitoring your B12 status.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Nutrition for children with ADHD. | Masterjohn Q&A Files #87

Mar 19, 2020 12:01

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Question: Nutrition for children with ADHD.

In adults 100 to 800 milligrams per day has been used in a couple studies showing effects in the brain. One of the things that's going wrong in ADHD is that the brain is not getting dopamine's signal that something is valuable enough to keep paying attention to it.

I think the drugs that are used to treat ADHD are increasing the tonic level of dopamine in the frontal cortex, and they're increasing the tonic level of dopamine in the basal ganglia. In the frontal cortex, the increased dopamine is basically making more stable mental states. If you focus on something, you will hold on to that better. In the basal ganglia, increasing the tonic dopamine is making it harder for a new thing to grab your attention, which reinforces the fact that you are more focused. Anything that increases dopamine is going to be good. There's that.

Should we just use the glycine to promote sleep, or should I also use it in the morning? I would say, ultimately, you have to judge it based on the results you get, but you should try it at other times during the day because one of the roles of glycine would be to provide the buffer against excess methylation.

For dopamine to make you pay attention to something that has value, you must have GABA suppressing attention to everything else. Dopamine cannot be a meaningful signal of the value of placing attention on something unless you have adequate GABA to suppress your attention paid to everything else. Because if you're paying attention to your schoolwork while you are also paying attention to your video games and to the mosquito in the corner equally as much, then you're not actually paying attention to your schoolwork. So, I think that anything that would boost GABA would be helpful.

So, yes to the glycine during the day. Yes, you do want to keep choline levels up. But remember that choline is a methyl donor. Choline is a double-edged sword here. First of all, the choline is needed for acetylcholine. When dopamine tells you to pay attention to something, once you're paying attention, you need acetylcholine to sustain your attention on that thing and get results. Dopamine is the signal that that thing has value to pay attention to. Acetylcholine is what you actually use to pay attention to it and get results.

You do want to help his acetylcholine levels, but you have to remember that choline is a methyl donor and that the more choline you have, the more important it becomes that the glycine is kept high enough to buffer excess methylation. Otherwise, choline could act as a double-edged sword and potentially wind up reducing dopamine levels.

The other thing that I would add is the GABA. Maybe start at 100 milligrams a day and work your way up to 800 and just be careful with the low dose. See what results you get. If it seems promising, try increasing the dose.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Coronavirus: Foods and Supplements

Mar 18, 2020 25:34

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Here's what I'm doing about the coronavirus:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/covid19

Here's my 41-page 92-reference guide, The Food and Supplement Guide for the Coronavirus:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/coronavirus

Nutrients important for neuroregeneration | Masterjohn Q&A Files #86

Mar 18, 2020 02:19

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Question: Nutrients important for neuroregeneration.

Iron, phosphorus, and sulfate are very important for regenerating nerves. Magnesium. Acetylcholine is a major factor in regeneration of nerves, and so choline is important. If you were to use a supplement, alpha-GPC would be the ideal choline supplement to use because it's superior at generating acetylcholine. Vitamin A and zinc are very important for nerve regeneration. DHA, which is one of the omega-3 fatty acids that you find in fish is very important. Vitamin B6. Possibly GABA supplementation can help.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Advice for what to do after suffering a transient ischemic attack | Masterjohn Q&A Files #85

Mar 17, 2020 08:40

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Question: Advice for what to do after suffering a transient ischemic attack.

A TIA, a transient ischemic attack, is like a mini stroke, but they all kind of fall into the same category where the development of plaque is a very significant part, is the major thing disposing you to having an event like that.

Nutritionally, the major factors in blood pressure are potassium is the biggest one, the salt-to-potassium ratio, not eating too much. Some people are salt-sensitive, some aren't. But the major factor is really the salt-to-potassium ratio. Some of the other minerals like magnesium and calcium are important. But then stress and physical activity are huge in blood pressure as well. Assuming that's under control, the main nutritional factors that you want to pay attention to are things that get the blood lipids under control and then things that get the process of calcification and inflammation under control.

The reason that the lipids are problematic is because they're getting damaged by free radicals and other damaging molecules, so things like vitamin C and E, glutathione, fruits and vegetables supplying polyphenols, all the minerals like zinc, copper, iron, manganese, selenium, all those things are important.

Figuring out whatever the limiting factor is and managing the details is a really big project. There are some simple rules of thumb like getting regular exercise, provided that the doctor okays it. Obviously, with cardiovascular issues, you have to do that, but whatever is safe for him to engage in. If needed, meditation or stress reduction on the blood pressure. And then just cut the junk food out and include a well-balanced diet.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

When on a ketogenic diet, it is a problem if ketones are going up to 5 to 6 millimoles per liter? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #84

Mar 16, 2020 03:28

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Question: When on a ketogenic diet, it is a problem if ketones are going up to 5 to 6 millimoles per liter?

One of the popular ketogenic advocates was saying that if the ketones are getting above 3, then it's from not eating enough protein. I don't really see it that way. I think that protein will suppress ketogenesis, and so will carbs. Five to 6 millimoles per liter is what you see in therapeutic ketogenic diets.

In terms of how you could bring the ketones down, more carbs or more protein are going to bring them down. Between the two of those, probably protein would be the most important thing to increase as a means of protection against lean mass loss and as a means of keeping neurotransmitters and all the other things that you do with protein healthy. But you could raise the carbs a little bit too. Because remember that your carb demand even on a ketogenic diet is definitely not down to 20 grams of carbs. That's not even feeding your brain on the ketogenic diet.

If you have room to increase carbs, then I think would be great to get the carbs up to at least 30 and then maybe use protein going up to supply the rest of that. Then also pay attention to micronutrients. Do a dietary analysis. If there are certain nutrients that this person is not really getting in that more vegetables would help those micronutrients, then increase the vegetables and the carbs along with them for that purpose. But just on macros alone, I would say go up at least 10 grams on the carbs and go up to, if you can get there, a gram of protein per pound of body weight on the protein, and that will bring the ketones down.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Are there any solutions to getting nauseated from zinc supplements even at low doses and even when the zinc comes as oysters? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #83

Mar 13, 2020 05:11

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Question: Are there any solutions to getting nauseated from zinc supplements even at low doses and even when the zinc comes as oysters?

With the zinc, my general recommendation is to take zinc on an empty stomach. The thing that is not controversial is that phytate is the principal inhibitor of zinc absorption. Phytate is found in whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes. I think there's a very broad agreement across the zinc research community that taking zinc not with a meal that contains whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes is going to lead to higher zinc absorption.

Then there's some controversy. Does it matter whether the zinc is on an empty stomach compared to a phytate-free meal, which would be a meal that doesn't have any whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes? Because there's a gray area there, I say if you can, take it on an empty stomach. If you can't, take it with a phytate-free meal.

Generally, it's the case that if someone takes 15 milligrams of zinc with a full glass of water, they are very unlikely to get nauseated from it. Whereas if almost anyone takes 50 milligrams of zinc with a full glass of water on an empty stomach, they're almost definitely going to get nauseated from it. I would get nauseated from it.

Taking the low dose should allow you to take it on an empty stomach, but for some people, they do get nauseated even taking only 15 milligrams on an empty stomach. Well, you have two options. The ideal thing would be figure out the lowest amount of food that it takes to.

If you eat the oyster at the end of a phytate-free meal, is it still making you sick? If so, I don't think that's the zinc. I think it's something else. And your digestive system might not be up to the task of eating oysters right now at this moment. But if at the end of a phytate-free meal if you can fit in one or two oysters and it doesn't make you nauseated at all, then I think that's great. Oysters are probably the ideal zinc supplement if you can get them in. A couple of oysters a day goes a long way to getting your zinc in.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/09/06/ask-anything-nutrition-march-8-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Could low LDL hurt female fertility? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #82

Mar 12, 2020 06:39

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Question: Could low LDL hurt female fertility?

I haven't seen evidence of it, but that would not surprise me at all given that cholesterol is what you make sex hormones from. If you see levels that low, I don't know that it's intrinsically a problem. You kind of want to start looking at what are the reasonable things you could expect to happen from that that affect female fertility? Fat-soluble vitamins could be relevant. Sex hormones could be relevant. I'd start looking at those things.

I doubt that the LDL being that low itself in and of itself is going to be the thing that compromises fertility. This is the thing. Is the LDL low because of really good clearance from the blood, or is it low because of really low production? If it's low because of really low production, then you definitely have problems with fat-soluble vitamin transport. Because if the liver is not making lipoproteins as much, the fat-soluble vitamins are staying trapped in the liver and they're not getting to other tissues that need them.

While there's no evidence for it, it makes perfect sense that dietary cholesterol would help that because dietary cholesterol is very helpful in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, where the exact same defect is 1,000X to produce a devastating result. It makes total sense that in someone who is a carrier for SLOS, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, who has defective cholesterol synthesis in their gonadal tissues and therefore has defective sex hormone synthesis, it makes total sense of eating cholesterol would help those people. So, I would try it.

Egg yolks. That's what most people are going to eat for cholesterol. But this all hinges on the question of the LDL is low, so what? Is it because it's being cleared rapidly or because it's not entering the blood due to lack of synthesis? Whether that person is going to have infertility as a result of it and whether that's going to be helped by dietary cholesterol, it's all going to get a hinge on that. But the good news is for both people, it's probably completely harmless to eat some eggs. Eating eggs might just be the thing that helps.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Is it safe to take creatine when nursing? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #81

Mar 11, 2020 08:22

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Question: Is it safe to take creatine when nursing?

If you felt fatigued and you took the creatine and all of a sudden that started reversing, then you either felt fatigued because you had low creatine synthesis, or you felt fatigued because you had a methylation problem. Those aren't mutually exclusive. If you're not methylating well, the most sensitive thing that will happen is you'll synthesize less creatine. But I mean it could have gone beyond creatine. It could have been that you're synthesizing less creatine, and you're not regulating your dopamine properly and things like that.

But certainly, you're addressing a methylation issue/a creatine deficiency issue. I don't know the exact cause and effect scenario that would lead to ovulation, but it makes sense that you ovulate. Think about the regulation of fertility, the whole thought process of the body's regulation of fertility. All of it comes down to energy. It comes down to the fact that when you get pregnant, you're investing -- I don't remember what the numbers are off the top of my head -- something like 50,000 kilocalories in the pregnancy. Then in lactation, you're investing another I think thousand kilocalories a day or something like that. The whole hypothalamic regulation of sex hormones and thyroid hormone is all regulated by leptin and insulin as signals of long-term and short-term energy status.

Insulin and leptin are hormones. Endocrine hormones are between tissues. But what happens at the cellular level is I think it's very plausible that something that's happening at the cellular level and the recognition of what those hormones mean to communicate that energy is present, sufficient for fertility is going to be ATP dependent. If you're missing creatine, then you're going to have a drop in the power of the ATP signal and the recycling of the ATP. This is the basis for why creatine is used for muscular power, but it's also the basis for why creatine is used to use energy in producing stomach acid or to communicate or to transmit light and dark signals through your eye to your brain to make vision. All over the place, creatine is super important to the cellular utilization of energy. My guess is it's correcting a response inside the cell to the leptin and insulin.

In terms of safety in breastfeeding, I don't think there's any evidence one way or another. It's probably safe because you could get this from meat, and there's no evidence of harm. But if you wanted to be hyper careful, I don't think you need to do this, but if you wanted to be like super, super careful, what I would do is divide the 5 grams over three or four meals evenly on the basis that there are very, very trace amounts of byproducts of high-dose creatine. Five grams will cause extraordinarily tiny amounts of toxins that appear in the urine. I mean, not toxins at the level that we're talking about, but I doubt it's a risk. But if you wanted to be hyper careful, divide the dose up evenly. 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Can you explain plant polyphenols and hormesis? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #80

Mar 10, 2020 11:18

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Question: Can you explain plant polyphenols and hormesis?

In brief, our detoxification system didn't evolve to handle the toxins of modern society. Modern society invents a new chemical. Our body knows it's a toxin, but it doesn't know it because we were exposed to it for millions of years. It knows it because it has similarity to other toxins. That similarity may be weaker or stronger depending on the toxin.

Our bodies do evolve to be bad at detoxifying. They evolve to be good at detoxifying. Our system is not designed to get sick when we encounter toxins. It's designed to get healthy when we encounter toxins. The way that works is throughout most of our evolutionary history, the toxins we were exposed to were the toxins in plants. Most of them are polyphenols. Most of them are the things that we ascribe health benefits to. A lot of those health benefits come from the fact that these are the toxins that our bodies are designed to work with.

Xenobiotic defense -- xenobiotic is something foreign -- this defense system is this giant umbrella system that in a very general level assesses the likelihood of how much energy should we invest in keeping that system running based on how much toxins are we exposed to and uses that metric to invest the energy in that entire machinery. We're not investing in getting rid of a specific toxin. We're just taking the collective toxin and investing in the collective detoxification machinery, the collective antioxidant glycation-defense machinery. Because fruit and vegetable polyphenols were the major toxins, our system is designed to be very highly responsive to them, to use them as that metric.

Now, in the modern society, what do we do? We invented new toxins. By the way, the fruit and vegetable polyphenols, what happens if you just take a bunch of them and you dump them on cells? You kill the cells. What happens when we eat them? Ninety-nine percent of them don't get absorbed. Why? Because the intestinal cells have a detoxification pathway that's just like the liver's.

I think where you cross the line is, what you don't want to do is isolate those things into a pill and megadose them. That's why people, when they ask me about sulforaphane and milk thistle, my view of that is that that's what you do when you can't eat a high volume of unrefined plant foods with five to nine fruits and vegetables. But what you don't want to do is say, "Well, if the bottle says one capsule milk thistle a day is good for me, then ten capsules of milk thistle on top of ten servings of fruits and vegetables is good for me." Then you're in the zone of who knows what that's doing to you.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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What to do when serum magnesium is high but RBC magnesium is low? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #79

Mar 8, 2020 06:44

Description:

Question: What to do when serum magnesium is high but RBC magnesium is low?

The magnesium in the blood and the hair is high. When you say blood, I'm assuming this is serum or plasma because the RBC magnesium is low. I'm hoping that's not whole blood magnesium in which case it would be hard to separate from the RBC magnesium. But I mean even for whole blood, if the RBC magnesium is low and the blood magnesium is high, then the magnesium that's in the blood that's high is in the serum or plasma, not in the RBCs obviously.

Clearly this means that you're deficient in magnesium transport. You're not deficient in magnesium. So, the last thing that you should do is start blasting high-dose magnesium at that. Because not only is it not going to help, but you basically have two or three times the risk of harm from supplementing high-dose magnesium, because the harm of high-dose magnesium comes when your serum levels go to double the upper limit of the reference range. If your serum level is high, and your RBC is low, and you start blasting.

B6, even if it's adequate, maybe try 10 milligrams. Work your way slowly up to 100 milligrams of P5P. See if that helps. If it doesn't, you probably have a more serious issue with magnesium transport. You might have a rare genetic defect in a magnesium transporter. Off the top of my head, I'm not sure how to manage that. There's probably things you can't do. It might come down to just maximizing all the different possible ways that you can get magnesium into your system and cells. That might mean that you want a modest hypermagnesemia.

In other words, you want your serum magnesium to be a little over the top of the upper reference range in order to try to drive magnesium into the red blood cells. But you still need to measure it regularly so that you know that you're not anywhere near twice the top of the upper reference range. Then just do what you can to maximize the other factors. Insulin, salt, and B6 is what I think there.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Is there a potential for adverse effects of 5-10 mg of folate for heterozygous MTHFR? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #78

Mar 6, 2020 15:11

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Question: Is there a potential for adverse effects of 5-10 mg of folate for heterozygous MTHFR?

Is there a potential? Yeah. The tolerable upper intake level for folate was set at 1 milligram on the basis that there are rare hypersensitivity syndromes that have caused reactions to 1 milligram or higher. On the basis that in numerous case reports, supplementation of more folate than that has been the factor that appears to precipitate the neurological degeneration in B12 deficient patients. It seems like if you're B12-deficient and you add a megadose of folate, there might be something causal about adding the folate precipitating the B12 deficiency. That makes sense.

Folate and B12 participate together in methylation. The neurological degeneration specific to B12 deficiency is probably mostly due to the non-methylation functions of B12. That's why it doesn't happen in folate deficiency. If you add folate, you're going to probably redirect some of the B12 into the methylation pathway, rob it from the other pathway, which is metabolizing methylmalonic acid into the citric acid cycle. You do that and you provoke the specific neurological degeneration of B12 deficiency.

The flipside of this is someone could say, well, there's no evidence that outside of these rare things that 50 milligrams of folate causes harm. That's true. There isn't a well-characterized harm from it. But I still think that it's stupid, it's stupid. Why would someone with a heterozygous MTHFR SNP need 10 milligrams of folic acid or methylfolate? That makes no sense biochemically at all. It makes no sense. First of all, are they compound heterozygous or are they just heterozygous for the SNP?

I don't know if it's harmful, but it's irrational to take high-dose methylfolate for this purpose or high-dose folic acid is irrational. It's on the basis that it's not effective. It is five to ten times the Institute of Medicine's tolerable upper intake level. It's not that I know it will cause harm. It's just that it's way into the territory of what has the possibility of harm in some people. Why for no benefit would you take yourself deep into the territory of possible harm?

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Is folate unstable in frozen liver or just in frozen veggies? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #77

Mar 5, 2020 50

Description:

Question: Is folate unstable in frozen liver or just in frozen veggies?

The answer is folate is stable in frozen liver. It is not stable in frozen greens. 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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How much vitamin C should I take with collagen? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #76

Mar 4, 2020 03:17

Description:

Question: How much vitamin C should I take with collagen?

There's no evidence that you need to take vitamin C with collagen. There is a study by Keith Baar, who showed that 15 grams of gelatin, not collagen, but I suspect the collagen is exactly the same, 15 grams of gelatin but not 5 grams, the dose is important, with 50 milligrams of vitamin C taken before exercise improved collagen synthesis in the tendons. They included 50 milligrams of vitamin C because it's made for collagen synthesis, but they don't show that you needed the vitamin C. They just had the vitamin C in there. I don't know if it even matters in that context whether you need the vitamin C. I also have no reason to think that you need 50 milligrams instead of 10 or that 100 milligrams wouldn't work better because they didn't test the different doses. They tested the different doses of gelatin. I see no reason to think a high dose of collagen is any different in this respect.

Let's assume that it's the same. What that means that I'm very confident that you need 15 grams instead of 5 grams when you take it before exercise to increase synthesis of collagen in tendons if that's what you care about. I have no confidence about how much vitamin C you need if you need any. But if you want to do what they did, then I do feel confident that 50 milligrams is enough to get some effect. I just don't know if it's enough to get maximal effect and I don't know if it's necessary at all or in that dose to get that effect.

If it's for joint health and if it's taken before exercise, the timing is important because what you're trying to do is leverage the exercise to get more blood flow of the nutrients to the joints. That's why the timing matters. In that case, you take the vitamin C with the collagen, 50 milligrams is the dose we know works. We don't know if it's necessary, and we don't know if it's optimal. We just know that it works. If you're not taking it for joint health and you're not taking it specifically before exercise, you still need vitamin C. But the timing doesn't matter and pairing it to the collagen doesn't matter.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Are liver capsules as good as eating liver? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #75

Mar 3, 2020 04:08

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Question: Are liver capsules as good as eating liver?

Liver pills are mainly for people who are not going to eat liver. That's the first thing. The second thing is, there are advantages to taking the dosing schedule of a little bit of liver every day. 

Probably the ideal thing would be to have 10 to 20 grams of fresh liver every day. But the number of people who are going to do that are even smaller than the number of people who are going to eat the fresh liver. What the liver pills do is, number one, they give people who don't eat liver that frequently to get the nutrients that have absorption caps that are better off gotten in small doses at a time to get those every day. It gives people who are not going to eat liver at all a way to get liver in. I don't know. I mean, it's a tradeoff. Probably almost no one is going to eat 10 to 20 grams of liver every day. If you don't, are you better off taking the capsules or are you better off taking liver once a week? You're probably better off taking half and half, like take three capsules every day and still eat liver once a week. It's probably the best thing to do in that case.

I don't recommend anyone who would otherwise eat liver stop eating liver and take the capsules, but I do recommend the people who won't eat liver take the capsules. I think it's a nice thing to do. If you eat liver but take the capsules anyway, then take that in a lower dose because you eat liver. Like I said, eat one serving of liver once a week or twice a month and take two, three, or four of the capsules instead of six; two, three or four capsules every day. I think that's a happy medium that can have best approximates the best thing which is the 10 to 20 grams of liver a day.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Should I take 3 grams of leucine per meal? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #74

Mar 2, 2020 03:46

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Question: Should I take 3 grams of leucine per meal?

Leucine is metabolized into a leucine metabolite that is the signal of protein synthesis. It's the thing that tells your muscles whether they should be synthesizing protein. But do you synthesize more protein when you upregulate all the factors of muscle protein synthesis? Well, that is entirely dependent on the amount of amino acids you have supplied. Think about it this way. Why is leucine used as the marker to determine how much muscle protein to make? Because usually when you get leucine, it's with high-quality protein that has all the other amino acids that you need to make muscle protein.

Now, the question is, is meat better than isolated protein? The research is pointing in the direction that at least some whole foods are just better than protein supplements, number one. Perhaps as a general principle, perhaps whole protein foods are better than protein supplements, number two. Number three, taking leucine or the leucine metabolite that regulates muscle protein synthesis is not going to be better than getting whole proteins even from protein supplements when you get enough protein to provide that leucine because the leucine and its metabolite don't actually achieve peak muscle protein synthesis unless you supply the protein with it. If you supply the protein with it, you do get the leucine.

There probably are questions that can still be worked out about this, but it's probably going to wind up being that it's a waste of time to take the leucine if you're getting enough protein, and it's stupid to take the leucine and not get enough protein. You should just eat a lot of protein is where I think this is going. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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What are your thoughts on root canals? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #73

Feb 28, 2020 10:03

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Question: What are your thoughts on root canals?

Before Weston Price embarked on his journeys that led to the publication of Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, which is an epic pioneering work in nutritional anthropology, before he did that, he spent 25 years as the first research director for what became the American Dental Association, researching in laboratory science and clinical science what were the causes of tooth decay and the consequences of tooth decay.

Price's argument was that no matter what you do to get the infection out of the main areas of the teeth, you are never going to get it out of the nooks and crannies of the dental tubules. If you basically try to get rid of the infection and then you stuff something in there and make sure it never comes out, you create a hypoxic environment that basically causes whatever is in there to mutate in worse possible form. 

George Meinig wrote a book called Root Canal Cover-Up. He was a root canal guy, an endodontist. Now, the endodontists say that Price's work was discredited a long time ago and that this is complete BS. 

Now, the problem is I have no idea to what degree modern science has adjusted to this. Now, I can't even ask Meinig to what degree has the evolution of endodontal techniques since you wrote the book, to what degree had they changed how we should view this, because he's not alive anymore, and I don't know anyone who can fill his shoes. Look, if you want a personal story on how conflicted I feel about this, I literally have two root canals in the same teeth on each side of my mouth that were the legacy of my veganism.

My suspicion is I wish I could give you a black and white answer. I know that it's not that useful to have an answer that's just nothing but gray zones. But I'm very skeptical of how good root canals are. I'm not so terrified that I'm highly motivated to get the other one taken out even though it probably is the last thing in my life that I should do more research on what to do about. I'm sorry, I can't give you a better answer than that. All I can say is yes, it is justified to be worried about the risks of root canals. I can say this totally unambiguously. What you should absolutely definitely not ever do is make your decisions about something that has any potential to be a root canal situation without a dentist.

The whole point of Price's work was they're serious from whole body health. Price was a pioneer in so many things. This is another one. Now, there's increasing evidence that inflammation in your mouth and decay in your mouth is tied to other diseases. Like periodontitis is tied to heart disease for example. Price was the pioneer of saying that the infections in your mouth are causing other diseases in the rest of your body.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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What does it mean when histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation occur together? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #72

Feb 27, 2020 04:09

Description:

Question: What does it mean when histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation occur together?

Well, if his blood sugar is no longer as stable and he has histamine intolerance, then that drug probably interferes with vitamin B6 metabolism. Let me try to take one minute to see if I can find quick information on this. I can't. I can't find it quickly.

My instinct is to say that the drug is affecting vitamin B6 metabolism on the basis that 80% of the vitamin B6 in the body is used for glycogen metabolism in liver, which is the thing that stabilizes your blood sugar between meals. If your blood sugar is not stable between meals any longer, then yeah, it could be a hormonal thing. What it really probably means is that there's something wrong with the liver's ability to store glycogen or to access the glycogen when it's stored because your blood sugar is stabilized between meals exclusively by the liver's glycogen metabolism.

How does that relate to histamine intolerance? They're both caused by B6 deficiency. That's my take. I'd measure his blood levels of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Off the top my head, I believe LabCorp has a test for that. It would be helpful to look at his excretion of xanthurenate, kynurenate, and quinolinate in organic acids test. The Genova ION has all three of those. I don't think the other one is available to have all three. But every urinary organic acids test has some of those. I would go from there.

I mean, if you want to save money, just trial a pyridoxal 5’-phosphate, which is the active form of B6. Trial a supplement of that to see if it helps. I would do that at, maybe start with 10 milligrams, but feel free to work up slowly over a few weeks to 100 milligrams. If a few weeks at 100 milligrams doesn't treat that and he's off the drug, then there's something else going on and I don't know what it is. But that would definitely be first line thinking for me. Thank you, Jennifer, for your question. I'm glad that was helpful.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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If PTH is mid-normal, do I need a calcium supplement? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #71

Feb 26, 2020 04:41

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Question: If PTH is mid-normal, do I need a calcium supplement?

I'm assuming that by midrange you mean it's 30. If you mean it's 40, then no, you're deficient or you're probably deficient. You need to test how you respond. But what I would say is, it would still be good for you to try increasing that and see if the PTH goes down anymore. Because my baseline for where I suspect that someone's PTH is maximally suppressed is 30. But the evidence that it's maximally suppressed is that it doesn't get suppressed by more calcium and vitamin D. If it goes down in response to calcium and vitamin D, then it wasn't maximally suppressed. Where you want to be is not 30 to 20. It's the point of maximal suppression.

Then the final thing is magnesium deficiency can compromise your ability to make PTH. I don't think that the average person in our society is deficient enough in magnesium for that to be relevant on the basis that population-wide most people have too much PTH. That contributes osteopenia and osteoporosis. But the big caveat here is if you are magnesium-deficient, then that might invalidate most of what I said if you're deficient enough to affect PTH.
If your PTH is around 30 and not higher than that, you're probably fine. But it's good to know your magnesium status because if it's really bad, that could change that interpretation. It's also good to know if adding more calcium suppresses your PTH further, because if it does, that's probably calcium that you need.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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What to do about sky-high pyroglutamate? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #70

Feb 25, 2020 09:37

Description:

Question: What to do about sky-high pyroglutamate?

Pyroglutamate, its other name is 5-oxoproline. It is something that is primarily produced when you are synthesizing glutathione, but you do not have enough of the second step in glutathione synthesis to keep up with the first step.

Maybe you need more glycine, but your glycine isn't low enough to cause orders of magnitude higher pyroglutamate. It's almost certainly the case that you have a glutathione synthetase deficiency, unless you have extraordinary levels of oxidative stress. I think that would be easy to test for because I just can't imagine that your glutathione levels -- I guess it's not that easy to test for because if you have a glutathione synthetase defect, you're going to have bad glutathione levels. If you have a tremendous amount of oxidative stress, you're also going to have low glutathione levels. If you have low glutathione levels, that's going to cause a tremendous amount of oxidative stress.
I think if it's not a glutathione synthetase defect, then it becomes a lot harder to figure out what it is because it probably means you have massive oxidative stress from somewhere and there's a lot of things that could cause that. That would be a potential Pandora's box of questions that would come out of that. But definitely the first step would be to look at glutathione synthetase.
This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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In hemochromatosis, why would ferritin be low but transferrin saturation high? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #69

Feb 24, 2020 07:38

Description:

Question: In hemochromatosis, why would ferritin be low but transferrin saturation high?

Ferritin is your long-term iron storage. Transferrin is your short-term iron storage. The problem with hemochromatosis is that usually in a normal functioning system, there is a hormonal regulatory system that prevents you from absorbing iron from food when you have enough iron that when you have too much iron, shuttle the iron into ferritin which is protective both against pathogens eating the iron to grow and against oxidative stress, which free iron causes, which if you don't know the details about can be thought of as wear and tear on your tissues over time.

In hemochromatosis, normally the way you judge how much iron you have is in the circulating transferrin pool, which is your short-term storage. How full is it? The defect in hemochromatosis is that when the short-term storage, transferrin, starts getting fuller than usual, you don't notice it, so you don't stop absorbing iron from food that makes the transferrin saturation go up even further. But you don't shuttle the iron into ferritin. That makes ferritin lower.

What people get confused by is that historically, we have only paid attention to hemochromatosis when it's too late, when the person has been suffering for it from 30 or 40 years and they need organ transplants. What happens at that point is that the ferritin is very, very high. Why is the ferritin high? Not because you had too much iron. The person without hemochromatosis has the ferritin go up when they have too much iron. The defect in hemochromatosis is that you do not stop absorbing from food when you have enough, and you do not put the iron into ferritin when you have too much.

The reason that ferritin is high in someone who's had hemochromatosis for 30 or 40 years is not because they have too much iron. It is because they have oxidative stress and damage caused by that iron. Oxidative stress and damage cause ferritin to go up no matter how much iron you have. So does infection, no matter how much iron you have. Essentially, what you have is ferritin is not the fireman that he should be to put out the fire as it starts, and the smoke detectors go off. Ferritin hemochromatosis is the cleanup crew who got to the fire after the house burned down.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Does folic acid act differently in the body than natural folate? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #68

Feb 21, 2020 15:53

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Question: Does folic acid act differently in the body than natural folate? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #68

They don't really. Everything that is said bad about folic acid is sort of true to an extent but has been completely exaggerated in some circles. What happens is you have an enzyme called dihydrofolate reductase, or DHFR. Its purpose is not to metabolize synthetic folic acid obviously because that folic acid molecule doesn't exist in the food supply. Its normal purpose is that every time that you use folate to participate in processes outside of methylation, such as DNA synthesis, you wind up producing dihydrofolate as a byproduct. DHFR recycles that and turns it into tetrahydrofolate, or THF. Tetrahydrofolate is what has the methyl group added to make methylfolate.

The question is, does that synthetic folic acid, we call that unmetabolized folic acid, does that cause harm? There are scientific hypotheses that it might, and it might, but there's no conclusive evidence of that. That's one side of the argument against synthetic folic acid. The other side of the argument is now that you are giving the DHFR enzyme more work, that means that might be detracting from the work that it has in recycling dihydrofolate that came out of the DNA synthesis reactions to make tetrahydrofolate.

People think that they just cut out white flour and therefore they're better off. No. You cut out white flour, now you need to do more work to make sure that you are actually getting your nutrients from whole foods because if you were eating six pieces of white toast that you didn't have to worry about getting nutrients from whole foods and now you do.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Can frozen vegetables be trusted for folate? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #67

Feb 20, 2020 02:09

Description:

Question: Can frozen vegetables be trusted for folate?

You absolutely cannot trust frozen vegetables as a source of folate ever. That's because folate is extremely unstable in the freezer, and you have no idea how old the vegetables are. If they were fresh-frozen yesterday, they'd probably have plenty of folate. But if they were fresh-frozen three months ago, they may seem completely fresh and yet they don't have any folate in them.

I'm not a fan of frozen vegetables mainly on the folate issue, on the basis that many people believe they are getting folate from their vegetables. If they're eating frozen vegetables, they may not be. I'm very worried that there are a lot of people out there who believe that they are doing something good by cutting out refined flour from their diet and starting to eat lots of vegetables. But when they come as frozen vegetables, you may be cutting out a lot of folate from the form of synthetic folic acid added to the enriched flour that you had been eating and cut out of your diet and then not getting anything from the frozen vegetables, and that's a recipe for folate deficiency.

There are a lot of people out there who think folic acid is some kind of toxin. It's not a toxin. It's effective at treating folate deficiency. It is effective at preventing neural tube defects. That's why it's added to flour. It is not the ideal form of folate. There's no question about that. But this is like calcium. People are saying that calcium supplements are bad. Well, not as bad as not getting any calcium. It's the same thing with folic acid. Folic acid is not the ideal form of folate, but it's a lot better than a folate deficiency.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #66

Feb 19, 2020 03:25

Description:

Question: How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much?

Cruciferous vegetables have an issue with potential goitrogens. At serving sizes like this, the only issue with cruciferous vegetables is that they increase your iodine requirement. In theory, if you are juicing cruciferous vegetables to have like ten servings a day, in theory, you might get to the point where you cannot overcome the goitrogenic effect with iodine. That is based entirely on animal experiments that were done a long time ago, and we have no human data on where you cross that threshold. But in this case, I think two or three servings of cruciferous vegetables basically just means you need to pay a little bit more attention to your iodine status.

In particular, you want to make sure that you're eating some seafood. If you're eating some seaweed in your diet, you're getting plenty of iodine in most cases. If you're not sure if you're getting enough iodine, then I would say 200 to 400 micrograms of iodine from a kelp powder-based supplement would be fine. Also, as a seasoning, you can get Maine Coast Sea Seasonings where you can just sprinkle seaweed onto your dishes as a flavor. It's like a salt shaker so it's really easy to use. Using that if you don't mind the taste is a great way to get iodine. I think that's really only the main concern there.

The spinach is not a cruciferous vegetable, so it's not really contributing to this problem. It is high in oxalates and so it has its own problem. As long as you're getting calcium with the oxalate, for most people, there are exceptions to this. But if you don't personally have an oxalate issue, meaning a high risk of kidney stones driven by high oxalate levels in your urine or potentially behavioral issues in children some people are tying to oxalates. But if you don't have a specific issue with that, then I think really the only issue with oxalate is you want to make sure that you're consuming calcium in the meal that you're getting it in.

The spinach has calcium, but it's only about 5% bioavailable so you should basically discount the calcium in the spinach. The kale and broccoli have bioavailable calcium. If you're mixing them together, that's probably a great way to do that, but you might not be hitting 300 milligrams of calcium in a meal. I think if you have a lot of oxalate in a meal, you probably really want to make sure you hit 300 milligrams of calcium in that meal.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/30/ask-anything-nutrition-march-4-2019

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Can you give any suggestions for increasing delta-6 desaturase activity? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #64

Feb 17, 2020 02:22

Description:

Question: Can you give any suggestions for increasing delta-6 desaturase activity?

There's a bunch of nutrients involved in that, so many that you basically just need to do a comprehensive nutritional screening for whether something is missing there. You might just have low activity by genetics. It's probably not worth solving that problem.

The big governor though is if you have if you have insulin resistance or you have low insulin levels from chronic carbohydrate restriction, that might increase it. But you also look at your inflammation because you might have some of the higher fatty acids being depleted from inflammation or oxidative stress. I mean, more nutrient-dense diet across the board, more carbohydrate, if that doesn't do it, then just maybe take a supplement or increase the liver and egg yolks to the point where the arachidonic acid is normal. Measure your CRP. If that's high, address inflammation.

In the Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, I have a big section on oxidative stress. I go through that testing. A starting point might be Genova's Oxidative Stress 2.0 blood panel. But if inflammation and oxidative stress are the things, work on those. If those aren't issues, then more nutrient density across the board, fix any nutrient deficiencies you find, increase carbohydrate if you're on low-carb. If none of those things work, then just increase your arachidonic acid level in your diet.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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What are the pros and cons of boosting sulforaphane? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #63

Feb 14, 2020 01:28

Description:

Question: What are the pros and cons of boosting sulforaphane?

Sulforaphane, the nice thing is it promotes detoxification. The bad thing is it raises the need for iodine. I don't know what ratio to take, but you definitely want to make sure that you're getting some kind of iodine into your diet, whether it's through like 200 micrograms of iodine from a kelp powder supplement or you experiment with milligram amounts from a broken up Iodoral tab or whatever. Because I don't know the dose, I'm just going to say work slowly and work your way up. Certainly, if you have any signs of hypothyroidism or you have any brain fog, increase the iodine or decrease the sulforaphane would be my opinion.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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Is it true that we can’t absorb more than 1.5 grams of creatine at one time? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #62

Feb 13, 2020 01:18

Description:

Question: Is it true that we can’t absorb more than 1.5 grams of creatine at one time?

I don't think that's true. From what I looked at, it looked like the absorption of creatine was really, really good. I don't know if someone was arguing maybe that we don't retain more than that. But I think the retention of your muscles is going to be best with creatine if you take it post-workout and if you take it with carbohydrate to stimulate insulin. But on the whole, I think that the absorption and retention is good enough that it's more a matter of how fast will you get to peak muscular creatine than it is about where you get in the long-term.

Maybe if you follow all the best procedures to absorb and retain creatine, you'll get to the 30% increase in muscular creatine in two weeks taking 5 grams a day instead of four weeks. Maybe someone who doesn't follow any best practices takes six weeks. But ten weeks later, you're probably going to be at peak effect if you just take 5 grams of creatine at a time without paying attention to all the details around absorption.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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NMN vs. NR: What’s better? And is TMG necessary? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #61

Feb 12, 2020 07:03

Description:

Question: NMN vs. NR: What’s better? And is TMG necessary?

Yeah. There are no human studies looking at NMN and how it's metabolized. There are studies of NR. No one has showed any positive benefits of supplementing NR in humans yet, but they haven't really done any long-term studies or looked at many things, and they really haven't looked at anything that I would really want to see for NR. They've looked at things like glucose and lipids and other metrics of metabolic health doesn't really do anything for that.

This is what I would say. My strong suspicion is that NMN is not absorbed intact. It's broken down into NR and it's absorbed intact as NR, while NR is just absorbed intact in NR. I believe that both of those supplements are going to lead to NR getting into the liver. I mean, I would use NR because there's more data on NR, and I wouldn't use NMN because there isn't any data on it. But it probably makes no difference at all because they're probably both absorbed as NR.

Maybe if your digestion is weaker, you're going to do better within NR than NMN because you probably almost certainly are not absorbing NMN intact. If you're not digesting it, then you're absorbing less of it. But probably for most people, it makes no difference. I believe that both of these are going to generate NAD levels in the liver much more effectively than nicotinic acid or niacinamide would, the two common niacin supplements that are available on the market now and have been taken for ages. I think it will be better at boosting NAD levels in the liver. I think that will allow the liver to nourish many other tissues in the body to get a better NAD response in those tissues.

My suspicion is that this is going to have a positive effect for anti-aging, for cellular repair. I think it's probably going to have a lot of promise for mental effects in the brain where there's high NAD turnover for neurotransmitter release. I think it's going to have probably really good effects in the gut where there's high NAD turnover because the gut faces so much damage by just being forced to deal with everything that you put into your body, unlike everything after the gut, after absorption, which has really high quality control. I think it's going to be great for skin issues.

I think that in order to get the best NAD response and to tax the methylation system the least, you want to take a smaller dose with every meal rather than taking a higher dose once. I would take like 150 milligrams max at a meal. If you're going to take 450 milligrams, I'd take 150 at each of three meals. If you want to take less than that, you either use the powder or empty half of it out in a capsule. Like take half the capsule, empty it out into your mouth with a meal, 150-milligram capsule to do that. It will give you 75 milligrams. Take that three times a day.

Then there's no good test to really see whether it's doing anything for you. You really have to judge it by your response. Are you getting tangible benefits from it? If so, then I think it's fine to keep it up. But yeah, I would take 100 milligrams of TMG for every 200 milligrams of nicotinamide riboside or nicotinamide mononucleotide. Personally, I wouldn't use the NMN and use the NR because there's more data on it. 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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What to do about cataracts | Masterjohn Q&A Files #60

Feb 11, 2020 07:33

Description:

Question: What to do about cataracts.

Carl Rayner says, "Cataract in one eye becoming noticeable. This eye had a posterior detachment about 11 years ago, which is basically healed. I've been on a low-carb diet for over 40 years. Eat raw cream cheese, eggs, meat and liver. In the past few years, adding fasting and more keto diet. Saw your thoughts about glutathione on the cheat sheet and interview with Wendy Myers. Am I on the right track and what else could I do? Grain intolerant. What testing beyond normal tests might be helpful?"

I believe that cataracts in the eye are largely driven by the glycation of lens proteins. The glycation of lens proteins is largely driven by methylglyoxal, which I did my doctoral dissertation on. In direct contradiction to much of the low-carbohydrate literature, glycation is not all driven by carbs. Methylglyoxal is quantitatively the most important source of advanced glycation end products in the body.

Methylglyoxal can be derived from glucose, or it can be derived from ketones, or it can be derived from protein. No one has ever done a very good study to determine whether you have more methylglyoxal on a ketogenic diet versus a high-carb diet. But there was one poorly designed study where they took a small handful of people. They said, "Here's the Atkins diet, new diet," Or what is it called? Atkins New Diet Revolution or whatever that book was called. They said, "Here, read this, go forth and do it." They went home, presumably they read the book or part of it, and they tried to do it. They came back, they lost weight, they had elevated ketones and guess what? They also had significantly higher methylglyoxal.

Also, everything in the pathway that leads from ketones to methylglyoxal was elevated. I would say the data were very strong that in those people, they had higher levels of methylglyoxal because they had higher ketone levels that were generating it. They went on the Atkins diet, and they worsened their glycation risk by making a lot more of the thing that causes most advanced glycation end products and the thing that is probably overwhelmingly driving cataracts. But they didn't show any health consequences, and they certainly didn't measure cataracts in that study because that wasn't the point of it.

They left more questions than answers. For example, what if they had a control group that lost the same amount of weight on a high-carb diet? My suspicion is that methylglyoxal would have gone up during weight loss but just not as much. I also think that if those people stabilized their new weight and then they worked carbs back into their diet, their methylglyoxal would go back down. In fact, I have a consulting client who developed cataracts that corresponded very well with when he started intermittent fasting. He did have poor glutathione status. We were able to improve his glutathione status, but the cataracts didn't go away.

Todd Becker asks, "How do you test methylglyoxal levels?" You don't. You become a guinea pig in a lab because doing a study on it. That's about it. Look, I'm not against keto and I'm not against intermittent fasting. But if you're specifically talking about dealing with cataracts, you're probably not going to get the cataract to go away, but you probably can stop them from getting worse and stop them from forming. I think intermittent fasting and keto is probably going in the wrong direction.

One thing that I do think, I don't think you're going to measure your methylglyoxal levels, but I think you should test your glutathione levels because glutathione is what detoxifies methylglyoxal. If you listen to my riboflavin podcast, we talked about cataracts being a sign of riboflavin deficiency and also being one of the things that's being investigated for whether riboflavin supplementation can help it.

Why does riboflavin supplementation help that? For the exact same reason as when I went on that big, longwinded answer about glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency at the beginning, the riboflavin is there to boost glutathione recycling. I think the whole story, all these pieces knit together to a very, very, very nice story, clean story saying what you want in your eye to avoid cataracts from forming and getting worse, forming in the first place and getting worse, is you want low levels of methylglyoxal in your lenses. How do you get that? You have very good glutathione status.

The keto thing is a maybe. There's no maybe that maybe keto makes that better, but there's a maybe that maybe keto makes that worse. You can't test the glutathione levels in your lens proteins, but you can test the glutathione levels in your blood. I would use the cheat sheet in a very targeted way for everything that's relevant to your glutathione status. I would follow the recommendations in there about how to boost your glutathione status. I would use your blood levels of glutathione as a metric.

