Richard Jacobs

Future Tech: Almost Here, Round-the-Corner Future Technology Podcast

Future Technologies Poised to Transform Our Lives For The Better
Future Tech: Almost Here, Round-the-Corner Future Technology Podcast

Description

Future Technologies Poised to Transform Our Lives For The Better are the focus of this podcast. Almost here means these technologies are Now Here, or Just Around The Corner: from Bitcoin to Artifical Intelligence, 3D Printing, Blockchain, Virtual Reality and More.

Categories

Education
Technology

Episodes

Gun Detection via Artificial Intelligence and Computer Vision Tech—Ben Ziomek—Actuate

Apr 5, 2020 21:16

Description:

Chief Product Officer at Actuate, Ben Ziomek, joins the podcast to discuss a new and potentially life-saving application of artificial intelligence and computer vision technology. Tune in to learn the following: Why and in what ways in can be challenging to detect weapons on camera without the AI-based technology that’s been developed and employed by Actuate How much video footage is necessary in order for this technology to identify and alert the authorities of a potential threat or gun detection How many false positives are generated on average, and the important trade-off between sensitivity and false positives Over the last several years in the U.S., there has been an unprecedented number of mass shootings and active shooter events. Unfortunately, even one second in the delay of an emergency response can cost several innocent lives. Actuate is an AI computer vision-based company that set out to address this problem. They began by speaking directly with law enforcement officers about what would help them mount more effective responses to these situations. One of the most consistent requests from these officers was for a way to determine where an active shooter is located within a building, and what type of weapon they have. In response, the team at Actuate has developed an AI and computer vision technology-based solution that can plug into virtually any security camera system that exists and instantly detect a visible weapon with better-than-human accuracy. In less than a single second, this technology can identify a weapon and alert the authorities. Each time there is an alert, a unique link is generated that can be shared with anyone who needs it, allowing those individuals to instantaneously track the person around the facility. Actuate is working with every type of security platform, and can notify teachers as well as automatically trigger the lock down of any facility when necessary. Press play for all the details and learn more by visiting actuate.ai.

Sleep Health and Psychology on Lockdown—Yelena Blank, Ph.D.—Clinical Psychologist and Sleep Expert

Apr 4, 2020 18:52

Description:

Clinical psychologist and sleep expert, Yelena Blank, Ph.D., discusses sleep health and her approach to helping those who suffer from a variety of sleep and psychological disorders. On this episode, you’ll learn the following: What type of patients Dr. Blank sees on a regular basis in the Bay Area, and how the tech industry and companies can play a role in the development of sleep issues, as well as contribute to sleeping problem and mental health solutions What type of approaches and practices Dr. Blank implements in addition to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (e.g. mindfulness, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)) How the recent coronavirus and subsequent quarantine is affecting people’s routines, psychology states, and sleep health, and how Dr. Blank’s practice is acclimating to the change When Dr. Blank graduated from college with a degree in psychology, she wasn’t sure how she wanted to apply what she'd learned. She decided to take a couple of years away from school to determine what exactly she wanted to do, and it was during that time that she encountered the world of sleep health and medicine, as well as the way in which trauma, PTSD, depression, and anxiety can affect sleep health. She was fascinated by it all, and decided that's what she wanted to pursue. She’s currently a licensed clinical psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area who provides sleep therapy and online events using evidence-based practices and tips combined with a nonjudgmental and collaborative approach to addressing her clients’ challenges. She discusses insomnia, the ways in which she can fill a gap in treatment for those with sleep apnea, circadian rhythm sleep disorder, shift work sleep disorder, and the fallacy that being a “night owl” is somehow inherently “bad.” She also touches on the ways in which the recent quarantine for coronavirus is affecting many of her patients, and how she’s helping them use this time to their advantage. Press play to hear the full conversation and check out https://www.yelenablankphd.com/ to learn more.

The Antibiotic Revolution: Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum Curator Shares a Slice of History

Apr 3, 2020 31:03

Description:

Author Kevin Brown established and curated the Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum in London. He tells listeners about the process of collecting special pieces and information to create an effective display, some lesser-known details about Fleming's life and discoveries, and perspective on how health and medicine history impacts current mindsets. Among other books, Kevin Brown authored Penicillin Man: Alexander Fleming and the Antibiotic Revolution. In this conversation he talks about what it's like to be a historian in this sciences. He tells listeners that he studies the history of medicine because it's a subject which affect most of us—he is studying at a wider history that's also political and societal and affects all of us on a daily level. He adds that the communication of history is where he wants to be: he likes explaining the stories to people, feeling like he is walking in the footsteps of health and medicine history. He comments that there's an excitement that comes to talking to visitors and seeing the excitement in their eyes—perhaps inspiring some to be the Alexander Flemings of tomorrow.  He continues with details of setting up the museum, procuring items, accepting special loans, and writing the material. Fleming's son gave the museum some items, in fact, and is a great supporter of the project. Brown shares the story of the summer Fleming made the infamous penicillin discovery, including details about other project of Fleming that lead to his mindset at the time. He also gives some perspective of the scientific mind and health and medicine history from the ancient Greeks to current ways we handle knowledge. For more, see the museum web site at https://fleminglaboratory.wordpress.com/ and email Kevin Brown through the museum at Kevin.Brown@imperial.nhs.uk.

Fighting Pathogens with Biotherapy: An Interview with Founder and CEO of RAW Molecular Systems, LLC

Apr 3, 2020 39:27

Description:

Dr. Richard Allen White began RAW Molecular Systems, LLC, eight years after his mother's death from streptococcus complications. His mission is to push science from addressing the theoretical basics to advance to applied states to better serve people and agriculture. He explains to listeners the possibilities that lie with phages to fight dangerous phenomena such as antibiotic resistance,  what two specific agricultural diseases his company is working to combat with phage cocktails, and the vastness of virus numbers and ancient place in the natural world's evolution and why they have therefore have tremendous potential to address pathogenic bacteria. Dr. Richard Allen White, III, has been focused on microbiology for the majority of his educational life. He has a PhD in microbiology and immunology from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and a Master's from Cal State East Bay, where he worked on HIV GEC responses. His company works on viruses that affect people, plants, fungi, and bacteria, though currently they are focused primarily on agricultural blights, namely the fire blight, which is a pathogenic bacteria that affects pears and apple crops, and a potato disease called verticillium, which is a devastating fungal pathogen.  However, they are moving toward targeting human and bee diseases as well. He describes the very complex yet ancient arms race between viruses and bacteria, and how nature has given us an "Excalibur" of sorts with phages and the benefits viruses can offer us.  In this constant battle between bacteria and viruses, a virus will take a clip of bacteria and uses it to defend itself against it later. This constant dynamic means viruses offer researchers numerous means to battle pathogenic bacteria and even other viruses. His company envisions that a wave of new therapeutics will come from synthetic microbiology. He explains that scientist can use natural viruses and combine them with a synthetic process involving phages. Researchers start from nature, knowing how a virus can infect a population, but then predict what will be infected and what they can do to magnify certain actions through synthetic means to fight pathogenic bacteria.  For more, see the company's web site at https://www.rawmolecularsystems.com/index. In addition, Dr. Richard Allen White has started a YouTube channel to explain more about their research.

Coronavirus Conversation – Luis P. Villarreal, Professor Emeritus, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, UC Irvine – Viruses, Infection & Coronavirus Updates

Apr 2, 2020 55:54

Description:

In this informative podcast, Luis P. Villarreal, Professor Emeritus, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, provides an overview of his thoughts on biological changes, virus evolution, viral gene therapy, and more. Podcast Points: Why is coronavirus more concerning than the standard flu? An overview on the origin of the coronavirus How do species continue to thrive while existing with persistent lifelong infections? As a Founding Director of the Center for Virus Research, Villarreal has long been interested in research related to viruses. Villarreal holds a PhD from the University of California, San Diego, and a BS from California State University at Los Angeles, in Biochemistry. Dr. Villarreal discusses the current state of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), commonly referred to as simply, coronavirus. He provides specific information on the origin of coronaviruses. As Dr. Villarreal states, most emerging viruses that go on to cause acute epidemics or a pandemic, typically come from a particular species found in the region that has a persistent lifelong infection. Bats, in particular, harbor a great deal of coronaviruses, as well as other viruses. These viruses are specific to the species and within the host species, they typically show almost no evidence of disease. These viruses are passed from generation to generation in bats, but have almost no effect on bat health; it’s an epigenome of the bat. The research doctor provides some interesting examples of specific studies of mice. He explains the research that shows how mice, like some other species, benefit from the viruses they carry because the virus can act as a way of ensuring a particular colony’s survival. For example, when mice engage in reproductive contact between colonies, the mice that are not colonized with the virus will die off. Dr. Villarreal talks about the ways that coronavirus establishes itself in hosts. This coronavirus is particularly difficult to tackle because it is quite successful at transmission, because hosts who carry the virus will often have no signs, or few signs, of any actual infection. He states that this virus presents a complex problem because it, unlike some other viruses, seems to be acting as if it is trying to establish a persistent infection in humans, in a similar manner to how persistent infections become established in animal species. In this event that is happening now, Dr. Villarreal states that this is an event of communication that has brought technology and science to its knees with the power it has exerted over human biology. Unfortunately, the United States’ delayed reaction, its slow response to the coronavirus, is going to make things worse than they might have been if the virus had been taken seriously at the beginning. Dr. Villarreal talks about some of the medications that are being repurposed for possible treatment of coronavirus. He discusses the clinical trials that are in progress and the need for immediate action. Continuing, Dr. Villarreal talks about the damage to the immune system that coronavirus creates, but details are thin at this point as to why it is happening. Going further, Dr. Villarreal talks about the virus and how it continues to retain its ability to harm in other species.  Dr. Villarreal is an SACNAS Distinguished Scientist, and he was recognized with the Distinguished Alumnus Award from California State University, the National Science Foundation Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring, and was elected as Fellow of the American Society of Microbiology.