Rather than getting them in the normal range, I would try to get them as high within the normal range as you can, and titrate your approaches according to what works. Test it every couple of months, make one very important change. Well, actually, follow all the steps in optimizing glutathione status right now or all the ones you're willing to do. Follow them for eight weeks, test glutathione status, get a baseline glutathione if you can, but eight weeks of all my suggestions or whatever you're willing to do with them. Retest the glutathione, see if it helped. If it helped, then tweak one thing at a time after that. Do that one thing very consistently and stably for four to eight weeks. Retest glutathione.

Whatever I said for glutathione, also consider maybe supplementing with high-dose riboflavin in there. Maybe 100 milligrams of riboflavin at each meal, I would probably revise my glutathione recommendations in the cheat sheet to include that as a possibility. Yeah, optimize against glutathione and consider riboflavin supplementation. Be very open-minded about the carbs, the keto and the fasting because those might be great for many things, but they're definitely not optimal for glutathione and methylglyoxal. Thanks, Carl.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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What can be done nutritionally to specifically improve antiviral immunity?

Feb 11, 2020 02:05

Description:

Question: What can be done nutritionally to specifically improve antiviral immunity?

Certainly, the fat-soluble vitamins, vitamins A and D, both important. Lauric acid as a fat. Coconut oil might be a good fat choice for the fat in your diet. Monolaurin would be a very good choice for a supplement. Lauricidin is the best monolaurin to take, 3 to 10 grams a day. Be careful of your bowel tolerance, spread it out among your meals, and cut back if it starts to loosen your stool.

Elderberry, which has mostly been studied in the context of flu, that probably has good antiviral properties.

Garlic. Garlic appears to require very high doses if you're just taking a garlic extract. If you're taking stabilized allicin, 180 micrograms a day is good. But you could raise the question what if you're missing on some of the other important compounds in the garlic. I'll debate with some of my friends about that, but what's really been tested is 180 micrograms of stabilized allicin.

Then zinc for sure in the immune response is super important.

Then you get back to nutrient density. Although I'd give special importance to vitamins A and D, arachidonic acid just mentioned, zinc and copper, both, and then those supplements. If you're missing any one particular nutrient, then you're going to wind up with a specific vulnerability that will persist until you fix that one nutrient. Thanks, anonymous.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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If free T3 looks good, why is TSH still a little high? Why hasn't the T3 brought it down enough? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #59

Feb 10, 2020 05:13

Description:

Question: If free T3 looks good, why is TSH still a little high? Why hasn't the T3 brought it down enough?

Your thyroid gland makes thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormone increases your metabolic rate and does a lot of related things. Your hypothalamus is governing that by controlling your pituitary, the master endocrine gland, and its secretion of TSH, which is what controls the thyroid gland and makes it make more thyroid hormone.

The way that the feedback occurs is that the circulating T4 is converted to T3 inside the cells of the pituitary. That is what suppresses the production of TSH, which is basically the pituitary monitoring the thyroid hormone levels to know whether the thyroid has done its job. If the pituitary, the master endocrine gland, decides that the thyroid has done its job, it takes down TSH, the signal to make more thyroid hormone.

You really are not looking at whether the free T3 is suppressing the TSH. Ninety percent of that suppression comes from circulating T4 that's converted to T3 inside the pituitary gland. You really are looking at whether the T4 is on the high end of normal or not. 

If your reverse T3 is on the higher end of normal, then that explains it. You basically have your brain telling your thyroid gland that it needs more thyroid hormone, but you have much of the rest of your body deciding that it's not in the position to carry out the effects on the metabolic rate that the thyroid hormone is demanding. It's converting the thyroid hormone into reverse T3, which is basically a thyroid antagonist.

If your reverse T3 is high, then I think you want to look at things like calorie intake, carb intake, and stress levels because I think those are the main things that might make your body want to resist the signal of thyroid hormone by making the reverse T3. If the reverse T3 is good, meaning it's pretty low, then I think that means that there is something either in your brain, specifically in the hypothalamus or in the pituitary or somewhere in the combination where they're just deciding that your body needs more thyroid hormone than you have.

My suspicion is that that's going to relate to how sensitive your cells are to the thyroid hormone, if your cells are somewhat resistant. Remember in the last AMA, this got brought up, and I talked about zinc deficiency and high free fatty acids being the primary things that are going to reduce sensitivity to thyroid hormone or cellular uptake. There are some indications that high free fatty acids might also decrease cellular uptake, but not much is known about what governs cellular uptake.

In fact, there are some genetic variations in cellular uptake. If the thyroid hormone levels are high in your blood because they're not getting into the cells, then that could easily explain everything. It's just that your problem seems pretty moderate because you're not saying that your thyroid hormones are sky high and your TSH is sky high. You're just saying everything is a little on the high side of normal.

It sounds like there's not a big problem, but that something somewhere your body is determining that you need a little bit more thyroid hormone. If you can address zinc, free fatty acids, and I would address zinc and free fatty acids as the top things, unless the reverse T3 is high, target carbs, calories, and stress.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

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What food supplements and training programs are good for developing muscle mass?

Jan 31, 2020 04:21

Description:

Question: What food supplements and training programs are good for developing muscle mass?

 

Overwhelmingly, what matters for muscle mass is working out, eating enough protein, and eating enough calories. 

 

You want to try and hit 10-20 sets per muscle group per week with eat set hitting within 80% of failure. So, if your doing a set of 8 reps but you could have done 20 reps with your chosen weight, that doesn’t count. You would want to pick a weight that you can lift no more than 10 times. Ideally, you’ll do some sets in the 5-rep range, 10-rep range, and 15-rep range. 

 

For protein, you probably want to be up around 1 gram per pound of body weight or per pound of target body weight. 

 

Then calories, you do need a caloric excess, but you don't want to get fat. If you know how many calories you need to be weight-stable, I recommend titrating the calories up 100 calories a day and then track your progress if you are gaining waist circumference. I know this is a little bit harder when you're a woman because you're going to have more fluctuations in water weight, but in terms of simple things to do to track your progress, waist circumference is valuable, and looking in the mirror is valuable.

 

If you can get an actual Bod Pod or DEXA scan, then that would give you more reliable information. There's a device called Skulpt. It's bioimpedance, I believe, but it's taking it at many different points where you take so much data that it actually becomes pretty accurate, but it's very time-consuming. Anyway, take your choice of what you're going to use to track your progress.

 

If you're not gaining any fat, you can very slowly add your total calories. If you are gaining fat, you need to cut back on the calories. But you need to have a caloric excess to maximize your muscle gains. That right there is probably 90% of it and anything else is probably completely pointless unless you are a very good athlete, in which case you're going to be looking for what's the next.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

 

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Should I manage my total cholesterol of 305 just for my doctor or should I be doing it for my own sake? If so, how should I do it?

Jan 30, 2020 11:48

Description:

Question: Should I manage my total cholesterol of 305 just for my doctor or should I be doing it for my own sake? If so, how should I do it?

 

You should want to improve your lipid profile for a lot more than to please your doctor.

 

Let's revisit this from a cholesterol skeptic point of view. Uffe Ravnskov, he wrote a book called The Cholesterol Myths. In that book, he shows a graph from the Framingham study where he maps out the people who have heart disease and the people who don't. If you look at that graph, one thing that you see is that everyone who had total cholesterol over 300 had heart disease and no one who didn't have heart disease had cholesterol that high.

 

Look, the only way to have a total cholesterol of 300 or more in most cases is to either have a thyroid disorder or to have a familial hyperlipidemia. We're talking about fasting levels here. You should want to manage your blood lipids for your own sake because people with familial hypercholesterolemia have a dramatically increased risk of having heart disease decades earlier than it becomes normal for the general population. 

 

I'm not saying it's 100% certain that if you have a cholesterol of 300 you will have heart disease, but you are way disproportionate in risk for that reason. You definitely want to address this for the sake of your health.

 

I think that if you have weight to lose, that losing weight should be one of the first things that you do to normalize your blood lipids and your inflammation. Being overweight also contributes to elevated free fatty acids, and elevated free fatty acids do raise your blood lipids. That's, in fact, the entire rationale of using high-dose niacin to lower LDL-C is by suppressing free fatty acid release.

 

It’s also important to address any inflammation in your gut. You might have microbiome issues, and working more high-fiber vegetables into your diet and diversifying across the different plant fibers is a great way to nourish your microbiome, reduce inflammation that comes from the intestines that would negatively affect your blood lipids.

 

If these things that we just talked about aren't enough to get the blood lipids into the normal range, then I think you want to experiment with eating more carbohydrate and a low-fat diet, but selecting those foods to maintain nutrient density. You could add something like psyllium husk fiber , which might be both good for your gut and the inflammation coming from your gut. It will also help reduce your cholesterol by making bile acids go into your feces and making your liver draw cholesterol from the blood.

 

If those natural things don't get your blood lipids into the normal range, then I think that you should consider being open to pharmacological methods. I've gone through all the cholesterol-skeptic literature and I'm against demonizing cholesterol. I do not believe that high cholesterol is the cause of heart disease.

 

But if your lipids are that high, it's overwhelmingly because you are not clearing them from the blood, and not clearing them from the blood is the single most important risk factor for them oxidizing, and them oxidizing does cause heart disease. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

 

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Do you have any recommendations on how to get enough calcium on a low-carb, no-dairy diet?

Jan 29, 2020 02:59

Description:

Question: "Do you have any recommendations on how to get enough calcium on a low-carb, no-dairy diet? I've read that vegetables provide calcium, but bioavailability is poor."

 

The bioavailability of calcium from different vegetables is highly dependent on the specific vegetables. 

 

Cruciferous vegetables have very good bioavailability. It's better than from milk. Spinach has like close to zero bioavailability. It's terrible and you shouldn't even count it. Nuts and seeds have about 20% of the calcium being absorbed. If you compare that to milk --- milk is probably going to be like 30% or 40%. Cruciferous vegetables are going to be like 50% or 55%.

 

The real problem is the volume. If you look at broccoli or kale and you look at how much volume of those foods do you need to eat in order to get 1000 to 1500 milligrams of calcium a day, which is the target, it's a ridiculously high volume. 

 

I'm a bit skeptical that you want to eat more than say 200 or 300 grams measured cooked of those foods a day because they're increasing your iodine requirement. At some point, they become a liability for your thyroid gland. I think it's best to eat two or three servings of those cruciferous vegetables a day, and that's basically maxing out the calcium that you can get from them. You're just not going to get anywhere near the 1000- to 1500-milligram target.

 

A low carbohydrate, non dairy containing diet is emulating the traditional diets of the Arctic where plant foods were very limited. How did they get their calcium? They crushed up fish bones. They freeze-dried fish bones, they pulverized them, and they ate the bone powder.

Bone meal is a traditional food. Some consider it as a supplement but it is the historic source of calcium in traditional diets that were low-carb.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

 

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What should people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency be doing not just about glutathione, but about folate, vitamin K, fatty acids, and neurotransmitters?

Jan 28, 2020 14:21

Description:

Question: What should people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency be doing not just about glutathione, but about folate, vitamin K, fatty acids, and neurotransmitters?

 

G6PD, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, is an inborn error of metabolism. It's the most common one in the world. About 8% globally have some impairment in this enzyme. The reason that it's important is because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is the enzyme that allows you to make NADPH, which is a specific derivative of niacin that's involved in antioxidant defense, detoxification, synthesis of neurotransmitters, and synthesis of nucleotides, which are needed for cell division because they're parts of DNA.

 

Someone with G6PD deficiency is vulnerable to hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells, because of glutathione deficiency. Glutathione reductase uses energy and NADPH, the thing that you can't make, to recycle glutathione. But it also uses riboflavin. So, one of the adaptations that someone with this impairment has to try to protect themselves is for the glutathione reductase enzyme to hog all the riboflavin so that it says, "I don't have enough of the raw material I need to make this happen, so I'm just going to make myself get way better at using what I do have." That's an adaptation to compensate for not being able to make NADPH is just to get way better at using NADPH to recycle glutathione.

 

Supplementing glutathione is not necessarily a bad idea. You just have to be aware that at a certain point you just can't solve every one of the dozens of problems that are happening. I think that you should measure your glutathione status. Probably the best test available, not because it's the best we could have available but because there's nothing better right now, is LabCorp's test for glutathione. If that looks low, then I would supplement with glutathione to try to bring that up to normal. 

 

For the folate recycling, you have to consider this basically as if you had a really bad MTHFR polymorphism because G6PD is needed to make the NADPH that MTHFR uses, again, with the help of riboflavin to make the methyl group on methylfolate. You can take some methylfolate, but as I've made the point in my MTHFR protocol at chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation, you have to take 18,000 times the RDA to compensate for the 18,000 times a day that you add a methyl group to the folate molecule using that enzyme. It's not safe to take anywhere near that much folate.

 

What I would do is just very strictly follow the MTHFR protocol that I have at chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation, and that involves doubling your choline intake because you don't need NADPH to use choline to support methylation. Just as if MTHFR didn't work because of genetics and not enzyme, what you would do is you double your choline utilization for methylation because you're not good at using folate. 

 

On recycling vitamin K, it probably just means that you need a high amount of vitamin K in your diet. I think it's probably similar as if you had a bad VKOR polymorphism. VKOR is the enzyme that recycles vitamin K using NADPH that you got from this pathway that's not working right when you have G6PD deficiency.

 

In terms of all this stuff that you are not good at synthesizing, like cholesterol, fatty acids, nucleotides, and neurotransmitters, I think the only thing that you can do for that is to try to eat a lot of these things preformed. That means eating a diet rich in relatively lean animal foods because they have a lot of preformed stuff, like cholesterol, in them and mainly in the flesh, not the fat. With plants, you want to eat mostly fibrous vegetables because they are highly cellular and rich in nutrients that you can’t make.

 

You don't want to go extremely low-fat, but if you eat a diet fairly rich in animal foods, you're going to get a lot of the specific fatty acids that you can't make. A high-fat diet is mostly giving you just a bunch of fat that you could have made yourself.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

 

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If my tryptophan is low, and I'm on a low-carb diet, would you recommend 5-HTP supplements or tryptophan supplements or both?

Jan 27, 2020 03:26

Description:

Question: If my tryptophan is low, and I'm on a low-carb diet, would you recommend 5-HTP supplements or tryptophan supplements or both?

 

There are multiple reasons why tryptophan could be low. It could be that you are not eating enough protein, or it could be that you have a high utilization of the tryptophan. I would look in the test and see if the 5-hydroxyindoleacetate is elevated — because if it is, then that would suggest high serotonin production, and that might explain the low tryptophan.

 

If that is the case, you may want to look into other explanations. In this particular case, we have talked about high estrogen levels and how they might be one of those things. In which case the root cause is the high estrogen levels and you need to address it at that level.

 

Repleting the tryptophan maybe isn't necessarily the goal unless you have symptoms that are related to low tryptophan levels. If you're overproducing serotonin, if anything, you might have symptoms that are more related to high serotonin levels. 

 

You might not have any symptoms that are related to low melatonin levels, which is downstream from serotonin, in which case the main negative effect of depleting the tryptophan would probably be related to niacin because tryptophan is used to synthesize niacin — in which case the goal would probably be best served by supplementing niacin instead of tryptophan. 

 

Something to note: if you're trying to put on lean mass and it's not working, it could theoretically conceivably be possible that serotonin overproduction would be depleting the tryptophan to the point where you didn't have enough tryptophan to put on the lean mass you want.




If the tryptophan is being diverted into serotonin, that's why it's low, again, judgeable by whether 5-hydroxyindoleacetic is elevated, then it makes no sense to put 5-HTP into the system because your problem isn't that you have low serotonin. If anything, it's that you have a high serotonin. 

 

The only other explanation I would say is if you have a low protein intake, you might need to increase your protein intake. But if that were the case, you would probably see other amino acids more across the board that were depleted and not just tryptophan. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

 

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What to do if signs and symptoms of zinc deficiency persist despite taking 75 mg zinc gluconate per day.

Jan 24, 2020 01:43

Description:

Question: What to do if signs and symptoms of zinc deficiency persist despite taking 75 mg zinc gluconate per day.

 

You should do plasma zinc. 

 

Also you know I kind of wonder whether you're taking that right. So if you're taking 75 milligrams of zinc like at one time then it's not surprising because you're absorbing like seven of those milligrams. The rest you are not. 

 

To maximize absorption take them on an empty stomach in 10-15 mg which is typically the smallest dose available. 

 

If you're doing that and the signs, the deficiency persist they're persisting when you're taking that, then it probably isn’t zinc related.

 

If they're persisting until you take that and it goes away, then either you aren't absorbing the zinc well, or you're not taking it right. Those are the two things. 

 

If you're not absorbing it well it could be a general malabsorption disorder, something causing loss of bile, or a polymorphism or genetic impairment in a zinc transporter, or low methylation which all can affect zinc transporters.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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What to do about high arsenic.

Jan 23, 2020 24

Description:

Question: Is a high value of arsenic a concern?

 

Yes, arsenic is a toxin. You probably don’t want a lot of it, if it's just a little high it might not cause terrible damage.

 

I would look at methylation if I saw high arsenic, because methylation is needed to get rid of arsenic.

 

Oh actually I should add that methylation supplements have been shown to help arsenic detoxification in areas of the world where arsenic was a serious concern.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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Are low total omega-6 levels on the ION panel a cause for concern?

Jan 22, 2020 26

Description:

Question Are low polyunsaturated omega-6 values on the ION test a concern?

 

Not the total, but if the arachidonic acid levels are low I would look at low arachidonic acid intake, or inflammation, or oxidative stress. It would concern me because arachidonic acid is important to a lot of physiological functions, but I don't care about the total omega-6.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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What to do when high selenium levels won’t come down, even if you’ve stopped supplementing.

Jan 21, 2020 21

Description:

Question: When high selenium does not come down in response dietary efforts and cessation of supplementation, what's going on?

 

Either there's high levels of selenium in the soil where your food is grown, or you have low methylation because methylation is needed to get rid of excess selenium.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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When should you take creatine, if you don’t have an MTHFR SNP?

Jan 20, 2020 38

Description:

Question: Creatine, when is it recommend that if you don't have the MTHFR SNP that causes methylation problems?

 

1.)When you want to improve your physique.

 

2.)When you want to improve your athletic performance.

 

3.)When you have a rare creatine synthesis disorder.

 

4.)If you have depression, it might help.

 

5.) If you have any signs that something else is messing with your methylation even though your genetics don't explain it.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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When to take tryptophan on a ketogenic diet.

Jan 17, 2020 48

Description:

Question: When should tryptophan be taken on a keto diet? Night, day, both?

 

Presumably you're doing this to try to increase tryptophan getting into the brain. 

 

The best thing to do is to take it two to three hours away from other protein. 

 

The second consideration is if you have an allotment of carbs that you concentrate at one time of day, then it would be best to take the tryptophan then. With the caveat being if you’re eating protein with the carbs. In that case it would be best to take it away from the protein + carb meal. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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Alex Leaf answers a question about creatine non-responders and methylation.

Jan 16, 2020 01:22

Description:

Question: Do you think there are true non-responders to creatine, or do you think that those apparent non-responders have some defects in methylation that makes typical doses of creatine sufficient only for other needs.

 

Alex Leaf would be a great person to ask about this and he's not here right now… 

 

[Alex appears] Alex, so Jen's question is are there true non-responders to creatine or do you just think that non-responders likely have some defect of methylation. It means the typical doses of creatine are only sufficient for their needs.

 

Alex: I don't think that methylation is going to be relevant here. When you look at responders and non-responders, the difference seems to be in their ability to uptake creatine into muscle cells from the serum. So, it's very unlikely be related to methylation and it has to probably do with differences in creatine transporter abilities across cell membranes.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/


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How to bring up low levels of arachidonic acid.

Jan 15, 2020 01:03

Description:

Question: How do I bring up low levels of arachidonic acid? Should I supplement with 250 milligrams? What brand is there from well-known company?

 

If you want 250 milligrams of arachidonic acid, eat an egg. I don't know anything about arachidonic acid supplements yet, except that they exist because you can eat eggs and you'll get plenty. Do you want to try the supplement? Well you can, but I don’t think it’s necessary. 

 

You eat two eggs a day already, so eat four. 

 

The oxidative stress and inflammation will consume the arachidonic acid, so look at that too.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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How to interpret the pattern of high citrate, low cis-aconitate, low glutamate, and high glutamine.

Jan 14, 2020 01:25

Description:

Question: How to interpret the pattern of high citrate, low cis-aconitate, low glutamate, and high glutamine.

 

The aconitate and citric acid are markers on the citric acid cycle where we metabolize most of our energy. If citric acid is high and isocitric acid is low, (this must be the Great Plains Test which doesn't have isocitrate/cis-aconitate) that would indicate oxidative stress.

 

In terms of the glutamate being low --- if your glutamate is low and your glutamine is on the high side, then you probably have ammonia generation from somewhere that you're mopping up with glutamate. That would be my guess, but that's another can of worms to open.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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Nutritional strategies for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) deficiency.|

Jan 13, 2020 03:46

Description:

Question: What are the best ways to optimize glutathione status for someone who has a G6PD deficiency?

 

Riboflavin was shown to be of benefit for normalizing oxidative stress in people who have glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

 

So for people who don't know what this is G6PD is, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase is an enzyme that you use to take energy from glucose specifically, you can't take it from anything else, and you use it to recycle glutathione which is a master antioxidant of the cell. 

 

You also need this to support the recycling of vitamin K and folate and you need this for synthesis of neurotransmitters among other things.

 

But the big problem with G6PD deficiency is that you can have a lot of things go sideways when you can’t use this pathway. Red blood cells become more vulnerable to hemolysis and that is a result of oxidative stress from poor glutathione recycling in the red blood cell. 

 

One of the adaptive responses to having G6PD deficiency is the glutathione reductase enzyme -- which is the enzyme that uses riboflavin and niacin to recycle glutathione with the energy taken from G6PD. 

 

That enzyme -- glutathione reductase -- it develops a voracious appetite for riboflavin that makes all the riboflavin that won't go anywhere else, get sucked up into that enzyme. So basically you become very dependent on riboflavin support of glutathione reductase because you have lost G6PD, the enzyme that's involved in passing the energy on to riboflavin in glutathione reductase.

 

There's probably no harm to starting at 400 milligrams of riboflavin a day, but if you feel like you want to be more cautious about it, I'd start at 5 or 10 milligrams a day, test the effect on glutathione status.

 

You know in this case I think you want to look at erythrocyte glutathione status, I don't usually recommend that test, but it might be a more relevant test specifically for this condition. 

 

What I would usually recommend for glutathione status would be plasma levels of glutathione. I also think LabCorp does whole blood glutathione. 



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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How much fatty fish should you eat?

Jan 10, 2020 57

Description:

Question: Are there diminishing returns in the amount of fish in a weekly diet? I know you mentioned eating fish about twice a week. I've been trying to eat salmon once a day. Is there an ideal ratio of fish to non-fish protein you should aim for?

 

There's not a lot of data backing that up and the data we have is pretty poor quality. But I'm of the mind that the diminishing returns come after one or two servings of fatty fish per week. I think if you're talking about white fish it's different. But I am referring to salmon or mackerel — I think once a week or twice a week is good. 

 

As for white fish — it's not as different from meat as you might think, the real big difference in my view is there are some different, like there's selenium and iodine among other things. The big difference in salmon, mackerel, and other fatty fish, versus lean fish versus meat is the type of fat. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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How to deal with the fact that blood tests for nutritional status aren’t adapted to children.

Jan 9, 2020 01:27

Description:

Question: How to deal with the fact that blood tests for nutritional status aren’t adapted to children?

 

There aren't childhood-based ranges that are data-driven. So what if the ranges need to be a little bit different in children?

 

The approach in the Cheat Sheet is not to rely exclusively on ranges, it's also to look at the diet and lifestyle analysis and to look at signs and symptoms. 

 

So what you do is you piece together: does the diet and lifestyle analysis, the blood lab, and the signs and symptoms all say deficiency X, too much Y. Then that's very good information and what you do is you intervene on the basis of what seems probable and you monitor the outcome.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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Matt stone and the “overdeification” of vitamin A. Or, are there many people who are vitamin A deficient? Hypersensitivity reactions, fatty liver, overzealous use of cod liver oil, and other concerns.

Jan 8, 2020 06:40

Description:

Question: I just saw an email from Matt Stone referring to the overly deified nutrient vitamin A. Also, a few Weston A. Price Foundation bloggers are starting to spread the word about being sick on a high vitamin A diet. Any thoughts about this and comments about Vitamin A being toxic?

 

You shouldn't deify any nutrient, right? Any point of view that breaks down the world into good and bad molecules, is a doomed-to-failure point of view because molecules don't have virtues. 

 

Everything is about context. Too much vitamin A cannot be defined outside of context. Not just what your needs are, not just what your genetics are, not just what your turnover rate is, not just whether you are getting pregnant, but also the presence of other things in the diet. For example, vitamins D, E, and K, which will affect the vitamin A requirement because they all regulate each other's breakdown.

 

Some people have too much Vitamin A. Some people take more vitamin A than they should. There's dozens of case reports of vitamin A toxicity, but there's no evidence that people at normal intakes who are not supplementing are getting inflammation from consuming dietary levels of vitamin A.

 

The RDA is 3,000 IU. If you're correcting deficiency, 10,000 IU is highly reasonable over a short period of time. On the other hand, if you have someone who has a very long history of taking vitamin A supplements at 30,000, 40,000, 50,000 IU over 3 years, then, yeah, they might have all kinds of problems from that because they're taking too much. Toxicity is also way more likely if they're not taking vitamin D, vitamin E, or vitamin K.

 

There's nothing remotely controversial about that; no reason to question it. 

 

There are probably a lot of people in Weston A. Price who think that more of a good thing is better, and I know for a fact that many people were taking two or three tablespoons of high-vitamin cod liver oil for many years. That was nuts then and it's nuts now; they’re getting too many fat-soluble vitamins and too many polyunsaturated fatty acids from high levels of cod liver oil like that. 

 

But again, 3 to 10,000 IU, even long-term, there's no evidence of toxicity. Some people are going to be intolerant. I know anecdotes of people who take vitamin A at very low doses and it causes some hypersensitivity reaction. I don't know what causes it. So there will be stories of people who improve when they take the vitamin A out of their diets. It will happen, it makes sense.

 

And on top of that there are epidemic proportions of people with fatty liver. What happens when fatty liver gets bad? The cells that store vitamin A in the liver dump their vitamin A into the bloodstream so they can transform into cells that lay scar tissue down in the liver. So people with fatty liver, which is about three-quarters of people who are obese, right, so about 70 million Americans, maybe more now, have fatty liver disease. Some proportion of them are laying down scar tissue in their livers and they are losing the ability to properly store and metabolize vitamin A.

 

Could taking vitamin A out of the diet for them help? Probably, but it's a very tough place to be in because those people are going to have cellular vitamin A deficiency. So it's like, do you save the liver or do you save everything else? It makes sense to temporarily withdraw vitamin A, but really you need to just fix the obesity and fatty liver disease, then restore vitamin A that is needed.

 

I have no problem saying that some people take too much vitamin A and that it can be toxic, but there are people going around right now saying that vitamin A is intrinsically toxic, and those people are absolutely nuts. That's flat-Earth level thinking that it's just intrinsically toxic and not a vitamin.

 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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Is it ok to mix carbs and fat?

Jan 7, 2020 07:07

Description:

Question: Is it ok to mix carbs and fat? There are a lot of people on the internet that claim the Randle cycle is behind America being fat, since the standard American diet is mixed in fats and carbs. Yet, I feel great on a diet of about 30% protein, 30% fat, and 40% carbs, based on meat, potatoes, fruits, and vegetables. 

 

The randle cycle addresses why you would have elevated fatty acids or hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia due to competition. You're more likely to have circulating energy supplies in your blood due to poor tissue uptake when you're consuming carbs and fats together, and you're more likely to be more dependent on a higher insulin response.

 

This doesn't mean that mixing them causes diabetes, it just means that there is more substrate competition and that, all else equal, if someone is on the edge of diabetes eating a mixed diet increases the probability that they're going to go over that edge because of the substrate competition contributing to hyperglycemia and the greater insulin requirement than someone who's on a low-carb or low-fat diet.

 

If you have no evidence of metabolic dysfunction on a mixed diet, then there's no issue.

 

Most Americans are fat because of caloric balance. Thinking that the glycemic or insulin response to eating plays a role in body fat gain is the same erroneous thinking that Taubes makes. There’s an element of truth in Taube’s carb-centric model, in that some people are going to eat more food in response to a high-carb diet if they have blood sugar problems. But that isn’t the norm.

 

To say that the Randle cycle is the cause of obesity is making the same mistake because it’s focusing on the glycemic and insulin responses to eating instead of overall energy balance. What makes you fat is eating too much food. 

 

The only thing that you should change about the calories in calories out (CICO) hypothesis, on a practical level, is to say that it tells you very little about the behavioral modifications that someone needs to make to sustain the caloric deficit over time.

 

So, why do people get fat? I largely endorse Stephan Guyenet's view: it's basically the proliferation of hyperpalatable food. A mixed diet leverages the principle of creating a hyperpalatable diet by mixing carbs and fat, but your diet doesn't sound hyperpalatable.

 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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What are “parent essential oils”? Should we get these instead of cold-water fish oils? Response to Brian Peskin’s theory.

Jan 6, 2020 04:53

Description:

Question: Can you explain what parent essential oils are? I was given some articles that seemed to be saying that high-dose cold-water fish oils are damaging to cell membranes and mitochondrial function.

 

"Parent essential oil" is a term invented by Brian Peskin, who looked at some  data that said it's not clear that supplementing with fish oil is good for you because doing so can cause oxidative stress and cause damage to cells.

 

That's true because the highly unsaturated oils found in fish oil, as well as in liver and egg yolks, are highly vulnerable to being damaged. This includes the physiologically essential omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, and omega-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. 

 

But that damage comes only when you eat too much. This is where I think Peskin is wrong, because he took that data and concluded that you don’t want to eat any of these oils. Instead, you should eat oils like flaxseed that provide the “parent” fatty acids that your body turns into DHA and arachidonic acid.

 

But the parent oils are prone to being damaged too, just to a lesser extent. On a gram to gram basis, they are safer, but you need to eat a ton of parent oils to get the physiological requirement for DHA and arachidonic acid. So, on a daily requirement basis, the parent essential oils are going to be way more damaging.

 

I recommend simply taking a small amount of arachidonic acid and DHA, since then you fulfill your requirements regardless of genetics or the environment or whatever could impede the transformation of parent oils to these physiologically essential oils. High-dose fish oil is ridiculous, and risky, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consume any. 



How to use an Oura ring to monitor HRV and optimize recovery and performance.

Jan 3, 2020 03:09

Description:

Question: What are your thoughts on monitoring HRV for optimizing performance?

 

Measure your HRV every night and you stop exercising entirely to get a baseline. 

 

You completely stop working out, you don't go “oh no I'm going to lose my muscle mass,” nothing's going to happen for a week or two. And this is the whole foundation of you having good data.

 

This baseline ensures that you have good starting data that isn’t influenced by anything. 

 

Now you start working out. You do one workout that's typical, you keep taking your HRV, you may see your HRV plummet. Then you say, how long does it take me to recover on my current diet and lifestyle?

 

You repeat that, like you don't work out again until it's back up to the plateau level. Then you work out again and you see if you have a repeatable response where there's a certain amount of time on average that's fairly replicable that it takes you to recover your peak HRV after your typical workout. Then when you have that you get on that frequency.

 

You can then start playing around with factors — like does it matter what type of workout I do? Is my recovery level consistently different when I lift weights at 5 reps per set versus 15 reps per set. Is my recovery time consistently different when I do cardio, or when I do cardio and weights on the same day, or when I play soccer. Then you can start to tailor your recovery time around the specific workouts.

 

Maybe it takes you two days to recover from one workout and four days recovering from another. Lower body, upper body, if you have a lower body upper body split, does it take me five days to recover the lower body and does it take me three days to recover from upper body?

 

At that point you can start tweaking diet and lifestyle. Do I recover faster if I eat more carbs? Do I recover faster if I eat food X?  Do it recover faster if I take supplement X? Always testing one thing at a time and making sure it's replicable before you form a conclusion before you do the next test.



Concerns about vitamin A in pregnancy

Jan 2, 2020 02:51

Description:

Question: Why did the FDA have a vitamin A requirement during pregnancy at 8,000 IU, which is much higher than the IOM recommendations in the past?

 

I have no idea. I do know that the concerns around vitamin A during pregnancy are that in the first weeks of pregnancy, 10,000 IU and higher has been associated with birth defects. That was one prospective study in 1995, which is higher quality than retrospective studies, but still contradicted all the retrospective studies that came to the opposite conclusion. 

 

So, there's no good consensus on the data, there's just moderately justifiable paranoia about the possibility that you could could cause birth defects. Also, there were like seven or eight letters to the editor about why that study had a bunch of problems with it, like the data just doesn't make sense.

 

So the basis for restricting A in pregnancy is a theoretical concern that doesn't have a lot of data to support it. That said, I see no reason why someone needs 10,000 IU or more going into the first eight weeks of pregnancy.

 

If you eat liver once or twice per week, you're not getting more than that. If you took a half a teaspoon of cod liver oil every day, you're not getting more than that. If you eat eggs and dairy every day, you're not getting more than that.

 

So, I would not supplement with 10,000 IU and higher vitamin A going into pregnancy, not because I'm super paranoid and there is good data justifying the restriction, but because the theoretical concern outweighs the lack of theoretical benefit in most cases for most women.

 

Now if that woman is trying to get pregnant, but her serum retinol is low and her eyes are dry and her night vision is bad and she has hyperkeratosis, then you bend the rules a little bit because you have an obvious justification to get her vitamin A levels up. 

 

It's just speculation versus speculation, so why not pave the middle ground of what you would reasonably get from food?

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Does mixing carbohydrate with fat cause people to get fat because of the Randle cycle?

Dec 30, 2019 03:47

Description:

Question: Does mixing carbohydrate with fat cause people to get fat because of the Randle cycle?

 

There's a theory floating around on the internet that mixed diets are more fattening than low-carb or low-fat diets because of the metabolic competition between glucose and fatty acids. 

 

I don't believe this to be true because, in the context of isocaloric diets, mixed diets don’t seem to be more fattening than low-carb or low-fat diets.

 

Isocaloric diets are important for understanding physiological cause and effect, but they interfere with the real-life practical understanding of something. We want to use isocaloric science to study the academic question of, physiologically, are carbs and fat more fattening when combined than not combined. But, in real life, people eat more food on a mixed diet than they eat on a low-fat or low-carb diet.

 

I think someone who says mixed diets are more fattening because of the Randle Cycle is totally misunderstanding this. They are more fattening because of the hyperpalatability factors that Stephan Guyenet has explained. 

 

Also, they probably are more likely to cause metabolic harm because of what Alex Leaf has explained about the Randle Cycle in his post, “Why you may reconsider buttering your potato” at Superhumanradio. He was arguing that you don't want to put butter on your potato because you have substrate competition between glucose and fatty acids, which makes it more difficult to clear the glucose from your blood and causes a compensatory higher insulin response.

 

I'm not so insulin-centric that I believe that you necessarily always want to be minimizing your insulin response, and I definitely know that I have friends and colleagues who disagree with me on that, but I just don't view any disease, including type-2 diabetes, as a problem with hyperinsulinemia.

 

The short of it is that the more you mix carbs and fat in your diet, the more likely you are to overeat. You don't necessarily overeat, but it's way more probable because it's hyperpalatable. The more you mix carbs and fat, the more you don't specialize in one or the other. What's the most efficient thing to do?

 

If you eat a high-carb, low-fat diet your body specializes in burning carbs, you eat a high-fat, low-carb diet your body specializes in burning fat — and you're not going to do either of those as good if you're eating a mixed diet. Can you do them good enough? Often times, but if you have metabolic problems you might want to try a low-carb or a low-fat diet so you can specialize and be more efficient with your metabolism, because if you have metabolic problems whatever you're doing isn't working for you right now.



What to do if gamma-tocopherol levels are low-normal while taking 100 IU/d of alpha-tocopherol.

Dec 27, 2019 02:01

Description:

Question: What to do if gamma-tocopherol levels are low-normal while taking 100 IU/d of alpha-tocopherol.  

 

My initial impression is that there is nothing wrong because I don't care that much about gamma tocopherol. My doctoral research specialized in gamma tocopherol and there is some evidence that gamma tocopherol does some things that alpha tocopherol doesn't do. It’s likely that people who take high-dose alpha tocopherol supplements are suppressing their gamma tocopherol levels.

 

But you don’t have to be in the middle of the green for gamma tocopherol on the ION test. So if you are taking a 100 IU of alpha tocopherol at the time of test, then stop taking that and replace it with TocoSorb, or take a lower dose. I think a reasonable dose of vitamin E for the average person is 20 IU.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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What to do if taking biotin and yet beta-hydroxyisovalerate is elevated.

Dec 26, 2019 07:59

Description:

Question: What to do if taking biotin and yet beta-hydroxyisovalerate is elevated.

 

Well in theory that's a marker of biotin deficiency, but you might have a defect in a biotin-dependent enzyme so you can try 5 milligrams, but if you still have high beta hydroxy isovaleric you need to start looking at a metabolic disorder, providing there are symptoms. You might have a 20% decrease in that enzyme activity.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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B6 deficiency, and who is a man with high estrogen, what should they do?

Dec 24, 2019 07:59

Description:

Question: For someone who is taking 45 mg of vitamin B6 as P5P but has xanthurenate, kynurenate, and quinolinate high in the urine as markers of vitamin B6 deficiency, and who is a man with high estrogen, what should they do?

 

If you have xanthurenate and kynurenate spilling into your urine, it means that quinolinate would be building up. Quinolinate is usually the last thing to rise in B6 deficiency. 

 

Quinolinate is an excitotoxin: it both can cause neurotoxicity like glutamate does and it can also make you hypersensitive to glutamate, effectively giving you a glutamate sensitivity.

 

You clarified that quinolinate is in the fourth quintile. So you're kind of in the zone quinolinate might be a problem, particularly if you have trouble sleeping, or if you have trouble with anxiety, or you have anything that would be related to glutamate sensitivity, like headaches. 

 

If you have any of those symptoms, they could be from quinolinate buildup. In that case, I recommend increasing B6. I would titrate it up to 100 mg. I'd be very cautious going higher than that. Don't take any pyridoxine hydrochloride ever.

 

Second course of action is look at iron and riboflavin levels. If there's any things wrong with those fix them, since they are needed to properly convert tryptophan alongside B6.

 

Third course of action is to reduce protein intake, if necessary, or search for low tryptophan proteins and focus on those to meet your protein needs. You need at least a few hundred milligrams of tryptophan in your diet to be okay.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



For someone who is homozygous for the H63D allele of the iron- and hemochromatosis-related HFE gene, if ferritin is low but transferrin saturation is high, should they still donate blood?

Dec 23, 2019 08:23

Description:

Question: For someone who is homozygous for the H63D allele of the iron- and hemochromatosis-related HFE gene, if ferritin is low but transferrin saturation is high, should they still donate blood?

 

H63D is one of the genes that predisposes to hemochromatosis, a condition of iron overload. Most clinicians who work in this area do not consider the H63D allele to be a concern because it's less severe. With that said, most people who are progressive on the iron research front do believe it's a concern. There is literature showing that people can get clinical hemochromatosis from it and you don't have to get clinically hemochromatosis to be worried about iron overload. 

  

My opinion on this is going to be different than someone who is an expert clinician, but is not immersing themselves deeply in the physiological literature about how this works.

 

I don't have the skills that they have in triaging and filtering who’s ideal for what treatment and looking at large numbers of people that do one or another treatment and knowing intuitively what happens in those — but what I do have is I have immersed myself very deeply in the physiology. 

 

So the way that I look at this is as follows: iron saturation is an estimate of your transferrin saturation. It's a cheaper way to estimate it than to actually measure transferrin saturation, so it's much more common to get iron saturation.

 

But let's assume that we're talking about actual transferrin saturation or that iron saturation is a good metric of it. That's your short-term iron storage. Ferritin is your long-term iron storage. The defect in the H63D allele, same for the C282Y allele of the HFE gene, the two moderate and severe hemochromatosis alleles. Allele is a variant of the gene.

 

In normal physiology what happens is transferrin acts as a gauge of your iron status. The normal physiological levels are between 30 and 40 percent. Now being 41 percent doesn't mean you have a disease, we're not talking about diagnosis here, we're talking about understanding the physiology.

 

Mechanistically this is designed so that as you go from 30 to 40 percent and especially as you go over 40 percent that communicates the signal to a hormonal system that says you have more iron than you need. So you ramp down iron absorption and you ramp up ferritin. Why do you ramp up ferritin? Because you have more than you need in your short-term storage, so that's when you put it into your long-term storage. Also, because ferritin is a protective response that prevents you from having free iron.

 

Free iron is bad because it feeds pathogens and it makes infections worse. Free iron is bad because it causes oxidative stress and causes wear and damage on your tissues. And so to avoid free iron you ramp up ferritin while you take down your absorption from food at the same time.

 

And now is that a problem at all?  You could debate that, but if you're just talking, if you're not talking about diagnosis and you're talking about wellness, and you're talking about health management then… What I would want to do myself in that situation is I would first of all not let the ferritin go under 20, and if it's going near there I

would be getting a CBC to make sure I'm not making myself anemic.

  

And so I would not stop donating blood just because the ferritin is going down 60, 50, 40, I would consider it a gray area, it would be my preference to focus on the transferrin saturation and get it consistently under 40%. You get the pinprick to look at your serum iron levels, they're not going to let you donate blood if you're actually in the danger zone of anemia.

 

So I would get the CBC to be proactive about it.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

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How to lower a resting heart rate in the 80s or 90s.

Dec 20, 2019 02:41

Description:

Question: Thoughts on lowering my resting heart rate. It's often in the high 80s or low 90s once I'm up for the day.

 

I wish I knew the answer to that. I'd use it for my heart rate. I don't even measure my heart rate because my whole life it's been kind of high. I think breathing and meditation are probably the best things that you can do.

 

I've typically had a white coat syndrome response to getting my blood pressure taken, and because as soon as I feel the pressure, I start to get

anxiety and I'm like, “oh no it feels like it's high” and I get an adrenaline rush.

 

A couple of years ago I got rejected from giving blood three times in a year because either my blood pressure, or my pulse was too high when they measured it, both because of the adrenaline surge.

 

I was not able to donate blood until I started using Headspace, the meditation app, in particular the visualizations of the happiness portion.

 

The first time I was able to donate blood was when I went in to get my blood pressure and pulse taken and I imagined that bright light in the middle of my chest I just did the visualization and "boom" my heart rate and my pulse, just went straight into normal zone because I was able to create an association between that visualization and the state that the meditation produced. 

 

So that would be the first thing that I'd try. If I find out that I have a medical condition with a physiological solution I'll let you know, because I have the same thing.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



How to manage the zinc-to-copper ratio and what to do if zinc and copper are both low-normal when supplementing with 15 mg of zinc and 1 mg of copper.

Dec 19, 2019 04:00

Description:

Question:  How to manage the zinc-to-copper ratio and what to do if zinc and copper are both low-normal when supplementing with 15 mg of zinc and 1 mg of copper.

 

I don't recommend looking at the zinc-to-copper ratio. Although there are studies correlating health endpoints with the zinc-to-copper ratio, I do not believe that it is a causal factor in disease. 

 

I believe the zinc-to-copper ratio is often associated with disease because inflammation raises plasma copper and lowers plasma zinc, based on taking zinc up in the cells and mobilizing stored copper out of the liver. You want zinc and copper at the right levels; the ratios are less important. You want both around the middle of the reference range; the bottom of the range is not adequate.

 

If you are taking a supplement, then the simplest thing to do would be to take it twice per day instead of once per day and to make sure you are taking it on an empty stomach. Up to 50 mg of zinc will not cause nausea on an empty stomach in most people if you take it with a full glass of water.

 

Some people do have digestive issues when supplementing on an empty stomach, and if you need to take it with food, do not supplement anywhere near phytate, which is the principal inhibitor of zinc absorption and is found in whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

 

I recommend Jarrow’s zinc balance, which has the exact ratio that you’re talking about. It’s a convenient way to have the copper in the zinc supplement already. But if you are low in copper, this isn’t an adequate source for two reasons: (1) the amount of copper is too low, and (2) the form of copper isn’t ideal (it has lower bioavailability because it’s not the oxidation state that you get in food).

 

For a copper supplement, I would want to use food first, and liver capsules if you want a supplement. For foods, check out the tiers of copper-rich foods that I recommend, which includes liver, cocoa powder, and certain mushrooms.



What nutrients are needed to break down old, damaged bone and build new, healthy bone?

Dec 18, 2019 04:38

Description:

Question: What nutrients are needed to break down old, damaged bone and build new, healthy bone?

 

So you are breaking down bone all the time throughout every second of your life. 

 

We are always breaking down bone, we are always building up new bone, and if you had any kind of defect in the ability to break down old bone, then you would have problems manifesting elsewhere. 

 

Bone breakdown is necessary to maintain your serum calcium levels. You would probably be having severe hypocalcemic attacks if you were not breaking down your old bone — and you probably also would have exercise intolerance and/or poor exercise performance as a result of the undercarboxylated osteocalcin released from bone, which acts as a hormone to improve energy utilization during exercise. 

 

In fact the overwhelming problem in the general population is that people are breaking down too much bone and not building it back up enough. 

 

So if you just look at the course of someone's life over time when we are young we are building more bone than we're breaking down and that, somewhere around 25 years old depending on male and female — we reach peak bone mass and then we spend the entire rest of our lives declining in bone mass.

 

To some degree when you're building bone you need everything. So eating a nutrient-dense diet across the board is important, but things that are extremely important that kind of stand out from building other tissues when you're building bone is collagen.

 

Half your bone is protein — about 95 percent of the protein in your bone is collagen. The limiting factor for collagen synthesis is glycine. Collagen peptides provide glycine and they also are better at stimulating collagen synthesis than just powdered glycine. So collagen peptides, bone broth, edible bones from canned fish or from the ends of small chicken bones, would all probably be helpful. Then clearly calcium and phosphorus are the overwhelming minerals in bones.

 

So you need enough calcium and enough phosphorus — between the two of those in the population most people do not get enough calcium and get too much phosphorus. People get phosphorus from processed foods and from soda, and in addition to the natural phosphorus in meat and other foods. If you are not eating junk food you probably don't get too much phosphorus, but you still probably get enough.

 

If you're not eating junk food, and you're not eating dairy, and you're not eating bones, you probably do not get enough calcium and in particular many people in the natural health community have read a lot of anti-calcium supplementation stuff.

 

I want to emphasize over and over again that it's better to get calcium from food than to get calcium from supplements, but it's better to get calcium from supplements and then not get calcium. 



What are my thoughts on detoxing heavy metals?

Dec 17, 2019 01:49

Description:

Question: What are my thoughts on detoxing heavy metals?

 

My thoughts are first you need to look at how bad the heavy metal is and if it is even at a level that a conventional practitioner would say you have toxicity; for example lead. 

 

If this is your situation then I don’t feel comfortable advising anyone here, but if your levels are slightly high and you would like to reduce them, then my suggestion would be zinc supplementation on the basis that most heavy metals produce a metallothionein increase. 

 

Metallothionein is your endogenous chelatior. 

 

The ability of the heavy metal to provoke that protective response is completely dependent on zinc concentrations inside your cell even across the range of deficiency through normal status through more zinc than you need, and there's no evidence for a threshold or cutoff.

 

So I think if your zinc status is fine and you boost your zinc status a little, without causing any zinc toxicity, or copper deficiency -- I think that's a very gentle and safe way to reduce your load of heavy metals.

 

Unless what you're seeing is arsenic, in which case methylation would be my focus because methylation plays a specific role in addressing arsenic. For anyone who hasn't seen that I have a comprehensive methylation resource at chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/24/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-17-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



What to do about elevated morning blood glucose in the mid 90s.

Dec 16, 2019 03:45

Description:

Question: What to do about elevated morning blood glucose in the mid 90s.

 

I think usually your morning glucose is primarily impacted by your hormones and very rarely impacted by what you ate the night before, unless you are severely glucose intolerant.

 

So the overwhelming probability is that if your blood glucose is elevated in the morning and mid-90s is not tremendously high; it is most likely cortisol. 

 

If there are other signs of slipping into pre-diabetes then I might come up with another explanation, but I don't think waking up in the morning and often having mid-90s glucose — with everything else being fine, is likely to be a sign other than cortisol levels. 

 

It's not necessarily a bad thing because you're supposed to have a cortisol spike in the morning. You may want to look at your cortisol levels over time. The DUTCH test can do that. It happens to look at a lot of other things that I think are useful so that might be my first go-to. 

 

First you want to know if that's actually the issue. 

 

If cortisol is out of range then you probably want to look at stress reduction as a first step, and there's some evidence for using phosphatidylserine to lower cortisol. 



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What to do, in the context of diabetes, if T3 supplementation does not increase heat production?

Dec 13, 2019 10:54

Description:

Question: neither my mother nor myself respond to T3 supplementation (cytomel; up to 140 mcg/d). Body temp remains low and reverse T3 stays normal. Could you discuss the factors that might interfere with thermogenesis in response to T3, and offer considerations how to improve this?

 

Having normal levels of reverse T3 tells you that the body isn’t deliberately getting rid of the thyroid hormone. High reverse T3 would be a sign that your body just doesn't want the thyroid hormone around.

 

That doesn't seem to be happening and so that makes me wonder if there could be a problem with taking up the thyroid into the cells. In which case I would expect thyroid hormone levels to be higher in the blood then you would otherwise expect them to be.

 

Or if there's a problem with the thyroid actually carrying out its functions inside the cell to regulate gene expression. This could be a zinc deficiency issue, since zinc is necessary to allow the thyroid receptor to bind to the DNA. In fact, zinc is necessary for everything that has a nuclear receptor that alters gene expression by binding to a nuclear receptor. This includes receptors for vitamin A and vitamin D, receptors for the sex hormones, and for thyroid hormones; all require zinc to act.

 

But, you seem to be saying that your issue is a specific thermogenic response, which makes me ask, are you seeing every other thing that you would expect from thyroid  hormone and not thermogenesis? 

 

If that's the case, I have no idea. But, if you're not seeing any of the effects from thyroid hormone that you would expect, then I would say maybe some kind of resistance to getting into the cell if blood levels are elevated. If blood levels are normal, then maybe it’s not acting on the nuclear receptor, which I'd think zinc deficiency. 

 

I don't know what else you could do with the exception of measuring the free fatty acids, which would be high if you had a zinc deficiency. They might not be if you're taking insulin and you're eating moderate to high carb. Get free fatty acids measured, which would often be called NEFA, for non-esterified fatty acids.

 

You know you can't have everything. I would rather your pancreas just start making all the insulin it needs, but options are limited, right? so I don't know if you can fix the temperature issue. If you can with fixing it at the root problem great, but if you can't then absolutely I would I would manage your temperature with clothing. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



What are your top three non-nutrient factors that prevent beta-oxidation or ketogenesis?

Dec 12, 2019 02:31

Description:

Question: "What are your top three non-nutrient factors that prevent someone from entering beta-oxidation or ketogenesis? I mean like sleep disruption."

 

Top three non-nutrient factors? Unless you are taking a drug that prevents lipolysis, then they aren't non-nutrient. 

 

The overwhelming things that govern those are carbohydrate and fat intake. You eat more fat, you have more beta-oxidation. You eat less fat, you have less beta-oxidation. You eat less carbohydrate beyond a threshold.

 

==I don't think sleep disruption is going to do that. Sleep disruption is going to increase your stress hormones — so with sleep disruption, your cortisol is going to spike, and it's going to increase your appetite for junk food —  so you're probably more likely to eat things that are anti-ketogenic when you're sleep-deprived because you're eating more junk food, which has more carbs. You probably are not going to have lower beta-oxidation. You're probably going to have higher oxidation because you're going to eat more fat.

 

But most people do not have impairments in beta-oxidation. 

 

If you have a riboflavin deficiency, you can have an impairment in beta-oxidation, but even in disease states, beta-oxidation is higher. If you have a fatty liver, beta-oxidation is increased because your liver is trying to get rid of fat.

 

The overwhelming thing governing beta-oxidation is the relative balance of fat going into your tissues versus out. To the extent carbs displace the fat from being burned, carbohydrate is going to decrease beta-oxidation —  but if you're eating carbohydrate, and you're eating more fat, versus less fat, you're going to have more beta-oxidation when you eat more fat. 

So, yes, sleep disruption will disrupt the appropriate way of handling those things, but I don't think it's going to block ketogenesis or beta-oxidation, except by messing up your appetite.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Recommendations for peripheral neuropathy

Dec 11, 2019 01:31

Description:

Question: "Any recommendations for peripheral neuropathy? Testing vitamin B, lion's mane?"

 

First of all, there is no such thing as vitamin B. I'm not trying to be a nitpick, but there's literally almost a dozen B vitamins, with different tests, that do different things. So, I think it's important to establish a habit of never saying vitamin B because, not to be a grammar nitpick, but I just think it's misleading to think about the concept of vitamin B. 

 

There are quite a few B vitamin deficiencies that can cause peripheral neuropathy. 

 

You can also cause peripheral neuropathy by taking vitamin B6 in too high doses, and that's one of the reasons why you have to separate them out because B6 is unique among the other B vitamins in that respect. 

 

In Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet; I have an index of signs, and if we go into peripheral neuropathy, I have listed here deficiencies of thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamin E — toxicity of selenium and B6. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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How to improve LDL receptor activity.

Dec 10, 2019 01:40

Description:

Question: "If cholesterol, LDL-P, and oxidized LDL are high, the sterol panel is normal, and TGs are great, would you suspect clearance of the particles driven by LDL receptor in the liver is the issue, and what would you recommend to boost LDL-R?"

 

Yes, it sounds like you should target LDL-R. 

 

The big regulators of LDL-R function are thyroid hormone, and the amount of cholesterol in the liver cell, and anything that brings bile acids into the feces, and that's generally a high-fiber diet; psyllium husk would be a fiber you could add.

 

Thyroid hormone is the other piece of that, and that you target with higher carbohydrate intake. Higher carbohydrate intake also acts on PCSK9 to boost LDL receptor activity. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Recommendations on magnesium supplements and dosage

Dec 9, 2019 02:25

Description:

Question: "What are your recommendations on magnesium supplements and dosage?”

 

My opinion is that most people shouldn't be supplementing with high doses of magnesium. I think if you're going to supplement with more than 400 milligrams a day, you should be testing your magnesium status, and you should be making decisions on that. I think there's way too many people throwing really high doses of magnesium into their system. 

 

The topical stuff makes sense if you're absorbing poorly, but hey, maybe you're absorbing poorly because you don't need it, and so I think you really have to judge it against real metrics of results.

 

So, in terms of types, I would not recommend magnesium oxide for anything. It's poorly absorbed, so maybe you could argue that magnesium oxide is going to help act as a laxative better, but that's not bowel function, that's pharmacologically modulating your bowel transit time. So, I don't think it makes sense to deliberately take a poorly absorbed magnesium to have that effect.

 

The good sources of magnesium are: magnesium citrate is okay, glycinate is okay, malate is okay, across the board, I genuinely don't believe that the form is that important. It's just that oxides of minerals including magnesium are generally poorly absorbed. There isn’t much difference in the other forms. As always tailor it to the individual. I wouldn't give blanket recommendations there.



This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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How to lower your calcium score

Dec 6, 2019 03:55

Description:

Question: "Calcium score, is there a way to treat one's calcium score and get it to zero?"

 

⇒ No, you don't treat the calcium score. You take the calcium score as indicative of what's going on in atherosclerosis, and you treat that.

 

The goal, I think, is calcium score equals zero. No, that's a bad goal because that's like saying my goal this year is to be a billionaire. Is that going to make me harder and get closer to it? I don't know. You set somewhere what the ideal is, but then you don't think about that, you think about — okay — what's the next step right now in front of me. What you focus on is the thing that's right in front of you. So, maybe you want to be a billionaire -- but your goal is, how do I increase my revenue this month? Not how do I be a billionaire this year.

 

If you want a calcium score of zero, fine, but you don't think about that; you think about how do I lower my calcium score, because then when you lower your calcium score, you do more of that. When you do something that raises your calcium score, you do less of that.

 

In atherosclerosis, calcium is super driven by the atherosclerotic progress. So, ideally it would be nice if you had ultrasound imaging of your carotid IMT. If you have advanced plaque formation, you probably will be able to see that on the IMT, like you can see how the plaque is developing and whether the actual atherosclerotic plaque is.

 

K2 is relevant there, but a general deficiency of K2 is more likely to manifest as diffuse calcium deposits everywhere in the artery. So, it might be that your LDL is high, and then that's what you should be focusing on. 

 

You really have to start from point A through B through C, and K2 is one of those things, but you need to look at all the factors that can be contributing to atherosclerosis.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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What do you think of alternative testing like hair mineral analysis or SpectraCell?

Dec 5, 2019 02:43

Description:

Question: "What do you think of alternative testing like hair mineral analysis or SpectraCell?"

 

I'm against SpectraCell on the basis of, it's not validated. I gave more details in a podcast episode "What Makes a Good Marker of Nutritional Status?" and you can find that at chrismasterjohnphd.com/marker.

 

Hair mineral analysis; I like hair mineral analysis when there is nothing better and more validated. For a lot of the trace minerals where we don't have good, validated markers of nutritional status, so I think hair mineral analysis is good. I also think hair mineral analysis is good if you don't have the money to do something comprehensive with all the best markers, and you want something that can clue you in when something might be off. So, the nice thing about it is, with less money, you cover all the minerals. The less nice thing about it is, it's not very well validated quantitatively. 

 

Even where there's data, like for example — it is validated that your iron in your hair tends to be higher when your iron in your body is higher, and vice versa. But it's not validated to say, when hair is X amount, this is when you need more iron, and when hair is Y amount, this is when you need less. The way that the blood markers are — like transferrin saturation, ferritin, hemoglobin, all these more validated markers. We have tons of quantitative data saying — the normal range is this — the optimal range is this.

 

You lose the precision when you go back to the hair mineral analysis. I wouldn't use it — the thing is, if you spend $200 on a hair mineral analysis, that's $200 that you can't put towards your Genova ION Panel, or you could have gotten four iron panels with that, right? 

So, you have to be careful that if your financial resources are constrained, you might want to do the hair mineral analysis on that basis, but it might be a better financial decision long-term to hold onto that money and do free stuff.

 

In Testing Nutrition Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, what I say is, if you don't have the money for the comprehensive testing, you focus on the things that are free. 

 

You do the dietary and lifestyle analysis. 

 

You do the symptom analysis. 

 

Then you go to the things that that indicates is most probable, and then you do the best validated test. Maybe this diet and symptom analysis all points you to iron, and you spend $60 on the iron panel, and that gives you more payoff than $200 on a hair mineral analysis. 

 

So, it's not an obvious choice about when to get the suboptimal test. It's something you have to think about carefully.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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How to address edema.

Dec 4, 2019 03:49

Description:

Question: How do I address edema? 

 

Edema is basically going to be caused by excess salt retention in the body. The reason is that with the exception of very extreme scenarios, your body is going to tightly regulate the sodium concentration of the water in your body, and sodium draws water. 

 

Now, that's not to say that the cause is eating salt. And there are cases where eating salt might remove edema. But generally salt retention of total water volume is going to be a big factor. In hypothyroidism it becomes I believe at least partly about glycoproteins in those spaces that are holding onto water. 

 

If it's thyroid-related, you're not really talking about nutritional support, you're talking about fixing your thyroid. Maybe that means nutritional support, but it might mean other things. But the nutrition is aimed at the thyroid, not the edema.

 

Maybe manganese would help modulate those glycoproteins in hypothyroidism the same way that it does in regulating the stickiness of the arterial wall. I'm totally guessing on that.

 

Edema in the menstrual cycle is caused by high aldosterone, which is probably caused by high progesterone. I know that everyone in alternative health thinks that progesterone is the good hormone, and estrogen is the bad hormone — but in PMS water retention, I believe progesterone is just accumulating so much that it's spilling into aldosterone. I genuinely don't know what to do about the high progesterone, but about the high aldosterone. Magnesium and B6 have been shown to help with that. I did an episode about that, so I would Google "Masterjohn what to do about menstrual weight gain" for more details on thata. Then I would play around with salt and potassium. So, generally less salt during that time and more potassium in the diet are potentially going to be helpful.

 

I think the principles are going to be similar elsewhere. It doesn't have to be in the menstrual cycle. You are generally going to find that salt is increasing extracellular water, and potassium is increasing intracellular water, and that's often going to be a factor in edema that can't be tied to thyroid hormone.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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How do you determine if you’re getting enough protein?

Dec 3, 2019 03:11

Description:

Question: "How do you determine if you're getting enough protein? I heard Dr. Stephen Phinney say, for those on a keto diet, if ketones are greater than 3 on a regular basis, then it's a sign you're not getting enough protein."

 

First of all, why are you on a ketogenic diet? 

 

If your purpose is to get the ketones, why wouldn't you want your ketones higher than 3? The ketogenic diet is, regardless of what people are doing it for, it's best tested in terms of epilepsy, and the classical ketogenic diet gets ketone levels up to 3 or 4 millimoles per liter… sometimes higher.

 

Then the question is, you're not doing it for medical therapy, why are you doing it? 

 

If you're doing it to lose weight, who cares what your ketones are? 

 

There's a ton of people out there who are on a "ketogenic diet" who don't care what their ketones are because they're doing it for weight loss, for body composition, or to feel better. If those are what your goals are, your metrics should just be whether you're losing weight, whether you're getting better body composition, or whether you're feeling better. There's no data backing up the fact that you can measure your blood ketones and determine what any of those outcomes are going to be.

 

That has nothing to do with why you need protein. Yes, too much protein is probably going to lower your ketones. Protein is anti-ketogenic. It's not as anti-ketogenic as carbs are, so I get the kernel of truth that Phinney is getting at. The higher your protein is, the lower your ketones are going to be, and maybe there's some general correlation to be seen across people that the people who tend to have ketones that high tend to not be eating enough protein, but that's a correlation that has nothing to do with the underlying reason of why you eat protein. 

 

You eat protein because you need protein to optimize your neurotransmitters, you need protein to optimize your metabolism, and you need protein to optimize your body composition. The number one metric that we have on protein intakes and quantifying them is on body composition, and you want a half a gram, to a gram of protein for every pound of target body weight. So, if you're trying to gain muscle, use what you want to have at the end of gaining muscle. If you are overweight, use what your ideal weight would be. And the more you care about your body composition, the more you should aim for the top of that range instead of the bottom. It doesn't matter if you're keto or not.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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What supplements would you recommend for a ketogenic diet?

Dec 2, 2019 04:13

Description:

Question: What supplements would you recommend for a ketogenic diet? Any concerns with carbs being that low? 

 

If someone's on a keto diet and they have 80 grams total carbs, the first question I have is where are the carbs coming from? 

 

That's really going to determine whether the person needs supplements. So, on a keto diet in general and protein, too? If you're eating a lot of fat instead of protein, then you're going to need supplements of the things found in protein foods. If your carbs are all coming from honey, then you're going to need things that are found in vegetables.

 

==>You just can't tailor nutrient needs based on carb total data alone. 

 

The biggest things would be make sure you're getting a gram of protein per pound of body weight if your ketones and goals can handle that load of protein. That'll protect you from a lot of nutrient deficiencies right there. Try to cook your proteins in ways that recapture the juices. That will help conserve the electrolytes. 

 

You also probably want salt and either a lot of low-net carb vegetables, or you're probably going to need more potassium in your diet. Those are the big things that I'd look at.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Why would a male have low blood levels of calcium?

Nov 29, 2019 01:58

Description:

Question: "Why would a male be low in calcium?"

 

You either have something wrong with parathyroid hormone governing your calcium levels, in which case you would want to see a doctor about that, or you have a long-going deficiency of related nutrients. 

 

Not enough calcium and not enough vitamin D should not cause low serum calcium — unless the deficiency has been going on for a very long time and is very bad.

 

Then again, I don't know what measurement you're referring to. So, maybe the calcium was a tiny bit low, and you remeasure it, and it's not low anymore; it was a fluke. 

 

But if you're talking about confirmed low serum calcium, then nutritionally, I would look at long-standing severe deficiencies of calcium and vitamin D. I'd follow it up with measurements of PTH and calcitriol to better assess the situation.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Can a low-carb diet cause waking up in the middle of the night?

Nov 28, 2019 07:49

Description:

Question: "I keep waking up in the middle of the night and stay awake for hours. Would low carb make it worse?"

 

It definitely could. 

 

Your brain will consume 120 grams of carbohydrate every day, just your brain. There's got to be another 30 grams or so that would be used no matter what obligately by red blood cells, certain cells in the testes, the kidney, and the lens of the eye. Then the rest of your body — if you're eating not a ketogenic diet, the rest of your body is not really trying to burn fat, so it's going to burn through carbohydrate.

 

Your liver stores about 90 grams of carbohydrate to be able to stabilize your blood sugar between meals, and overnight is the biggest time where it has to do that because overnight is the longest period of time that you go without meals.

 

If you add that up, you're looking at like 250 grams of carbohydrate a day — and remember we haven't gotten to high-intensity exercise yet.

 

Now, if you go on a ketogenic diet, what happens? 

 

Well, your brain glucose consumption goes down from 120 grams a day to like 30 or 35 grams a day. You cannot and will not ever, ever, ever, ever, ever go to zero. That's one thing. You still have another 20, 30 grams of carbohydrate that you're burning through by cells that cannot burn anything else. You still have a minimum probably 60 or 70 grams of carbs per day that you need — even when you're maximally keto-adapted. I'm not saying you need to eat those carbs. You'll make them through gluconeogenesis if you don't eat them.

 

But the rest of the body where the needs were flexible, has mostly shifted to burning fat for fuel on a long-term ketogenic diet. So, the real big problem is if you're not low-carb enough to be keto, but you're way under 200, 250 grams of carbs a day. Like, probably 100 grams of carbs a day is like, if it works for you, great, but if you have symptoms of low blood sugar at night, you shouldn't be spending a lot of time guessing why, because you're in this gray area where you are not keto-adapted, your brain is still burning through 120 grams a day, your liver still stores 90 grams a day, and the rest of your body still probably is preferentially burning carbs for energy instead of storing them for the most part because the carbs are there. So, your body is not deliberately, intensively reorganizing to conserve the carbohydrate in that gray area.

 

==If you are eating 50 or 100 grams of carbs, and you are in this place, then you absolutely should connect the two and see if increasing your carbs helps.

 

Low-carb is not the best solution to high fasting glucose. There's a lot of people on low-carb who have high fasting glucose. There's a ton of people who go low-carb and develop high fasting glucose. That’s because a low carb diet alters the hormonal environment in two main ways:

 

1.) Increases the morning glucagon response. 

 

2.) Increases adrenal hormones. 

 

Both of these are early and late-stage adaptations to low glucose supply. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Best formula and dosage of no-carb electrolytes to take at night to optimize sleep, especially after sauna use

Nov 27, 2019 01:25

Description:

Question: "Which brand and dosage of no-carb electrolytes would you take at night to optimize sleep, especially after sauna use?"

 

I would drink a bottle of Gerolsteiner, and I would add to it 100 milligrams of any kind of magnesium: citrate, glycinate, malate, those three are fine. And I would add to it 400 milligrams of potassium citrate, or bicarbonate if it's an empty stomach.

 

You say no-carb. Because of the potassium, I personally would take maybe like a teaspoon of honey with this. I would also take some salt. Let's say a half a teaspoon, to a teaspoon of salt with it. The caveat being if you’re sodium sensitive you should be mindful not to overdo it. If you know you don't have a problem with salt and blood pressure, then I would recommend adding the sodium to the mix. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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Heart palpitations as a result of vitamin K2 supplementation and whether increasing calcium intake could help | Masterjohn Q&A Files #13

Nov 26, 2019 03:46

Description:

Question: "Vitamin K2, MK-4 and MK-7, might have caused prolonged heart palpitations. Upon stopping it, symptoms mostly resolved after a week or so. Does that mean that the body is better off without it? Might increasing calcium intake mitigate this?" 

 

I would say, the calcium is really interesting. I genuinely hadn't thought of that until you mentioned it. Even though I've heard other people ask this question, I haven't had time to look into it, but you raise a good point.

 

So, it is conceivable, for example, that your bone density has been very low because you have not had the K2 you needed to get the minerals into the bone. So when you get the K2, you start loading the calcium into the bone, but maybe because your whole body is programmed to assume things were the way they were before you started taking the K2, then it doesn't adapt fast enough to normalize your blood calcium, which, by the way, how do you normalize your blood calcium? You take calcium out of the bone.

 

MK-4 has been studied in high-milligram doses as an osteoporosis drug because it inhibits bone resorption. If you inhibit bone resorption, you will definitely interfere with your ability to maintain normal serum calcium levels because bone resorption is how you do that.

 

So, either you're giving the nutrients needed to get the calcium into the bone and the body is just prioritizing that because it's been missing them for so long, and your serum calcium drops — or you're actually creating signaling stopping bone resorption, and so your blood calcium drops because of that.

 

Either way; taking calcium might impact that, and I would love to have some anecdotal data on that because there's no studies on K2and heart palpitations. So, I would love it if we have some anecdotes of people saying whether the calcium helps, especially since so much of the K2 stuff is so skeptical of calcium. 

 

Kate Rheaume-Bleue's book Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox, I think it's a great book. Basically, what that book is, is an enormous elaboration of my 2007 article on Activator X and Weston Price. 

 

If I had written that book, I would have done things a little bit differently. The whole idea of the calcium paradox that's in the title, I think it has merit. There is some data indicating that calcium supplements might worsen the risk of heart disease, but I think that the conclusions are way too anti-calcium, and I think there's too many people out there taking K2 who have it in their heads that calcium supplements are bad. 

 

Calcium supplements are bad compared to getting enough calcium from food. A huge portion of those people are not getting enough calcium from food, and getting calcium is more important than where it comes from.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Bovine colostrum for those with dairy sensitivities, and what to do about food sensitivities in general | Masterjohn Q&A Files #12

Nov 25, 2019 09:07

Description:

Question, part 1: "Bovine colostrum from New Zealand cows. Yea or nay for those with dairy sensitivities? If nay, what would you recommend instead?"

 

What is your goal? If you have a dairy sensitivity, your problem could be with casein, with the whey proteins, or with something more specific like certain antibodies. It's very complicated. You're less likely to tolerate colostrum if you have a known dairy sensitivity, but you can't really know without testing the colostrum.

 

Question, part 2: "to settle a client's overactive immune system down."

 

What, specifically, about the overactive immune system are we looking at? I would think maybe this is chronic inflammation that's not resolving, and then I'm thinking more about arachidonic acid and DHA.

 

Question, part 3: "She can take a supplement one time and then the next time it throws her over. Same with food."

 

Okay, that sounds to me like an oral tolerance issue. When you put something in your mouth, it goes to your gut, and then your immune system decides whether it's safe or whether it's not safe. Your immune system doesn't know anything when you're born; it is more or less a blank slate. You do have predispositions because you have genetics that impact categories of protein fragments that you have the potential to make a decision about, but you are never born having a tolerance or intolerance to something. You are born with very broad genetics that say, “I will make decisions about this category, I can't recognize this category, I will make decisions about this category.”

 

So, you eat food or take supplements, you put something in your mouth, you swallow it. In your gut, your immune system says, “This might be something important, I'm going to take it back to my home base and decide what to do about it.” That home base is called the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, or GALT. Your immune system is deliberately taking things into that lymph tissue, purposefully taking fragments that are not completely digested for the purpose of making decisions about it.

 

In the gut, how does it make that decision? Overwhelmingly, there are two pro-tolerance factors. They are prostaglandin E2, which is made from arachidonic acid, the omega-6 fatty acid that's found most abundantly in egg yolks and liver, and that is the direct target of anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, high doses of EPA from fish oil, and probably a lot of herbal anti-inflammatories. They will lower prostaglandin E2, and prostaglandin E2 is critical for oral tolerance in the gut.

 

So, any potential anti-inflammatory is a potential contributor to this. You need prostaglandin E2, made from COX-2 from arachidonic acid, made from everything that everyone believes is inflammatory. All the anti-inflammatory drugs, the Zone diet, almost everything written about inflammation says prostaglandin E2 is inflammatory. It is one of the two central causes of oral tolerance, of the immune system recognizing that something is safe.

 

The other is retinoic acid made from vitamin A. So, to create a pro-tolerance environment, you want no COX inhibitors being taken, you want sufficient arachidonic acid in the diet, and you want sufficient vitamin A in the diet.

 

Then what are the factors that tell the immune system, this is not safe, and that is tissue damage. So, the immune system is basically saying, "I will make a decision about this. To make this decision, I need data." So, what are the data that things are okay? Retinoic acid, prostaglandin E2. What are the data that say this is not okay? All the factors released during tissue damage because tissue damage is the number one sign that something is harmful.

 

So, if the thing comes in and they're fine, then the next time they take it, they don't tolerate it. That sounds like they are programmed to decide that everything that comes in is a threat. And so they take it, and it gets into their system and it doesn't do anything, but meanwhile the immune system took a piece of that into gut-associated lymphoid tissue, and said, "We need to program to make an army against this threat," and so it's the second time that they took it that they have the reaction.

 

And so that means, again, get the arachidonic acid, get rid of the anti-inflammatories, get the retinoic acid from the vitamin A, and thoroughly investigate any possible sources of tissue damage in the gut. I don't know if it's necessarily the gut. It could be tissue damage somewhere else that then the things circulate into the gut, but it's probably the gut because that's what's closest to the situation. So, those are the things that I would be looking at.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

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The Carnivore Debate Part 2 | Mastering Nutrition #70

Nov 24, 2019 02:41:52

Description:

In part 2 of The Carnivore Debate, we cover the philosophy of the carnivore diet and the potential pitfalls of carnivore and keto.

The research that Dr. Saladino and I discussed with each other before this debate is listed in the show notes -- there are five pages of references!

Here’s what we debated:

What exactly is a carnivore diet? Is a 90% meat diet a carnivore diet, a carnivore diet you cheat on, a carnivore-ish diet, or just a meat-heavy omnivorous diet? And why definitions absolutely matter.  Is the carnivore diet ancestral? What can we learn from present-day hunter-gatherers, the archeological record, and our evolutionary history as revealed by our genes?  Who is the carnivore diet for?  To what extent do carnivore and keto overlap? What are the benefits of keto and how broadly applicable are they? What are the potential harms of keto? In particular: acid-base balance thyroid, stress, and sex hormones oxidative stress and glycation sports performance We agree we need to cycle between the fed state and the fasting state. Can the keto diet, designed to mimic fasting-state physiology, provide adequate fed-state signals to keep our body feeling well nourished? Inuit CPT-1a deficiency redux: did a genetic impairment in the ability to make ketones sweep through the Arctic to protect the Inuit from acidosis, or to help them stay warm?

Dr. Saladino completed residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington and is a certified functional medicine practitioner through the Institute for Functional Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Arizona where he worked with Dr. Andrew Weil focusing on integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry. Prior to this, Dr. Saladino worked as a physician assistant in Cardiology. It was during this time that he saw first hand the shortcomings of mainstream western medicine with its symptom focused, pharmaceutical based paradigm. He decided to return to medical school with the hope of better understanding the true roots of chronic disease and illness, and how to correct these. He now maintains a private practice in San Diego, California, sees clients from all over the world virtually, and has used the carnivore with hundreds of patients to reverse autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, and mental health issues. When he is not researching connections between nutritional biochemistry and chronic disease, he can be found in the ocean searching for the perfect wave, cultivating mindfulness, or spending time with friends and family. 

Find more of Dr. Paul Saladino on the Fundamental Health podcast and at https://carnivoremd.com

Get my free 9-page guide to optimizing vitamins and minerals on the carnivore diet at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/carnivore 

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Masterjohn and Saladino Show Notes

00:42 Cliff Notes

05:18 Introductions

05:28 What is a carnivore diet?

18:15 Is the ancestral human diet carnivore or omnivore?

50:40 Who is a carnivore diet for?

01:08:03 To what extent do carnivore and keto overlap?

01:10:34 Who is a keto diet for?

01:18:50 Ketogenic diets are only a partial mimic of fasting physiology

01:23:46 Ketones effect on the NAD/NADH ratio 

01:27:31 Ketogenesis has opposite effects in the liver as in the ketone-utilizing tissue.

01:29:31 Ketogenic diets and oxidative stress

01:40:18 Longevity: why you want to cycle between the fasting state and the fed state

01:45:04 Can the ketogenic diet provide a sufficiently robust fed-state signal?

01:53:11 The keto diet and thyroid, stress, and sex hormones

02:10:05 Keto and sports performance

02:18:05 Why do the Inuit have a genetic impairment in making ketones, to protect against acidosis, or to stay warm?

02:35:48 Wrapping up

 

The Carnivore Debate Part 1 | Mastering Nutrition #69

Nov 23, 2019 02:24:14

Description:

Dr. Paul Saladino, Carnivore MD, and I sit down to talk about the carnivore diet. In part 1, we focus on whether you can get all the vitamins and minerals you need on a carnivore diet, and how to best design a carnivore diet to maximize the nutrition you get.

We discuss what I consider high-risk nutrients:

Vitamin C Folate

And what I consider conditional-risk nutrients:

Manganese​  Magnesium​ Vitamin K​  Potassium​  Molybdenum​ 

We also chat about some other things:

Dioxins in animal foods: a reason for vegetarianism?  The methionine-to-glycine ratio: balancing meat with bones and skin. Did paleo people get nutritional deficiencies? Bioindividuality: why we all have different needs and our needs evolve over time. Diversify to manage risk: does this mean eat plants, or just eat all the parts of an animal? Ketogenic diets and oxidative stress. Do carbohydrates give you more intracellular insulin signaling? Should carnivores eat dextrose powder for carbs? Are today’s hunter-gatherers representative of those from 80,000 years ago? Did the Maasai really mostly eat meat and milk? My open-door helicopter ride in Hawaii.

Dr. Saladino completed residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington and is a certified functional medicine practitioner through the Institute for Functional Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Arizona where he worked with Dr. Andrew Weil focusing on integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry. Prior to this, Dr. Saladino worked as a physician assistant in Cardiology. It was during this time that he saw first hand the shortcomings of mainstream western medicine with its symptom focused, pharmaceutical based paradigm. He decided to return to medical school with the hope of better understanding the true roots of chronic disease and illness, and how to correct these. He now maintains a private practice in San Diego, California, sees clients from all over the world virtually, and has used the carnivore with hundreds of patients to reverse autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, and mental health issues. When he is not researching connections between nutritional biochemistry and chronic disease, he can be found in the ocean searching for the perfect wave, cultivating mindfulness, or spending time with friends and family. 

Find more of Dr. Paul Saladino on the Fundamental Health podcast and at https://carnivoremd.com

Get my free 9-page guide to optimizing vitamins and minerals on the carnivore diet at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/carnivore 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Masterjohn and Saladino Show Notes

2:11 Introductions

6:36 Dioxins in food. 

14:33 Methionine to Glycine ratio.

23:08 Nutritional deficiencies in paleolithic people.

27:09 Bio individuality/diversity

36:07 Deficiencies that arise from eating only muscle meat.

37:26 Vitamin C

44:22 Weston A. Price’s documentation of whale stomach lining and moose adrenal as a source of vitamin C in Arctic diets.

56:03 Ketogenic diets, oxidative stress, and vitamin c. 

58:36 Insulin

1:05:46 Antioxidant status.

1:22:44 Folate.

1:26:05 Riboflavin.

1:30:23 Manganese.

1:32:28 Dextrose powder.

1:37:31 Potassium/sodium.

1:52:37 Hunter gatherer diets now vs. 80 000 years ago.

2:03:05 The Maasai.

2:09:00 Vitamin K

2:19:00 The most radical thing I’ve done recently. 

If your cholesterol is high, how do you avoid having a large burden of oxidized LDL? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #11

Nov 22, 2019 06:34

Description:

Question: If your cholesterol is high, how do you avoid having a large burden of oxidized LDL?

 

First, normalize your cholesterol. 

 

And no, I’m not saying that high cholesterol is the cause of heart disease. It's not, but oxidized LDL is, and the number one cause of both high cholesterol and oxidized LDL is not clearing LDL particles from the blood. So, I would never skip over the question of what I can do to get cholesterol in the normal range.

 

I think the boundaries of the normal range are a little exaggerated. 

 

If you look at traditional cultures that eat a traditional diet, live a traditional lifestyle — they're not modernized, and they don't have heart disease — you do see cholesterol levels that go higher than ours. 

 

So, for a man, maybe going up to 220 mg/dL in total cholesterol is pretty normal. For a woman in her 40s and 50s, up to 250 maybe.

 

I'm not looking to change those numbers if lifestyle and diet are ancestral. If everything else about the data make it look like that person's very healthy — especially if direct measures of plaque development like carotid IMT, intima-media thickness, and coronary calcium score are normal. I wouldn't be thinking about fixing the cholesterol at that point.

 

But, for someone whose cholesterol is like 300 mg/dL, you don't even see that in Tokelau, where the saturated fat content and the traditional cholesterol levels are the highest ever recorded in an ancestral population. So, when they're that high, you have to fix it as your first line of defense.

 

That means improving LDL receptor activity. 

 

The big things to look at are body composition, inflammation, fiber intake (higher fiber is generally better), and thyroid.

 

Let's say you haven't brought the cholesterol down, what do you do to protect it?

 

Well, that largely comes down to a few things. Imagine the lipoprotein leaves the liver, some as LDL, some as VLDL, both of which wind up being LDL at some point. It leaves the liver packaged with antioxidants. Those include vitamin E and coenzyme Q10, but it isn’t limited to those two. They are just the most important in this situation.

 

When LDL is circulating in the blood, it gets behind the arterial wall, and that's the main site of oxidation. So, the question is, how oxidizing of an environment is that? Also, it gets stuck behind the arterial wall, so the question is, how sticky of an environment it is? 

 

Because if it gets stuck in the oxidizing environment behind the arterial wall, then that's the very powerful regulator of whether it's going to oxidize.

 

So, the stickiness. Probably the dietary approach that best regulates the stickiness is manganese. Manganese is found mostly in plant foods and vegetarians have the highest intakes. People with plant-rich diets that also eat animal foods are in the middle. And people who eat a lot of animal foods and no plants are at the bottom. So, eat a lot of plant foods is one thing. There are some animal experiments specifically with blueberries as a source of manganese showing in animals that it makes the arterial wall less sticky, so there's that.

 

Then there’s the oxidizing environment. A big part of that is systemic inflammation because if inflammation causes oxidative stress. You should have been looking at inflammation for high cholesterol in the first place. Assume you have that covered. And then antioxidants in general. 

 

You're looking at protein, selenium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese, vitamin C, vitamin E, glycine… you're looking at so many things in there, so you really got to figure out what the weakest link is in that person and focus on that weakest link. There may be many.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



The role of the lymphatic system in fat metabolism | Masterjohn Q&A Files #10

Nov 21, 2019 01:18

Description:

Question: "I'm curious about the role of the lymphatic system in fat metabolism, specifically in high-fat, low-carb diets. Is there a biochemical explanation for why improving lymphatic circulation would improve fat metabolism?"

 

Well, I wouldn't call it biochemical, I'd call it physiological, but yes. 

 

Fat goes from your gut through your lymphatic system to your blood. If your lymphatic circulation is not good, neither is the delivery of your fat to any part of your body. It's as simple as that. 

 

If your lymphatic system is slow, so is your delivery of fat to every organ in your body.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



The relationship between Lp(a) and cardiovascular disease| Masterjohn Q&A Files #09

Nov 20, 2019 01:43

Description:

Question: "Lp(a) and genetic component with relation to cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease."

 

First, I'm going to be able to give better answers to questions if they're more specific.

 

But to the question: Everyone seems to think that Lp(a) causes heart disease. I don't believe it.

 

I don't believe it because the function of Lp(a) is to clean up oxidized LDL particles. It might have other roles, but that's one of the primary ones.

 

So, we have two possible explanations for the correlation between Lp(a) and heart disease. Either Lp(a) causes heart disease and people with genetically elevated levels have a higher risk of heart disease, or it is correlated simply because people with more oxidized LDL particles (which does cause heart disease) have more Lp(a) to clean them up.

 

I’ll be recording with Peter Attia on this topic, so I’ll brush up on Lp(a) data beforehand and may change my viewpoint, but this is my view right now. If anyone wants to send me data to look at to revise my view, I'll happily take a look.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Could magnesium hydroxide be absorbed via skin and cause hypermagnesemia? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #08

Nov 19, 2019 32

Description:

"Can magnesium hydroxide be absorbed via skin?"

 

I don't know. I genuinely don't know.

 

"I've been applying milk of magnesia as a deodorant alternative in spray form for a few years now, and it works well, but I'm concerned about I might be hypermagnesemic, as I'm having low pulse, low blood pressure, and frequent bowel movements."

 

You might be hypermagnesemic. You should measure your magnesium status, for sure.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Concerns about long-term bicarbonate supplementation and other suggestions for raising pH | Masterjohn Q&A Files #07

Nov 18, 2019 07:06

Description:

Concerns about long-term bicarbonate supplementation and other suggestions for raising pH

 

Helen Donnell says, "Your post on urine pH and exercise tolerance was a game-changer for me, but anytime I miss a dose of bicarb, I'm right back to 5. Any long-term concerns with taking bicarb two to three times a day, any suggestions for other ways to get my system pH up?"

 

Well, I will say in my case that I stopped taking the bicarbonate when I figured out that I had a zinc deficiency. So, for people who don't know the backstory here, Google "Masterjohn urine pH" and you'll probably get that blog post to come up. It's called "How Normalizing My Urine pH Helped Me Love Working Out Again". 

 

The backstory in brief is, when I was going through the mold and barium toxicity crisis of turn of 2016 into 2017. I got to the point where it would take several days to recover from one workout. I couldn’t afford to be laid out like this

 

I realized while looking at some lab tests —  a Genova ION Panel — had some findings that suggested pH imbalance problems. The only thing abnormal in my ION Profile was that my glutamine-to-glutamate ratio. The glutamate was really high, and the glutamine was really low. 

 

First thought; sounds like a pH issue. I was talking with a friend of mine that led down the same rabbit hole, maybe the reason the workout is tanking me is because my system can't handle the lactic acid.

 

So, I started measuring my urine pH, and my urine pH was very, very low. Less than 5. 

I just kept taking bicarbonate at ¼ teaspoon increments. It just wasn't going anywhere until at some point, all the sudden I shot up out of bed, and I was like I want to work. I felt amazing. I went and measured my urine pH, and it was 6. 

 

It was like it just went nowhere until I got enough bicarbonate in. Once that happened it crossed the threshold getting into 6, and all the sudden I felt amazing. That was the first big clue. Then I replicated things over time, and found that it was a consistent effect.

 

What turned things around for me was when I realized that my zinc was low. That was because bicarbonate allowed me to work out consistently and gain more muscle mass. Gaining muscle made me get patches of dry skin. 

 

Well, what do patches of dry skin mean?

 

It’s the earliest sign of zinc deficiency. Resistance training increases muscle mass and that requires more zinc to sustain the new tissue. 

 

What does zinc have to do with pH balance? Well, zinc is a cofactor for carbonic anhydrase, which is one of the main enzymes in regulating pH. 

 

I started supplementing zinc and tested my plasma zinc. Even though I had been taking zinc for three days, my plasma zinc was at the level I associate with a deficiency — which is around 70. Once I started supplementing zinc, the pH problems went away. 