Pediatric Transplantation Challenges and Achievements: Dr. George V. Mazariegos Shares an Overview

Apr 2, 2020 32:25

Description:

A specialist in pediatric transplantation for children facing liver and intestinal disease, Dr. Mazariegos discuss current practices. He explains how treatments can vary among the spectrum of ages and individual situations, advances that allow for a reduction of immunosuppressant drugs, including heightened monitoring abilities for asymptomatic viral biomarkers, and  challenges in recommending treatments with possible future advancements in mind. Dr. George V. Mazariegos is the director of Pediatric Transplantation at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. He is an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the departments of Surgery, Anesthesiology, and Critical Care Medicine. While he specializes in children with liver and intestinal disease, the center cares for all pediatric transplantation issues. He gives listeners an overview of transplantation history and explains the particular quality-of-life issues that involve pediatric patients. He comments that most pediatric patients, about 95%, require lifelong immunosuppression; a big focus of his research is understanding why that 5% doesn't need those drugs and what we can learn from them. Dr. Mazariegos explains that advances in viral detection and other monitoring tools have made it possible to reduce the amount of drugs patients need to take to the bare minimum. Therefore, they’ve been able to monitor the side effects and adjust the dosing before complications become significance. He adds a summary of the ways these drugs would change according to life stages various patients face. Finally, he addresses the near-term future of his field, describing the challenge of trying to balance what's "around the corner" with what doctors can and should proceed with for now. For example, gene therapies have been touted as "just around the corner" for 20 years. Therefore, while gene therapy is very promising as half these kids suffer from a genetic condition, it isn't a usable treatment yet. While there has been progress in the delivery of the gene vector, the efficacy hasn't been proven. For more, see his information page at https://www.chp.edu/find-a-doctor/service-providers/george-mazariegos-519, follow him on Twitter with @CHPtransplant, and email him through his CHP web site information page. He's Happy to chat with parents and patients. 

Microbial Musings—Adam Arkin, Ph.D.—Senior Faculty Scientist, University of California, Berkeley

Apr 1, 2020 33:31

Description:

Dr. Adam Arkin’s research focuses on the synthetic biology of microorganisms, environmental genomics, and molecular ecosystems biology. On today’s episode, you will learn: How many microbes exist in a single gram of soil, and how scientists conduct research in the lab to try to identify how all of these microbes interact and function as a community What bacteriocin is and how it can utilize a partial phage to kill other bacteria directly How to understand the longitudinal dynamic between viruses and bacteria At the University of California, Berkeley, Adam Arkin, Ph.D. is researching one of his primary interests, which is how microbes (i.e. bacteria, archaea, viruses) transform the environment and impact various processes, including the processes that occur in our own bodies. He is working on how to track and characterize groups of microbes, understand how they operate together, and determine the ways in which we may be able to intervene in order to get microbes to do things that are beneficial to us. The largest projects he’s working on involve terrestrial environments, such as the subsurface of a watershed. In particular, Dr. Arkin and his team are researching the microbes in a field behind the Oak Ridge National Lab, where the soil is contaminated with uranium and has the highest level of nitrates on Earth. In that location, microbes breathe in the metals and transform them to immobile and relatively harmless substances. Dr. Arkin explain how this may be applied to the agricultural arena in order to use microbes that mobilize nutrients for crops, protect them from pathogens, increase resilience to drought, and improve their ability to sequester carbon, thereby reducing greenhouse gasses. He continues by discussing the potential of a human microbiome that is resistant to invasion by pathogens and allows us to make better use of nutrients. What’s stopping the development of this? Dr. Arkin explains that despite the growing amount of data being gathered in the field, there are still huge gaps in basic data about the composition and function of microbial genes in a wide range of conditions. Consider, for example, that a single gram of soil contains one million microbes and about 10,000 different species of microbes, and that the human gut contains just as many, if not more. He explains the approach that has allowed his research and the research of others to show that most large community microbial dynamics can be described by much smaller numbers of pairwise interactions. In other words, predictions about a large community of microbes can be made based on observations of smaller number of pairwise interactions among community members. In addition to all of this, Dr. Arkin takes a look at viruses and phages, bacteriocin, mechanisms of cell sensing, the various uses of phages (including those in the therapeutic realm), in what ways his research relies on machine learning and computational biology, and so much more. Tune in for the full conversation and visit http://genomics.lbl.gov/ and http://enigma.lbl.gov/ to learn more.