 

So, zinc is definitely something I would look into. If zinc isn’t your issue, I would keep going down the rabbit hole and do a comprehensive analysis like I do with Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. 

 

Harms of bicarbonate: alkalinizing the stomach is the main one. To avoid complications you want to take it as far away from food as possible. I do think that excessive chronic use and alkalizing the stomach could lead to a lower ability to kill pathogens in the stomach and lead to overgrowth of bacteria in the stomach or small intestine. I would feel more comfortable about using it as a bridge to get from point A to point B and fixing the underlying regulatory problems as the destination.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Should you be more concerned about overall fat intake or saturated fat intake with familial hypercholesterolemia?| Masterjohn Q&A Files #06

Nov 15, 2019 03:24

Description:

Should you be more concerned about overall fat intake or saturated fat intake with familial hypercholesterolemia?

 

Question: "I have familial hypercholesterolemia, as well as a mutation in my Lp(a). I listened to your 2016 podcast regarding FH and have implemented a low-fat diet and am in the process of fixing thyroid issues. My question is, can you please further explain whether I should be more concerned about overall fat or saturated fat intake?"

 

To be clear, I am not treating anyone here. I am not a medical practitioner, so I am not treating the disease of familial hypercholesterolemia and this is just educational in nature. 

 

As a general principle, if I'm thinking about familial hypercholesterolemia —  I would be thinking more about saturated fat, with that said, I would be testing it.

 

First it depends on the specific saturated fatty acid, but saturated fat relative to other fats raises cholesterol levels. There are people that dispute that, but the data is super clear. This does not mean that everyone should lower their saturated fat intake because most people can probably accommodate that, right? Most people have a working system to regulate their cholesterol levels.

 

The thing is with the familial hypercholesterolemia, that system is broken, so you become hypersensitive to all the things that do have some effect. You will be hypersensitive to the fact that saturated fat raises cholesterol levels more so than other fats do — but I think it's more to the root of the problem, based on how these things regulate LDL receptor activity, which is what clears cholesterol from your blood and which is what is broken in familial hypercholesterolemia. 

 

I think a lower-fat, higher-carbohydrate diet is more relevant to the root mechanism. 

 

How do you test this? So, standard lipid panels are dirt cheap, and it is not hard to convince your doctor to order them. You don't need to get fancy. You don't need the NMR and all that other stuff. I'm not saying it doesn't have its place, but if you want to do dietary tests to see what are the big factors affecting you, you just run these standard tests every couple of months and you pick a diet to go on and stay on it for 4-8 weeks and then see what the results are.

 

So, you do the low-fat diet where most of your fat comes from coconut, which is the Kitavan diet, where they don't have heart disease. You can try that for 4 or 8 weeks, and then look at your cholesterol levels. Next you do the low-fat diet where most of your fat comes from olive oil, which is a more of a Mediterranean approach. You can try that and see what that does to your cholesterol levels.

 

You tailor your diet to your own response —  because I can predict what will generally happen, but the individual person is going to have so many different genetic and other factors, that influence what they're responsive to that they just need to test it out.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



How would you address normal TSH but low T4? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #05

Nov 14, 2019 04:25

Description:

How would you address normal TSH, but low T4? 

 

Well, the first thing I'd do is I'd look at your T3. For those of you who aren't familiar with thyroid hormones, TSH tells your thyroid to make thyroid hormone. T4 is the precursor. T3 is the active hormone. 

 

If your TSH is normal, that means that your pituitary is receiving the proper messages from your thyroid gland.

 

But if your T4 is low I would ask; is your T3 normal or high? If your T3 is high, then you're probably just converting it very rapidly. If your T3 is low —  then even though your pituitary appears to be receiving the right signals, you're not making enough thyroid hormone.

 

In fact, it would become unclear whether your pituitary is actually making the right signal because if your T4 and your T3 are low, your TSH should be high because your pituitary should be saying, "wait a second, T4 and T3 are low, so I need to make more of the message, TSH, to tell the thyroid gland to kick into gear."

 

If T4 and T3 are both on the lowish side and the TSH is normal. I would then look to the pituitary.

 

In terms of nutritional issues, I think the big things that you're looking at are calories, carbohydrate, and body fat — because the pituitary is overwhelmingly asking the question, do I have enough energy in the short term and the long term to engage in the health-promoting, long-term investments that thyroid hormone governs? 

 

Those are many, like all the biological peacocking, like making nice hair, and making nice skin, and making things look nice. It’s also protecting your tissues from damage. Then the big, thing is if you're in the right age bracket, is fertility.

 

So, if your pituitary is not making as much TSH as it should, then that's basically saying your brain perceives that you don't have enough energy on hand, and that means either your body fat's too low, your calories are too low, or your carbs are too low —  because those are the big signals that your brain is going to use.

 

As mentioned int the Nutrition in Neuroscience series that I did all of these releasing hormones that govern the endocrine system require copper, vitamin C, zinc, and glycine. 

 

So bottom line is; look at is body fat, calories, and carbs. But the next layer to peel back would be; vitamin C and copper especially, and zinc and glycine in the background.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Best clinical way to monitor COMT function if you have already tested for SNPs

Nov 13, 2019 03:46

Description:

"What do you think is the best clinical way to monitor COMT function if you have already tested for SNPs?"

 

One way you can look at it is through the DUTCH test — which is at dutchtest.com — it's a dried urine hormone testing platform, they have a methylation index that is based on the methylation of estrogen. For example; the main significance of COMT, is related to long-term risk of estrogen-related cancers.  

 

Acute symptoms are primarily going to manifest in the brain in the relation between COMT and dopamine. 

 

The higher your COMT activity, the more flexible your brain. 

 

The lower your COMT activity, the more rigid your brain. 

 

If your nutrition is straight and you don't have a psychological disorder, that's just a personality trait.

 

They call this the worrier/warrior, phenotype. 

 

High COMT activity; you don't worry as much, like a warrior who picks his battles, wins, and repeats. There is nothing to worry about, the only concern is victory.

 

If you are a low COMT activity; you're not a warrior, you're a worrier. You think about all the possible ways something could go wrong. Instead of moving forward with an image of invincibility, you struggle to move at all, like a deer in the headlights. 

 

But that's the extremes. Within most of the population, it's just a personality trait. 

 

So, you really look at, how is your mind operating? If your mind is getting stuck on stuff, low COMT. If your mind is racing around to different things, high COMT. If that's just your personality, don't worry about it. But if it’s starting to interfere with your life, then that’s where it matters. 

 

Low COMT, focus on methyl donors: B12, folate, choline, betaine, some of the other assisting B vitamins. 

 

High COMT, focus on  methyl buffers: Glycine. 

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Supplements that may increase deep sleep

Nov 12, 2019 03:39

Description:

Supplements that may increase deep sleep. So, deep sleep is, primarily what's going on in deep sleep is that all of your biogenic amines, which are most of the neurotransmitters that you make from protein with the possible except — like depending on how you classify it, you could say ultimately you make melatonin from protein, but it's not a biogenic amine. Biogenic amines, which are the catecholamines — all are basically shut off. They're probably not zero, zero, but they're almost zero during sleep. Acetylcholine is also shut down during deep sleep, but it pops up during REM sleep. I really don't think this is a supplement issue.  First of all, you definitely don't want to be taking anything that has acetylcholinesterase inhibitors at night.  Non-organic foods have pesticides that are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. I don't know if that's relevant here dose-wise. Things that improve cognitive function are often acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. So, gingko biloba is one. I wouldn't take that at night. There are drugs that treat neurological problems, especially Alzheimer's, that are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors; I wouldn't take those at night.  I'm on the fence about whether you should take choline at night. I think it's most likely fine to eat eggs at night. If you're taking something like alpha-GPC; I'm not sure. You might want to avoid that at night if you find, particularly if you find that when you're tracking your sleep with an Oura ring your REM is higher than normal and your deep sleep is lower than normal.  But other than that — I would say that methylation support is very important to help lower some of the important biogenic amines. Histamine, for example, is primarily gotten rid of with methylation in the brain and if your histamine levels are high during the day, it might cause anxiety during the night and that could interfere with your deep sleep. Electrolytes are also super important. Calcium, magnesium, salt and potassium. All these things you need to get straight in order for your sleep cycle to be working right. If your cortisol is high at night or other factors of anxiety are high at night you might want a targeted supplement there, like phosphatidylserine — the evidence is conflicting, but has been used to lower the stress response.  I don't think it's a blanket answer to that question. I think it's like figuring out what's the cause of the low deep sleep and working from there.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here:https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/ 

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep | Masterjohn Q&A Files #02

Nov 11, 2019 06:33

Description:

Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep

 

I don't know enough about the HRV, the heart rate variability, to comment on improving that specifically. Heart rate variability is largely related to recovery from stress. So, I know the Oura ring tracks heart rate variability during sleep. 

 

The main application that I'm familiar with HRV for is recovery from stress, especially from exercise. So anything that supports recovery — mainly is rest, is going to support that. Getting enough carbohydrates to support your high-intensity exercise is going to be another thing.

 

In general, nutrient density across the board is going to be supportive of recovery, and enough calories. 

 

Now, lower anxiety at night before or during sleep I think is a whole different story. 

 

You might have anxiety because you have not recovered well from your exercise. 

 

Maybe your cortisol is running high. 

 

But it could be for totally different reasons, and that's a giant can of worms that I don't think really can be unpacked in an umbrella answer. I think that's kind of something that needs to be very individualized because it requires 10, or 15, or 20 follow-up questions.

 

But some of the first things that I would think about would be what are you doing to psychologically wind down? The fact is that this is not all about nutrition. It's not all about light hygiene. It's also about psychology. So, is your anxiety at night driven by overthinking? If so, what are you overthinking about? You may need to start a psychological wind down routine if this is your issue. 

 

And then, there are so many other potential causes of anxiety that you really have to address it on a case-by-case basis, but those are the top things that I think about.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep | Masterjohn Q&A Files #02

Nov 11, 2019 06:33

Description:

Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep

 

I don't know enough about the HRV, the heart rate variability, to comment on improving that specifically. Heart rate variability is largely related to recovery from stress. So, I know the Oura ring tracks heart rate variability during sleep. 

 

The main application that I'm familiar with HRV for is recovery from stress, especially from exercise. So anything that supports recovery — mainly is rest, is going to support that. Getting enough carbohydrates to support your high-intensity exercise is going to be another thing.

 

In general, nutrient density across the board is going to be supportive of recovery, and enough calories. 

 

Now, lower anxiety at night before or during sleep I think is a whole different story. 

 

You might have anxiety because you have not recovered well from your exercise. 

 

Maybe your cortisol is running high. 

 

But it could be for totally different reasons, and that's a giant can of worms that I don't think really can be unpacked in an umbrella answer. I think that's kind of something that needs to be very individualized because it requires 10, or 15, or 20 follow-up questions.

 

But some of the first things that I would think about would be what are you doing to psychologically wind down? The fact is that this is not all about nutrition. It's not all about light hygiene. It's also about psychology. So, is your anxiety at night driven by overthinking? If so, what are you overthinking about? You may need to start a psychological wind down routine if this is your issue. 

 

And then, there are so many other potential causes of anxiety that you really have to address it on a case-by-case basis, but those are the top things that I think about.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

 

What causes low white blood cell count and what can you do about it?| Masterjohn Q&A Files #01

Nov 4, 2019 02:16

Description:

Nutritional causes of low white blood cells and possible solutions?

 

The absolute first thing that I would always think of when I see low white blood cells is copper. 

 

So, generally copper deficiency at its most sensitive is going to cause neutropenia; which is low neutrophils, but it can cause low white blood cells across the board. I'm not saying there aren't other things, but that's going to be the number one thing that I jump to first when looking for low white blood cells.

 

Solutions, well, I'm not going to assuming it's copper. What I'm going to say is, do we have copper here? So, the first thing is testing serum copper, or serum ceruloplasmin. Which are the two most important markers of copper status. 

 

Is the individual eating copper-rich foods? 

 

Top Tier: Liver, oysters, shitake mushrooms, spirulina, and cocoa powder.

 

Second Tier: All other organ meats other than liver, all other mushrooms besides shitake, all other shellfish besides oysters. 

 

Third Tier: Legumes, and potatoes. 

 

First I want to know if they are eating any of the top two tier copper-rich foods. If the answer is no, then I'm not going to wait on the serum copper and serum ceruloplasmin.

 

I would suggest increasing the copper-rich foods because there is absolutely no harm in modifying the foods you eat to ensure you’re getting some in there. 

 

You don't really need the testing to do that. But I would definitely get the testing before I would start doing any bigger interventions than that. For example, I'm not going to start that person on a copper supplement if I don't have good data backing up copper deficiency.

 

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/

 

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



What causes low white blood cell count and what can you do about it? | Masterjohn Q&A Files #01

Nov 4, 2019 02:16

Description:

Nutritional causes of low white blood cells and possible solutions?

The absolute first thing that I would always think of when I see low white blood cells is copper. 

So, generally copper deficiency at its most sensitive is going to cause neutropenia; which is low neutrophils, but it can cause low white blood cells across the board. I'm not saying there aren't other things, but that's going to be the number one thing that I jump to first when looking for low white blood cells.

Solutions, well, I'm not going to assuming it's copper. What I'm going to say is, do we have copper here? So, the first thing is testing serum copper, or serum ceruloplasmin. Which are the two most important markers of copper status. 

Is the individual eating copper-rich foods? 

Top Tier: Liver, oysters, shitake mushrooms, spirulina, and cocoa powder.

Second Tier: All other organ meats other than liver, all other mushrooms besides shitake, all other shellfish besides oysters. 

Third Tier: Legumes, and potatoes. 

First I want to know if they are eating any of the top two tier copper-rich foods. If the answer is no, then I'm not going to wait on the serum copper and serum ceruloplasmin.

I would suggest increasing the copper-rich foods because there is absolutely no harm in modifying the foods you eat to ensure you’re getting some in there. 

You don't really need the testing to do that. But I would definitely get the testing before I would start doing any bigger interventions than that. For example, I'm not going to start that person on a copper supplement if I don't have good data backing up copper deficiency.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/02/09/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-1-2019/

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a



Ask Us Anything About Sports Nutrition with Chad Macias, Danny Lennon, and Alex Leaf, May 25, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #68

Oct 23, 2019 02:28:24

Description:

On May 25, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me, Chad Macias, Danny Lennon, and Alex Leaf in a live Zoom meeting to ask us anything about sports nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

Is there a risk of depleting histidine with beta-alanine supplementation? What’s the best form of fuel to use during a workout? Candy, or something else? Nutritional strategies for recovery from soft tissue injuries to muscles, tendons and ligaments from lifting? Is AMPK the primary regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle, and does it matter? Can riboflavin help with exercise performance? Why the post-workout anabolic window DOES matter, and why you should NOT eat too much protein BEFORE lifting. Take BCAAs, or just eat protein? Should athletes cycle caffeine, and does it matter if they are fast or slow oxidizers? Nitric oxide: does it have important effects by modifying proteins, rather than just affecting blood flow? Is it delayed-onset muscle soreness if it happens all the time? Or is it a pathology? Transdermal carnosine (Lactigo) for fibromyalgia, the role of glutamate and neurotoxicity in fibromyalgia and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and my own experience with using high blood glutamate to identify how acidity was wrecking me after workouts. Maximizing muscle growth and optimizing performance on a low-protein diet. Best time to take Tru Niagen (nicotinamide riboside) and TMG (trimethylglycine), especially the purpose of increasing exercise tolerance. How important are refeeds for dieters? Carbohydrate periodization for endurance athletes? Is there any value to training low during those times where you depend on glucose to either try to train your body to better tap into limited glycogen stores or to try to create a better aerobic response? Besides leucine, what could help increase protein synthesis to prevent sarcopenia in older adults who strength-train regularly?  For muscle growth, what generally applies to everyone?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

02:54 Is there a risk of depleting histidine with beta-alanine supplementation?

08:40 What’s the best form of fuel to use during a workout. Candy, or something else?

19:17 Nutritional strategies for recovery from soft tissue injuries to muscles, tendons and ligaments from lifting?

22:55 Is AMPK the primary regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle or are there other important pathways that need to be considered and which can be targeted by nutrition in addition to endurance training?

28:43 Can riboflavin help with exercise performance?

39:30 Why the post-workout anabolic window DOES matter.

44:26 Does the form of HMB matter?

49:07 Why you should NOT eat too much protein BEFORE lifting.

54:34 Take BCAAs, or just eat protein?

59:13 Summarizing the things that help with muscle growth.

1:00:28  How should caffeine be cycled if being used to enhance weightlifting performance and/or weight loss? Is there a difference for fast or slow metabolizers of caffeine?

1:04:25 More on caffeine

1:09:30 Caffeine for weightlifters

1:14:30  Nitric oxide: does it have important effects by modifying proteins, rather than just affecting blood flow?

1:20:42 Is it delayed-onset muscle soreness if it happens all the time? Or is it a pathology?

1:24:34 Transdermal carnosine (Lactigo) for fibromyalgia. My own experience with using high blood glutamate to identify how acidity was wrecking me after workouts.

1:30:04 The role of extracellular glutamate and neurotoxicity driving DOMS and fibromyalgia. 

1:31:46 Recommendations for maximizing muscle growth and optimizing performance on a low-protein diet.

1:41:59 Best time to take Tru Niagen (nicotinamide riboside) and TMG (trimethylglycine) especially the purpose of increasing exercise tolerance.

1:52:24 How important are refeeds for dieters?

1:54:42 Carbohydrate periodization for endurance athletes.

1:59:12 Is there any value to training low during those times where you depend on glucose to either try to train your body to better tap into limited glycogen stores or to try to create a better aerobic response?

2:08:27 Besides leucine, what could help increase protein synthesis to prevent sarcopenia in older adults who strength-train regularly?

Ask Us Anything About Hormones with Dr. Carrie Jones, May 10, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #67

Oct 19, 2019 02:16:57

Description:

On May 10, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me and Dr. Carrie Jones in a live Zoom meeting to ask us anything about hormones, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

What time of day is best to take T4 and/or T3? How to use pregnenolone to manage perimenopausal insomnia? Is insomnia different between people who are and aren't on HRT? Estrogen’s effect on the kynurenine pathway could be keeping you up at night. What about men with high estrogen? Over-the-counter supplements to lower SHBG and increased free testosterone? Mycotoxins Iodine, fatigue, and “detox” reactions. Loss of libido and sexual sensation with the LEEP procedure: could progesterone and vitamin E help? What else? Should I be on testosterone replacement therapy? Supporting hormones with nutrition. Why is early morning waking a characteristic symptom of depression and what other conditions have early waking as a symptom? Causes for night sweats in men? Nutritional advice for breast cancer prevention, and the HRT question. Water retention near menstruation. Why would a woman have no cycle? Why would a woman have an anovulatory cycle? What can be done to reverse hypothyroidism other than taking thyroid hormone?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

04:20   Introduction

07:55     Guidance on what time of day it is best to take T4 and/or T3?

10:37     The use of pregnenolone to manage perimenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia

12:30      Insomnia is different between people who are and aren't on HRT?

14:15       Estrogen and kynurenine pathway

19:02       Aromatizing in Men

21:40       Over-the-counter supplements to lower SHBG and increased free T, boron, zinc, various herbs

24:20      Discussion about Mycotoxin.

28:48     Discussions in Iodine and mild fatigue and detox.

35:14     Discussion on soft tissue calcification.

40:40    Discussion on LEEP Procedure

45:53     Discussion on testosterone

54:30     Suggestions on supplements to assist with delayed onset muscle soreness. 

55:48     How does the body make hormones and what nutrients and foods do they need to do this?

59:29     Know more about hormone production.

1:09:00  Why is early morning waking a characteristic symptom of depression and what other conditions have imbalances of early waking as a symptom?

1:17:00   When should you consider increasing progesterone or estrogen.

1:20:30   Causes for night sweats in men.

1:25:00   Dietary nutritional advice for breast cancer prevention, macronutrient ratios, micronutrient intakes, et cetera. Also any thoughts on risks and benefits of HRT in perimenopause relative to breast cancer risk?

1:28:29   Discussions on Methylation

1:34:35   Struggles with water retention around period.

1:39:23   Why would a woman have no cycle? Why would a woman have an anovulatory cycle?

1:45:02   What can be done to reverse hypothyroidism other than taking thyroid medicine? 

Pantothenic Acid, Part 2 (Testing, Food, and Supplements) | Mastering Nutrition #66

Oct 9, 2019 02:22:51

Description:

This is part 2 of the pantothenic acid Mastering Nutrition podcast. Pantothenate is also known as vitamin B5! It supports your mood, mental health, skin clarity, energy, sleep, and comfort.

Alex Leaf and I team up again, this time to how to get B5 from foods and supplements, and how to know when you’re getting enough.

When you aren’t getting enough, you may suffer from fatigue, apathy, discomfort, uneasiness, or pain. You may get numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. You may get depressed, quarrelsome, childish, or want to spend all day in bed. Your pulse may get higher than you’d expect after minor exertion. Your sleep gets trashed. You get muscle cramps and abdominal cramps, you fart more, and when things get real bad you might throw up.

The best test for measuring B5 status is urinary pantothenic acid. Currently, the only place I know where to get this is the Great Plains OAT test. Hopefully someone will offer it as a standalone. Blood tests are not very useful. 😔

Official recommendations suggest we only need about 5 milligrams per day. In the podcast we discuss why some people might need GRAMS per day. 

❗❗❗There aren’t ANY supplements on the market that have the major forms of B5 found in food. There is good reason to think that food B5 is superior to supplements such as pantothenic acid and pantethine.❗❗❗

I recommend shooting for 10 milligrams per day from food, and then supplementing more when necessary:

 2 heaping tablespoons of unfortified nutritional yeast gives you 10 mg.
 2 100-gram servings of roasted sunflower seeds or the livers of chicken, beef, lamb, or veal will give you this, but I recommend limiting liver to two servings per week.

3 100-gram servings of gjetost cheese, black and red caviar, kidney from lamb imported from New Zealand, pork liver (and most products made from it), shiitake mushrooms, or canned grape leaves will do the trick.

Most fresh cuts of muscle meat give you enough in somewhere between 3-5 100-gram servings, though some require up to four pounds and the data is pretty messy.

Five 100-gram servings of any of the following will work: eggs, duck, goose, emu, fresh salmon or trout, raw avocado, canned chilli, peanuts, peanut butter, cashews, white or portabella mushrooms, liver pate (limit to 5 servings per week), giiblets or heart from chicken or turkey, beef thymus or heart, pork kidney or brain, or lamb brain.

The following can give you enough if you eat four pounds of them: whole grains, most natural dairy products besides butter, most seafood that isn’t canned, most beans that aren’t canned, raw coconut, most nuts and seeds, and most processed meats.

Here are a few reasons to supplement:

One gram of pantothenic acid from sodium or calcium pantothenate has been used for rheumatoid arthritis, and 2-10 grams per day have been used for acne. In acne, a topical cream containing dexpanthenol (a cream-soluble form of B5, the cream usually marketed as wound-healing cream) is combined with the oral dose.

300 mg pantethine 3 times per day lowers cholesterol.

These doses appear extremely safe, with only a very small proportion of people experiencing minor side effects even at these very high doses.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

More details in this huge podcast! Listen in below!

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

01:14 Recap of Part 1

06:39 Cliff Notes

14:51 The case for why urinary pantothenic acid is the only legitimate marker of nutritional status and why blood concentration is not a useful marker

28:23 How the Adequate Intake for pantothenic acid was established

29:42 The idea of pantothenic acid balance and comparing it to nitrogen balance

41:38 What I think the recommended pantothenic acid intake should be

45:06 The effect of different forms of food processing on loss of B5 from foods

50:21 Dietary sources of B5, divided into five tiers

54:11 The contribution of the gastrointestinal microbiome to B5 status

01:06:12 Causes of suboptimal status or deficiency of pantothenic acid

01:11:59 Prevalence of suboptimal pantothenic acid status

01:12:32 When I think supplementation with high doses is warranted

01:13:10 What are some of the benefits, besides fixing deficiency, that we might get from supplementing with pantothenic acid or its derivatives?

01:13:26 The use of pantethine as a therapeutic for dyslipidemia

01:23:01 Comparison of pantethine supplementation to high-dose niacin for lowering blood lipids

01:25:33 Topical dexpanthenol for skin health and wound healing

01:29:13 The effect of pantothenic acid supplementation on acne

01:32:42 The effect of pantothenic acid supplementation on sports performance

01:40:58 The effect of pantothenic acid supplementation on hair health

01:42:34 The effect of pantothenic acid supplementation on arthritis

01:48:31 Summary of pantothenic acid supplementation

01:52:28 Is there any reason to use pantothenic acid specifically versus other forms such as pantethine?

01:54:49 Does it matter if you take pantothenic acid in divided doses or all at once?

01:57:08 Does it matter if you take pantothenic acid with food?

01:58:51 Two insightful quotes from papers on pantothenic acid

02:04:08 Pantothenate should be known as the B vitamin that we know the least about, not the B vitamin that we are least likely to become deficient in.

Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, March 8, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #65

Sep 6, 2019 02:58:18

Description:

On March 8, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me in a live Zoom meeting to ask me anything about nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

What to do if zinc causes nausea?  When on a ketogenic diet, it is a problem if ketones are going up to 5 to 6 millimoles per liter? What if I'm on a ketogenic diet, and I can't get my ketone levels up higher than 1 millimole per liter when my primary reason for being on the ketogenic diet is that I'm trying to control blood glucose better? Advice for what to do after suffering a transient ischemic attack. Nutrients important for neuroregeneration. What causes sinus congestion, and what can help? Nutrition for children with ADHD. Nutritional recommendations for MTR and MTRR polymorphisms. Why the main problem with hyperglycemia is not glucose but rather advanced glycation end products, and why the main determinant of advanced glycation end products is low insulin signaling. Does the difference between cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin, and methylcobalamin matter, and does the difference between sublingual, oral, and intramuscular injection matter? Could fat malabsorption be driven by genetic polymorphisms that lower activity the PEMT enzyme? And could fat malabsorption in general be causing not only mineral deficiencies but also hyperabsorption of oxalate from foods? Why am I always sneezing first thing in the morning? What if I cannot get my ferritin up and supplementing iron actually raises my serum iron well above the normal range? A rant on why many people use “MTHFR” to slap a label on their health problems.

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral 

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:43 Cliff Notes

11:13 Introduction

13:23 Should blacks and whites have different normal ranges for their HDL cholesterol? And general principles we should keep in mind when thinking about interracial differences or differences between groups.

17:24 Are there any solutions to getting nauseated from zinc supplements even at low doses and even when the zinc comes as oysters?

22:35 When on a ketogenic diet, it is a problem if ketones are going up to 5 to 6 millimoles per liter?

26:17 Advice for what to do after suffering a transient ischemic attack

35:57 Nutrients important for neuroregeneration

39:26 What causes sinus congestion, and what can help?

42:36 Do MTHFR polymorphisms other than the famous C677T and A1298C matter at all?

44:54 Nutrition for children with ADHD

57:07 How to address orthostatic hypotension

58:53 Nutritional recommendations for MTR and MTRR polymorphisms

01:10:54 Do you know anything about the value of lithium for ADHD?

01:11:08 Information about my free Vitamins and Minerals 101 class

01:13:30 Why the main problem with hyperglycemia is not glucose but rather advanced glycation end products, and why the main determinant of advanced glycation end products is low insulin signaling.

01:24:19 Thoughts on nutrition and breast health

01:33:03 Is it useful to measure urine pH?

01:39:57 What would be a high dose of iodine?

01:41:29 Recommended dose of glycine

01:43:31 Does the difference between cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin, and methylcobalamin matter, and does the difference between sublingual, oral, and intramuscular injection matter?

01:53:10 Are bilirubin and uric acid useful markers of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress? What are better markers?

01:58:25 Could an elevated BUN indicate protein malabsorption and low stomach acid?

02:03:31 What if I'm on a ketogenic diet, and I can't get my ketone levels up higher than 1 millimole per liter when my primary reason for being on the ketogenic diet is that I'm trying to control blood glucose better?

02:04:39 Could fat malabsorption be driven by genetic polymorphisms that lower activity the PEMT enzyme? And could fat malabsorption in general be causing not only mineral deficiencies but also hyperabsorption of oxalate from foods?

02:08:18 How to manage blood levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

02:09:57 Why am I always sneezing first thing in the morning?

02:12:03 Follow-up to question about ketone levels

02:12:48 What if I cannot get my ferritin up and supplementing iron actually raises my serum iron well above the normal range?

02:19:25 What about pyroluria and measuring kryptopyrroles?

02:22:51 Are there safety concerns in supplementing cyanocobalamin rather methylcobalamin in those with MTHFR polymorphisms? And a rant on why many people use “MTHFR” to slap a label on their health problems.

02:34:14 Advice for patient with hypercholesterolemia, elevated fasting glucose and insulin, ferritin of 194, and iron saturation of 33%

02:45:31 What to do about high fasting glucose that only seems to improve with long sleep

02:48:00 What should the upper limit of fatty fish intake be?

Riboflavin for Strange Unresolved Health Problems | Chris Masterjohn Lite # 153

Jul 9, 2019 08:48

Description:

Got any strange, unresolved health problems? 🤭

High-dose riboflavin might help! 

MIGHT. 😬

This episode is a shot in the dark, but covers how high-dose riboflavin could help with a lot of mystery issues.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101 

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet 

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10 

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/18/exercise-dieting-make-need-riboflavin

How to Get Enough Riboflavin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/20/7774

The Best Blood Test for Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/06/25/best-blood-test-riboflavin

Riboflavin Supplements: Free B2 Is Better Than FMN or Riboflavin 5’-Phosphate

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/06/18

Riboflavin for Iron-Deficiency Anemia

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/07/02/riboflavin-iron-deficiency-anemia

High-Dose Riboflavin for Migraines

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/07/04/high-dose-riboflavin-migraines

 

Save Hundreds on My Consulting Services -- Expires July 8, Monday at Midnight

Jul 7, 2019 07:59

Description:

Hey Everyone!

From now through midnight on Monday, July 8, I'm offering big discounts on my consulting services.

📌 First, if you purchase an appointment, gift certificate, or package, by that time, you will lock in my 2020 rates at $300/hour. July 9 they are going up to $450. This alone saves $150 off each appointment, and saves $300 off appointments that have one-hour data analysis add-ons.

📌 Second, if you *also* sign up for the CMJ Masterpass by midnight on Monday, July 8, I'm offering two additional benefits:

✅ My September through December, 2019 rates will go down from their current $450/h to $300/h. This saves $150 off each appointment and saves $300 off the price of appointments with a one-hour data analysis add-on.

✅ You'll get a unique coupon code that takes an additional $50 off July and August 2019 appointments (bringing them from $450 to $400 for a one-hour call, and not affecting the rate of data analysis add-ons) and all 2020 appointments, bringing them from $300 to $250 for a one-hour call, and not affecting the rate of data analysis add-ons.

👉 To take full advantage of this offer, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass using this link: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-master…/…/buy…

👉 Then purchase a package or gift certificate using this link: https://app.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php?owner=16124930

👉 Then email me and I will send you a unique link you can use to get the correct prices.

Additionally, please read about what I offer using this link: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/consultations and on the purchase page please look at my availability in the calendar and at my terms before signing up.

After you sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, you'll see the first post when you log in has more detail about how the logistics of this offer (like how to access your coupon code, for example).

Additionally, in case it helps, here is my previous post with a short summary of what I offer:

🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶
Hey everyone! 🙋‍♂️

I'm now accepting new consulting clients!

My expertise is my PhD in nutrition, with my extensive experience converting science into practical strategies for improving health, with my main interest being developing unique insights and ways of approaching things. I am not a doctor, and if you choose to work with me you will not be my patient. Rather, I will offer my opinions and knowledge to you, and will give you suggestions to help you solve your problems or achieve your goals.

In this capacity I consider myself a consultant and not a coach. I am good at giving you my logical analysis of your health data and pointing you in the right direction. I am not as good at providing motivation and accountability, and I do not offer the type of day-to-day contact that is well suited to motivational coaching.

My clients do best when they schedule appointments approximately three months apart. This provides enough time for them to try something, generate some personal experience or data, or to run tests and send me the results. This way I have new information to help interpret and I use it to help my clients revise their health programs and strategies.

The issues I am best at helping with are these:

✅ vitamin and mineral nutrition
✅ blood lipids
✅ weight loss
✅ thyroid hormones
✅ methylation
✅ antioxidant status
✅ blood sugar regulation
✅ energy metabolism and specific impairments in its pathways
✅ plasma amino acid and urine organic acid tests

🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶🔶

Once again these are the three things you need to do by midnight, July 8, to take full advantage of this offer:

👉 Sign up for the CMJ Masterpass using this link: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-master…/…/buy…

👉 Then purchase a package or gift certificate using this link: https://app.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php?owner=16124930

👉 Then email me and I will send you a unique link you can use to get the correct prices.

I look forward to working with you! 😊

High-Dose Riboflavin for Migraines | Chris Masterjohn Lite #152

Jul 4, 2019 07:58

Description:

Got migraines? 😣

You may need a LOT of riboflavin! 😮

This episode covers what dose to use, and how to time the dosing.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101 

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet 

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10 

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/18/exercise-dieting-make-need-riboflavin

How to Get Enough Riboflavin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/20/7774

The Best Blood Test for Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/06/25/best-blood-test-riboflavin

Riboflavin Supplements: Free B2 Is Better Than FMN or Riboflavin 5’-Phosphate

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/06/18

Riboflavin for Iron-Deficiency Anemia

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/07/02/riboflavin-iron-deficiency-anemia

Riboflavin for Iron-Deficiency Anemia | Chris Masterjohn Lite #151

Jul 2, 2019 07:01

Description:

Got anemia? 🙋🏽🙋🏼‍🙋‍♀️🙋🏿‍♀️

You may need more riboflavin! 😮

This episode covers how to know if your iron-deficiency anemia could be helped by riboflavin, and what to do about it using food and supplements.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/18/exercise-dieting-make-need-riboflavin

How to Get Enough Riboflavin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/20/7774

The Best Blood Test for Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/06/25/best-blood-test-riboflavin

Riboflavin Supplements: Free B2 Is Better Than FMN or Riboflavin 5’-Phosphate

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/06/18

Riboflavin Supplements: Free B2 Is Better Than FMN or Riboflavin 5’-Phosphate | CML #150

Jun 27, 2019 08:29

Description:

What’s the best riboflavin supplement? 🤷‍♂️

For years I thought it was riboflavin 5’-phosphate, also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN). In this episode, I explain why I know believe it is plain old riboflavin.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/18/exercise-dieting-make-need-riboflavin

How to Get Enough Riboflavin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/20/7774

The Best Blood Test for Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/06/25/best-blood-test-riboflavin

The Best Blood Test for Riboflavin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #149

Jun 25, 2019 06:25

Description:

This episode covers the best blood test to use for assessing riboflavin status.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet


To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

How to Get Enough Riboflavin From Food | Chris Masterjohn Lite #148

Jun 20, 2019 10:35

Description:

Here’s how to get RIBOFLAVIN from FOOD. 🍲 😋

This episode covers how to figure out how much you need, and which foods to get it from.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/18/exercise-dieting-make-need-riboflavin

Pantothenic Acid, Part 1 (What It Is and Why We Need It) | Mastering Nutrition #64

Jun 19, 2019 02:15:29

Description:

Pantothenic acid is vitamin B5. You use it to make coenzyme A, a molecule that is central to energy metabolism, most famous for forming acetyl CoA, which lies at the intersection of all anabolic (building up) and catabolic (breaking down) reactions.

Alex Leaf and I team up again, this time to tackle B5.

This is what happens when you don’t have enough:

You get fatigue apathy, discomfort, uneasiness, or pain. You get numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. You may get depressed, quarrelsome, childish, or want to spend all day in bed. Your pulse gets higher than you’d expect after minor exertion. Your sleep gets trashed. You get muscle cramps and abdominal cramps, you fart more, and when things get real bad you might throw up.

Much of this can be explained by pantothenic acid’s role in working all of this magic:

We use it break down fat, protein, and carbohydrate for energy. We use it to synthesize fatty acids, ketones, and cholesterol. We use it to synthesize all of the steroid hormones, including the sex hormones, the glucocorticoids that regulate blood sugar, and the mineralcorticoids that regulate electrolyte balance and blood pressure. We use it to regulate our use of iron properly, including preventing its accumulation in the brain, where it can cause neurological damage. We use it to make melatonin, which tells our body it’s time to sleep. We use it to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in learning, memory, and cognitive performance during periods of sustained, focused attention. We use it to make mucin, which lubricates the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, vagina, penis, and internal organs. We use it to regulate the fasting/feeding cycle by flipping on the genes for autophagy during fasting and flipping on the genes for repair and antioxidant defense during feeding. We use it for quite a few other things too, like the detoxification of some drugs; the synthesis of hemoglobin to prevent anemia; switching on the urea cycle to help us burn protein for energy cleanly; using folate to synthesize DNA, all the major vitamin-derived carriers in the system of energy metabolism, and glycine, an amino acid that acts as a calming, sleep-promoting neurotransmitter, stabilizes blood sugar, and supports collagen synthesis to make your bones strong and your skin smooth.

Burning fat only requires 20% more B5 than burning carbs, which is small compared to how these macros affect riboflavin requirements, However, under conditions of stress you can burn carbohydrate without any B5 at all and you cannot do that with fat. In mice with severe deficiencies of coenzyme A, ketogenic diets dramatically worsen the neurological effects of deficiency.

Although pantothenic acid is named for its presence everywhere and in everything using the Greek word “pantos,” and the common dogma is that no one is deficient, Alex and I make the case in this two-part podcast that suboptimal pantothenic acid status might just be the norm.

And the crazy thing? Official recommendations suggest we only need about 5 milligrams per day. In the podcast we discuss why some people might need GRAMS per day.

Plus, why the FOOD forms might be superior to anything you can get in any supplements on the market.

In part 2, to be released on July 5, we’ll cover how to get pantothenic acid in foods, blood tests, and supplements.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

14:02 Symptoms of experimentally induced pantothenic acid deficiency

15:57 It is thought that pantothenic acid deficiency doesn’t occur naturally.

18:59 Experiments inducing pantothenic acid deficiency

26:06 Signs and symptoms of suboptimal pantothenic acid status

26:54 Is there pantothenic acid toxicity?

30:52 Hypothetical problems of taking high doses of pantothenic acid

31:53 What pantothenic acid is

35:28 Comparisons to niacin and riboflavin

37:14 Roles of coenzyme A

46:02 Roles of 4’-phosphopantetheine

48:12 Burning fat requires 20% more vitamin B5 than burning carbohydrate; and why in the context of severe deficiency of B5 or impairment in the metabolism of B5 a high-fat diet could have devastating consequences.

53:09 The importance of the ratio of acetyl-CoA to free CoA in regulating many metabolic pathways

01:01:02 There are metabolic disorders, such as fatty acid oxidation disorders, that compromise the pool of coenzyme A.

01:03:03 Synthesis of coenzyme A

01:06:47 How coenzyme A synthesis is regulated

01:11:38 Degradation of coenzyme A

01:15:44 The physiology of pantothenic acid absorption

01:25:29 A 2015 paper showed that 4’-phosphopantetheine can cross cell membranes via passive diffusion.

01:29:00 The physiology of pantothenic acid transport in the blood

01:32:11 Cellular uptake of pantothenic acid from the blood

01:33:21 Tissue distribution of pantothenic acid

01:36:00 There may be a particularly high need for pantothenic acid in adolescence.

01:37:01 Mothers actively transfer pantothenic acid to their fetuses and into their milk at their own expense.

01:39:29 Pharmacokinetics of supplementation

01:48:20 A case for why food is superior to supplements for vitamin B5

01:52:41 Inborn errors of coenzyme A metabolism include pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).

Exercise and Dieting Make You Need More Riboflavin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #147

Jun 18, 2019 07:12

Description:

Losing weight? Leaning out? Slimming down? 🙋🏽🙋🏼‍♂️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️🙋🏿‍♀️

Hitting the gym? Doing cardio? Gettin’ yo fat-burnin’ on? 🙋🏽🙋🏼‍♂️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️🙋🏿‍♀️

You might need more riboflavin. 😬

This episode covers by how much, and how to get it from food.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/13/high-fat-diets-make-need-riboflavin

High-Fat Diets Make You Need More Riboflavin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #146

Jun 13, 2019 06:20

Description:

Eating keto? Low-carb? High-fat? 🙋🏽🙋🏼‍♂️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️🙋🏿‍♀️

You might need more riboflavin. 😬

This episode covers how much more you’d need and how to get it from food.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/11/riboflavin-tanning-beds-fungal-infections

Riboflavin and Tanning Beds for Fungal Infections? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #145

Jun 11, 2019 09:49

Description:

Have a fungal infection? Here’s how the combination of tanning beds and riboflavin might help.

This is speculative, but worth trying for many people. Make sure to talk to your doctor about any infections you have and anything you’re doing to treat them.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/06/7758

Sunlight and Tanning Beds Hurt Your Riboflavin Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #144

Jun 6, 2019 06:51

Description:

Do you sunbathe or use tanning beds? If so, you might need more riboflavin.

Tune in for the details.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/06/04/know-need-riboflavin

How to Know If You Need More Riboflavin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #143

Jun 4, 2019 07:47

Description:

Riboflavin is the ultimate fat-burning nutrient. 🔥

Could you need more of it? This episode covers the signs you could need a just a little more, and what it would look like if you started running real low.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive podcast I did on riboflavin with Alex Leaf, which has 50 scientific references:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

Here are some previous posts on riboflavin:

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (written version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/riboflavinmthfr

Your “MTHFR” is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency (video version)

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency-2/

How to Take Niacin Without Hurting Your Liver | Chris Masterjohn Lite #142

May 30, 2019 09:42

Description:

Niacin is great! BUT… It can hurt your liver. 😟

This episode covers a protocol to make sure niacin doesn’t hurt your liver. It covers the specific form you take, your health history, the dose, and what to take it with to protect your liver.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here is Alex’s blog post on this specific topic:

https://alexleaf.com/2019/02/22/niacin-heart-disease-liver-toxicity-and-diabetes/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/30/know-need-niacin

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/14/get-enough-niacin-food

The Best Blood Test for Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/16/best-blood-test-niacin

Should You Use Niacin to Lower Your Blood Lipids?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/21/7721

How to Take Niacin Without Getting Diabetes

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/23/take-niacin-without-getting-diabetes

How to Take Niacin Without Flushing

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/28/take-niacin-without-flushing

How to Take Niacin Without Flushing | Chris Masterjohn Lite #141

May 28, 2019 06:51

Description:

Ugh, the NIACIN FLUSH! 🥵🥵🥵

This episode covers what to do and what NOT to do to avoid it. It covers slow-release niacin, extended-release niacin, inositol hexanicotinate, niacinamide, aspirin, and waiting it out.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here is Alex’s blog post on this specific topic:

https://alexleaf.com/2019/02/22/niacin-heart-disease-liver-toxicity-and-diabetes/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/30/know-need-niacin

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/14/get-enough-niacin-food

The Best Blood Test for Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/16/best-blood-test-niacin

Should You Use Niacin to Lower Your Blood Lipids?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/21/7721

How to Take Niacin Without Getting Diabetes

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/23/take-niacin-without-getting-diabetes

 

How to Take Niacin Without Getting Diabetes | Chris Masterjohn Lite #140

May 23, 2019 10:50

Description:

Here’s how to take NIACIN 😁… without getting DIABETES. 😔

Alex Leaf and I did a HUGE podcast on niacin, and Alex looked at the data on whether it is safe and effective to use for preventing heart disease.

Based on that data, one out of every 18 people who use it for this purpose get saved from heart disease, but for every 7 people saved from heart disease, 3 get diabetes.

In this episode I cover Alex’s idea on how to take niacin without getting diabetes.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here is Alex’s blog post on this specific topic:

https://alexleaf.com/2019/02/22/niacin-heart-disease-liver-toxicity-and-diabetes/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/14/get-enough-niacin-food

The Best Blood Test for Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/16/best-blood-test-niacin

Should You Use Niacin to Lower Your Blood Lipids?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/21/7721

 

Should You Use Niacin to Lower Your Blood Lipids? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #139

May 21, 2019 10:05

Description:

Should you use niacin to lower your blood lipids?

For every seven people that this saves from heart disease, three get diabetes. This episode covers alternative strategies to achieve the same effect of niacin on blood lipids without the risk of diabetes.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/14/get-enough-niacin-food

The Best Blood Test for Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/16/best-blood-test-niacin

The Best Blood Test for Niacin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #138

May 16, 2019 08:09

Description:

Here’s why the best test for niacin status is HDRI’s NADH/NADPH, how to use it to calculate the niacin number, and what numbers you should be aiming for.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/14/get-enough-niacin-food

How to Get Enough Niacin From Food | Chris Masterjohn Lite #137

May 14, 2019 11:41

Description:

Here’s how to get NIACIN from FOOD. 🍲😋

I recommend getting a half gram to a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight (double this if you measure your weight in kilograms), which contributes to your niacin status, as well as 20 milligrams of preformed niacin from food per day.

So, here are your foods, arranged in five tiers.

Tier 1 supplies close to 15 mg or more per serving.

Fresh yellowfin or shipjack tuna, anchovies, liver (beef, lamb, pork), unfortified nutritional yeast in the amount of 3 heaping tbsp.

Tier 2 supplies 7-14 mg per serving.

Peanuts and peanut butter, liver (veal, chicken, turkey), most fresh meat products from typical farm animals and game if they are lean cuts, certain fish (canned or fresh bluefin tuna, salmon, mackerel, yellowfin, halibut, American shad, sturgeon, cod, mahimahi, and bluefish), certain seeds (hemp, chia, sunflower).

Tier 3 supplies 3-6 mg per serving.

Most but not all other finfish (but not shellfish); sesame seeds and tahini, pumpkin and squash seeds, pine nuts, almonds, chestnuts, flax seeds, peas, cuts of meat that are not muscle or liver or are fattier, many mushrooms (white, portabella, shiitake, oyster, crimini), coffee (caffeinated, Italian “heavy” roast, 10 g/cup).

Tier 4 supplies 1-2 mg per serving.

Bulking up on these “don’t hurt” your niacin status.

Most beans, most crustaceans, processed meats, white and sweet potatoes, tomatoes, kale, cabbage, coffee (caffeinated, 10 g/cup, French “dark” roast, at high end or New England “light” roast at low end).

Tier 5 supplies less than 1 mg per serving.

Virtually all other foods that are not mostly fat, mostly sugar, or unenriched refined flours contain some niacin. They are harmless if you eat abundantly from tiers 1-3 first, but harmful if you do not, especially if they also serve to stop you from bulking up on tier 4 foods, which is necessary if you don’t meet your requirement from tiers 1-3.

Just bad for niacin status.

Fat, sugar, and unenriched refined flours are the most displacing. The more of these foods you eat, the lower your niacin status will be.

Most enriched flours are in tier 2 or 3.

Traditionally processed whole grains are likely to occupy tier 4.

Honorable Mentions

Some foods are rich but not consumed in enough quantity to be relevant: dried spirulina, chilli powder, coriander, paprika, parsley, ginger, tarragon, red or cayenne pepper would all occupy tier 2 at 100-gram servings.

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How To Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin/

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/09/women-need-niacin-men

Do Women Need More Niacin Than Men? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #136

May 9, 2019 09:31

Description:

Do women need more niacin than men?

The RDA says they need less. But the evidence suggests otherwise.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging

How to Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/30/know-need-niacin

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/07/free-niacin-grains-seeds

 

How to Free the Niacin in Grains and Seeds | Chris Masterjohn Lite # 135

May 7, 2019 08:47

Description:

Are your whole grains and seeds good sources of niacin? That depends on you prepare them!

Whole grains have 80-90% of their niacin locked up, and seeds have 40% of their niacin locked up. This episode covers how to free the bound niacin.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging

How to Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/04/30/know-need-niacin

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite-videos/2019/05/02/coffee-free-locked-niacin

 

 

 

Coffee! How to Free the Locked-Up Niacin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #134

May 2, 2019 06:21

Description:

COFFEE 😍😍😍

Is it a good source of NIACIN?

That depends on how you brew it. This episode has the details on the effect of roasting, coffee strength, and decaffeination.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How to Know If You Need More Niacin

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/30/know-need-niacin/

How to Know If You Need More Niacin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #133

Apr 30, 2019 08:41

Description:

Ever wonder if you need more niacin?

This episode covers the signs and symptoms of niacin deficiency as well as the reasons you’d be likely to become deficient.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Vitamins and Minerals 101. This is my new, free, 30-day course that covers the basics of each nutrient, including why it’s important, how to get it from food, how to know if you need more, when you should think about supplementing, and concerns for special diets or special populations. You can get it delivered by Facebook Messenger or email. The Messenger version is taught by Chris Masterbot, my baby bot, is more interactive, and has more jokes and emojis. This requires no background beyond high school and is made for the beginner, but even many experts find it a great refresher and find little golden nuggets in each lesson. Sign up for free at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/101

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I've been through the pain and suffering of embracing a diet because I *thought* it was healthy, only for it to wreck my body and mind. I've been through the path of healing, only to make the mistakes of thinking that what worked best for me would work for everyone, and that what I did to heal would be something I would need to do forever. I've learned the hard way that each of us is unique, and that we all change with time. Your needs are not mine, mine are not what they were ten years ago, and yours won’t be in ten years what they are now. That’s why we need a recipe to know exactly what’s missing, what’s there in excess, and what’s out of balance. It is my mission to empower you to know exactly what your body needs, and to make exactly the right decisions to nourish it. Make the cheat sheet your secret weapon, and use the code LITE20 to get 20% off, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

Here are other recent episodes on niacin:

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+?

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/25/safely-take-nicotinamide-riboside-anti-aging/

How to Safely Take Nicotinamide Riboside for Anti-Aging | Chris Masterjohn Lite #132

Apr 25, 2019 07:12

Description:

Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is the best form of niacin to take for anti-aging benefits.

BUT… it could sap your creatine supply, making you weaker, hurting your digestion, or causing you to get depressed.

AND it could mess with your dopamine, giving you “sticky brain” syndrome, causing negative thoughts and emotions to get stuck in your mind.

How do we protect against this? It all comes down to dose, frequency, timing it with meals, and making sure you have enough methyl donors.

Tune in for the details.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

I don’t have an affiliate relationship with Niagen, but I have one with Amazon, and if you would like to purchase the recommended product in a way that offers me a small commission to support the free work I put out at no extra cost to you, you can use this link:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/niagen

Here’s a Twitter exchange I had with Charles Brenner, who patented and distributes that product, in which he ignored all my points about creatine:

https://twitter.com/ChrisMasterjohn/status/1102389284798107651

https://twitter.com/CharlesMBrenner/status/1102394681550360578

The studies Brenner conducted showing NR causes massive excretion of methyl groups:

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/108/2/343/5051210

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27721479/

My original video, Why You Should Be Careful With Niacin and Nicotinamide Riboside: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/26/careful-niacin-nicotinamide-riboside/

Start Here for MTHFR and Methylation: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

The recent videos on niacin and NAD:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/18/should-you-inject-yourself-with-nad/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/23/best-form-niacin-anti-aging/

The Best Form of Niacin for Anti-Aging | Chris Masterjohn Lite #131

Apr 23, 2019 06:43

Description:

Niacin, niacinamide, nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide, oh my! 🙉

Which form should you take for anti-aging? In this episode, I recommend nicotinamide riboside (NR). It’s better at increase NAD+ levels than niacin or niacinamide. It’s probably equal to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), but NMN hasn’t been studied as well. NMN is probably absorbed as NR anyway, and might have lower absorption if your intestines are damaged.

Tune in for the details of why I’m making this recommendation.

Also, stay tuned for the next episode on how to use NR safely, or, use the links below to get the safety details in my long-form niacin podcast.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/

Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

I don’t have an affiliate relationship with Niagen, but I have one with Amazon, and if you would like to purchase the recommended product in a way that offers me a small commission to support the free work I put out at no extra cost to you, you can use this link:


https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/niagen

Should You Inject Yourself With NAD+? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #130

Apr 18, 2019 10:46

Description:

Should you inject yourself with NAD+ to stay young forever? 💉😮

My buddy Ben and some guys at Onnit are doin’ it. 👊

I’m a little less prone to livin’ on the edge. 🤓 I like the idea of living forever, but, well, I don’t want to wind up 🤕 or 🥴.

Tune in for my thoughts on NAD+ injections.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s Joe Rogan’s interview of Ben Greenfield, where I took the clip from used in this episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehfdd1eH4g4

Here’s a massive 2-part podcast series I did on niacin with Alex Leaf, which has 52 scientific references:

Part 1: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/01/niacin-part-1-need/


Part 2: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/16/niacin-part-2-blood-tests-foods-supplements/

What to Do About Fatty Liver | Chris Masterjohn Lite #129

Apr 16, 2019 10:31

Description:

An estimated 70 million Americans have fatty liver disease, and the strongest predictors are obesity and type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

The lab I worked in when I completed my PhD specialized in fatty liver disease, so I did a lot of research on this and have published some papers on it.

Here’s my recommended fix, which I call the “choline-boosting modified fast.” It focuses on weight loss that is as rapid as the person can handle, but no more rapid; using the foods least likely to contribute to liver fat, modified according to the person’s ability to digest them; and supplying the nutrients needed to remove fat from the liver through foods, if possible, and otherwise through supplements.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10


My “Start Here for Fatty Liver” page has many of my articles on this topic, rich with scientific references: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2016/04/24/start-here-for-fatty-liver-disease/

Vitamin A and Fatty Liver | Chris Masterjohn Lite #128

Apr 11, 2019 06:30

Description:

Fatty liver can hurt your liver’s ability to store vitamin A, which could make vitamin A supplements or vitamin A-rich foods toxic. Yet one of the main conditions that causes fatty liver -- obesity -- also makes your cell’s deficient in vitamin A, deep down inside.

This a big problem! You might need more vitamin A, yet not be able to handle getting it.

Tune in for my solution.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are other recent posts on vitamin A: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/02/know-vitamin-toxicity/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/04/7558/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/09/vitamin-pregnancy-worry/

 

Vitamin A and Pregnancy: Should You Worry? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #127

Apr 9, 2019 06:57

Description:

Can vitamin A cause birth defects?

Maybe. Here’s what I recommend to do with your vitamin A intake when you’re expecting, or expecting to maybe be expecting.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s the article I discuss in the video: https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/childrens-health/vitamins-for-fetal-development-conception-to-birth/

Here are other recent posts on vitamin A:  https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/04/7558/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/04/7558/

What to Do About Vitamin A Toxicity | Chris Masterjohn Lite #126

Apr 4, 2019 06:12

Description:

If you have vitamin A toxicity, should you see a doctor? What foods should you stop eating, and are there any supplements you should start taking?

Tune in for my suggestions.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here is the post on how to know if you have vitamin A toxicity:  

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/04/02/know-vitamin-toxicity/

How to Know If You Have Vitamin A Toxicity | Chris Masterjohn Lite #125

Apr 2, 2019 07:58

Description:

Is vitamin A toxic?

It can be!

It’s a super-important essential nutrient and MANY people need MORE of it, yet it still has the potential to cause problems.

Here is a method to use signs and symptoms, the amounts of vitamin A you’ve been exposed to, and lab tests to determine if you’ve gotten too much.

There are a few symptoms that I neglected to mention in the video that are worth taking note of: skin peeling, itching, cracked lips, and fatigue.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s a great paper on vitamin A toxicity:

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/78/6/1152/4677527


Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet covers testing for vitamin A toxicity in the context of a comprehensive plan for managing nutritional status. Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, March 4, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #63

Mar 30, 2019 02:51:14

Description:

On March 4, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me in a live Zoom meeting to ask me anything about nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much? Can frozen vegetables be trusted for their folate? Do cooked legumes lose folate when frozen? I go on an extended rant about the harm done by exaggerating the harms of synthetic folic acid. We use labs to identify a probable genetic defect in glutathione synthesis. When to think about supplementing with calcium. When a drug makes histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation collide. My thoughts on root canals. Should you take leucine to gain muscle mass, or just eat protein? A GREAT discussion on how our detoxification system evolved to handle fruits and vegetables, and why eating them can help us out through the principle of "hormesis." Could low LDL levels compromise female fertility?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

AMA About Nutrition Show Notes

00:40 Cliff Notes

03:44 Introduction

06:48 How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much? And why frozen vegetables cannot be trusted as a source of folate.

12:21 Do cooked legumes lose folate when frozen?

16:09 The difference between folic acid and folate, including a rant about the over exaggeration of the harms of folic acid.

34:02 Thoughts on myasthenia gravis and Epstein-Barr virus?

35:20 In the context of hemochromatosis and iron overload, why would ferritin be low when transferrin saturation is high?

43:04 What to do when the lab says that your pyroglutamate levels are the highest that they've ever seen? Could it be a glutathione synthetase deficiency?

52:43 Can you use a high GGT, gamma-glutamyltransferase, to indicate that the body is trying to make more glutathione?

54:40 What if taking collagen at night causes you to wake up and pee?

01:00:08 Does high serum B12 have any relation to cancer?

01:05:06 Should you take a calcium supplement if dietary calcium intake is low, blood calcium is normal, PTH is midrange, and vitamin D is 48 nanograms per milliliter?

01:11:07 What does it mean when after taking a drug, histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation collide?

01:15:53 What are my thoughts on root canals?

01:25:58 What do I think of Layne Norton's suggestion to take 3 grams of leucine with every meal?

01:30:00 Are liver pills really as good as eating cooked liver?

01:34:08 How much vitamin C should be taken with a standard daily dose of collagen?

01:37:41 What do I think causes fibromyalgia?

01:41:33 Is folate also unstable in frozen liver, or does it just apply to greens?

01:42:37 Is there a potential for adverse effects for someone who supplements with 5 or 10 milligrams of folic acid or methylfolate based on a heterozygous MTHFR SNP?

02:00:05 What to do when serum magnesium is high, but the magnesium doesn't make it into the cells.

02:05:00 Any recommendations on increasing DHEA?

02:05:29 Are thyroid nodules similar to goiter in some cases?

02:06:23 Is it a problem if arginine, citrulline, and beta-alanine are elevated in the Genova ION Profile while supplementing with beta-alanine and citrulline malate?

02:08:56 A discussion of plant polyphenols and hormesis.

02:20:22 Is it safe to take creatine when nursing?

02:29:02 Is vitamin E supplementation harmful if you have a GSTP1 polymorphism?

02:33:25 Could low LDL levels compromise female fertility?

Do Children Need Less Nutrients Than Adults? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #124

Mar 28, 2019 07:32

Description:

Does a growing child need a *less* nutritious diet than an adult?

You would think so, looking at the RDAs! Yes, some of them are higher during childhood growth phases, such as calcium. But many of them are lower, and not because we know children need less but simply because they were scaled down by bodyweight.

Should a child half your size who eats twice as much food as you eat a diet that’s only 25% as nutrient-dense?

I doubt it.

Tune in for my thoughts on the topic and what I think we should do about it.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Your “MTHFR” Is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency | Chris Masterjohn Lite #123

Mar 26, 2019 07:38

Description:

Got MTHFR? 😬

Relax! Riboflavin will come to the rescue! 😁

MTHFR is an enzyme that uses folate (vitamin B9) to support your mental and physical health. It does so by using riboflavin (vitamin B2) to make the methyl group of methylfolate.

The common polymorphisms that lower MTHFR activity may do so simply by hurting its ability to bind riboflavin, and enough riboflavin may be able to bring that activity completely back up to normal!

Tune in for the details.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Your “MTHFR” Is Just a Riboflavin Deficiency: https://www.facebook.com/chrismasterjohn/posts/2055466797822271?__xts__[0]=68.ARClRvxs872wt7-3lIkGNHxQtLp6z_dNCwMkQnmca7MDVcXzkDV66Bqz69iVB-YNgJJZ-h3Bx8J-4LqujrQIDPOtevlPXCb_dqXakyOX5deOIOgRw1vpmLOPfOPBBw2aIIT9uC6JeNkYXrRfjp6qR0n0xN8m_ObAxdSV0SAF_HW5xZmvtArjHCGDdCBZYHH1GaHtOWkwirbHSOJkYu5xTeNbcBBbytj0tVLgkxr5pxLW-WDGGp1lnXqF3keDdeoM5tIxBpNw4CWCNEPCdeoP-LmX-79bqAK5F9BzdAtE3Hyzx60ugzsZoZGzZ2y_5c6fv0JQ4zXDsWdDRZUl_Yh0QeiHug&__tn__=-R

Start Here for MTHFR and Methylation: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

Alex Leaf’s post on riboflavin and MTHFR: https://alexleaf.com/2019/02/11/supplement-riboflavin-to-fix-the-mthfr-polymorphism/

Our giant podcast episode, Why You Should Manage Your Riboflavin Status and How to Do It: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/16/manage-riboflavin-status/

How to Use an Oura Ring and HRV for Exercise Performance and Recovery | CML #122

Mar 21, 2019 08:15

Description:

Feel tanked after your workout? 😫

Well you might feel fine, but you might still be stressing your body too much. How do you know?

This is my recommended protocol for using heart rate variability to determine how recovered you are. It covers everything from getting an accurate baseline measurement to discovering and testing things that impact your recovery time.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links related to this episode (no affiliate relationships):

https://ouraring.com/ (top recommendation due to superiority of sleep data)

http://www.sweetwaterhrv.com/

https://elitehrv.com/personal-pro

5 Signs Your Brain Needs More Vitamin C and Copper | Chris Masterjohn Lite #121

Mar 19, 2019 06:25

Description:

“Low Copper Low Vitamin C BRAIN Syndrome”

Ok it’s not a medical term. I invented it. But this is the cluster of signs and symptoms that make it sound like your brain needs more vitamin C or copper, based on the neuropeptides we need these nutrients to activate.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links related to this episode:

Part 2 of Nutrition in Neuroscience: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/18/nutrition-neuroscience-part-2/

How to Stop Waking Up to Pee:    https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/12/stop-waking-pee/

How to Manage Your Copper Status (short version): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/08/manage-copper-status-2/

Why You Should Manage Your Copper Status and How to Do It (long version): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/02/03/manage-copper-status/


Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Niacin, Part 2: Blood Tests, Foods, and Supplements | Mastering Nutrition #62

Mar 16, 2019 02:20:53

Description:

In part 1 we covered what niacin is and why you need it. Here’s part 2, where Alex Leaf and I cover blood tests, foods, and supplements!

How much do we need? The RDA has some flaws, including claiming women need less than men, when all the evidence shows women need *more* than men.
Why eating enough protein is so essential, yet so unreliable as a way of boosting niacin status.

How the niacin in your coffee, seeds, and grains is all locked up and unavailable, and how to release it through proper preparation. Do you drink light roast or dark roast? You may either hate or love this episode… or you might just switch coffees.

Should we take high-dose niacin to lower cholesterol? Alex has a theory on how we can do that without getting diabetes. 😬

High-dose niacin can cause liver failure and can kill lab mice. But Alex and I know how to steer clear of that problem!

NAD-boosting supplements are the new darling of the anti-aging industry. But should we take nicotinamide riboside (NR), nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), or should we endure all the whole-body burning 🔥 that the folks injecting NAD+ are so hyped up about? We discuss the promises and problems of these approaches.

Why you should match glycine to one form of niacin and trimethylglycine (TMG) to all of them.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Niacin Part 2 Show Notes

00:38 Cliff Notes

01:35 Recap of Part 1

15:32 Markers of niacin status

17:32 Methylated metabolites of niacin in the urine as a marker of niacin status

19:05 Caveat to using methylated metabolites of niacin in the urine as a marker of niacin status

20:16 Erythrocyte NAD(H)/NADP(H) ratio, the “niacin number,” as a marker of niacin status

22:55 Caveat to the niacin number as a marker of niacin status

28:34 Critique on how the RDA for niacin was established

40:12 How protein intake affects the dietary requirement for preformed niacin

42:48 Estrogen regulates the synthesis of niacin from tryptophan.

43:35 In men in particular, niacin synthesis from tryptophan might just be a way to clear excess tryptophan.

45:31 General discussion about protein requirements

49:46 How different forms of food processing, such as nixtamalization, fermentation, and sprouting, increase the bioavailability of niacin

52:51 Niacin in coffee

53:52 Niacin in nutritional yeast

54:16 Dietary sources of niacin, divided into five tiers

59:57 Niacin in herbs and spices, including spirulina

01:03:46 The contribution of the microbiome to niacin status is not well studied.

01:04:56 Where we would expect to see niacin deficiency

1:05:38 Risk factors for niacin deficiency include Hartnup’s disease, megaduodenum, intestinal malabsorption, carcinoid tumors, certain drugs, alcoholism, HIV/AIDS, and deficiencies of iron, riboflavin, and B6.

01:09:52 Risk factors for suboptimal niacin status include a diet based on unprocessed whole grains, a diet based on sugar and fat, a diet low in non-collagen protein, any form of cellular damage, and low ATP levels.

01:14:42 How metformin and berberine could affect niacin status

01:17:28 The effect of leucine and muscle growth on niacin status

01:19:54 The prevalence of inadequate niacin intake and niacin deficiency

01:24:00 Contributors to niacin toxicity

01:25:08 The use of nicotinic acid to benefit blood lipids and reduce heart disease risk

01:31:14 Potential side effects of taking nicotinic acid to manage blood lipids include the flushing reaction, liver harm, and increased diabetes risk.

01:34:22 The mechanism behind high-dose nicotinic acid-induced insulin resistance and how you could mitigate it

01:48:01 Rodent studies of nicotinamide riboside supplementation

01:50:58 Human studies of nicotinamide riboside supplementation

01:56:32 Why the rodent studies of nicotinamide riboside supplementation look more promising than the human studies

02:04:16 What is the probability that someone would get longevity benefits from supplementing with nicotinamide riboside?

02:05:15 Whether or not Alex and Chris will start supplementing with niacin after doing the research for this podcast

02:06:17 Should someone with hypercholesterolemia consider taking nicotinic acid? How should they manage the side effects, and which form is best?

02:10:53 Does it matter if niacin is taken with food?

 

Ten Steps to Healthy Sleep | Chris Masterjohn Lite #120

Mar 14, 2019 12:16

Description:

Here are ten steps to healthy sleep!

What has been most game-changing for you? Let me know in the comments!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links related to this episode:

My Recommendations for Better Sleep (this has a link to the online calorie calculator, the sleep mask, and ear plugs I mentioned): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/07/29/my-recommendations-for-better-sleep/

The recent Chris Masterjohn Lite episodes (there are six per page, hit the right green arrow to go to the next six): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/lite

Carbs or Keto for Sleep: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/06/12/carbs-keto-sleep/

Five Rules for a Healthy Diet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/09/27/five-rules-healthy-diet/

How to Track Your Vitamin and Mineral Intake: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/24/track-vitamin-mineral-intake/

That Moment You Wake Up to Pee And Can’t Fall Back to Sleep: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/01/31/moment-wake-pee-cant-fall-back-sleep/

Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Stop Waking Up to Pee | Chris Masterjohn Lite #119

Mar 12, 2019 06:42

Description:

Don’t you just hate it when you keep waking up in the middle of the night to pee?

If this is your biggest sleeping problem, listen up. In this episode I cover how sleeping regular hours is one of the most important ways to combat this, and how nutrients (salt, vitamin C, copper, zinc, glycine, enough calories) and stress management can also help.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links related to this episode:

How to Make Your Own Melatonin:  https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/05/how-to-make-your-own-melatonin/

Vitamin A for Sleep:  https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/07/vitamin-a-for-sleep/

Should You Eat Protein At Night:  https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/21/7405/

Part 2 of Nutrition in Neuroscience, which covers the nutrients involved in making ADH: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/18/nutrition-neuroscience-part-2/

That Moment You Wake Up to Pee And Can’t Fall Back to Sleep: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/01/31/moment-wake-pee-cant-fall-back-sleep/

How to Manage Your Copper Status (short version): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/08/manage-copper-status-2/

Why You Should Manage Your Copper Status and How to Do It (long version): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/02/03/manage-copper-status/

How to Manage Your Zinc Status (short version): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/10/23/manage-zinc-status-2/

Why You Should Manage Your Zinc Status and How to Do It: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/03/04/manage-zinc-status/

How to Manage Your Vitamin C Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/15/manage-vitamin-c-status/  

Get Better Sleep With Glycine: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/13/get-better-sleep-glycine/

Balancing Methionine and Glycine in Foods: The Database: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/balancing-methionine-and-glycine-in-foods-the-database/

Why You Need Glycine: A Panel Discussion: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/01/08/why-you-need-glycine-a-panel-discussion/

Getting Better Sleep — Cool, Dark, And Lots of B6, Carbs, Calories, and Fat: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2011/03/25/getting-better-sleep-cool-dark-and-lots/

Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, February 23, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #61

Mar 8, 2019 02:42:45

Description:

On February 23, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me in a live Zoom meeting to ask me anything about nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talked about lots and lots of things: 5-HTP versus tryptophan; unusually low appetite, my recommendations for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; choline and cognitive decline; how to gain muscle mass; side effects of vitamin B6; balancing thyroid hormones; which form of niacin to take for anti-aging (nicotinamide riboside, NR, versus nicotinamide mononucleotide, NMN); high cholesterol; measuring omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid status; handling MSG sensitivity; sulforophane; unraveling an apparent urea cycle defect; harms of vitamin E for GSTP polymorphisms...

…. and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:43 Cliff Notes

11:50 If my tryptophan is low, and I'm on a low-carb diet, would you recommend 5-HTP supplements or tryptophan supplements or both?

15:14 Should I be concerned about high HDL cholesterol in the context of low normal total cholesterol?

17:51 Is it a problem if my appetite is too low and I don’t seem to eat enough food, but everything about my health and well-being is great?

22:32 What should people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency be doing not just about glutathione, but about folate, vitamin K, fatty acids, and neurotransmitters?

36:53 Why do you recommend the Genova ION Profile instead of the NutrEval?

38:08 Could choline citrate, CDP-choline or alpha-GPC mitigate the risk of cognitive decline associated with anticholinergic use?

39:28 Do you have any recommendations on how to get enough calcium on a low-carb, no-dairy diet?

42:26 Should I manage my total cholesterol of 305 just for my doctor or should I be doing it for my own sake? If so, how should I do it?

54:14 During a workout, is there one type of sugar that is better at getting through the gut than any other type of sugar?

58:41 What food supplements and training programs are good for developing muscle mass?

01:03:02 Upcoming revisions to Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, and which tests you could cut back on in order to save money.

01:05:36 Any thoughts on cod liver oil and Jigsaw Alaskan cod liver oil in particular?

01:08:26 Would you discuss the role that taurine might play in MTHFR? Adding taurine produced an immediate and dramatic improvement in my energy levels.

01:10:33 Tinnitus and nightmares as side effects from P5P supplementation.

01:15:33 What about the Jigsaw magnesium supplements?

01:16:18 If free T3 looks good, why is TSH still a little high? Why hasn't the T3 brought it down enough?

01:21:36 What to do about cataracts.

01:29:11 Do you have any gut experts you can recommend?

01:29:29 From your deep dive into nicotinamide riboside and NMN, do you think either is effective, and is one preferred over the other? Do you still recommend taking TMG with NR?

01:36:34 Do you know any differences in carbohydrate lipid metabolism in someone who has congenital adrenal hyperplasia?

01:38:18 Is it good insurance to supplement minerals that are less studied like chromium, molybdenum, and boron, or do you think it's unlikely to be beneficial?

01:39:35 If I have high LDL, do I need to know more about large fluffy particles versus small dense or should I just act on it now?

01:50:33 Do you know a potential reason that high LDL is associated with prostate cancer? What do you think of annatto tocotrienols?

01:52:24 Is it better to use red blood cell fatty acids like OmegaQuant offers instead of plasma fatty acids like Quest offers?

01:53:16 What could cause all of the following to be low at the same time: phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamic acid, taurine, and threonine?

01:56:13 Can a B12 deficiency cause irreversible effects?

01:56:55 Can the B12 be near 2000 and still be a problem if the person has signs of B12 deficiency?

01:59:52 Suggestions for how to handle MSG sensitivity other than avoiding it.

02:04:00 Do you know of a good commercially available test for carnitine?

02:04:27 Is it true that we can’t absorb more than 1.5 grams of creatine at one time?

02:05:46 What could cause all of the following to be low at the same time: phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamic acid, taurine, and threonine? The phenylalanine-to-tyrosine ratio is high, and the tryptophan-to-large non-polar amino acid ratio is low.

02:07:18 What are the pros and cons of boosting sulforaphane?

02:08:16 What could cause all of the following to be low at the same time: phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamic acid, taurine, and threonine? 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is high.

02:14:28 Can you give any suggestions for increasing delta-6 desaturase activity?

02:16:50 What can be done nutritionally to specifically improve antiviral immunity?

02:18:55 Urea cycle question. High arginine, high ornithine, normal citrulline, very low aspartate, low glutamate, mid-range normal glutamine. Why does my urine stink, and why do I feel fatigued when I eat more protein?

02:30:34 I read that supplemental vitamin E has been shown to have a negative impact on individuals with this specific polymorphism by raising levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood. Do you have a view on this?

Vitamin A for Sleep | Chris Masterjohn Lite # 118

Mar 7, 2019 06:22

Description:

To get good sleep, your brain needs to know when it’s daytime and when it’s nighttime. How does it know? Vitamin A tells it!

So if you don’t have enough vitamin A, your brain is going to be clueless.

Tune in for how to figure out if vitamin A is at the bottom of your sleeping problems.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links mentioned in this episode:

How to Make Your Own Melatonin:  

 https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/03/05/how-to-make-your-own-melatonin/

Vitamin A Plays an Essential Role in Setting the Circadian Rhythm and Allowing Good Sleep: https://www.westonaprice.org/vitamin-plays-essential-role-setting-circadian-rhythm-allowing-good-sleep/

How to Manage Your Vitamin A Status: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/16/manage-vitamin-status/

Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Make Your Own Melatonin | Chris Masterjohn Lite #117

Mar 5, 2019 07:53

Description:

Here’s how to make your own melatonin. No, not in your basement -- in your brain.

We cover the effect of protein, carbs, vitamins, blue-blocking, and sunshine.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are some links mentioned in this episode:

Tryptophan and Carbs for Sleep: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/26/tryptophan-carbs-sleep/

Why You Shouldn’t Take Melatonin Too Often: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/28/shouldnt-take-melatonin-often/

Masterclass With Masterjohn: The Antioxidant System: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/antioxidant

Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Vitamin B6 Status: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/13/manage-vitamin-b6-status/


Start Here for Methylation: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

Niacin, Part 1: What It Is and Why You Need It | Mastering Nutrition #60

Mar 1, 2019 02:05:50

Description:

Niacin is vitamin B3. You use it to make NAD, the ultimate anti-aging molecule that repairs your DNA and lengthens your telomeres, and the most foundational molecule in our entire system of energy metabolism.

It is especially important to protecting your mind, your skin, and your gut.

You use it to release all your neurotransmitters. This is why depression sets in as the earliest sign of deficiency and why, when it gets bad enough, it leads to suicidality or schizophrenia-like psychosis. You use constantly it to repair the microscopic damage done to your skin every time you step out into the sunlight. This is why red, inflamed skin appears on the backs of your hands or on your face when you’re deficient, but only if you get outdoors a lot.

You use it to fuel the rapid turnover of cells in your intestines (the cells that absorb the nutrients in our food are replaced every 2-3 days!), and to repair those cells from the constant barrage of insults they face (think of everything those cells *don’t* let in our body 💩and the fact that *they* need to stare all that stuff down!) This is why deficiency will give you diarrhea and make you deficient in lots of other nutrients.

You use it for lots of other things too, like participating with riboflavin to make the methyl group of methylfolate and recycle glutathione, the master antioxidant of the cell. You use it to recycle vitamin K, to support detoxification in the liver, and to synthesize cholesterol, fatty acids, neurotransmitters and nucleotides.

Who needs more? We all do!

Why? Because just aging alone depletes niacin and getting sick or developing diseases as we age depletes it all the more. Niacin repairs damage, so the more damage we face the more we consume.

In fact, this is why many people are taking supplements like nicotinamide riboside (NR) or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), to slow the onset of aging, or to age more gracefully. Some people are even injected NAD!

But should we be?

And what about the dark side of niacin? We all know the flush -- the redness and itching that accompanies high-dose niacin that people take to lower cholesterol. At high doses, niacin can even damage the liver. How? By sapping methyl groups. Sapping methyl groups can give you liver failure when it’s *really* bad, but sapping them just a little can leave you feeling weak, emotionally stuck, or tied up in a mental funk.

In this two-part podcast series, Alex Leaf and I tackle all of these questions. Click the link to listen to part 1, where we teach you what niacin is and why you need it.

In part 2, two weeks from today, we’ll cover how to get niacin in foods, blood tests, and supplements.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

11:35 The stories of Julie, John, and Jane

17:36 Symptoms of pellagra: the three Ds of dermatitis, dementia, and diarrhea, and the fourth D, death

24:00 Speculative signs and symptoms of suboptimal niacin status

24:59 Symptoms of excess niacin

26:43 Excess niacin will reduce the supply of methyl groups, which can lower creatine synthesis and affect neurotransmitters, and is probably what underlies niacin-induced liver damage.

30:31 Explaining the stories of Julie, John, and Jane in the context of niacin deficiency or toxicity

34:25 Chemical properties of niacin

37:03 How niacin and nicotinic acid derived their names

38:58 Chemical structures of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, nicotinamide riboside (NR), nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)

42:51 The biochemistry of niacin

43:05 The differences between NAD(H) and NADP(H) in metabolism

47:03 NAD is often broken down to form ADP-ribose.

48:10 How PARPs (including PARP1 and tankyrase) and sirtuins use NAD to protect us from DNA damage, repair DNA damage, lengthen telomeres, and regulate gene expression

54:27 ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs)

56:43 The NAD metabolites cyclic ADP-ribose, linear ADP-ribose, O-acetyl-ADP-ribose, and NAADP are involved in regulating calcium transport, which is especially important for neurotransmitter release.

58:19 How the biochemistry of niacin explains the deficiency symptoms

01:03:23 The biochemistry of how we get niacin from foods and how we dispose of excess niacin

01:07:14 How the degradation pathways of niacin explain the liver toxicity and flushing reaction from different forms of niacin

01:22:08 Extended-release niacin

01:24:44 Rationale for nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) supplementation

01:33:38 Physiology of niacin absorption and circulation

01:40:47 Endogenous synthesis of niacin

01:41:20 Tracer studies of oral and intravenous nicotinamide riboside supplementation in mice

01:45:40 Estrogen is a strong regulator of the conversion of tryptophan to niacin.

01:47:41 Pharmacokinetic study of Niagen (nicotinamide riboside) supplementation in humans

 

Why You Shouldn’t Take Melatonin Too Often | Chris Masterjohn Lite #116

Feb 28, 2019 07:34

Description:

I used to be addicted to melatonin. I couldn’t sleep without taking a time-release melatonin every night.

Well, it wasn’t really an addiction. It was that my sleep just sucked, so I was stuck using melatonin because my body wasn’t working right.

I haven’t needed melatonin to sleep for *years.* I regard it as a sign of the success of what I’ve done to fix my sleep that I don’t need it anymore.

Do you take melatonin?

I’m not against it. I think everyone should have some melatonin on hand in their bedroom and their travel bag. But taking it every night cannot replicate the natural rhythm inside your body. Taking a dual action immediate- and time-release can get close, but it just ain’t the same thing. So, use the melatonin when needed, but consider it part of the journey and not the destination. Until you’re off the melatonin, you still have fixing to do.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

For more detail on the underlying science behind this episode, see part 4 of my Nutrition in Neuroscience series:  https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/01/nutrition-in-neuroscience-part-4/


Here’s a good dual-action melatonin you could take when needed. Purchasing it with my link will earn me a small commission at no extra cost to you, which helps support the free work I put out: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/dualactionmelatonin

Tryptophan and Carbs for Sleep | Chris Masterjohn Lite #115

Feb 26, 2019 07:17

Description:

In order to sleep well, you need to get a good dose of tryptophan into your brain at any point during the day. The simplest way to do that is with natural, whole-food, high-glycemic carbohydrates like white potatoes and sweet potatoes.

Tune in for how to make this work on a high-carb, low-carb or even keto diet, when to include a tryptophan supplement, and what to consider when timing the supplements or carbs.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here is the previous episode on carbs, tryptophan, and stress-resistance: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/22/carbs-serotonin-stress-resistance/

Here are some studies on carbs and protein affecting tryptophan transport and sleep:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/573061

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21349213

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17284739

Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, February 17, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #59

Feb 24, 2019 02:25:36

Description:

On February 17, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me in a live Zoom meeting to ask me anything about nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talked about lots and lots of things: using the Oura ring to measure HRV and optimize athletic performance and recovery, what to do in the context of diabetes if T3 doesn’t increase your heat production, whether keeping warm with clothing has health benefits if you can’t get your body temperature up, what to do about high morning glucose, how to get rid of heavy metals, how to repair bone, what vegans should do to get arachidonic acid levels up, zinc and copper supplementation, kale and spinach smoothies, blood donation when your transferrin saturation is high but your ferritin is low, dealing with a high resting heart rate, lots of questions on organic acid markers, how estrogen can mess up vitamin B6 markers even in men and when that means you should lower your protein intake, whether combining carbs and fat makes people fat, how many eggs to eat a day, how the nutritional needs of children are special, vitamin A toxicity in and out of pregnancy, creatine non-responders, intermittent fasting hurting sleep…

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

…. and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

8:24 What to do, in the context of diabetes, if T3 supplementation does not increase heat production?

17:03 If you can't get your body temperature up to normal, will wearing more clothing to keep warm improve health?

19:40 What to do about elevated morning blood glucose in the mid 90s.

21:38 What are my thoughts on detoxing heavy metals?

23:36 What nutrients are needed to break down old, damaged bone and build new, healthy bone?

28:06 What should an ethical vegan with low delta-6 desaturase activity do to bring low arachidonic acid levels up to normal?

30:20 How to manage the zinc-to-copper ratio and what to do if zinc and copper are both low-normal when supplementing with 15 mg of zinc and 1 mg of copper.

34:20 How to lower a resting heart rate in the 80s or 90s.

37:00 Is a daily green smoothie with spinach or kale a risk because of thallium, goitrogens, oxalates, or other concerns?

39:20 For someone who is homozygous for the H63D allele of the iron- and hemochromatosis-related HFE gene, if ferritin is low but transferrin saturation is high, should they still donate blood?

48:20 For someone who is taking 45 mg of vitamin B6 as P5P but has xanthurenate, kynurenate, and quinolinate high in the urine as markers of vitamin B6 deficiency, and who is a man with high estrogen, what should they do?

56:18 What to do if taking biotin and yet beta-hydroxyisovalerate is elevated.

57:17 What to do if gamma-tocopherol levels are low-normal while taking 100 IU/d of alpha-tocopherol.

59:30 Does mixing carbohydrate with fat cause people to get fat because of the Randle cycle? (continued at 1:21:00)

1:03:35 Do children need less nutrients than adults because they have lower body weights, or do they need more nutrients than adults because they are growing faster? (

1:07:12 What to do for a five-year-old who is unusually exhausted, and how to assess their nutritional needs. (Brief followup at 1:35:50)

1:09:30 Concerns about vitamin A intake during pregnancy.

1:12:24 How to use an Oura ring to monitor HRV and optimize recovery and performance.

1:15:40 What are "parent essential oils"? Should we get these instead of cold-water fish oils? Response to Brian Peskin’s theory.

1:21:00 More on whether the combination of carbs and fat makes people fat as a result of the Randle cycle.

1:29:00 Matt stone and the "overdeification" of vitamin A. Or, are there many people who are vitamin A deficient? Hypersensitivity reactions, fatty liver, overzealous use of cod liver oil, and other concerns.

1:35:50 How to deal with the fact that blood tests for nutritional status aren't adapted to children.

1:37:05 How much fatty fish to eat.

1:38:05 Nutritional strategies for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) deficiency.

1:42:58 If berberine lowers LDL-C and total-to-LDL-C but raises ApoB, what does this mean?

1:45:50 How to interpret the pattern of high citrate, low cis-aconitate, low glutamate, and high glutamine. (Followup at 1:53:05)

1:47:20 What do I think about Loren Cordain, his views on salt and dairy, and his opinion of Chris Kresser?

1:53:55 What to do about acne that gets worse with stress and better with cardio?

1:55:37 For MTHFD1, PEMT and MTHFR, should I be supplementing choline?

1:56:13 How to bring up low levels of arachidonic acid.

1:57:17 Using blood tests to determine whether you should increase your calcium intake.

1:57:45 Alex Leaf answers a question about creatine non-responders and methylation.

1:59:22 Could neurotransmitter levels be artificially low on the Genova ION panel if you fasted for 24 hours before having samples taken?

2:00:07 When to take tryptophan on a ketogenic diet.

2:00:52 When should you take creatine, if you don't have an MTHFR SNP?

2:01:30 My thoughts on PQQ and CoQ10 supplements.

2:02:02 What to do when high selenium levels won't come down, even if you've stopped supplementing.

2:02:24 Is four eggs a day too much?

2:03:05 Are low total omega-6 levels on the ION panel a cause for concern?

2:03:50 What to do about high arsenic.

2:04:24 What to do about fungal infection suggested by elevated D-arabinitol.

2:05:33 Migraines and twitching caused by coffee that responds to electrolytes.

2:09:55 What to do if signs and symptoms of zinc deficiency persist despite taking 75 mg zinc gluconate per day.

2:11:35 What to do if intermittent fasting beginning before 3:00 PM hurts sleep.

2:13:55 What to do about high-normal TSH and no diagnosis of a thyroid disease.

 

 

Should You Eat Protein At Night? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #114

Feb 21, 2019 04:50

Description:

Could eating protein at night hurt your sleep? In this episode I discuss why it *might* hurt your sleep. Eating protein at the last meal of your day is important if you are trying to build muscle, but if you are trying to resolve sleeping problems then trying a lower-protein meal at night should be one of the tools in your kit.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10


For more detail on the underlying science behind this episode, see part 4 of my Nutrition in Neuroscience series: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/01/nutrition-in-neuroscience-part-4/

Can Alpha-GPC and Gingko Hurt Your Sleep? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #113

Feb 19, 2019 05:44

Description:

In the last episode, I covered how and why I use alpha-GPC and ginkgo biloba supplements during periods where I need increased focused concentration. But could this hurt your sleep if you take them at night?

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' Grass Fed Beef Brain. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and brain... all in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://AncestralSupplements.com

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here’s the last episode on using the cocktail for focused concentration: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/14/alpha-gpc-ginkgo-biloba-focused-concentration/      

Here’s the study mentioned in the episode that suggested better improvements in sleep quality when Alzheimer’s patients took an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor in the morning instead of at night: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23948729

Why You Should Manage Your Riboflavin Status and How to Do It | Mastering Nutrition #58

Feb 16, 2019 02:45:38

Description:

Riboflavin is the ultimate fat-burning nutrient. It makes even a bad MTHFR work right, and it keeps you looking young and beautiful forever.

Here’s everything you need to know about why you should manage your riboflavin status and how to do it.

In this podcast I join with Alex Leaf of Examine.Com. I focus on what riboflavin is and what it does, while Alex focuses on riboflavin supplements.