On the Status of Sleep Medicine and Health in the U.S.—Matthew Anastasi—Limina Sleep Consulting

Apr 1, 2020 25:29

Description:

CEO of Limina Sleep Consulting, Matthew Anastasi, discusses the current state of sleep medicine and health in the U.S. Tune in to learn the following: What two processes determine whether a person feels alert or sleepy How the Affordable Care Act signed into law a decade ago has had a big impact on sleep health and medicine Why the differences between in-home sleep studies and lab-based sleep studies are important and how they can result in false diagnoses or undetected cases of sleep apnea For over 20 years, Matthew Anastasi has worked in the sleep industry in various capacities, including as a sleep technologist, author, researcher, volunteer, and conference organizer. On today’s show, he shares his insights on sleep and the valuable knowledge he has gained over the course of his career. He begins by discussing the impact of the homeostatic drive and the circadian clock on our bodies and level of alertness. “The circadian clock is actually embedded in every living cell in our body…every cell in our body…knows what time of day it is, and when you change that, even by one hour, that has a huge impact on the function that each cell has throughout the circadian rhythm,” says Anastasi. With a combination of his years of research and clinical experience in the field, Anastasi established Limina Sleep Consulting as a way of providing a variety of services in the sleep industry, such as advice for companies that want to put forth evidence-based best practices, expert strategic analysis for investment companies, conference organization and lectures for sleep professionals who want to stay ahead of the curve, and support for industry sales and marketing. He explains the specific ways in which sleep medicine practices and policies have changed over the past 20 years, how providers and patients alike are being affected by these changes, and what needs to be done in order to ensure and maintain a safe environment for patients, sleep technologists, and respiratory therapists. He also discusses why it can take months just to see a sleep professional, and five months for a patient to receive treatment after being diagnosed. For patients who are healthy enough, the trend is to move more toward in-home sleep studies, sleep diagnosis, and treatment. Press play to learn about the ways in which Limina Sleep Consulting is working against the challenges and barriers to sleep health and treatment, uncovering avenues for better sleeping problem solutions, and teaming up with other organizations in the process. For more information, visit https://liminasleepconsultingllc.weebly.com/.

Up in the Electron Clouds—Preston J. MacDougall, Ph.D.—Author & Professor, Middle Tennessee State University

Mar 31, 2020 46:39

Description:

You may or may not remember learning about the periodic table in chemistry class and why it’s shaped the way it is. Dr. Preston MacDougall explains the orbital model that’s behind it, and why orbitals are actually just invented mathematical entities. Tune in to learn the following: Why it’s significant to understand the difference between the orbital model and the probabilistic model of electron behavior in chemical bonds and reactions How the vibrational timescale of molecules poses barriers to experimentation, and the complex process by which chemists collect x-ray diffraction data and view molecules vibrating in zero-point motion or harmonic mode What role non-contact enzymes or catalysts play in chemical reactions Preston J. MacDougall, Ph.D. is an author and professor at Middle Tennessee State University, and returning guest on today’s episode. He begins by explaining the orbital model, which he says is a convenient model for teaching early students of chemistry how to understand electron configurations and why the periodic table is organized in the way that it is. However, he says that orbitals are actually just mathematical entities that do not apply to anything but single electrons. Why? Dr. MacDougall explains that it’s because the orbital model assumes that an individual electron is not influenced by the motions of all of the other electrons around it. As opposed to the orbital model, Dr. MacDougall prefers to consider the probabilistic picture, which is that every electron in an atom has a certain probability of being found at a certain point around the nucleus at any given time. This is referred to as the charge or cloud density, and he explains how it changes with relation to the proximity of the electron to the nucleus of the atom. He continues by discussing the vibrational timescale of molecules, which is less than a trillionth of a second. So, how is it that scientists conduct experiments on molecules that vibrate so quickly? He explains the method of obtaining x-ray diffraction data, which begins by the cooling of crystals with liquid nitrogen or liquid helium until they reach a temperature of about -250 degrees Celsius. At that point, molecules reach the lowest possible energy state of zero-point motion, where chemists can then “deconvolute” the electron cloud and make it appear as though a molecule is standing still. Dr. MacDougall expounds on the ways in which the pressure produced by atoms on other atoms can be modified to produce electron cloud changes, explains the octet rule and stability of noble gasses, touches on the applications of quantum chemistry and molecular modeling in drug design, and so much more. To learn more, visit https://www.mtsu.edu/faculty/preston-j-macdougall.