Going into this podcast I changed my mind about three important things:

While I had always discussed riboflavin as relevant to methylation and MTHFR, I had kept it in the back seat in my methylation protocol. Half way through recording this podcast I realized that it really deserves a front seat in my MTHFR protocol. In fact, it may be the case that there’s nothing wrong with the common MTHFR polymorphisms at all and that they only appear to hurt MTHFR activity because most of us aren’t getting enough riboflavin. And why aren’t we? Liver. Liver. We just have to eat liver. In Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, I had included HDRI’s erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity test as test for assessing riboflavin status. After doing the research for this podcast, I am now convinced that this test is only reliable as a marker of riboflavin status when the lab tests the enzyme activity with and without the addition of riboflavin, which HDRI doesn’t do. I will be revising the cheat sheet soon to rely solely on LabCorp’s whole blood riboflavin test for assessing riboflavin status. I have, for years, believed that riboflavin 5’-phosphate (aka, flavin mononucleotide or FMN) supplements are better than plain old riboflavin, especially for people who are hypothyroid or have low adrenal status, since these conditions impair the activation of riboflavin to it’s 5’-phosphate form. After doing the research for this podcast I now believe that for healthy people it makes no difference and that for people with small intestinal pathologies, the cheaper, less fancy, plain old “riboflavin” is likely to be more effective.

In this podcast we being by considering the fictional stories of people who seem to have little in common. We then explain their stories by looking at the signs and symptoms of riboflavin deficiency. We consider the science of what riboflavin is, how it is used by the body, what it does for us, how to have great riboflavin status, and how to become deficient. We round this out with an extensive discussion of riboflavin supplementation.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Riboflavin Show Notes

00:37 Introduction

01:46 Three things that I’ve changed my mind about while doing the research for this podcast

04:24 Cliff notes

14:13 Three stories of riboflavin deficiency

18:05 Signs and symptoms of riboflavin deficiency

21:31 Speculative symptoms of suboptimal riboflavin status

23:49 Chemical properties of riboflavin

27:22 Medical applications: infants with jaundice, eye surgery for keratoconus, and treatment of fungal keratitis

30:38 Chemical structure of riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)

33:02 Riboflavin’s roles in the body: energy metabolism, the antioxidant system, methylation, detoxification, and other nutrient interactions

34:03 Riboflavin’s roles in energy metabolism

39:33 How the different macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat, and protein) affect the riboflavin requirement differently

46:05 Riboflavin’s role in the antioxidant system

50:12 Riboflavin’s roles in the methylation system

52:29 Riboflavin’s interactions with other nutrients: vitamin B6, niacin, and iron

55:47 Riboflavin’s roles in detoxification

57:44 Other riboflavin-dependent enzymes include NADPH oxidase, monoamine oxidase, and protein disulfide isomerase.

59:31 The physiology of riboflavin absorption

01:02:31 The physiology of riboflavin utilization and the importance of magnesium, ATP, thyroid hormone, adrenal hormones, and protein

01:06:43 The gold standard marker of riboflavin status is the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC).

01:12:11 LabCorp’s whole blood riboflavin test, normalized to the concentration of blood hemoglobin, is the closest commercially available equivalent to the EGRAC.

01:14:02 Why urinary glutaric acid is not a specific marker of riboflavin status

01:14:54 Measuring riboflavin status should be done after an overnight fast, and biotin does not interfere with the test.

01:15:54 How the RDA for riboflavin was established

01:22:02 How much riboflavin is needed to optimize riboflavin status and maximally suppress the EGRAC?

01:27:25 Why high doses of riboflavin might be beneficial in cases of suboptimal magnesium, energy, thyroid, or adrenal status

01:31:04 Dietary sources of riboflavin

01:36:39 Free riboflavin is found in milk, fortified flours, and many riboflavin supplements.

01:38:55 Riboflavin is destroyed by light.

01:41:16 Riboflavin is produced in the colon, but it is unknown how much this contributes to systemic riboflavin status.

01:43:55 Factors that interfere with riboflavin status and utilization

01:51:02 Genetic defects in riboflavin metabolism and transport

01:53:50 How common is riboflavin deficiency and suboptimal riboflavin status?

01:58:36 Riboflavin supplementation for iron deficiency anemia

02:00:29 The relationship between riboflavin and the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and effects on homocysteine and blood pressure

02:09:32 Riboflavin supplementation and exercise performance

02:14:30 Whether or not riboflavin supplementation could impair adaptations to exercise

02:18:25 Riboflavin supplementation for migraines

02:25:06 Rapid fire questions

02:25:21 Does it matter whether we take free riboflavin or riboflavin 5’-phosphate?  

02:26:51 Should riboflavin be taken with food?

02:30:28 How often should you take riboflavin?

02:32:20 Does it matter if you take riboflavin in one dose or divided doses?

02:33:13 Are there any adverse effects of riboflavin supplements?

Alpha-GPC and Ginkgo Biloba for Focused Concentration | Chris Masterjohn Lite #112

Feb 14, 2019 06:54

Description:

Here’s how and why I use alpha-GPC and ginkgo biloba supplements during periods where I need increased focused concentration. Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

For a collection of my dopamine and choline resources, see https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation where they are collected together with my methylation resources.


Here is a science paper documenting the different plants that contain acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17346955

How to Make Your Own GABA | Chris Masterjohn Lite #111

Feb 12, 2019 09:54

Description:

Here’s how to make your own GABA, not in your basement, but in your brain.

GABA helps relax you, helps you make faster and better decisions under pressure, and helps you face your fears with less of a harmful stress response.

To make it ourselves we need glucose to enter the brain, then we need to use seven B vitamins, at least four minerals, and a robust supply of cellular energy to make the GABA, and we need salt, potassium, and energy to make it function properly.

Tune in for how to get all these nutrients from food and make it happen.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Here are the recent episodes on GABA:

GABA for Faster Decision Making https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/24/gaba-faster-decision-making/

Facing your Fears with GABA

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/29/face-fears-gaba/

Why You Might Need Carbs With Your GABA or Glycine https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/05/7367/

How to Get GABA from Food https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/07/get-gaba-food/Does

GABA or Glycine Wake You Up? https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/25/glycine-gaba-wake/Here are other episodes on the nutrients mentioned in this one:

How to Monitor Your Thiamin Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/28/monitor-thiamin-vitamin-b1-status/

How to Monitor Your Vitamin B6 Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/13/manage-vitamin-b6-status/

Why You Need to Manage Your Iron Status and How to Do It:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/01/27/need-manage-iron-status

How to Manage Your Copper Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/08/manage-copper-status-2

How to Manage Your Magnesium Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/23/manage-magnesium-status/

3 Ways to Get Enough Potassium:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/19/3-ways-get-enough-potassium/

The Best Way to Supplement With Potassium:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/14/best-way-supplement-potassium/

For a comprehensive guide to managing nutritional status for all of these nutrients, making the information easier to find and use, get your copy of Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 for $5 off, and save over 15%.

Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, Feb 1, 2019

Feb 9, 2019 02:20:58

Description:

Here’s the recording of the February 1 Ask Me Anything!

30 CMJ Masterpass subscribers sat in on a Zoom session with me last Friday and asked me whatever they wanted about nutrition.

We talk about bone meal for calcium, K2 and heart palpitations, low white blood cell counts, lowering anxiety at night and getting better deep sleep, probiotic cycling, fat intake and familial hypercholesterolemia, negative consequences of taking baking soda too much for too long and what to do instead, the lymphatic system and fat metabolism, intolerances to food and supplements, electrolytes after sauna use, heart rate variability, SIBO, H. pylori, protein on keto, hair mineral analysis, SpectraCell, and more.

Listen in to hear my answers!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Ask Me Anything Show Notes

13:20 Alternative bone meal powders to Whole Bone Calcium from Traditional Foods Market

15:54 Nutritional causes of low white blood cell count and possible solutions

18:09 Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep

24:40 Brands, forms, and dosage recommendations for nicotinamide riboside and nicotinamide mononucleotide

27:08 Dosage recommendations for berberine

27:50 Supplements that may increase deep sleep

31:18 Brands and dosage recommendations for CBD oil

31:31 Probiotics brand and cycling recommendations

33:19 Is Theracurmin as effective as Meriva Curcumin for arthritis?

39:19 Best clinical way to monitor COMT function if you have already tested for SNPs

43:10 How would you address normal TSH but low T4?

47:38 Should you be more concerned about overall fat intake or saturated fat intake with familial hypercholesterolemia?

50:59 Concerns about long-term bicarbonate supplementation and other suggestions for raising pH

58:08 Could magnesium hydroxide be absorbed via skin and cause hypermagnesemia?

58:40 The relationship between Lp(a) and cardiovascular disease

01:00:23 The role of the lymphatic system in fat metabolism

01:01:41 If your cholesterol is high, how do you avoid having a large burden of oxidized LDL?

01:08:16 Bovine colostrum for those with dairy sensitivities, and what to do about food sensitivities in general

01:17:24 Heart palpitations as a result of vitamin K2 supplementation and whether increasing calcium intake could help

01:21:10 Best formula and dosage of no-carb electrolytes to take at night to optimize sleep, especially after sauna use

01:22:35 Can a low-carb diet cause waking up in the middle of the night?

01:30:24 Why would a male have low blood levels of calcium?

01:32:21 What to do about low cortisol

01:33:19 What supplements would you recommend for a ketogenic diet?

01:35:09 Recommended brands of resveratrol and whether or not you should take resveratrol

01:38:55 Recommendations for treating SIBO and H. Pylori

01:44:26 What do you think about taking clomid to boost testosterone?

01:44:38 How do you determine if you’re getting enough protein?

01:48:14 Avmacol and sulforaphane

01:50:22 How to address edema

01:55:07 What do you think of alternative testing like hair mineral analysis or SpectraCell?

01:57:49 How to lower your calcium score

02:01:45 Recommendations on magnesium supplements and dosage

02:04:09 How to improve LDL receptor activity

02:05:48 Is milk thistle beneficial?

02:06:16 Do you have any concerns with taking 400 milligrams of phosphatidylserine supplements before bed to lower cortisol?

02:06:33 What would cause low platelet count, and how would you fix it?

02:06:53 Recommendations for peripheral neuropathy

02:08:22 What are your top three non-nutrient factors that prevent beta-oxidation or ketogenesis?

How to Get GABA from Food | Chris Masterjohn Lite | Chris Masterjohn Lite #110

Feb 7, 2019 05:56

Description:

GABA helps relax you, helps you make faster and better decisions under pressure, and helps you face your fears with less of a harmful stress response.

Tune in to find out how to get it from FOOD!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

Page 84 of this PDF has a table of the GABA content of foods: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/gabathesis

Here are the recent episodes on GABA:

GABA for Faster Decision-Making https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/24/gaba-faster-decision-making/


Face Your Fears With GABA https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/29/face-fears-gaba/


Why You Might Need Carbs With Your GABA or Glycine https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/02/05/7367/

Why You Might Need Carbs With Your GABA or Glycine | Chris Masterjohn Lite #109

Feb 5, 2019 05:38

Description:

Most people won’t have adverse effects from taking GABA or glycine supplements, but some do. If you find that either of these cause anxiety from tanking your breathing or heart rate, a dose of high-glycemic carbs like white potatoes, sweet potatoes, or rice, could be the thing that helps.

Tune in to find out why!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

Here are the recent episodes on GABA:

Face your Fears with GABA: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/29/face-fears-gaba/

Courage, Not Confidence, For Facing Fears: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/31/courage-not-confidence-facing-fears/

Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 4 | Mastering Nutrition #56

Feb 1, 2019 01:26:55

Description:

Part 4 of how NUTRITION has a HUGE impact on your BRAIN!

Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.

Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 2 on the COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS! Mental and emotional health, cognitive performance, and sleep!

Ads

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:39 Cliff Notes

12:08 Anatomy of the brain

16:41 The role of the basal ganglia in suppressing the investment of energy in any type of program until there is a worthwhile reason not to suppress it, and how dopamine acts as a signal of value in the basal ganglia via disinhibition

24:56 Why we can view Parkinson’s as fundamentally not a problem with movement but as a problem with a perception of the value of investing energy in controlling movement

28:23 Tonic and phasic dopamine and the importance of COMT-mediated methylation for regulating the tonic level of dopamine

36:34 The importance of GABA in suppressing the programs that dopamine doesn't signal has value in order to make the dopamine signal of value meaningful

37:28 Overview of the autonomic nervous system; the sympathetic nervous system mediates the fight-or-flight response, and the parasympathetic nervous system mediates the rest-and-digest response.

41:11 The roles of acetylcholine and norepinephrine in the autonomic nervous system, and the importance of nitric oxide to the sexual functions of the autonomic nervous system

44:28 Sleep and circadian rhythms, the importance of vitamin A, morning sun exposure, and avoiding blue light at night

48:12 Melatonin synthesis, the importance of vitamin B6, BH4, oxidative stress, vitamin B5, methylation, and tryptophan uptake into the brain

51:10 Why you can't mimic your natural melatonin rhythm with melatonin supplements

52:55 Antidiuretic hormone, the importance of light hygiene for preventing you from getting up to pee in the middle of the night, and why salt might also help

56:14 Whether the timing of carbohydrate, protein, and choline supplements makes a difference for your daytime wakefulness, your nighttime sleepiness, your deep sleep, and your REM sleep

01:00:44 The possibility that glycine and magnesium could help get rid of conditioned fear responses

01:01:30 Thoughts on consciousness; are we a ghost in the machine, or are we just a machine?

01:06:25 The default mode network is fundamentally about our inward, introverted-directed processes, contrasted with the executive control network, which is fundamentally about our relationship to the outside world and our extraverted functions.

01:10:52 How activities that had nothing to do with people skills but allowed me to flex my extroverted muscles, like exploring the outside world on my own, helped me with my people skills

01:16:48 Nutrition cannot replace the cognitive work necessary to have a healthy mindset and life, but nutrition does make it easier to do the right thing for your mental health.

Courage, Not Confidence, For Facing Fears | Chris Masterjohn Lite #108

Jan 31, 2019 06:21

Description:

We often look to ourselves for confidence when facing up to our fears. This is wrong. Here I share a personal story about how the idea of “courage, not confidence,” from Tim Ferriss’s interview with the designer Deb Millman, helped me face up to a fear.

And I didn’t even have any GABA with me!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

For access to ad-free episodes, with transcripts, and to get the episodes weeks before they are released to the public, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off.


Here is the book discussed in the episode. Purchasing it will earn me a small commission at no expense to you, which helps support the free content I put out: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/tribeofmentors

Introducing the CMJ Masterpass

Jan 30, 2019 07:56

Description:

The CMJ Masterpass is for those of you who really love me. 💙

The GINORMOUS earlybird discount is about to disappear! ⏰So check this out now if you're not a member yet to see if it's for you. (or sign up at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass 

Here's a video tour of what it looks like inside the Masterpass.

🔷The Masterpass is an all-access pass to premium features on all my audio and video content including Chris Masterjohn Lite (short, practical tips), Mastering Nutrition (long, in-depth podcasts on a specific topic), or Masterclass With Masterjohn (nutritional biochemistry courses with lessons arranged in series) that help you get my content faster and get more out of it.

🔷 The Masterpass also gives you a once-a-month opportunity to get in on a small-group live digital Q&A.

Here's what you get as premium features:

✅ Early access to content: you get episodes as soon as they are produced, usually weeks and sometimes months before they are released to the public.

✅ No ads standing in the way between you and my content.

✅ Transcripts! These are great if you like to read, or if you want to be more productive. For example, I would first listen to the episodes while I'm doing something else to scan for familiarity, then I'd go back later and keyword search the transcripts for the things I found most interesting so I could follow them up by taking notes or reviewing them in more detail.

✅ Specifically in Masterclass With Masterjohn, you get additional learning tools, such as videos you can keyword search (you literally type in a word and hit "enter" to watch it skip to each instance where I use that word) or put on a customized loop (with three clicks you start and end the loop wherever you want and it plays that section over and over again until you stop it). You also get transcripts with the slides, references, and further reading materials embedded exactly where they are relevant. Even the scientific papers are mostly one click to open up the full text.

Here's what's going on with the Q&A sessions:

🔶We use Zoom, a video chatting software, in webinar mode. You can ask your question anonymously in text, but you can also ask it publicly, and you can even get "on stage" and share your mic, web cam, or screen with everyone.

🔶I can't promise that everyone will get in every month. I'm limiting the seating -- the first time around is this Friday, to 30 seats that are already sold out -- to ensure everyone included gets to ask a question and I have time to give them a good answer. Right now I am promising to open up one live Zoom session per month and you as a Masterpass holder get the opportunity to grab your seat on a first-come, first-served basis. Over time I will experiment with the frequency and size of the sessions to make sure I'm offering the best value I can.

🔶As a Masterpass holder, you'll get immediate access to the replay whether you had a seat in the session or not.

🔶Eventually they get published as an episode of Mastering Nutrition. So you can get a little mini-famous 🌟in these. 🤩

And now about that discount.

This is for you --> 💰

Haha, seriously though.

I created the "earlybird" discount for all the people most on fire to see this happen who signed up while the system was still being constructed. That discount is 50% off, not just right now, but on the recurring membership fee FOREVER, through the life of the program. Depending on whether you pay once a month or once a year, it saves you $60-90/year.

Now, the CMJ Masterpass is virtually finished. All the content has been fully migrated. The only things I have left to do are finish getting up the search bars and some how-to video tours. I'll be finishing that up today.

So the earlybird discount is about to disappear. It ends tomorrow, Thursday, January 31, at midnight eastern time.

To lock in your last chance of a $60-90/year discount, use the link https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass

That link has the 50% discount already activated and it will stay that way until the discount expires tomorrow night.

Remember this isn't for everyone. I'm not asking you to sign up unless you really love my content and would just love to have more of it faster with all these features that help you get the most out of it. I love all of you either way. ❤️

If you're on the fence, check out this video to see what it looks like on the inside.

Oh, and if it feels like a risk, it's not. I'm confident that if you love my content you will absolutely love the Masterpass, so I'm offering a 30-day money-back guarantee. If you didn't like it for any reason, let my support team know within 30 days and you get your money back.

Hope to see you inside the Masterpass! 😊

Face Your Fears With GABA | Chris Masterjohn Lite #107

Jan 29, 2019 05:39

Description:

Do you feel too stressed when trying to face your fears? That stress could tank your immune system.

Believe it or not, a little GABA can help you tolerate the stress, and face your fears without hurting your immune function.

Tune in for how 100 mg of GABA could help!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

For access to ad-free episodes, with transcripts, and to get the episodes weeks before they are released to the public, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. But! The EARLYBIRD discount -- a 50% discount saving $60-90 per year for the entire life of the program -- is about to disappear in the next 48 hours and using the link https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass will have it already activated if you use it in time.

Here’s the study discussed in the episode:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16971751

Here’s a high-quality GABA supplement that uses the same dose as discussed in this episode. Purchasing it earns me a small commission at no extra cost to you, which helps support the free content I put out:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/thorne/gaba


Here’s the higher-dose GABA supplement discussed in the last episode. Same deal on the commission. https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/pureencapsulations/gaba

Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 3 | Mastering Nutrition #55

Jan 25, 2019 56:39

Description:

Part 3 of how NUTRITION has a HUGE impact on your BRAIN!

Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.

Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 2 on the THE FIVE SENSES!

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral


Get all four episodes of Nutrition in Neuroscience right now, ad-free, and with transcripts, as well as free access to monthly live Zoom Q&A sessions, by signing up for the CMJ Masterpass. For a *very limited time* you can still get a 50% lifetime discount that saves you $60-90 per year for the entire life of the program by using the code EARLYBIRD. To make it easier, you can use this link, which has the code already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=EARLYBIRD

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:35 Cliff Notes

08:50 Exteroception and proprioception are mediated by mechanoreceptors.

11:32 Pain is mediated by nociceptors, which are unspecialized, low-sensitivity neurons.

13:10 Capsaicin activates the TRPV1 receptor, which is also activated by hot temperatures.

15:12 The use of topical capsaicin to relieve chronic pain

18:25 Interoception is our sense of the physiological state within the body.

20:20 Why anorexics crave spicy foods

22:17 Managing pain in the peripheral nervous system; acidity sensitizes pain receptors.

24:12 Managing the fatty acids that help resolve inflammation, particularly arachidonic acid and DHA, to help with peripheral sensitization to pain

25:59 Combining aspirin with fish oil, glycine, and bicarbonate to help with peripheral sensitization to pain

30:50 Central sensitization to pain occurs through an LTP-like process, which is mediated by NMDA receptors.

32:47 Overview of vision and the importance of vitamin A

38:21 The role of vitamin A in preventing night blindness and its very closely related role in setting your circadian rhythm

41:54 Overview of hearing

44:20 Nutrients important for hearing

45:44 Overview of smell

47:41 Overview of taste

 

GABA for Faster Decision-Making | Chris Masterjohn Lite #106

Jan 24, 2019 05:23

Description:

 

Need to make quick decisions under pressure?

Tune in for how 800 mg of GABA could help!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

For access to ad-free episodes, with transcripts, and to get the episodes weeks before they are released to the public, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. For a *very limited time* you can still get a 50% lifetime discount, saving $60-90 every year, by using the EARLYBIRD code. If it still works, use that before LITE10. To make it easier, this link has the EARLYBIRD code already activated when you click on it: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=EARLYBIRD

Here’s the study discussed in the episode:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521208/


Here’s a high-quality GABA supplement that uses a dose close to the one discussed in this episode. Purchasing it earns me a small commission at no extra cost to you, which helps support the free content I put out: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/pureencapsulations/gaba

Carbs for Serotonin and Stress-Resistance | Chris Masterjohn Lite #105

Jan 22, 2019 07:01

Description:

While collagen won’t bonk your serotonin if you eat enough other protein, low-carbing too much might. Here’s why at least one meal a day with natural high-glycemic carbs like white potatoes or sweet potatoes could help improve your stress-resistance.

Tune in for more details and for what to do if low-carb is something you need to stick to.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

For access to ad-free episodes, with transcripts, and to get the episodes weeks before they are released to the public, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. For a *very limited time* you may still be able to use the code EARLYBIRD to get a 50% lifetime discount. Try it to see if it still works before using LITE10.

 

Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 2 | Mastering Nutrition #54

Jan 18, 2019 01:50:56

Description:

Part 2 of how NUTRITION has a HUGE impact on your BRAIN!

Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.

Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 2 on the NEUROTRANSMITTERS!

Get all four episodes right now, ad-free, and with transcripts, by signing up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Nutrition in Neuroscience Show Notes

00:36 Cliff Notes

10:15 Overview of neurotransmitters

12:55 Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter.

20:08 De novo glutamate in the central nervous system is overwhelmingly made from glucose.

22:55 Ketogenic diet for epilepsy

26:12 Glutamate metabolism

29:42 There are two classes of glutamate receptors: ionotropic and metabotropic.

30:45 There are three classes of metabotropic glutamate receptors, their actions are complex and variable, and they can be excitatory or inhibitory.

31:04 The ionotropic glutamate receptors include AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and kainite receptors, all of which have a depolarizing effect by allowing sodium and potassium to flow freely through them.

33:47 Four unique things about the NMDA receptor: magnesium is required to block its ion channel, it’s important for coincidence detection, it allows calcium to come into the cell, and it has a glycine-binding site.

39:16 Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are important for forming memories, and glutamate receptors play an important role.

46:48 GABA and glycine are the two primary inhibitory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system.

50:04 GABA and presumably glycine can be stimulatory if there is more chloride on the inside of the neuron than the outside.

54:52 Evidence that GABA might cross the blood-brain barrier

57:43 GABA in foods

01:00:14 GABA metabolism in the nervous system

01:02:07 Glycine

01:08:01 Acetylcholine

01:13:49 The biogenic amines include histamine, serotonin, and the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine).

01:14:30 Synthesis of the catecholamines

01:16:45 Dopamine

01:20:07 Norepinephrine

01:22:31 Histamine

01:26:14 Serotonin

01:29:10 ATP and adenosine

01:32:37 Peptide neurotransmitters

01:32:59 Hypothalamic releasing hormones include thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

01:35:14 Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)

01:35:31 Oxytocin

01:36:18 Vasopressin

01:36:56 Synthesis of the neuropeptides Substance P, MSH, oxytocin, and vasopressin requires glycine, zinc, copper, and    vitamin C.

01:40:23 Endocannabinoids and the importance of arachidonic acid, EPA, and DHA

Will Collagen Bonk Your Serotonin? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #104

Jan 17, 2019 12:43

Description:

Will collagen supplements bonk your serotonin and make you depressed or anxious?

Tune in for my response to an article that Trudy Scott, author of The Anti-Anxiety Food Solution,  wrote about this over at “Every Woman Over 29” blog.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links mentioned in this episode:

Trudy Scott’s article: https://www.everywomanover29.com/blog/collagen-gelatin-lower-serotonin-increase-anxiety-depression/

My episode on why collagen shouldn’t replace other protein:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/06/do-you-supplement-with-collagen/

How GABA and glycine can sometimes have a stimulatory effect:
https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/25/glycine-gaba-wake/

How to Fix Chronic Pain | Chris Masterjohn Lite #103

Jan 15, 2019 11:58

Description:

Here are 5 ways to help resolve chronic pain: managing inflammation, reducing acidity, magnesium, glycine, and GABA. Tune in for more details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links mentioned in this episode:

3 Ways to Clear Stubborn Inflammation: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/10/3-ways-clear-stubborn-inflammation/

Nutrition in Neuroscience has been started here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/11/nutrition-neuroscience-part-1/


Part 3 of Nutrition in Neuroscience will be published on January 25 but is available now to members of the CMJ Masterpass. To get all four episodes of this series RIGHT NOW, ad-free, and with transcripts, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass.

Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 1 | Mastering Nutrition #53

Jan 11, 2019 01:24:45

Description:

Nutrition has a HUGE impact on your brain!

Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.

Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 1 on the basic cellular functions of neurons!

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

14:55 The primary type of cell in the nervous system is the neuron.

16:32 Glial cells are the assistants of the nervous system.

17:22 Cells in the nervous system are polarized.

18:54 Mitochondria are typically only located at the synapse of neurons and in the middle of photoreceptors; creatine is important for transporting energy in a cell where ATP production is highly polarized.

26:43 Sources of creatine

28:13 Brief overview of how to support methylation

31:06 The polarization of astrocytes and the obligate need for glucose in the brain

37:33 Electrical signaling, resting membrane potential, depolarization, threshold potential, hyperpolarization, and the importance of sodium, potassium, and chloride

45:13 How to get enough sodium, chloride, and potassium in the diet

53:51 The sodium-potassium ATPase uses ATP to pump three sodium ions out of the cell and two potassium ions into the cell, so magnesium and all of the nutrients involved in energy metabolism are important.

58:44 How action potentials propagate

01:03:40 Myelin and the importance of cholesterol

01:06:53 Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of cholesterol synthesis that results in neurological problems that are corrected by dietary cholesterol.

01:09:32 Calcium acts as a second messenger in the nervous system, and the cytosolic calcium concentration has to be kept very low for this to work, which requires ATP energy.

01:14:22 Other roles of calcium in the nervous system

01:15:34 Sufficient dietary calcium and ATP energy are needed to support the second messenger roles of calcium.

3 Ways to Clear Stubborn Inflammation | Chris Masterjohn Lite #102

Jan 10, 2019 08:41

Description:

Here are 3 ways to clear stubborn inflammation: managing your fatty acids, taking a new supplement that jump-starts the resolution process, or going with the aspirin protocol from a few episodes ago. Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links mentioned in this episode:

The last episode on omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids:  

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/08/omega-6-omega-3-fatty-acid-ratio-care/

The aspirin episode: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/01/aspirin-goes-best-bicarbonate-glycine/

Here are products mentioned in this episode. Purchasing them using these links earns me a small commission at no extra cost to you, which helps support the free work I provide:

Arachidonic acid supplements: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/aa

Specialized pro-resolving mediators: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/spm

The Omega-6 / Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio: Should You Care? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #101

Jan 8, 2019 10:54

Description:

Should you care about your omega-6/omega-3 ratio? The short answer is, no, not unless you’re vegan or eat a diet that doesn’t contain liver, egg yolks, and fish.

Nevertheless, blood testing for arachidonic acid, EPA, and DHA levels can be useful and can guide dietary choices to improve the levels of these fatty acids. Still, don’t get caught up in the arachidonic acid-to-EPA ratio. And be mindful about how EPA behaves differently when you are or aren’t taking aspirin.

Tune in for the details!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links mentioned in this episode:

How to avoid false data when using Cronometer to track your nutrient intake: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/24/track-vitamin-mineral-intake/

How anti-inflammatory drugs might lead to food intolerances: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/09/25/best-weapon-food-allergies-food-intolerances/

How anti-inflammatory drugs might contribute to chronic inflammation: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2019/01/01/aspirin-goes-best-bicarbonate-glycine/

The Quest test for AA, EPA, and DHA: https://www.questdiagnostics.com/testcenter/TestDetail.action?ntc=91001


Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, which puts this testing into the broader context of lab testing and gives protocols for using the testing: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 for $5 off

What to Do About Menstrual Weight Gain | Chris Masterjohn Lite #100

Jan 3, 2019 10:01

Description:

Ladies, do you gain a lot of weight around your period?

Here’s how daily supplementation with the right forms of magnesium and B6, as well as targeted use of a low-salt, high-potassium diet around your period with herbal diuretics and just the right dose of dark chocolate can help. Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links mentioned in this episode:

Briana Theroux’s web site: https://brianatheroux.com

Using the links below generates a small commission for me at no extra cost to you:

Magnesium and B6 together (this could be taken twice a day): https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/mgandB6

Alternatively, you can take magnesium as glycinate or malate and B6 as pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (P5P) separately to yield 2-400 mg Mg and 40-50 mg P5P per day.

If you like the taste, you could use this dandelion leaf and root tea: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/dandelionleaftea

If you don’t like the taste of the tea, you could use these capsules: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/dandelionleafcapsules

Why Aspirin Goes Best With Bicarbonate and Glycine | Chris Masterjohn Lite #99

Jan 1, 2019 09:52

Description:

Most over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs carry a risk of causing food intolerances and chronic, low-grade inflammation. Aspirin is an exception. But this is why it’s best taken with bicarbonate and glycine. Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Will MCT Oil Help You Lose Weight? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #98

Dec 27, 2018 09:49

Description:

Replacing most of your fat with MCT oil will help create a small caloric deficit that can assist in weight loss, but is it worth it? Tune in for my answer.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Does Glycine or GABA Wake You Up? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #97

Dec 25, 2018 07:34

Description:

GABA and glycine supplements should both have a calming effect, helping to reduce anxiety and make you sleep better.

But some people have asked me, what if they do the opposite? What if they cause anxiety and wake you up at night? Tune in for my answer.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links to things mentioned in the episode:

Testing Nutritional Status, The Ultimate Cheat Sheet is at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet (use the code LITE5 to get $5 off)

The specific comment addressed in this episode: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/10/11/dont-use-niacin-buffer-excess-methyl-groups/#comment-47351

For *many* resources on glycine: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

On GABA, 5 Ways to Help With Glutamate Sensitivity and Glutamate Dominance: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/06/14/5-ways-help-glutamate-sensitivity-glutamate-dominance/

3 Ways to Get Enough Potassium: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/19/3-ways-get-enough-potassium/

The Best Way to Supplement With Potassium: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/14/best-way-supplement-potassium/

How to Manage Your Magnesium Status: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/23/manage-magnesium-status/

How to Manage Your Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Status: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/28/monitor-thiamin-vitamin-b1-status/

How to Manage Your Vitamin B6 Status:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/13/manage-vitamin-b6-status/  

Why You Should Be Careful With Niacin and Nicotinamide Riboside: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/07/26/careful-niacin-nicotinamide-riboside/

DON’T Use Niacin to Buffer Excess Methyl Groups: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/10/11/dont-use-niacin-buffer-excess-methyl-groups/

 

Does Methylfolate Make You Angry or Depressed? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #96

Dec 20, 2018 08:09

Description:

Does methylfolate make you angry or depressed?

Tune in to hear what I think is going on and what to do about it.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here is a link to the liquid methylfolate supplement recommended in the episode:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/liquidfolate

Here are links to the original comment threads discussed in this episode:

https://www.facebook.com/chrismasterjohn/videos/271674290121604/?comment_id=273676619921371&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R%22%7D


https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/10/02/what-everyone-should-be-doing-about-methylation/#comment-47229

7 Steps to Cure Histamine Intolerance | Chris Masterjohn Lite #95

Dec 18, 2018 09:27

Description:

Here’s a 7-step protocol to tackle histamine intolerance.

Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are links to other episodes that were mentioned in this one.

Copper:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/08/manage-copper-status-2/

Vitamin B6:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/13/manage-vitamin-b6-status/

Vitamin C:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/15/manage-vitamin-c-status/

Estrogen:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/04/migraines-menstrual-cycle-histamine/

Kidney and DAO:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/29/kidney-dao-supplements-histamine-intolerance/

Methylation:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

Selenium:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/20/manage-selenium-status/

Vitamin A:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/16/manage-vitamin-status/

Alcohol:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/11/alcohol-and-histamine/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/13/is-alcohol-good-for-you/

Medications:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/06/taking-medications-cause-histamine-intolerance/

Is Alcohol Good for You? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #94

Dec 13, 2018 10:43

Description:

Is alcohol good for you?

It’s clear to me that 1) alcohol is a toxin and 2) it can help with having fun, which is good for you, but in this episode I consider whether some dose of alcohol might actually be fundamentally good for you. I discuss three ways this might work and what the optimal dose might be, as well as sharing a story of how I used alcohol to help clear up a fungal infection.

Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This is the episode on alcohol and histamine that was mentioned:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/11/alcohol-and-histamine/

 

Alcohol and Histamine | Chris Masterjohn Lite #93

Dec 11, 2018 04:33

Description:

Could drinking alcohol be contributing to your allergies or histamine intolerance?

When my allergies started going nuts in Greece this summer, I was drinking more alcohol. Alcohol impairs the clearance of histamine *and* competes with histamine to be cleared itself. So it could make your allergies worse or contribute to histamine intolerance if you have it.

Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Are You Taking Medications That Cause Histamine Intolerance? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #92

Dec 6, 2018 06:18

Description:

Could your medications be contributing to your histamine intolerance?

There are over 50 medications that could be culprits, so if you have symptoms of histamine intolerance and you are on any medications, tune in to this episode to find out if the ones you’re taking could be a problem.

Make sure to discuss any problems with your medication or changes to be made with your doctor! Please don’t change your medications on the basis of this episode alone!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here are the links to the introductory episodes on histamine intolerance:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/22/dietary-histamine-reliable-information/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/27/test-histamine-intolerance/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/29/kidney-dao-supplements-histamine-intolerance/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/12/04/migraines-menstrual-cycle-histamine/

Migraines and the Menstrual Cycle: Histamine? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #91

Dec 4, 2018 06:08

Description:

Ladies, let’s talk about your cycle.

Specifically, do you get migraines, other types of headaches, flushing, itching, or any other allergy-like symptoms that correlate with your menstrual cycle?

If so, you could be experiencing temporary histamine intolerance caused by too much estrogen. Tune in to learn more!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

Here is the link to the Histamine Block: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/DAO

Here is the link to the kidney extract: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/kidney

Here is the link to the last episode on using DAO supplements:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/29/kidney-dao-supplements-histamine-intolerance/

 

Kidney and DAO Supplements for Histamine Intolerance | Chris Masterjohn Lite #90

Nov 29, 2018 07:03

Description:

Got histamine intolerance? Here are two supplements that could help.

Tune in to learn which ones to use!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

 

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Here is the link to the Histamine Block: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/DAO

Here is the link to the kidney extract: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/kidney

 

Here is the link to the episode that lists the symptoms of histamine intolerance in more detail, and covers food sources of histamine:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/22/dietary-histamine-reliable-information/

Here are the links to the episodes on B6, copper, and vitamin C:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/08/manage-copper-status-2/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/13/manage-vitamin-b6-status/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/15/manage-vitamin-c-status/

How to Test for Histamine Intolerance | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML 89

Nov 27, 2018 06:37

Description:

Do you have histamine intolerance?

It could be confused with an increased burden of mast cells, one of the main types of cells that release histamine.

Tune in for two lab tests that can help you tell the difference.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Here is the link to the episode that lists the symptoms of histamine intolerance in more detail, and covers food sources of histamine:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/22/dietary-histamine-reliable-information/

 

Dietary Histamine: How Reliable Is the Information? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #88

Nov 22, 2018 11:52

Description:

Histamine!

 

If you suffer from ANY of these symptoms -- diarrhea, headaches (including migraines), nasal congestion, asthma, wheezing, low or high blood pressure, heart palpitations (when your heart skips, flutters or beats irregularly), hives, itching, or flushing, you could be histamine intolerant.

 

If you are, this means that, as much as your symptoms seem like allergies, it could be a reaction to histamine in foods, such as hard cheese, fish, shellfish, dried nuts and fruit, and fermented and aged products more generally.

 

But can you trust the lists you find on the internet of which foods to avoid? In this episode I look at the data on histamine in foods -- and it’s messier than you might think.

Tune in to see which foods you should be most concerned with.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Selenium Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #87

Nov 20, 2018 09:10

Description:

Selenium makes you resilient to all kinds of stress, including the physical attacks of infections and toxins. It keeps your nails healthy, prevents the wear and tear on your tissues as you age, keeps your body from launching too much inflammation and releasing too much histamine, and appears to protect against several cancers.

On the other hand, too much worsens the risk of diabetes and causes some of the same problems that “just enough” protects against.

Because the soils vary so much in their selenium content, it’s hard to judge what you’re getting just from the foods you eat, and selenium is one mineral I think everyone should test at least once.

Tune in for everything you need to know about how to manage your selenium status!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Here’s the methylation page mentioned in the episode: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation


Here’s a much more detailed page on selenium: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/02/18/why-you-should-manage-your-selenium-status-and-how-to-do-it/

How to Manage Your Vitamin C Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #86

Nov 15, 2018 10:23

Description:

Vitamin C protects against bleeding gums, makes your bones strong, helps keep you from getting sick, protects against the normal wear and tear on our tissues, helps us deal with alcohol, cigarette smoke, and toxins in our environment, and may even help support our ability to experience the emotional impact of physical intimacy. That last one is a little speculative, but it does make sense, because vitamin C is needed to make oxytocin, the so-called love hormone!

Tune in for everything you need to know about how to manage your vitamin C status!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Weston Price and Beyond | Mastering Nutrition #52

Nov 14, 2018 01:20:02

Description:

In this episode, Hilda Librada Gore of the Wise Traditions podcast interviews me about the work of Weston Price, dental researcher extraordinaire and pioneer of nutritional anthropology. In the second half, we talk about how to condense what we've learned since Price's time about nutrition into some practical rules of thumb that can help us achieve the best diet to meet our nutritional needs.

It originally appeared on the Wise Traditions podcast as episode 155 and 156.

If you can be in Baltimore, MD this weekend, November 16-November 19, come to the Wise Traditions Conference! I'll be giving an all-day seminar on Monday the 19th about measuring and managing nutritional status. You can register for the conference on site and select my seminar as an add-on.

Regardless of if you come to my seminar, you can get my "cheat sheet" for measuring and managing nutritional status at chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet and use the code MASTERINGNUTRITION to get $5 off your order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

Here's what you can expect to find in the podcast.

PART 1

Dr. Weston A. Price, a Cleveland dentist and researcher from the late 1800s, has been called the “Isaac Newton of Nutrition.” His research is just that pivotal to our understanding of the role diet plays in our health. Today, we take a deep dive into the research that Dr. Price conducted and how we can benefit from it. What foods did traditional peoples enjoy that helped them cultivate good health? What did they avoid? And what can we learn from their choices? On this podcast, Chris Masterjohn, a nutrition expert who has a PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Connecticut, explains the foundational work of Dr. Price.

In the 1930s, Dr. Price traveled the world in order to study isolated people groups, visiting sequestered villages in Switzerland, Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribal groups, Australian Aborigines, and more. He was interested in finding out how these groups resisted the tooth decay and deformations that he was seeing in his clinic in the United States. The world over, Dr. Price found that those on their traditional diets not only had beautiful straight teeth, free from decay, but they also enjoyed vibrant health and vitality. Chris discusses in detail how Dr. Price went about this work and how it can serve us in our pursuit of good health today.

Highlights from the conversation include:

Chris’ own recent trip to Greece and how he made discoveries for himself the purpose of Dr. Price’s research the wisdom and and history of traditional cultures the role nutrition plays in tooth decay the “displacing foods of modern commerce” the developmental effects of refined vs traditional foods how the width of the face is determined by more than just genetics the shocking story of the skulls Dr. Price found in Peru why our oral health and overall health are intrinsically linked how reversing tooth decay and healing cavities with diet is possible the difference between fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins & which are so difficult to get Dr. Price’s four main food categories for good health

PART 2 

We understand the beauty and benefit of diversity. We switch up our exercise routines. We diversify our investment portfolio. But did you know that it’s a good idea to diversify our diets, as well? Today, Chris Masterjohn makes a strong case for why it’s critical to do so for optimal health. Chris is a health expert and educator, with a PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Connecticut. He explains in detail his rules of thumb for healthy eating. He give us practical ideas on how to translate the research of Dr. Weston A. Price from head knowledge to the dinner plate. Along the way, he tells stories about traditional people groups‘ dietary patterns; he warns us about the dangers of dietary extremes; and he gives us a window into the way he himself eats for optimal health.

Highlights from the conversation include:

Chris’ “rules of thumb” for good health why it’s important to diversify our food sources how nutrients are different, even in the same food groups how to actually implement Dr. Price’s research in your life practical tips and advice for diversifying your food the problem with categorizing certain foods as “good” or “bad” why plants are not as good a source of calcium compared to dairy products or bones the dangers of the carnivore diet how there are no people groups who eat animal foods exclusively; nor are there people living solely on plant foods the strange story of isolated peoples who had no access to animal foods the importance of eat eating the entire animal, nose to tail what to do if your body has specific needs what Dr. Price found when he searched for vegan people groups the important principle of how distinct our nutritional needs are (both compared to others’ needs and how our own needs change over time) Learn about the true diversity of traditional cultures

How to Manage Your Vitamin B6 Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #85

Nov 13, 2018 10:56

Description:

Vitamin B6 protects against depression, anxiety, insomnia, age-related cognitive decline, hypoglycemia, kidney stones, and the morning sickness of pregnancy.

Tune in for everything you need to know about how to manage your B6 status!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral


This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Copper Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #84

Nov 8, 2018 11:58

Description:

Copper!

Copper is needed to prevent anemia, histamine intolerance, high cholesterol, and osteoporosis, probably helps with allergies, and is needed to make you feel good overall. There’s a dark side to its toxicity, but more likely you need more copper than less.

Tune in for everything you need to know about how to manage your copper status!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

These links are mentioned in the episode:

Zinc for heavy metals: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/11/01/zinc-heavy-metals/

The methylation page: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

Here’s a much more detailed page about copper: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/02/03/manage-copper-status/

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

DON’T Count Your Collagen as Protein | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #83

Nov 6, 2018 10:14

Description:

Do you supplement with collagen?

 

Collagen is great, and important, but you SHOULDN’T be counting it toward your protein intake.

 

I’ve been seeing “collagen protein” bars around, and there’s nothing inaccurate about calling them that, but it seems easily to be misled into thinking they provide all the protein we need at a meal. They don’t.

 

Many people have asked me why I talk about collagen and non-collagen protein separately, and this episode explains why. Listen in and let me know what you think!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

These links are mentioned in the episode:

The glycine database: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/glycinedatabase

The glycine podcast: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/gycine

The methylation page, where it all fits into context: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

 

Zinc for Heavy Metals | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #82

Nov 1, 2018 05:54

Description:

Got heavy metals?

 

If the elevation of heavy metals is modest (for example, less than twice the upper limit of the reference range), I think it is best to use zinc supplementation as a gentle approach to help detoxify. Here’s how I recommend using zinc for heavy metals.

My previous episode on how to supplement with zinc can be found here:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/10/25/how-to-supplement-with-zinc/

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Why I DON’T Recommend Zinc Picolinate | Chris Masterjohn Lite #81

Oct 30, 2018 09:03

Description:

There are plenty of zinc supplements out there, and while many are acceptable, I don’t recommend using zinc oxide or zinc picolinate. People are often surprised that I recommend against picolinate. So, in this episode, I explain why.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Supplement with Zinc | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #80

Oct 25, 2018 07:01

Description:

Wondering what the best way is to supplement with zinc?

This episode covers what kind to take, what dose, when to take it, how often, with what foods or on an empty stomach, and of course how to know if you should be supplementing.

My preferred zinc supplement for most people is Jarrow Zinc Balance. You can use one of these two links to generate a commission to support my work at no extra cost to you.

Amazon: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/amazon/jarrow/zincbalance

Iherb: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/iherb/jarrowzincbalance

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Zinc Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #79

Oct 23, 2018 08:35

Description:

Zinc is needed for healthy skin, a robust immune system, sharp vision, stable blood sugar control, balanced and strong hormonal health, and far more. It’s even needed for protection against the heavy metals that pollute our environment.

Here’s how to make sure you’re getting enough -- but not too much!  -- from managing your diet, to non-dietary causes of deficiency, to measuring and managing your zinc status with bloodwork.

My methylation resources, mentioned in the episode, can be found here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/methylation

My other zinc resources, mentioned in the episode, can be found here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/zincsearch

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.


This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

7 Natural Ways to Boost Your Glutathione | Chris Masterjohn Lite #78

Oct 18, 2018 07:13

Description:

 

Glutathione is a molecule you make from the protein in your diet that is incredibly important to protecting your liver, thyroid, and lungs. It’s the master antioxidant of the cell, critical to detoxing and cleaning out your system, and plays an especially important role in preventing asthma.

Here are seven natural ways to boost your glutathione status!

This is the link to the glycine database that is mentioned in the episode: http://chrismasterjohnphd.com/glycinedatabase

 

This is the link to the episode on magnesium status mentioned in the episode: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/08/23/manage-magnesium-status/

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Glutathione for Asthma | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #77

Oct 16, 2018 05:51

Description:

Do you have asthma? Do you know or love someone who does?

Here’s how to use supplemental glutathione (reduced, liposomal, and nebulized) to help with this condition.

This is the link to the episode on nitric oxide, mentioned in this episode: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2018/01/11/nitric-oxide-genes-blood-pressure-asthma/

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

DON’T Use Niacin to Buffer Excess Methyl Groups | Chris Masterjohn Lite #76

Oct 11, 2018 07:17

Description:

Many people use niacin supplements to reduce their methylation rate. Some use it regularly because they are “overmethylators” and some use it intermittently when they experience symptoms they associate with overmethylation.

In this episode, I describe why I don’t recommend using niacin in this way. Doing so is using niacin as a drug, not a nutrient. Our goal should be instead to supply glycine in nutritionally adequate amounts to make the methylation system run smoothly like a well-oiled machine.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

DON’T Use Histamine Levels to Assess Methylation Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #75

Oct 9, 2018 04:55

Description:

A number of practitioners use whole blood histamine levels to classify people into undermethylators and overmethylators. I don’t agree with using histamine levels to assess methylation status. Tune in to find out why.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Kresser/Kahn Vegan Debate on Joe Rogan: My Post-Game Analysis

Oct 4, 2018 01:17:36

Description:

Please head on over to the YouTube video and like it, share it, or comment on it to help me promote this! 

It would also be great if you're on Twitter if you could like, retweet, or reply to the tweet about the analysis.

The links mentioned in the podcast can all be found in the description of the YouTube video.

Enjoy!

Why I Don’t Believe in “Overmethylators” and “Undermethylators” | Chris Masterjohn Lite #74

Oct 4, 2018 06:03

Description:

Are you an undermethylator or an overmethylator?

Neither!

Chris Masterjohn Lite is a show about what works. Today we kick off a short series on a few things that don’t work by discussing why I don’t think it’s useful and why I think it’s actually counter-productive to classify people as undermethylators and overmethylators.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

What EVERYONE Should Be Doing About Methylation | Chris Masterjohn Lite #73

Oct 2, 2018 11:11

Description:

MTHFR or not, this is the minimum that EVERYONE should be doing to support methylation, boiled down into five simple rules.

Tune in to learn the rules!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Five Rules for a Healthy Diet | Chris Masterjohn Lite #72

Sep 27, 2018 07:06

Description:

Here is a healthy diet, boiled down into five simple rules.

Tune in to learn the rules!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Your Best Weapon Against Food Allergies and Food Intolerances | Chris Masterjohn Lite #71

Sep 25, 2018 08:24

Description:

Food allergies seem more common now than ever. Are we just hearing about them more because of better awareness, or are they really more common? We have reliable data about celiac disease: it’s four times as common now than it was a half century ago. I suspect the same is true of other food intolerances and of food allergies.

Your best weapons? The egg yolks and liver that have disappeared from our diets during this timeframe, and avoiding unnecessary use of over-the-counter anti-inflammatories.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.


This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.  

 

 

Vitamin A for Allergies | Chris Masterjohn Lite CML #70

Sep 20, 2018 08:47

Description:

When I was in Greece this August, I didn’t have any allergies at first, but then they started acting up, and they kept getting worse throughout my trip. I thought it was from the local environment, but when I woke up with conjunctivitis in the last week I looked back and realized my diet had been very deficient in vitamin A while I was there. Vitamin A deficiency can be an important cause of allergies, and if you suffer from allergies you should consider your vitamin A status.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

Blood Tests for Food Allergies | Chris Masterjohn Lite #69

Sep 18, 2018 07:26

Description:

Many people have asked me what I think about blood tests for food allergies. In this episode, I explain.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

Seasonal Allergies? Think About the Histamine in Your Food | Chris Masterjohn Lite #68

Sep 13, 2018 07:28

Description:

If you suffer from allergies, you may need to remove fermented, aged, and cured foods from your diet. While the ultimate solution should be to make yourself more resilient to both pollen and these foods, lowering the amount of histamine in your “histamine bucket” may provide needed relief in the short-term.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

When Measuring Your Waist Circumference Doesn’t Work | Chris Masterjohn Lite #67

Sep 11, 2018 07:49

Description:

In the past I have recommended measuring your waist circumference in addition to your scale weight when you are trying to lose weight or gain muscle. This is an easy way to gauge how much of your change in weight is fat versus muscle.

 

But sometimes it just doesn’t give you good information. Waist circumference is influenced not just by abdominal fat but also by the amount of undigested food in the stomach, and by retention of water and gas from hormones, inflammation, and digestive distress. This episode is about how to tell when you should and shouldn’t be measuring your waist circumference.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com.

Why You Shouldn’t Manage Iron Overload With Diet | Chris Masterjohn Lite #66

Sep 6, 2018 07:31

Description:

It may seem that people at risk of iron overload should manage it by avoiding iron-rich foods, but in most cases this is a bad idea. Iron-rich foods are rich in many other nutrients, like copper, zinc, vitamin A, and vitamin B12. Chelators like phytate can induce deficiencies of other minerals, like zinc. In this video, I explain why dietary management should be a last resort for iron overload.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Why You Probably Don’t Need to Care About Avoiding Iron-Rich Foods | Chris Masterjohn Lite #65

Sep 4, 2018 07:37

Description:

A lot of people seem to think that they should avoid iron-rich foods, even if they have no reason to believe they have a genetic predisposition to iron overload. In this video, I show you why this is ridiculous. I *do* have a genetic predisposition to iron overload, and I consume over 5 times the daily value for iron, including 10 ounces of red meat, and my iron status is kept on the low end of the physiologically healthy range by donating blood about once a year. Watch the video to see the numbers!

In the video, I reference this previous episode on looking up your genetics for iron overload: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/03/22/know-youre-risk-iron-overload/

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

 

This is the Bloodwork You Should Get for Iron Overload | Chris Masterjohn Lite #64

Aug 30, 2018 07:41

Description:

In this episode, I break down an iron panel and explain why it’s important to also measure serum ferritin and transferrin, and when you should use transferrin saturation instead of iron saturation as a marker of your short-term iron status.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Monitor Your Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #63

Aug 28, 2018 07:58

Description:

Thiamin, or vitamin B1, is needed for energy metabolism but is especially important to carbohydrate metabolism. Its deficiency causes severe neurological problems, but moderate deficits may manifest more mildly as poor carbohydrate tolerance. Carnivores and vegans alike can get plenty of thiamin if they eat the right foods, but a diet based mainly on fat, or on refined foods that have not been fortified with thiamin, can cause deficiency. Nevertheless, thiamin is unusual in that most factors contributing to deficiency are not dietary, and many are actually environmental. In this video, I teach you how to assess your thiamin status and fix it if you have a problem.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Magnesium Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #62

Aug 23, 2018 08:56

Description:

Magnesium is needed for literally everything in the body. When you don’t have enough, the most common problems are twitching, muscle cramps or spasms, heart palpitations, and weakness, plus other signs and symptoms discussed in the video. In this episode, I teach you how to look for its deficiency, how to use three different lab measurements to monitor your magnesium status, and how to fix a problem if you find one.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Test Kidney Function When Taking Creatine | Chris Masterjohn Lite #61

Aug 21, 2018 03:52

Description:

Taking creatine can raise your serum creatinine and give the false impression your kidney function is declining. Here is how to avoid this problem.

 

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Manage Your Vitamin A Status | Chris Masterjohn Lite #60

Aug 16, 2018 08:15

Description:

Dry eyes? Poor night vision? Get sick often? Bumpy or flaky skin? You may need more vitamin A. In this video, I tell you how to figure that out, and what to do about it.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

The Best Way to Supplement With Potassium | Chris Masterjohn Lite #59

Aug 14, 2018 08:15

Description:

Only 2% of Americans meet the official recommendations for potassium, yet potassium supplements carry risks that has led the FDA to strictly regulate the amount in one serving to be so small you would need to take 50 pills a day to meet the requirement. Here are my recommendations for using potassium citrate powder in a way that protects you from the risks and allows you to get the benefits of much larger amounts than found in the typical pills.

The potassium citrate powder discussed in the video can be found at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/potassium. If you use my affiliate link, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Please make sure to watch the video for proper use of the supplement and clear the decision with your doctor in case you have any conditions or are on any medications that impair your ability to handle potassium supplements.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

The Best Way to Supplement With Calcium | Chris Masterjohn Lite # 58

Aug 9, 2018 05:23

Description:

Calcium supplementation is controversial. Some people believe that supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, can increase the risk of heart disease. Here are my recommendations for calcium supplementation to make it as close to eating whole foods as possible.

The bone meal powder I use can be found at chrismasterjohnphd.com/calcium. If you use my affiliate link, I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Do you really need to be taking fish oil? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #57

Aug 7, 2018 06:34

Description:

Do we really need to be taking fish oil?

For most people, it is better to use fish or pasture-raised egg yolks to get omega-3s. But there are specific reasons to use cod liver oil, fish oil, or krill oil. More details in the video!

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Gain Muscle Without Gaining Fat | Chris Masterjohn Lite #56

Aug 2, 2018 07:31

Description:

How do you put on muscle without risking gaining fat? You need the right workout, enough protein, and a gentle caloric surplus. Watch the video for more details!

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

7 Ways to Keep Your Blood Sugar Stable | Chris Masterjohn Lite #55

Jul 31, 2018 09:21

Description:

Here are seven ways to keep your blood sugar in control: vinegar; glycine, proper balance and eating order within your meals, walking after your meal, putting your carbs after exercise, managing your glycemic load per meal, and focusing on meals that have a low glycemic index for you personally.

The video covers these recommendations in more detail.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Why You Should Be Careful With Niacin and Nicotinamide Riboside | Chris Masterjohn Lite #54

Jul 26, 2018 12:31

Description:

Are you using niacin or nicotinamide riboside? If so, watch this video! These supplements can help you age more gracefully and give you more energy, but they can also hurt your liver, mess with your neurotransmitters and your mood, and even sap your energy.

In this video I discuss using a powder for better control over the dose, and how to match your niacin dose to a corresponding dose of trimethylglycine (TMG).

The nicotinamide riboside powder can be found at hpnsupplements.com.

The TMG can be found at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/tmg.

If you use my affiliate link for the TMG, I will get a small commission at no extra cost to you, which will help support the free work

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

How to Track Your Vitamin and Mineral Intake | Chris Masterjohn Lite #53

Jul 24, 2018 12:37

Description:

One of the most powerful things you can do to evaluate whether your nutrition is on point is to track your vitamin and mineral status for a few days that are representative of your diet. Here’s how to do it with Cronometer, with specific recommendations for making it representative and accurate, and avoiding errors in data collection. Plus, you get to see my results for a day!

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

3 Ways to Get Enough Potassium | Chris Masterjohn Lite #52

Jul 19, 2018 08:41

Description:

In this video, I give you three different ways to get enough potassium. The first focuses on eating a lots of fruits and vegetables. The second focuses on a diet low in fat, moderate in grains, and devoid of refined foods. The third focuses on selecting vegetables with the highest amount of potassium per net carb for use in high-fat, low-carbohydrate or ketogenic diets.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

Why Salt Raises Blood Pressure in Some People | CML #51

Jul 17, 2018 05:59

Description:

In this video, I give you three different ways to get enough potassium. The first focuses on eating a lots of fruits and vegetables. The second focuses on a diet low in fat, moderate in grains, and devoid of refined foods. The third focuses on selecting vegetables with the highest amount of potassium per net carb for use in high-fat, low-carbohydrate or ketogenic diets.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

5 Ways to Help With Glutamate Sensitivity and Glutamate Dominance | Chris Masterjohn Lite #50

Jun 14, 2018 09:13

Description:

If you have negative reactions to MSG, slowly cooked protein, pressure cooked protein, or fermented foods, you might have glutamate sensitivity. If you have a neurological or psychiatric condition (anxiety, sleep disorders, epilepsy are all examples), you might have glutamate dominance.

In a previous episode, I discussed the possibility that oxaloacetate supplementation could help. In this episode, I discuss five more things to try: GABA, glycine, vitamin B6, magnesium, and electrolytes (salt and potassium-rich foods).

Here is the older episode on oxaloacetate: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/05/11/oxaloacetate-supplements-help-glutamate-sensitivity/

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Carbs or Keto for Sleep? | CML #49

Jun 12, 2018 07:16

Description:

If you’re trying to get better sleep, should you be upping your carbs, or going keto?

Paradoxically, both of these strategies can help, but for different reasons. In this episode I cover why they can help, how to pick your strategy, and some ways you can gain some more freedom over which strategy to choose.

In this episode I mention the sleep recommendations that I put out last year. They can be found here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/sleep

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

How to Protect Your Muscle Mass When Losing Weight | CML #48

Jun 7, 2018 05:32

Description:

When you want to lose weight, you really want to lose fat, right? You’re not trying to turn into a wimpy twig with no muscle mass, are you?

If so, it’s important to design your weight loss strategy in a way that protects your muscle mass. If you don’t, your weight loss could be as much as half lean mass, and that’s not what you want.

The two most important strategies are the right type of exercise program and consuming enough protein. Avoiding weight loss that’s too rapid is another strategy that can help. In this episode, I provide the details about how to implement these strategies in the right way.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Emotions and Environment Could Be Hurting Your Weight Loss | Chris Masterjohn Lite #47

Jun 5, 2018 08:04

Description:

Are you struggling to lose weight? Feel like you don’t have the willpower to make it happen?

Your emotional relationship with food and your environment could be hampering your ability to succeed. Knowing whether you are a moderator or a sustainer, knowing which of the “four tendencies” determine your relationship to inner and outer expectations, and identifying the emotional and psychological needs that you are meeting with food can all help you design a weight loss program that properly addresses your emotions and environment.

In this episode I discuss two quizzes made by Gretchen Rubin:

Moderator versus abstainer (more an article than a quiz: https://gretchenrubin.com/2012/05/quiz-are-you-an-abstainer-or-a-moderator/)

The Four Tendencies https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4232520/gretchenrubinfourtendenciesquiz

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Weight Loss: The Low-Hanging Fruit | Chris Masterjohn Lite #46

May 31, 2018 07:50

Description:

Why should you bother spending time tracking calories or eating something so monotonous as “The Robot Diet” when there are plenty of dietary approaches out there that allow a variety of delicious foods, don’t require time spent tracking calories, and work for so many people?

These approaches are “the low-hanging fruit of weight loss.” Is there low-hanging fruit available to you? How do you know when you’ve picked it all? That’s what I answer in this episode.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Lose Weight With the Robot Diet | Chris Masterjohn Lite #45

May 29, 2018 06:48

Description:

The most reliable way to lose weight is to track calories, but tracking calories is time consuming. With the Robot Diet, you can substitute consistency for tracking calories, and save tons of time. Eat like a robot to have the abs of a robot. Walk like a human, talk like a human, and act like a human, and no one will no where they came from.

Here are the two episodes I released last year on tracking calories:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/05/02/reliable-way-lose-weight/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/05/04/easiest-way-track-calories/

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet

Chris Kresser on Unconventional Medicine | Mastering Nutrition #51

May 23, 2018 01:26:40

Description:

In this episode, I interview Chris Kresser!

We discuss his new book, Unconventional Medicine, and everything he is doing over at the Kresser Institute, including his new health coach training program. Chris is changing the face of medicine with his new paradigm. Listen in to find out why I told him that in the 2020 presidential debates, I expect the candidates to be debating how many jobs Kresser created over the last four years.

You can buy his new book, Unconventional Medicine, on Amazon.

If you’re interested in becoming a health coach, or if you already are one and wish to undergo his new training to get his functional medicine perspective, you have up until June 3 to enroll. You can sign up here.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Yours for only $30.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

11:46 Introduction

12:29 Alternative medicine’s critique of conventional medicine and what Chris Kresser has to add to that critique

15:41 Why hasn’t alternative medicine outcompeted conventional medicine?

18:42 The differences between alternative medicine, integrative medicine, and functional medicine

25:14 The functional medicine approach to headaches

27:03 The California Center for Functional Medicine’s intake process for new patients

34:32 Why taking medications to reduce fever might be a bad idea in most cases but can be helpful in some rare cases

37:27 How we can justify the costs of testing in functional medicine. Using type 2 diabetes as an example, investing $5,000 up front for one patient can save half a million dollars in the long run.

42:01 Who will end up paying for functional medicine?

47:38 What Chris Kresser is doing to spread the functional medicine approach to healthcare: his book Unconventional Medicine; the California Center for Functional Medicine; his program with the Berkeley Fire Department; and the Kresser Institute’s physician and health coach training programs.

52:53 Why doctors still need people skills

56:21 The importance of allied health providers, such as health coaches, nutritionists, and nurse practitioners, and how they can make longer appointments with physicians economically feasible

1:10:07 Advice for starting a career in functional medicine and deciding what degree to pursue

1:16:05 Advice for physicians who want to start practicing functional medicine

1:17:55 Who should read Unconventional Medicine and where to get it

 

 

Here’s What to Do About VDR Mutations | Chris Masterjohn Lite #44

Jan 23, 2018 04:53

Description:

Are mutations in your genes for the vitamin D receptor impacting your vitamin D requirements?

There are three common genetic variants, known as Taq1, Bsm1, and Fok1. They’ve been associated with the risk of certain diseases but no one has quite sorted out what they are actually doing. It’s possible they raise your need for vitamin D. Watch this video for my recommendations on what to do if you have them.

I recommend testing your VDR genes with StrateGene, which you can get here:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene

For more information on how to get the StrateGene report, watch this video:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/04/know-need-care-mthfr/

You may also enjoy these other two videos I made about vitamin D testing:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/05/16/tell-difference-vitamin-d-calcium-deficiencies/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/05/18/vitamin-d-normal-pth-high/

Can You Get Vitamin A From Plants? It Depends on Your Genes. | Chris Masterjohn Lite #43

Jan 18, 2018 05:26

Description:

Can you get vitamin A from plant foods? It depends on your genes.

Listen to this podcast to learn how to figure out your BCO1 genetics and how this impacts your vitamin A requirement.

Vitamin A is found in the form of carotenoids in red, orange, yellow, and green vegetables, and in the form of retinol in animal foods, especially liver. BCO1 helps you convert the carotenoids to retinol, which is the form you need to have in your body to be healthy. Many of us have genetic impairments in BCO1. In fact, for genetic reasons alone, if you took 100 of us, half of us would make the conversion less than half as well as the other half. A quarter of us would have our ability to make the conversion slashed four-fold.

But it isn’t *all* about genetics. There are many other factors -- thyroid health, iron, protein, zinc, vitamin E, parasites, oxidative stress, heavy metals, polyunsaturated fats -- the list just goes on and on for the things that can affect this conversion. Knowing your genes is helpful, but only one piece of the puzzle.

Listen to the podcast for how I recommend handling this.

I recommend testing your BCO1 genes with StrateGene, which you can get here:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene

For more information on how to get the StrateGene report, watch this video:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/04/know-need-care-mthfr/

What to Do About Your COMT Genes | Chris Masterjohn Lite #42

Jan 16, 2018 07:12

Description:

Do you have anxiety? Depression? Attention problems? Or are you worried about estrogen and cancer?

If so, listen to this podcast to learn about the role of your COMT genetics.

COMT metabolizes dopamine, estrogen, and various other things. Half of us have the genetic for intermediate activity. The other half of us are split evenly between high and low activity. When nutrition is optimal, this just leads to personality differences: with low COMT activity, you’re better at focusing, but tend to ruminate on things rather than letting them go; with high COMT activity, you rarely get stuck in a rut, but you just as rarely sit down to focus on one single thing. When nutrition is off, we can go to pathological extremes, whether it’s depression and anxiety on one hand, or attention deficit and hyperactivity on the other. Robust COMT activity is also needed to get rid of harmful forms of estrogen that contribute to cancer risk.

I recommend testing your COMT genes with StrateGene, which you can get here:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene

For more information on how to get the StrateGene report, watch this video, the first of the three MTHFR videos:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/04/know-need-care-mthfr/

Here are the two other MTHFR videos:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/06/what-to-do-about-mthfr/

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/11/bloodwork-get-mthfr/

Why You Should Manage Your Thiamin Status and How to Do It | Mastering Nutrition #50

Jan 15, 2018 56:21

Description:

Today, January 14, is the *last day* to get 30% off your entire order by entering masterjohn as the promo code at checkout when you make purchases on paleovalley.com.

Thiamin, or vitamin B1, is central to both energy metabolism and antioxidant defense. While its deficiency causes many problems, out of all the B vitamins its deficiency is most neurological in nature, because energy metabolism of the brain becomes severely compromised, and because neurotransmitters derived from protein cannot be produced. In its most severe form, beriberi, it can cause loss of muscle control, twitching, muscles freezing into awkward positions, and seizures.

Carbohydrates require twice as much thiamin as fat. This means, on the one hand, that high-carbohydrate diets increase the need for thiamin, and on the other hand, that people who are deficient in thiamin may have neurological symptoms that resolve when they go on a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet.

Thiamin is widely distributed in foods. Historically, diets high in refined grain produced beriberi, but now refined grains are enriched in thiamin, so its deficiency is rarely caused by diet. However, certain foods such as raw fish and moths that are eaten in some cultures contain thiamin antagonists, gastrointestinal microbes can degrade thiamin, and there are various environmental causes of thiamin deficiency, such the algae that grow in dead zones. As such, environmental exposure to thiamin antagonists may be a more common cause of thiamin deficiency than poor dietary intake.

Still, some foods are much higher in thiamin than most others, with whole grains, legumes, yeast, and red meat being among the best sources.

The show notes for this episode are available at chrismasterjohnphd.com/50.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I wrote this to make everything you could possibly need to measure and manage your nutritional status all one click away. Get it now!

This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Your Nitric Oxide Genes, Blood Pressure, and Asthma | Chris Masterjohn Lite #41

Jan 11, 2018 05:39

Description:

Do you have asthma? High blood pressure? Knowing your nitric oxide genes may help you find a solution.

In this episode we continue to look at the StrateGene report, this time focusing on the genes for endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Impairments in this enzyme can increase your risk of asthma or high blood pressure. If you have either of these conditions and impairments in the enzyme, then you may benefit from strategies aimed at increasing nitric oxide production. Ensuring adequate zinc and arginine are part of the strategy because they support the enzyme, but you also should consider strategies that get around the enzyme, such as foods and supplements that generate nitric oxide enzymatically. Watch the video to learn more!

I recommend testing your eNOS genes with StrateGene, which you can get here:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene

For more information on how to get the StrateGene report, watch this video:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/04/know-need-care-mthfr/

Here is a link to Neo40:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/neo40

Your MTRR Genes and Vitamin B12 | Chris Masterjohn Lite #40

Jan 9, 2018 06:25

Description:

You may have heard of MTHFR, but have you heard about MTRR? If you care about your vitamin B12 status, listen to this podcast to learn about it.

MTRR is an enzyme that helps you repair your vitamin B12 once it’s been damaged. You don’t need to use it a lot most of the time, so some of us, including me, have genetic variations that make it not work very well, yet we’re fine most of the time. But when you are exposed to new health challenges that increase the damage done to your B12, suddenly you may need to use the enzyme more than usual, and if you have genetic impairments in the enzyme you may suddenly become vulnerable to vitamin B12 deficiency.

I don’t recommend making a specific nutritional strategy around MTRR, but I do recommend you monitor your B12 status more proactively if you have genes that lower your MTRR activity.

I recommend testing your MTRR with StrateGene, which you can get here:

chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene

For more information on how to get the StrateGene report, watch this video:

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2017/12/04/know-need-care-mthfr/

Why You Need Glycine: A Panel Discussion | Mastering Nutrition #49

Jan 8, 2018 01:50:22

Description:

Glycine can you sleep, stabilize your blood sugar, improve your joint health, keep your skin beautiful, and do much more. It's a little amino acid with a big impact on your health.

This episode is a panel discussion between Dr. Chris Masterjohn, Alex Leaf of Examine.Com, and Vladimir Heiskanen, covering everything you need to know about glycine.

The best way to get glycine is from hydrolyzed collagen. Great Lakes offers the best balance of quality, transparency, and price. Vital Proteins, while more expensive, uses enzymatic digestions rather than heat to hydrolyze the collagen, and some people find that their digestion tolerates Vital Proteins but not other brands.

Some people respond better to pure glycine. For these cases I recommend Bulk Supplements pure glycine powder. It has the same sweetness as sugar and can be used as a sweetener.

You can view the show notes for this episode at chrismasterjohnphd.com/49.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I wrote this to make everything you could possibly need to measure and manage your nutritional status all one click away. If you purchase it by Wednesday, January 9, you can turn in your proof of purchase at any point in the future while my consultations are available to get $30 back on a single consultation or $100 back on a Health and Wellness Package. Get it now!

This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Ten Tips for Preventing Kidney Stones | Chris Masterjohn Lite #39

Jan 4, 2018 09:05

Description:

Concerned about kidney stones? Here are ten things you can do to naturally protect yourself.

Believe it or not, calcium is protective. But there is far more. Listen to this podcast to learn all about it.

Introducing... Testing Nutritional Status: The ULTIMATE Cheat Sheet!

Jan 3, 2018 17:09

Description:

Happy 2018!

After many dozens of hours putting this together, I'm super excited to announce "Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet."

Over the course of 2017, many of you followed my podcast series on measuring and managing nutritional status. Some of you absolutely loved it. Some of you found it too technical to follow, or found the episodes too long and dense to share with your friends and family and were excited when I started condensing them into much shorter Chris Masterjohn Lite episodes. At the end of the day, I still am only about 5% through the series, mainly because producing each episode takes me about two weeks of doing nothing else and I need to clear out more time for it.

One of my goals in 2018 is to unleash the complete series.

But this also calls for something else:

Could I completely distill the practical, actionable information from all the technical explanations? Could I collect it all into one, easy-to-find place?

One of you wrote to me last year:

Hi Chris, I'd happily pay for a PDF cheat sheet containing all your evidence-based recommendations in one table. I frequently find myself hunting through your transcripts :)

Just a suggestion, keep up the good work.

Man oh man, was he right. Quite often, dozens of hours reviewing the science around a nutrient led me to recommend specific tests that are not in common use, or specific ranges for tests that are commonly used but where the lab's range is far too broad, or just way off.

So I started to put together such a cheat sheet. Lo and behold, I found myself hurting as I tried to find my own practical recommendations in the sprawling 2-hour transcripts. 

🤕

After all this time in the trenches, what I've emerged with... let's just say, ain't no ordinary cheat sheet.

It's the ULTIMATE cheat sheet.

It's is a “cheat sheet” in two ways:

● All of the lab testing required for comprehensive nutritional screening is reduced to a single page, with hyperlinks making ordering any of the tests just one click away.

● In just five pages, I provide full instructions for lab testing, blood pressure, and dietary analysis, as well as an algorithm for quick decisions on what to do next for each marker that may be off.

This “cheat sheet” is ultimate because of what comes next:

● Over 70 pages list the signs and symptoms associated with all the possible nutrient imbalances, the potential causes of nutrient imbalances, and an action plan for correcting each imbalance.

To top it off, it ends with an index of the signs and symptoms of nutrient deficiencies and imbalances. The index has 178 entries, and each entry links directly to the sections of the text where those signs and symptoms are discussed. This makes it incredibly easy to browse through the index for the things that seem most interesting or relevant to you and find exactly what you're looking for without having to read the whole guide.

If you're getting antsy, you can buy it right now, but read on if you'd like to learn more about it.

Three Ways to Use the Cheat Sheet

Let's face it, testing nutritional status can be expensive. In my consulting practice, some of my clients often ask me to find ways to minimize the costs associated with figuring out nutritional problems. Others are able to get practically anything covered by insurance if they use the right labs, and others just want me to find the cream of the crop, the best of the best.

So I've started the cheat sheet by outlining three different ways to use it:

In the comprehensive approach, you get the comprehensive lab screening, conduct a dietary analysis and a series of home blood pressure measurements, and collect a list of signs and symptoms that seem relevant from the index. In the time-saving approach, you skip the dietary analysis -- the most time-consuming part -- and only resort to dietary analysis if and when some of your health challenges prove too difficult to resolve without it. In the cost-saving approach, you skip the lab screening, only resorting to running labs when doing so proves necessary to determine the best course of action.

The comprehensive approach is the one that generates the correct strategies the fastest, but if time or finances are constraining, the other two options allow you to make the best of the resources you have at your disposal.

By the way, while practical, this is an entirely educational resource. Please don't try anything in the cheat sheet without consulting your doctor, and please don't ever ignore the advice of your doctor because of anything I've written in the cheat sheet.

This Is a Living Document

Putting this cheat sheet together has been tremendously valuable to me. It required me to do a lot of research, and to collect my thoughts and findings all into one place. I know very well that it's going to be my primary tool for helping myself and others in the years to come. So I want to keep this constantly up-to-date for both myself and for you.

You'll notice that I've called it Version 1.0. Since it's practical in nature, I decided to think of it more like a software program than a book, and went with version over edition.

When you purchase the cheat sheet, I recommend you enter your email address in the shopping cart. That will allow me to email you updates to future editions. If I make small changes to it, I will call the versions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and so on, and give you the updates for free. When I make bigger changes, I will release versions 2.0, 3.0, and so on, and give you steep discounts for having purchased version 1.0 early in the life of the guide.

I will also offer you opportunities to give me your feedback on the guide, and I will consider that feedback in the production of updates.

This Is a Practical, Not a Scientific Argument

I've put together a small collection of further reading materials at the end of the guide. If I had thoroughly referenced every statement in the guide, it would be unwieldy, with a sprawling bibliography that rivaled the guide in length. I mean, geez this is a cheat sheet and it's already 78 pages long! Instead, I listed what I consider the best starting places for developing a deeper understanding of the material. One of those resources is my podcast, where I will be doing an episode on each nutrient this year, in full scientific glory.

What that means is that this is not for you if what you are looking for is full explanations of how things work, how I came to each conclusion, and the exact source of each statement pinned clearly to the statement itself. I have plenty of writings of that nature, but this isn't one of them.

This is for you if you want to the practical what-to-do information all distilled into one place. And hundredsof hyperlinks ensuring you never have to scroll, squint your eyes to find things, or make an appointment with Dr. Google.

This Is a Digital Document

The format of the cheat sheet is a PDF. You'll be able to download it immediately after purchase.

You can certainly print it out if you wish, and that might be best if you want to read it straight through. However, please keep in mind that one of the key features is the hundreds of hyperlinks. They bring you to the exact section you want to use when reading the instructions for use. They bring you to the exact paragraph to read when looking things up in the index. They bring you to the exact lab test when looking for a test to order. So, keep the digital version handy if for no other reason than this amazing assortment of links.

An AMAZING Gift for You if You But It This Week

If you buy the cheat sheet this week (by January 9), you can use your proof of purchase at any time to obtain a discount (technically a rebate) on my consultation services:

If you purchase a single consultation, you can turn in your proof of purchase and I'll give you $30 back. That's the full value of the cheat sheet. So you can think of this as 10% off the consultation, or getting the cheat sheet completely for FREE. If you purchase a Health and Wellness Package, you can turn in your proof of purchase and I'll give you $100 back. That's a $30 investment to get $100 back, a $70 profit. It's like buying bitcoin!  😉

You don't have to commit to a consultation now. This offer is good for the entire life of my consultation services.

So, the action you need to take this week to be eligible is to purchase the cheat sheet, and to save the email with the download link and receipt as your proof of purchase. The action you can take at any time in the future is to use the proof of purchase for a rebate on my consultation services. This is subject to the availability of my services. If you wait until 2020, I cannot guarantee I will still be offering consultations. If you wait until August, I cannot guarantee you'll get your spot at a convenient time. All I guarantee is that as long as I offer these services, I will honor the rebate.

Even if you decide not to follow up on the rebate, what you get is an amazing resource for the ridiculously cheap "full price" of $30.

Actually, you can pay less than that.

Plus a Discount If You Buy It Today!

For today and today only, I'm offering an early bird discount.

At checkout, put in this discount code:

SaveMe5!

It takes $5 off the price and expires at 11:59 PM tonight, eastern time.

Here It Is...

Ready?

You can buy it here:

Testing Nutritional Status: The ULTIMATE Cheat Sheet

Happy New Year!
Chris

Oxalates: Should You Be Concerned About Collagen? | Chris Masterjohn Lite #38

Jan 2, 2018 05:26

Description:

So far we’ve seen that glycine or collagen supplements can improve sleep, tendon health, and blood sugar. But many of you have asked me, should we be concerned that they can raise oxalate levels? This could potentially increase the risk of kidney stones.

There’s about a ten percent chance you could be at risk of a kidney stone some day, and if you’re in that minority you should be concerned about your exposure to oxalates. Glycine is very unlikely to generate oxalates, but collagen may, especially if you are deficient in vitamin B6. In this podcast, I describe how to figure out if this is relevant to you and what to do about it.

Glycine With a Meal for Blood Sugar | Chris Masterjohn Lite #37

Dec 28, 2017 03:23

Description:

Got blood sugar problems? Glycine might help!

3-5 grams of glycine before a meal helps stabilize your blood sugar after the meal, and 15 grams a day every day helps improve long-term blood sugar stability in type 2 diabetes. Listen to this podcast for the best way to implement this strategy.

Collagen Before Your Workout for Tendon Health | Chris Masterjohn Lite #36

Dec 26, 2017 03:48

Description:

Achy joints? Tendon pain? Just looking to stay youthful forever?

Taking 15 grams of collagen before your workout, maybe with a little vitamin C, can do wonders for your tendon health. Your tendons aren’t that metabolically active and they don’t vacuum up what they need as actively as your muscles do. Getting the collagen peptides into your bloodstream before your workout makes them available to your tendons when your workout starts pumping blood directly into all the nooks and crannies where those shy little tendons are found.

Here is the link to the Sigma Nutrition episode with Danny Lennon and Keith Baar: https://sigmanutrition.com/episode143/

Creatine: Far More Than a Performance Enhancer

Dec 22, 2017 01:33:13

Description:

Creatine, best known for its ability to build muscle and enhance athletic performance, is also critical for digestion, mental health, protecting your hearing, and keeping your skin vibrant and youthful.    From among the various options for creatine supplementation, I recommend Optimized Nutrition micronized creatine powder. If you are using creatine while traveling, try Optimized Nutrition creatine caps.

Click here for the only searchable database of the creatine content of foods on the internet. It has over 140 entries!

This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!  

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Get Better Sleep With Glycine | CML #35

Dec 13, 2017 04:28

Description:

Do you have trouble sleeping, or wish you felt more rested and energized during the day?

Glycine might be one of the best things you can try. It doesn’t just have a calming effect, but it improves sleep quality and can make you feel more rested even on the same amount of sleep. In this episode, I discuss how to use glycine for better sleep and why you should consider both free glycine and hydrolyzed collagen.

This is the Bloodwork You Should Get for MTHFR | CML #34

Dec 11, 2017 08:21

Description:

Is what you’re doing for MTHFR working? How would you know?

In this episode I cover the most important blood work to get to make sure what you’re doing is working. I cover the importance of homocysteine, how to interpret glycine and sarcosine levels on a plasma amino acids test, the difference between measuring serum or plasma folate and measuring red blood cell folate, and more.

What to Do About MTHFR | Chris Masterjohn Lite #33

Dec 6, 2017 08:44

Description:

Got MTHFR? I got you: here’s what you can do with nutrition to optimize for your genetics.

MTHFR mutations increase your need for choline and glycine. It’s key to get methylfolate in your diet, but high-dose methylfolate supplements are not the solution. You need to boost choline as an alternative supply of methyl groups, and creatine supplementation can help you better conserve your methylfolate by reducing the need to use it. This is important because adequate methylfolate preserves glycine and prevents it from being lost. Too little protein hurts methylation, but too much worsens the loss of glycine, so you need to hit the Goldilocks amount. Finally, you need to get more glycine to make up for whatever you’re losing.

In this episode, I explain how to use food and supplements to make all this work in your favor.

How to Know If You Need to Care About Your MTHFR | Chris Masterjohn Lite #32

Dec 4, 2017 08:54

Description:

Should you care about your MTHFR?

Here’s how to find out your MTHFR genetic status and know how it affects you.

MTHFR is an enzyme that allows folate, or vitamin B9, to support a process known as methylation. Methylation is important to mental health, cardiovascular health, sports performance, and preventing cancer, just to name a few. In this episode, I show you how to find your MTHFR genetic status. I also discuss how the various different genetic combinations impact you and how you can leverage that information to determine how strictly you should follow the dietary recommendations I’ll outline in the next episode.

To order a StrateGene report while kicking a small commission my way at no extra cost to you, use this link: chrismasterjohnphd.com/strategene I appreciate the support!

The audio of this episode was generously enhanced and post-processed by Bob Davodian of Taurean mixing. You can find more of his work at taureanonlinemixing.com.

Are You Coming to Wise Traditions?

Nov 5, 2017 04:43

Description:

Are you coming to Wise Traditions 2017?

It's in Minneapolis, with some pregame events beginning on Thursday November 9th and the main conference running from Friday, November 10th through Monday, November 13th.

I'm excited to see friends like Ben Greenfield and Laura Schoenfeld, to meet many other people I know only through the internet, and to spend some face-to-face time with lots of people who share traditional diets as a common interest.

I'll be giving two talks, plus teaching an all-day interactive course on measuring and managing nutritional status.

Here's what I'm doing:

On Saturday, I'll be giving a talk on the role of protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, and minerals in achieving an optimal hormonal balance. On Sunday, I'll be giving a talk "Methylate Your Way to Mental Health: Beyond Folate and B12 Supplements." On Monday, I'll be teaching an all-day interactive course called "Measuring and Managing Nutritional Status Masterclass."

To register for the conference, go here. Please note that the Monday class on managing nutritional status comes separately. When you sign up, look for the "Monday Event Registration" header on the form, and change the dropdown menu from "No Monday Event Selected" to "Chris Masterjohn (includes lunch)."

The Masterclass will take each of the essential nutrients, and cover both the "what" and the "why" behind the signs and symptoms of deficiency, the distribution in the diet, and the lab work used to assess nutritional status. It will consist of 10-15 minute chunks of lecture interspersed with questions that I'll give you. You'll vote on the answers with an app on your mobile device or laptop and we'll look at how people respond (anonymously in aggregate), often using the responses as a basis for discussion. You will have numerous opportunities to ask me questions about what we cover through the class and a more free-for-all-style opportunity to ask me anything at the end.

Sound great? Register here!

Register for Wise Traditions, 2017

Hope to see you there,
Chris

How We Make Ketones | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #32

Oct 10, 2017 10:11

Description:

In conditions of glucose deprivation, such as fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketogenesis serves to reduce our needs for glucose. This reduces the need to engage in the energetically wasteful process of gluconeogenesis, which would otherwise be extremely taxing on our skeletal muscle if dietary protein were inadequate. Ketogenesis mainly occurs in the liver. The biochemical event that leads to ketogenesis is an accumulation of acetyl CoA that cannot enter the citric acid cycle because it exceeds the supply of oxaloacetate. The set of physiological conditions that provoke this biochemical event are as follows: free fatty acids from adipose tissue reach the liver, providing the energy needed for gluconeogenesis as well as a large excess of acetyl CoA. Oxaloacetate, with the help of the energy provided by free fatty acids, leaves the citric acid cycle for gluconeogenesis. These events increase the ratio of acetyl CoA to oxaloacetate, which leads to the accumulation of acetyl CoA that cannot enter the citric acid cycle and therefore enter the ketogenic pathway. This pathway results in the production of acetoacetate, a ketoacid. Acetoacetate can then be reduced to beta-hydroxybutyrate, a hydroxyacid, in a manner analogous to the reduction of pyruvate, a ketoacid, to lactate, a hydroxyacid. Acetoacetate is an unstable beta-ketoacid just like oxalosuccinate (covered in lesson 6) and can also spontaneously decarboxylate to form acetone, a simple ketone that is extremely volatile and can evaporate through the lungs, causing ketone breath. This lesson covers the basic mechanisms of ketogenesis and sets the ground for the forthcoming lesson on the benefits and drawbacks of ketogenesis in various contexts.

Click here for the full lesson

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Cortisol and Gluconeogenesis |MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #31

Oct 9, 2017 09:36

Description:

The last lesson covered how insulin, glucagon, and allosteric regulators from within the liver ensure that the liver only engages in gluconeogenesis when it can and when it needs to. This lesson focuses on an additional layer of regulation: cortisol. Cortisol is the principal glucocorticoid in humans. Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones produced by the adrenal cortex that increase blood glucose. Cortisol has multiple actions on the liver, muscle, adipose, and pancreas that all converge on making glucose more available to the brain. Among them, it increases movement of fatty acids from adipose to the liver, which provide the energy for gluconeogenesis, and the movement of amino acids from skeletal muscle to the liver, which provide the building blocks for gluconeogenesis. Cortisol serves both to antagonize insulin, thereby acutely increasing gluconeogenesis, and to increase the synthesis of gluconeogenic enzymes, which amplifies all other pro-gluconeogenic signaling and increases the total capacity for gluconeogenesis. In fact, even the day-to-day regulation of gluconeogenesis by glucagon is strongly dependent on normal healthy levels of cortisol in the background. Since gluconeogenesis is an extremely expensive investment with a negative return, it makes sense that the body would regulate it as a stress response, and thus place it under control by cortisol. This raises the question of whether carbohydrate restriction increases cortisol. Several studies are reviewed in this lesson that indicate that 1) there may be an extreme level of carbohydrate restriction that always increases cortisol, and 2) carbohydrate restriction definitely increases cortisol in some people. It may be the case that other stressors in a person’s “stress bucket” determine whether and how strongly the person reacts to carbohydrate restriction with elevated cortisol.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/31

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Regulation of Gluconeogenesis | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #30

Oct 8, 2017 13:39

Description:

Since gluconeogenesis is extremely expensive, it has to be tightly regulated so that it only occurs when both of two conditions are met: 1) the liver has enough energy to invest a portion into synthesizing glucose, and 2) the rest of the body is in need of that glucose.