Meet Cutii: a Fully-Operated Robot Designed to Enrich Social Connection for Housebound Seniors

Mar 31, 2020 17:25

Description:

Richard Marshall is the Business Development Director for the company that has created Cutii, an autonomous robot created to enlarge social connection for seniors who want to age in place at home. He describes some of the robot's functions, including autonomous, infrared sensor movement and ability to learn the living space in which it functions, voice-controlled as well as controllable by family who are outside the home, such as the senior's children, and additional applications such as an adept telemedicine feature and ability to do museum tours and cooking classes in real time.  Richard Marshall describes the goal in creating Cutii as a tool to combat loneliness for seniors. He reminds listeners that there's a tidal wave of people entertaining retirement as well as a growing problem of disconnection and loneliness in society, especially for seniors. Therefore, they hope to use Cutii to connect people who want to age in place at home, to allow people to stay at home as long as possible while still communicating in a fuller way with the outside world. He adds that they've deliberately designed it to not imitate a human; rather it is a fully-operated robot that moves along on wheels, is about five feet tall, and it is sturdy and accessible. He provides examples of its usefulness such as a senior's kids' ability to call their mother up and send Cutti to find her in the living space if they are concerned or just want to chat. The kids can control Cutii remotely and find her and then talk with her. Conversely, the senior can control Cutti with their voice and tell it to come where they are for any need, including social connection with distance family and friends. Richard Marshall also explains several design features and how it may serve well in an emergency yet also as an enrichment, for example, as a way to participate in a cooking class in real time.  It is in the market now in France and has been successful and well-received. He remarks that it's not YouTube on wheels, rather a newer more flexible way to offer live interactions when you are limited to being in your home. They are starting product trials in the U.S. and should be hitting the market in late 2020 and are ready to talk to channel partners in the U.S. now as well. For more, see the web page at  https://www.cutii.io/en/ Podcast Transcript Richard Jacobs: Hello, this is Richard Jacobs with the Finding Genius podcast series. My guest today is Richard Marshall. He's a business development director. The company that he's working for they've created a robot that works with the elderly, I guess to help them become more independent, keep their peace of mind, et cetera. That's called Cutii. The website is cutii.io. It's part of Richard's company and we'll get more into the details in a second. But Rich, thanks for coming. How are you doing? Richard Marshall: Yeah, Richard, great though. Look, I really appreciate this opportunity and it's great to meet you. Richard Jacobs: Yeah. So tell me about you know, the company and what's the premise of it? Richard Marshall: Well, look, I think your introduction is factual, but I would say, Richard, that yeah, at its core, what we're doing is combating loneliness for seniors, for our elderly and let's be frank, in virtually every society in the world now. Because you likely know the world's population is aging rapidly and we have a tidal wave of people here in the United States who are entering retirement. I think the numbers are something like 10,000 a baby boomer generation. People are retiring every day in the United States now Richard Jacobs: A day. Wow. That's amazing. Richard Marshall: Isn't it amazing. Yup. It's incredible when you think about it. So this is a societal change and it's a time of happiness and joy for a lot of people. Retirement is something that a lot of people look forward ...