Since the liver is the metabolic hub of the body that also plays a major role in anabolic synthesis and nitrogen disposal, it also regulates glycolysis and gluconeogenesis according to whether amino acids are available to supply energy in place of glucose and whether there is sufficient citrate and associated energy for biosynthesis. This lesson covers how insulin, glucagon, alanine, citrate, fructose 2-6-bisphosphate, ATP, ADP, and AMP regulate the flux between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/30

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Gluconeogenesis |MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #29

Oct 7, 2017 10:25

Description:

Gluconeogenesis is extremely expensive. Three steps of glycolysis are so energetically favorable that they are irreversible. Getting around them requires four gluconeogenesis-specific enzymes and the investment of a much larger amount of energy. Overall, six ATP worth of energy are invested to yield glucose, a molecule that only yields 2 ATP when broken down in glycolysis. This lesson covers the details of the reactions as well as the rationale for investing so much energy. One of the most pervasive themes in biology is the drive to conserve energy. That we will spend this much energy synthesizing glucose is a testament to how essential it is to our life and well being.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/29

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Insulin as a Gauge of Energetic Versatility | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #28

Oct 6, 2017 07:43

Description:

Insulin is commonly seen as a response to blood glucose whose primary role is to keep blood glucose within a narrow range. This view of insulin fails to account for its many roles outside of energy metabolism that govern long-term investments in health. The biochemistry and physiology of insulin secretion suggest, rather, that insulin is a gauge of short-term energy status and energetic versatility. Since glucose can only be stored in small amounts and since it is the most versatile of the macronutrients in its ability to support specialized pathways of energy metabolism, it makes sense that it would be wired to the pancreas as the primary signal of short-term energy status and energetic versatility. In this lesson, we review the unique uses of glucose and the mechanisms of insulin signaling to synthesize them into a more nuanced view of the role of insulin than is typically presented.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/28

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The Pentose Phosphate Pathway | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #27

Oct 5, 2017 10:34

Description:

The pentose phosphate pathway provides a deep look into a stunning array of essential roles for glucose. In it, glucose becomes the source of NADPH, used for antioxidant defense, detoxification, recycling of nutrients like vitamin K and folate, and the anabolic synthesis of fatty acids, cholesterol, neurotransmitters, and nucleotides. At the same time, glucose also becomes the source of 5-carbon sugars, used structurally in DNA, RNA, and energy carriers like ATP, coenzyme A, NADH, NADPH, and FADH2. DNA is needed for growth, reproduction, and cellular repair; RNA is needed to translate genetic information from DNA into all of the structures in our bodies; the energy carriers constitute the very infrastructure of the entire system of energy metabolism. This lesson covers the details of the pentose phosphate pathway, how it operates in multiple modes according to the relative needs of the cell for ATP, NADPH, and 5-carbon sugars, the role of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and thiamin deficiency in its dysfunction, and what it means for the importance of glucose to human health.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/27

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Are We All Evolved to Eat High Protein? | Mastering Nutrition #47

Oct 5, 2017 01:07:15

Description:

In August of this year, 25-year-old bodybuilding mom Meegan Hefford was found unconscious in her apartment, brought to the hospital where she was declared brain-dead, and died soon after. The cause? "Too much protein before competition," according to the New York Post. She had recently doubled her gym routine, started dieting, and begun slamming protein shakes in preparation for an upcoming bodybuilding competition. No one knew she had a rare genetic disorder that would make the breakdown of protein acutely toxic for her until after her death.   Does this tragic case carry lessons for the rest of us without rare genetic disorders? In this episode, I make the answer a definitive YES.   Protein is essential to life and health, but its metabolic byproduct, ammonia, is toxic. Humans dispose of excess nitrogen largely as urea, a nontoxic metabolite of ammonia that can be safely excreted in the urine. Rare genetic defects like Hefford's interfere directly with the production of urea. Other genetic defects that interfere with the use of certain fuels, especially fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids, can indirectly impair the synthesis of urea during metabolic crisis. Impairments of urea synthesis lead to the accumulation of ammonia, with devastating neurological consequences.   Null genes manifest in infancy and are best studied. Partial genetic deficiencies, like Hefford's are often asymptomatic through adulthood until dietary changes (protein supplementation, carbohydrate restriction, fasting) or metabolic demands (intense exercise, illness) force a greater rate of protein catabolism.   There is at least one genetic polymorphism in a urea cycle gene that is COMMON and associated with disease: the A allele of rs5963409 in the OTC gene is present in up to 25-30% of some populations. It impairs ammonia disposal and arginine synthesis and it increases the risk of hypertension and Alzheimer's disease.   Does it impair protein tolerance? It hasn't been directly studied, but it is reasonable to believe that people with this polymorphism may not tolerate protein as well as others, and that arginine supplementation could help.    We need to stop dismissing inborn errors of metabolism as too rare to be relevant and we need to start connecting the dots and learning the lessons they carry for everyone.   This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!  

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Insulin Doesn’t Make You Fat | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #26

Oct 4, 2017 12:12

Description:

Although insulin promotes storage of fat in adipose tissue, this occurs in the context of multiple layers of regulation where energy balance is the final determinant of how much fat we store. In a caloric deficit, the low energy status of muscle and heart will lead them to take up fat rather than adipose tissue, even in the presence of insulin. Insulin combined with low energy status will promote the uptake of glucose in skeletal muscle over adipose tissue and will promote the oxidation of glucose rather than its incorporation into fat. Some advocates of the carbohydrate hypothesis of obesity have argued that glucose is needed to form the glycerol backbone of triglycerides within adipose tissue. Although glucose can serve this role, it isn’t necessary because adipose glyceroneogenesis and hepatic gluconeogenesis can both provide the needed glycerol phosphate. Further, low energy status promotes the use of glycerol as fuel and high energy status is needed to promote the formation of glycerol from glucose. Finally, fatty acids are needed to store fat in adipose tissue and they overwhelmingly come from dietary fat in almost any circumstance. Insulin can only promote de novo lipogenesis, the synthesis of fatty acids from other precursors such as carbohydrate, in the context of excess energy, and this pathway is minor in conditions of caloric deficit, caloric balance, or moderate caloric excess. Thus, although insulin does promote storage of fat in adipose tissue, it doesn’t directly affect energy balance, and energy balance is the determinant of how much fat you store overall.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/26

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Insulin Shuts Down Fat-Burning | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #25

Oct 3, 2017 07:55

Description:

Insulin prevents fat-burning in part by locking fat in adipose tissue and in part by shutting down transport of fatty acids into the mitochondrion inside cells. By downregulating lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at heart and skeletal muscle and upregulating it at adipose tissue, insulin shifts dietary fat away from heart and muscle and toward adipose tissue. By downregulating hormone-sensitive lipase in adipose tissue, it prevents the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue into the blood. At the cellular level, insulin leads to the phosphorylation and deactivation of AMPK. Since AMPK inhibits acetyl CoA carboxylase, insulin-mediated deactivation of AMPK leads to activation of acetyl CoA carboxylase and the conversion of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA inhibits carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and thus blocks the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondrion. Nevertheless, all of these steps are also regulated at the most fundamental level by energy status, as covered in lesson 22. Further, insulin stimulates the burning of carbohydrate for energy, as covered in lesson 24. So, is insulin’s blockade of fat-burning sufficient to cause net fat storage, or does this critically depend on energy balance? This question will be answered in the next lesson.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/25


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Insulin Makes You a Carb Burner | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #24

Oct 2, 2017 06:02

Description:

Most people interested in health and nutrition know that insulin clears glucose from the blood into cells, but it is much less widely appreciated that insulin also makes you burn that glucose for energy. Insulin stimulates the translocation of GLUT4 to the membrane of skeletal muscle, heart, and adipose cells, and activates hexokinase 2. GLUT 4 increases the rate of glucose transport across the cell membrane and hexokinase 2 locks the glucose into the cell, making sure that glucose travels inward rather than outward. Insulin stimulates glycogen synthase, causing you to store glucose as glycogen, but it also stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase, causing you to burn pyruvate for energy. The key determinant of which one of these you do is the energy status of the cell. Glucose 6-phosphate is needed to activate glycogen synthase, and it only accumulates if high energy status is inhibiting phosphofructokinase. If low energy status is stimulating phosphofructokinase, the net effect of insulin is to irreversibly commit glucose to glycolysis, and then to stimulate the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle to allow the full combustion of the carbons and maximal synthesis of ATP. Thus, if you need the energy, the net effect of insulin is to make you burn glucose to get that energy.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/24


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Insulin Isn’t Just About Glucose | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #23

Oct 1, 2017 13:11

Description:

Insulin secretion. Remarkably, we know from dietary studies that we get the most insulin from eating carbohydrate, yet we know from molecular and cellular studies that insulin secretion is primarily triggered by the ratio of ATP to ADP inside the pancreatic beta-cell. The former implies that insulin is a response to glucose, while the latter implies that insulin is a response to total energy availability. What can explain this discrepancy? In this lesson, we explore the possibility that it is the anatomy and physiology that drive the dietary effect of carbohydrate rather than the biochemistry. Carbs are wired to get soaked up by the pancreas when blood sugar rises above the normal fasting level once the liver has taken its share to replete hepatic glycogen, whereas fats are wired to go primarily to the heart and muscle when those organs need energy and to go primarily to adipose tissue otherwise. The combination of circulatory routes and the relative expression of glucose transporters and lipoprotein lipase by different tissues likely directs fat to the pancreatic beta-cell as a source of ATP only during extreme hyperglycemia or when it exceeds adipose storage capacity due to obesity, insulin resistance, or very high-fat meals. The pancreatic beta-cell does have a diversity of complicated and often controversial secondary biochemical mechanisms that “amplify” the insulin-triggering effect of ATP, and carbs are more versatile at supporting these mechanism than fat. These likely make a contribution to the dietary effect, but they strike me as unlikely to be the primary driver of the dietary effect. Thus, insulin is a response mainly to carbohydrate availability but also to total energy availability, and this driven mainly by the anatomy and physiology but also by the biochemistry. Seeing insulin as a response to cellular energy status will eventually help us broaden our view of insulin as a key governor of what to do with that energy that goes far, far beyond regulating blood glucose levels.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/23

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Energy Status Regulates Fat Burning | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #22

Sep 30, 2017 09:15

Description:

This lesson covers the regulation of beta-oxidation. The primary regulation of beta-oxidation occurs at the mitochondrial membrane, where fatty acids are transported into the mitochondrion. Acetyl CoA carboxylase governs both the formation of fatty acids from non-carbohydrate precursors and the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondrion. Its product, malonyl CoA, is a substrate for fatty acid synthesis in the cytosol but a regulator of fatty acid transport in the mitochondrion. Thus, there are two isoforms of acetyl CoA carboxylase that are regulated similarly. The cytosolic isoform plays a direct role in fatty acid synthesis and the mitochondrial isoform regulates beta-oxidation. This ensures that the two processes are regulated reciprocally, so that one is shut down to the extent the other is activated, thereby preventing wasteful futile cycling. The primary regulator of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity is, as you might expect by this point, energy status. When a cell needs more energy, it lets fatty acids into the mitochondrion. When it has too much, it shuts down fat-burning.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/22

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Energy Status Regulates Glycolysis |MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #21

Sep 29, 2017 11:35

Description:

This lesson covers the regulation of glycolysis. The principle regulation occurs at phosphofructokinase, which guards the gate to the first irreversible, committed step to burn glucose for energy. What governs it? Energy. If you need more ATP, you burn more glucose; if you don’t, you don’t. If the cell has glucose beyond its needs for energy, it uses it for the pentose phosphate pathway, which allows the production of 5-carbon sugars and antioxidant defense if needed, or stores it as glycogen if there is room. If not, glucose-6-phosphate accumulates and shuts down hexokinase. This, together with low AMPK levels, causes glucose to get left in the blood. The other key regulated step of glycolysis is pyruvate kinase, where the primary purpose of regulation is to prevent futile cycling between steps of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. On the whole, glycolysis and glucose uptake are regulated primarily by energy status and secondarily by glucose-specific decisions about the need for glycogen or for the pentose phosphate pathway. Since we mostly use glucose for energy under most circumstances, the key regulation of the pathway is the regulation of phosphofructokinase by energy status. This means glucose uptake is largely driven by energy status, and our decisions about preventing hyperglycemia should center on total energy balance.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/21

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Glycolysis | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #19

Sep 27, 2017 14:52

Description:

In this lesson, we examine the entire glycolytic pathway. We use as our theme the transfer of oxygen from phosphate to newly generated water. This explains why the standard stoichiometry of glycolysis found in textbooks show it generating two water molecules, and ties the information together with the analogous principles from substrate-level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle and the relative differences in water consumption and carbon dioxide generation between fat and carbohydrate. As with our discussion of the citric acid cycle, we also reveal why the standard stoichiometry of glycolysis is misleading and why, when we account for atoms rather than molecules, we find glycolysis to be net water-neutral.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/19

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Beta-Oxidation |MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #20

Sep 27, 2017 10:07

Description:

In this lesson, we examine the beta-oxidation in its simplest form: the breakdown of a long-chain, saturated fatty acid. We see once again the principle that the oxygen content of a molecule determines how much water its metabolism consumes and how much carbon dioxide its metabolism releases. In beta-oxidation, we consume one water per round and release no carbon dioxide. This reflects the fact that fatty acids are not hydrates of carbons like sugars are, which is where the name carbohydrate comes from.

 

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Carbs and Sports Performance: The Evidence | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes # 18

Sep 26, 2017 12:15

Description:

Can fat fuel intensity in a competitive athlete? This lesson takes a critical look at the commonly cited evidence in favor of a neutral or beneficial effect of low-carbohydrate or ketogenic diets on sports performance, as well as key pieces of conflicting evidence. Bottom line? Fat can fuel duration, but probably can never fuel your peak intensity, just as the physiology would predict.

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Carbs and Sports Performance: The Principles | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #17

Sep 25, 2017 11:48

Description:

Can athletes fat-adapt their workouts? This lesson lays down the principles of exercise biochemistry and physiology needed to understand the importance of the three energy systems supporting energy metabolism in skeletal muscle: the phosphagen system (ATP and creatine), anaerobic glycolysis (dependent on carbs), and oxidative phosphorylation (dependent on carbs, fat, or protein). We discuss why maximal intensity always depends on carbs if the intensity and duration are sufficient to deplete phosphocreatine concentrations, and clarify the window of time and intensity that can be fat-adapted. This sets the foundation for the next lesson, which looks at the evidence of how carbohydrate restriction and ketogenic diets impact sports performance.

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Carbs Spare Protein In a Way Fat Can't | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #16

Sep 18, 2017 10:20

Description:

“Anaplerosis” means “to fill up” and refers to substrates and reactions that fill up a metabolic pathway as its own substrates leak out for other purposes. The citric acid cycle is a central example of this because its intermediates are often used to synthesize other components the cell needs. On a mixed diet where carbohydrate provides much of the energy, pyruvate serves as the main anaplerotic substrate. During carbohydrate restriction, protein takes over. Fat is the least anaplerotic of the macronutrients because the main product of fatty acid metabolism, acetyl CoA, is not directly anaplerotic. There are several very minor pathways that allow some anaplerosis from fat, but they are unlikely to eclipse the need for protein to support this purpose during carbohydrate restriction. Thus, carbs and protein are the two primary sources of anaplerosis. This means carbs can spare the need for protein, and that protein requirements rise on a carb-restricted diet.

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Why We Make Lactic Acid | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #15

Sep 12, 2017 11:35

Description:

One of the advantages of carbohydrate over fat is the ability to support the production of lactate. This is so important that carbohydrate is physiologically essential to red blood cells and certain brain cells known as astrocytes. For the same reason, it plays an important role in supporting the energy requirements of the lens and cornea, kidney medulla, and testes, and supports the quick boosts of peak energy needed during stressful situations that include high-intensity exercise. The biochemical role of lactate is to rescue NAD+ during times when NAD+ becomes limiting for glycolysis and glycolysis becomes a meaningful source of ATP. Through the Cori cycle, lactate can extract energy from the liver’s supply of ATP and deliver it to other tissues such as skeletal muscle in the form of glucose. This lesson fleshes out the physiological and biochemical roles of lactate and serves as a foundation for the next lesson, which explores the role of carbohydrate in supporting sports performance.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/17

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Thiamin, Ketones, and Microbes | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #14

Sep 10, 2017 09:51

Description:

Did you realize that thiamin deficiency can be caused by your environment? In the old days, beriberi was associated with the consumption of white rice. Nowadays, refined foods are an unlikely cause of thiamin deficiency because they are fortified. We associate deficiency syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy and Korsakoff’s psychosis primarily with chronic alcoholism. Yet there are regional outbreaks of thiamin deficiency among wildlife attributed to poorly characterized thiamin antagonists in the environment. Thiamin-destroying amoebas can pollute water, thiamin-destroying bacteria have been isolated from human feces, and thiamin-destroying fungi have also been identified. Could toxic indoor molds and systemic infections play a role as well?

Thiamin deficiency is overwhelmingly neurological in nature and hurts the metabolism of carbohydrate much more than fat. Indeed, preliminary evidence suggests thiamin supplementation can help mitigate glucose intolerance. Ketogenic diets are the diets that maximally spare thiamin and are best characterized as treatments for neurological disorders. Anecdotally, ketogenic diet-responsive neurological problems sometimes arise as a result of infection. Could ketogenic diets be treating problems with thiamin or thiamin-dependent enzymes? One must exercise caution here: fat contains little thiamin, and ketogenic diets can actually cause thiamin deficiency if they don’t contain added B vitamins. The relationships between thiamin, glucose metabolism, and neurological health are remarkable and desperately need our attention.

For the full lesson, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/14

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Pyruvate Dehydrogenase | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #13

Sep 9, 2017 09:45

Description:

The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the one decarboxylation step that carbohydrate undergoes to generate acetyl CoA, which accounts for the one carbon dioxide molecule produced in carbohydrate metabolism that is not produced during the metabolism of fat. It also accounts for why burning carbs requires twice as much thiamin as fat. In fact, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is remarkably analogous to the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, sharing all the same cofactors and catalyzing virtually the same reactions. In this lesson, we look at why this has to be true and how it works. This provides the foundation for our deeply practical look at thiamin in the next lesson.

chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/13

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Carbs, Fat, and Carbon Dioxide | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #12

Sep 7, 2017 08:53

Description:

Since carbs are richer in oxygen than fat, they consume less water in their metabolism and release more carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide puts stress on the lungs and its generation should be restricted in the case of lung injury to allow healing. This calls for a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. On the other hand, carbon dioxide is needed to support the action of vitamin K and biotin, and to promote delivery of oxygen to tissues during exercise.

In our first glimpse into glycolysis and beta-oxidation, we find that understanding the basic chemical makeup of these molecules is deeply relevant to how we would manipulate the diet in many contexts of health and disease.

For the full lesson, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/12

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Urinary Organic Acid Tests | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #11

Sep 6, 2017 11:29

Description:

Now we take it clinical: how do we use what we’ve learned so far to interpret the section of a urinary organic acids test that reports the citric acid cycle metabolites?

We begin by looking at the underlying chemistry to explain the curious absence of oxaloacetate on these tests. We conclude by mastering the ability to spot three unique patterns: energy overload, oxidative stress, and thiamin deficiency.

For the full lesson go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/11

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Why We Consume H2O in the TCA Cycle | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #10

Sep 5, 2017 12:25

Description:

This lesson looks at the fundamental principle that atomic oxygen is the limiting factor for the release of carbon dioxide in metabolism, and when we don’t have enough we take it from water. This will become very relevant when we cover fats versus carbohydrates, because they consume different amounts of water and release different amounts of carbon dioxide for this very reason. That, in turn, relates to a number of health endpoints such as the functions of vitamin K and biotin, delivery of oxygen to tissues, and the stress placed on the lungs during breathing.

Here, we look at the principle in the citric acid cycle. In doing so, we see that, while textbooks only point to two water molecules consumed, a third water molecule is irreversibly consumed to donate oxygen to the cycle via phosphate.

For the full lesson, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/7

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Why Does CoA Come Back to the TCA Cycle? | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #9

Sep 4, 2017 09:04

Description:

This lesson addresses the curious case of why CoA makes a brief cameo in the citric acid cycle during the formation of succinyl CoA only to leave again in the next step. We dig into the chemistry underlying the high-energy thioester bond that CoA forms with acyl groups, which explains more broadly one of the key roles of sulfur in energy metabolism. We conclude by looking at how the appearance of CoA allows us to harness energy released during the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate to form ATP directly during “substrate-level phosphorylation,” or, alternatively, to use energy from ATP to invest in the synthesis of heme.

chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/9

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7 Unforgettable Things About α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #8

Sep 3, 2017 09:30

Description:

This complex is so rich in biochemical concepts and relevance to health and disease. Having done the dirty work of looking at its organic chemistry mechanisms in the last lesson, here we explore broadly applicable biochemistry principles like energetic coupling and substrate channeling. We look at how thiamin deficiency, oxidative stress, arsenic, and heavy metal poisoning can affect metabolism, and how to recognize markers of these processes in blood or urine. We make the subtle yet critical distinction between oxidative stress and oxidative damage. We look at the role of this complex in Alzheimer’s disease. We then turn to the product of this complex, succinyl CoA, to examine how it provides an entry into the cycle for odd-chain fatty acids and certain amino acids and an exit out of the cycle for the synthesis of heme. In doing so, we look at the roles of vitamins B12 and B6 in these processes, the use of methylmalonic acid to diagnose B12 deficiency, and the ability of B6 deficiency to cause sideroblastic anemia.

For the full video, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/8

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α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #7

Sep 2, 2017 08:11

Description:

The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is marvelously complex and incredibly rich in details that are relevant to the big picture of metabolism and to many issues of health and disease. Today, we break down what actually happens so that we can spend all of Wednesday’s lesson discussing the rich array of relevant principles it brings to light.

For the full video, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/7

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I'm Now Accepting New Clients!

Sep 2, 2017 06:33

Description:

Are you interested in working with me one-on-one so I can help you better meet your health goals?

Good news! I’m now accepting new clients for both hourly consultations and health and wellness packages.

Here are the core things I’m best at that I would love to do for you:

Help you develop actionable priorities and an overall strategy for improving your health. Discuss your experiences with you and suggest useful tests that you could ask your doctor about. Analyze the results of genetic tests, digital food logs, and blood and urine measurements for markers of health and nutritional status. I can then use these analyses to suggest practical strategies that you could implement with proper supervision of a health care professional.

If you want to want to read more about what I have to offer, head over to the main consultations page:

Health and Wellness Consultations With Chris Masterjohn, PhD

Although I have no plans to expire the offer, I suggest you act rather swiftly if you want to book sessions between now and February because the spots available from September through January are limited and will fill up fast. After February, my availability is much more open. 

Once again, here are the links you may need:

learn more about what I have to offer. Book an hourly session. Book a health and wellness package.

Whether sooner or later, I look forward to working with you and helping you fulfill your health goals.

If you have any questions about how this works, please do not hesitate to email me at chris [at] chrismasterjohnphd {dot} com.

Dry Skin on a Low-Fat Diet? Try Egg Yolks or Liver. | Chris Masterjohn Lite #31

Sep 1, 2017 03:52

Description:

If you develop dry skin on a low-fat diet, especially if you're eating egg whites and throwing out the yolks, it could be a biotin deficiency. Or, it could be an essential fatty acid deficiency. Either way, egg yolks and liver come to the rescue.

Isocitrate Dehydrogenase | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #6

Aug 31, 2017 10:48

Description:

This lesson looks at the third step of the citric acid cycle in much more detail, digging into the organic chemistry concepts involved in the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. We dive deep into this because it’s the only way to explain why this step parts ways with most other decarboxylation reactions in that it does not require thiamin (vitamin B1).

This, in turn, provides a basis for understanding why burning carbohydrate for fuel requires twice as much thiamin than burning fat, and why high-fat, low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets can be used to overcome problems with thiamin deficiency or defects in thiamin-dependent enzymes. We conclude by looking at how this step allows the interconversion of amino acids and citric acid cycle intermediates, the role of vitamin B6 in this process, and the use of enzymes known as transaminases to diagnose B6 deficiency and liver dysfunction.

For the full episode, go to chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/6

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Dry Skin When Adding Muscle? Think Zinc. | Chris Masterjohn Lite #30

Aug 30, 2017 04:15

Description:

Do you get dry skin when you put on muscle mass? It could be a zinc deficiency. Here's how to take care of it.

Regulation of ATP Production by the Need for ATP | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #5

Aug 29, 2017 08:09

Description:

The fifth MWM Energy Metabolism lesson explores the third and fourth steps of the citric acid cycle and explains how the rate of ATP production is regulated according to the cell’s need for ATP. Together with lesson four, it explains how cells regulate their ATP production according to their needs and abilities. In the course of exploring this theme, we look at the role of AMP kinase (AMPK) in promoting energy uptake when ATP levels are low.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/5

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Regulation of ATP Production by Reactive Oxygen Species | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #4

Aug 28, 2017 07:06

Description:

This lesson explores the first two steps of the citric acid cycle and explains how the rate of ATP production is regulated according to the abilities of the electron transport chain. Together with lesson five, it explains how cells regulate their ATP production according to their needs and abilities. In the course of exploring this theme, we examine the role of reactive oxygen species in diabetes.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/4

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Cellular Respiration| MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #3

Aug 27, 2017 09:33

Description:

This lesson provides an overview of the basic objectives of using the citric acid cycle and the electron transport chain to make ATP. We start here because, no matter whether we burn protein, carbs, or fat, these two interrelated systems are what is shared in common.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/3

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Activation Energy & Enzymes | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #2

Aug 26, 2017 07:47

Description:

The second MWM energy metabolism looks at how we use enzymes to exert exquisite control over what happens inside our bodies.

If the second law of thermodynamics holds that entropy is always increasing, why don’t we reach maximum entropy right away? Why do we observe any order at all?  The activation energy represents the resistance to change that can be found in any substance. We exploit the concept biologically by maintaining a body temperature that provides insufficient energy for most relevant reactions to go forward without catalysis, and imposing upon this backdrop an expansive repertoire of enzymes that can, in a regulated fashion, lower the energy barriers sufficiently for reactions to go forward.

This lesson looks at how they do that, and how we regulate their activity.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/2

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Thermodynamics | MWM Energy Metabolism Cliff Notes #1

Aug 26, 2017 07:34

Description:

The first MWM Energy Metabolism lesson answers the question, why do we have to eat such an enormous amount of food?

The answer is to comply with the second law of thermodynamics. If you have a chemistry background, you should recognize this as a light review of the thermodynamics unit from a general chemistry class, with its most essential concepts teased out and packed into a half hour lesson. If you don’t, you can use this as a basic foundation for understanding the biochemistry to follow.

The lesson relates the 2nd law to food coloring dispersing in water, how a hydropower plant operates, ATP production, and why we need to eat our bodyweight in food more than once a month. In the process, we have a little fun.

Watch the full lesson at chrismasterjohnphd.com/mwm/2/1.

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Introducing the Energy Metabolism CLIFF NOTES!

Aug 26, 2017 05:39

Description:

Masterclass With Masterjohn Energy Metabolism is a structured course that begins with foundational principles and progresses to advanced topics to give you everything you need to know about the biochemistry of how we break down food for energy, use the energy, and store the excess.

It broadcasts FREE on YouTube and Facebook twice a week and is now in its 31st lesson.

As a subscriber to the Mastering Nutrition podcast, you will now get the cliff notes of these lessons in audio format. 

This gives you three ways to engage with the course:

If you just want the cliff notes, sit back and relax. As long as you're subscribed to the Mastering Nutrition podcast, they'll pop up in your feed one by one, every day that there's no other content released in the feed. That begins with lesson one later today. If you want to watch the full lessons, you can do so using the YouTube playlist, by going to the videos section of my Facebook page and playing the playlist, or by going to chrismasterjohnphd.com, hovering over "Masterclass" in the main menu on desktop and clicking the dropdown arrow to the right of "Masterclass" on mobile, and choosing "The Free Version." Sign up for MWM Pro for early access to content, enhanced keyword searching, self-pacing tools, downloadable audio and transcripts, a rich array of hyperlinked further reading suggestions, and a community with a forum for each lesson.

However you choose to engage, enjoy! 

Living With MTHFR | 46

Aug 13, 2017 02:01:50

Description:

MTHFR is an enzyme that allows folate (vitamin B9) to support the cellular process of methylation, which is important for the synthesis of creatine and phosphatidylcholine, the regulation of gene expression, neurotransmitter metabolism, and dozens of other processes. There are two common polymorphisms that decrease its activity, A1298C and C677T, with C677T having the stronger effect. Genetic decreases in MTHFR activity are associated with cardiovascular disease, neurologic and psychiatric disorders, pregnancy complications and birth defects, and cancer.

While discussions of these polymorphism tend to focus on repleting methyl-folate, this should only be a small piece of the puzzle. The bigger pieces of the puzzle are restoring choline, creatine, and glycine. 

In this episode, I describe how the methylation system works, how it's regulated, and how it's altered with MTHFR variations. I then use this to develop a detailed dietary strategy and an evaluative strategy to make sure the dietary strategy is working.

Show notes coming soon!

This episode is brought to you by Ample Meal. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides a balance of fat, protein, and carbohydrate, plus all the vitamins and minerals you need in a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. The protein is from whey and collagen. The fat is from coconut oil and macadamia nut oil. The carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals come exclusively from food sources like sweet potatoes, bananas, cocoa powder, wheat and barley grass, and chlorella. I use Ample on Mondays when I have 12 hours of appointments with breaks no longer than 15 minutes. It keeps my brain going while I power through the long day, never letting food prep make me late for an appointment. Head to amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “MASTERJOHN” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Is Insulin Really a Response to Blood Glucose? | 45

Jul 30, 2017 01:38:45

Description:

Insulin is almost universally considered a hormone whose primary purpose is to regulate blood glucose levels. Indeed, it does this. But is that the whole picture? When we look at what governs pancreatic insulin secretion inside the beta-cell, it's about total energy and the versatility of the short-term energy supply, not about glucose. When we look at what insulin does to energy metabolism, it does far more than regulate blood glucose: it governs how we use energy and what we do with it.

What is insulin really doing? Find out in this episode. I can't promise the episode is practical, but I promise it's incredibly thought-provoking.

You can find the show notes at chrismasterjohnphd.com/45.

This episode is brought to you by Ample Meal. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides a balance of fat, protein, and carbohydrate, plus all the vitamins and minerals you need in a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. The protein is from whey and collagen. The fat is from coconut oil and macadamia nut oil. The carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals come exclusively from food sources like sweet potatoes, bananas, cocoa powder, wheat and barley grass, and chlorella. I use Ample on Mondays when I have 12 hours of appointments with breaks no longer than 15 minutes. It keeps my brain going while I power through the long day, never letting food prep make me late for an appointment. Head to amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “MASTERJOHN” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Here's what you'll find in this episode, and more:

00:55 Cliff Notes

12:45 Insulin is widely perceived as a response to blood glucose, yet there are a variety of reasons to see it as a response to short-term energy status and the versatility of that short-term energy.

14:48 Defining "insulin signaling."

18:00 Dietary effects on insulin and glucagon: fat, protein, and carbohydrate.

21:45 Effects of insulin outside of energy metabolism: for example, glutathione synthesis, production and activation of thyroid hormone, protection against glycation.

28:10 Insulin signaling is directly triggered by the level of ATP in the pancreatic beta-cell.

35:10 Amplification signals in beta-cell: anaplerosis, cataplerosis, lipogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway.

45:30 The anatomy and physiology of macronutrient transport mean that fat and carbohydrate are delivered to the pancreatic beta-cell in very different ways, resulting from circulatory routes and the relative expression of glucose transporters and lipoprotein lipase.

01:07:15 Unique roles of glucose in specialized energetic pathways.

01:07:50 Cytosolic ATP generation depends on glucose and is important to red blood cells, astrocytes, the lens and cornea of the eye, the kidney medulla, the testes, and under conditions of high-intensity exercise, stress, hypoxia, or suffocation.

01:11:10 Only glucose can allow a tissue to borrow energy from the liver in the Cori cycle.

01:14:30 Glucose is the primary anaplerotic substrate; protein is secondary; fat has little anaplerotic pathway.

01:15:50 Only glucose can support the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides NAPDH and 5-carbon sugars for DNA; RNA, all of the energy carriers in energy metabolism (NADPH, NADH, FADH2, Coenzyme A, ATP); synthesis of nucleotides, neurotransmitters, fatty acids, and cholesterol; recycling of vitamin K and folate.

01:21:40 Insulin as a response to total energy and energetic versatility.

The Biochemistry of Why Insulin Doesn't Make You Fat | 44

Jul 22, 2017 01:47:27

Description:

Do carbs and insulin make you fat?

The argument centers on the ability of insulin to promote the conversion of carbohydrate to fat and lock fat in adipose tissue, as well as the necessity of glucose to provide the backbone to fat molecules within adipose tissue. But the argument ignores that all of these pathways are fundamentally regulated at a biochemical level by how much energy you need and how much you have. In episode 44 of Mastering Nutrition, we take a deep dive into the details of the biochemistry and see how insulin serves as a gauge of whole-body energy and glucose availability but simply can't be the thing that makes you fat.

This episode is brought to you by Ample Meal. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides a balance of fat, protein, and carbohydrate, plus all the vitamins and minerals you need in a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. The protein is from whey and collagen. The fat is from coconut oil and macadamia nut oil. The carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals come exclusively from food sources like sweet potatoes, bananas, cocoa powder, wheat and barley grass, and chlorella. I use Ample on Mondays when I have 12 hours of appointments with breaks no longer than 15 minutes. It keeps my brain going while I power through the long day, never letting food prep make me late for an appointment. Head to amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “MASTERJOHN” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Show notes for this episode are found at chrismasterjohnphd.com/44.

In this episode, you'll find all of the following and more:

00:45 Cliff Notes

10:15 The biochemistry and physiology of the carbohydrate/insulin hypothesis of obesity: insulin stimulates de novo lipogenesis (fatty acid synthesis), promoting the conversion of carbohydrate to fat; insulin stimulates lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and inhibits hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) at adipose tissue, locking fat into fat cells; since adipose tissue lacks glycerol kinase, it cannot reuse the glycerol backbone of fats digested by lipoprotein lipase, and dietary carbohydrate is needed to provide the glycerol 3-phosphate that forms the backbone of newly resynthesized triglycerides.

16:30 All biochemical pathways are regulated by cellular energy status. Key players are ATP, ADP, AMP, AMP kinase (AMPK), NADH/NAD+, FADH2/FAD, Ca2+, CoA and acyl CoAs, and citrate.

30:42 Although insulin promote storage of fat in fat tissue, this can be overridden by low energy status.

40:10 Although insulin promotes fat storage, it causes a proportionate increase glucose oxidation, so no net change in caloric balance.

46:10 Glucose oxidation in muscle is driven by energy status and that determines the availability of glucose to adipose tissue.

01:00:45 Glucose can act as the source of glycerol 3-P for adipose tissue triglyceride synthesis, but it isn’t necessary because of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. Furthermore, while it can serve this role, the degree to which it does so is driven by energy status.

01:05:50 Glucose can act as a source of glycerol 3-P for adipose, but it needs a source of fatty acids, which come mainly from fat as long as energy status is high enough.

01:06:50 Insulin can drive de novo lipogenesis, but only when energy status is high enough.

01:20:05 What happens when we eat carbs alone, fat alone, or both in the context of low and high energy status.

01:32:20 The path to weight loss is the path to a sustainable caloric deficit.

 

Methylate Your Way to Mental Health With Dopamine | 43

Jul 17, 2017 01:38:03

Description:

Our consciousness is like a net. We want the net to be fluid enough to let thoughts that bother us pass through without grabbing our attention, but strong enough to grab on to the ideas and motivations that will drive us to achieve what we value in life. Nutrition has a big impact on this net. In this episode, learn how foods like liver, egg yolks, meat, leafy greens, legumes, collagen, bone broth, spinach, wheat, and beets can impact how fluid or stable your mind is by impacting the methylation of dopamine, and how to achieve the proper balance.

This episode is brought to you by Ample Meal. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides a balance of fat, protein, and carbohydrate, plus all the vitamins and minerals you need in a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. The protein is from whey and collagen. The fat is from coconut oil and macadamia nut oil. The carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals come exclusively from food sources like sweet potatoes, bananas, cocoa powder, wheat and barley grass, and chlorella. I use Ample on Mondays when I have 12 hours of appointments with breaks no longer than 15 minutes. It keeps my brain going while I power through the long day, never letting food prep make me late for an appointment. Head to amplemeal.com and enter "MASTERJOHN" at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

In this episode, you'll find all the following and more:

00:38  Cliff Notes

12:15  Three stories illustrating how foods impact mental stability and fluidity.

13:00  How veganism profoundly worsened my OCD and panic attacks and going Weston A. Price made them disappear.

 18:55  Jeffrey is an entrepreneur who uses intermittent fasting and low-protein lunches to remain hyper-focused through the workday, but at the risk of an occasional panic attack.

 22:05  Jordan uses methylation supplements to optimize his energy and mental focus, but can experience a spectrum of methylation states that range from bodily tiredness on one end to intense focus suitable for creative and analytic work in the middle, to flighty productivity suitable for errands on the high end, to a severe crash characterized by apathy.

 26:50  The methylation system and the roles of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine), magnesium, ATP, B6, serine and glycine, folate, B12, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, choline, betaine, and creatine.

 34:18  The two principle fates of homocysteine.

 40:10  Glycine as the endogenous buffer of extra methyl groups.

 42:40  Obtaining betaine and choline from foods.

 45:40  Creatine as a methyl group sparer.

 48:20  Niacin and nicotinamide riboside as a tax on the methylation system.

 50:25  Tonic and phasic dopamine, and how methylation mediated by catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) regulates the balance.

 57:20  How the balance of tonic and phasic dopamine determines the ease of switching mental states.

1:03:50  Worrier vs. warrior phenotype.

1:09:10  Histamine in the brain as an alertness signal and a potential contributor to panic attacks.

1:11:55  Explaining the three stories.

1:22:00  Practical conclusions.

Can Fat Fuel the Athlete? | 42

Jul 8, 2017 01:21:41

Description:

In this episode, we look at whether fat can fuel the athlete. We begin with the physiological principles involved, then take a look at the evidence from studies swapping fat for carbs to see how it impacts athletic performance.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

 

Is Coconut Oil Killing Us? | 41

Jun 24, 2017 01:33:44

Description:

In this episode, I weigh in on the American Heart Association's new Presidential Advisory and Dietary Fats and Cardiovascular Disease, and all the headlines that have been spinning on the supposed risks of coconut oil.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

The show notes for this episode can be found at chrismasterjohnphd.com/41.

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

03:55 The recent headlines on coconut oil


04:52 The American Heart Association’s new Presidential Advisory, “Dietary Fats and Cardiovascular Disease” is not centrally about coconut oil, but it laments its the popularity of coconut oil.


07:10 This is a position paper reinforcing the conventional view about saturated fat as the stance against it within the scientific community has begun to soften around the edges. The 2015 dietary guidelines and the 2016 Ramsden paper reflect that softening.


14:39 The inclusion and exclusion criteria of the “4 core trials” of the AHA meta-analysis


16:38 The 4 core trials


17:00 The Finnish Mental Hospitals Study makes the largest contribution to the AHA conclusion but was not a randomized controlled trial and doesn’t belong in this list.


23:44 The Oslo Diet-Heart Study was included and made a contribution, yet other trials were excluded on the basis of confounding that were far less confounded than Oslo.


27:38 The LA Veterans Administration Hospital Study showed that a vitamin E-deficient diet makes you vulnerable to the heart disease-promoting effects of smoking, and that vegetable oils cause more cancer than cigarettes.


36:41 The Medical Research Council study showed a trend toward a benefit of soybean oil that was not statistically significant. Lack of heat damage to the fats in the diet, coenzyme Q10, and omega-6/omega-3 balance could have played a role in the trend.


41:12 Exclusion of Rose 1965 and Minnesota Coronary Survey from the “4 core trials” was fair.


42:33 Controversy over the possible contribution of trans fats to the results of the Sydney Diet Heart Study. But this as a basis for exclcusion could have excluded the LA Veterans Administration Hospital Study as well.


47:59 The impact of including or excluding MRC and Sydney shows how the conclusions are driven not by the cumulative data but on the qualitative decisions about which studies to include.


52:02 The observational studies are hopelessly confounded by popular campaigns about the heart-healthiness of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat.


56:08 The experiments in monkeys using lard, palm oil, and dietary cholesterol to bring their plasma cholesterol to 300-400 mg/dL.


58:33 The oxidation of lipoproteins drives atherosclerosis and polyunsaturated fats drive the oxidation. This is embraced by the leading conventional thinkers.


1:06:00 The AHA position on coconut oil is based on its effect on LDL-C, explicitly arguing in favor of ignoring its effects on HDL-C, and explicitly acknowledging the complete absence of clinical evidence.


1:13:12 Coconut oil has benefits unrelated to heart disease, such as the antimicrobial (antifungal and antibacterial) effects of lauric, capric, and caprylic acids, and the increased energy expenditure and decreased appetite caused by capric and caprylic acids.


1:17:00 Coconut oil could protect against heart disease due to its low polyunsaturated fat content.


1:19:32 Traditional Pacific island diets were far higher in saturated fat than the standard American diet, yet heart disease was absent.


1:22:09 The Tokelau Migrant Study showed that the freedom from heart disease on Tokelau, where coconut consumption pushed saturated fat over 50% of calories, was not due to genetics or age.

Why You Should Eat Glutathione | 40

May 7, 2017 01:19:06

Description:

In episode 40, I explain why glutathione survives digestion and can be absorbed intact, and why supplementing with it or eating it in foods helps support your health.

 

My recommended supplements: Jarrow Reduced Glutathione and Core Med Science Optimized Liposomal Glutathione. In most cases, save money by trying Jarrow first.

Use the discount code from this episode to sign up for Masterclass With Masterjohn Pro with a $20/year lifetime discount, offer ending May 13.

This episode is a companion to Consuming Glutathione in Foods and Supplements, which has a searchable database of glutathione in 285 foods.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

0:00:38  Cliff Notes

0:08:22  What is glutathione and why is it important?

0:13:33 Special Masterclass With Masterjohn Pro discount for Mastering Nutrition listeners

0:20:10  Why does glutathione survive digestion?

0:20:50  How is glutathione absorbed intact?

0:35:48  Evidence for intact absorption of glutathione

0:36:00  Oral glutathione increases tissue glutathione in animals when glutathione synthesis is blocked with BSO.

0:38:12  Glutathione crosses CACO-2 monolayers, a model of human intestinal absorption, even when glutathione breakdown is inhibited with acivicin and glutathione synthesis is inhibited with BSO.

0:39:25  Isotopically labeled glutathione fed to mice enriches labeled glutathione in liver and red blood cell with no signs of the label in glutathione digestion products.

0:40:30 Glutathione supplements increase glutathione status in humans.

0:41:10  Caveats and contrary evidence.

0:48:15  What form of supplement (sublingual, liposomal, regular) is best?

0:56:10  What are the best specific supplements?

0:58:10  What dose should you use, and how should you know if you should use it?

0:58:43 Anecdote: 1 gram of glutathione relieves laughing-induced wheezing. 

1:02:50  Glutathione in foods: reduced glutathione, t