Mapping Covid 19 through Artificial Intelligence with Dr. Ching-Yung Lin and Graphen.AI

Mar 30, 2020 35:28

Description:

Graphen.ai turned their resources to mapping Covid 19 mutations in late February. Their CEO, Dr. Ching-Yung Lin, explains the process and tells listeners what his company has learned, including the number of mutations thus far by implementing artificial intelligence in healthcare, the patterns it shows under different climates by way of whole genome sequencing analysis, and how and why these mutation data points are helpful for fighting the virus. Graphen specializes in building AI platforms based on graphs to serve sectors such as the financial industry. They’ve worked to identify hard-to-trace global movements such as terrorist networks and money laundering. As Covid 19 began to progress, the company turned its resources to using artificial intelligence in healthcare, plotting and analyzing available data such as whole genome sequencing analysis. Dr. Ching-Yung Lin describes for listeners the steps they have taken. The company assessed what they could contribute to understanding the virus propagation at the end of February. They felt it was an appropriate time for them to jump in and help contribute through using artificial intelligence in healthcare. He explains that different countries are sequencing the virus and sharing the data. Graphen takes this data and shows the mutations, but also shows the parent viruses of these mutations, giving them the ability to map its path. When the virus propagates or replicates, it copies itself. As with any copying process, mistakes can happen in translation--this is essentially a mutation.  Mutations are very important indications of how it changes and how it propagates and spreads; therefore, this information is providing the crux for how Graphen can investigate Covid 10’s habits. For example, they are able to reverse-assess the danger a community may be in: they can us the virus sequencing to determining how long it has actually been in the community based on mutations. They are trying to use this information to figure out how it might continue to replicate itself but also how to shut down its replication ability They are sharing the mutation of each virus and gender and age of the diagnosed patient on their web site so people can study the data on their own if they would like. It’s updated every day.  Find out more at http://www.graphen.ai/covid.html Contact them through email with questions or information by sending to info@graphen.ai. Finally, if you have any ability to get Graphen more data, please consider reaching out to them.

Lung Organoid Research: Advancing Surfactant Protein B Deficiency Treatment with Dr. Sandra Leibel

Mar 29, 2020 37:18

Description:

Neonatologist and researcher Dr. Sandra Leibel discusses her research into a particular gene therapy process involving a lung organoid model. She explains her research and surrounding issues, including the basics of lung research, and specifically the importance of the surfactant process in keeping lungs from collapsing; how mutations lead to the need for surfactant protein b deficiency treatment in babies; and  how her model showed positive treatment possibilities but what must happen before treatment is available clinically. Dr. Sandra Leibel is an assistant clinical professor in pediatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine and a neonatologist specialist at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego.  She's currently focused on the lab side of her work involving a gene therapy process. Dr. Leibel created a model using induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells, and differentiated them into three-dimensional lung organoids. She's using these models to test a possible surfactant protein b deficiency treatment. She explains to listeners the basics of lung geography and mechanics and how of the 40 different lung cell types, she uses the epithelial cells in her model. She describes the surfactant production that happens in the distal portion of the lung, which is the furthest portion, yet serves the whole lung by reducing surface tension and keeping our lungs from collapsing.  These alveolar type 2 cells can undergo a mutation during embryonic development that damages the b protein of those cell; they cannot then produce effective surfactant. These babies are born needing to be on a breathing machine until they are able to get a lung transplant. However, she's found an exciting advancement in her research, namely that by introducing a virus vector that carried a healthy b gene, she measured signs of the model cells completely normalizing into surfactant-producing cells. In other words, she was able to cure the disease in a dish.  She explains the implications of this, the timing for clinical use, and other related issues. For more, google her name and see her page at UC San Diego: https://profiles.ucsd.edu/sandra.leibel

An Integrative Approach to Sleep Disorders and Cardiovascular Health—Dr. Sherif Hassan—International Physician and Keynote Speaker

Mar 28, 2020 24:44

Description:

Dr. Sherif Hassan is an international sleep medicine doctor from Washington DC who focuses on the relationship between sleep disorders and cardiovascular disease, and the benefits of precision medicine. Tune in to learn the following: What impacts sleep apnea and hypopnea have on heart muscles on a short and long-term basis How the oral microbiome, oral hygiene (including the use of mouthwashes), and sleep apnea impact the levels of nitric oxide in the body, and why this is so important for cardiovascular and overall health How the right amount of sleep and exercise, proper nutrition, and the optimization of metabolic and basic functions of the body might be achieved through a program Dr. Hassan is developing Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent yet most preventable non-communicable disorder in the U.S., and is greatly affected by sleep disorders—in particular obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea during sleep. Dr. Hassan sees value not only in taking an integrative approach to sleep and overall health of the individual, but also in following up with patients after they have received treatment for a sleep disorder. He explains that the outcomes following some of the most common forms of treatment such as CPAP, BiPAP, and dental appliances are very poorly understood, as is the correlation between sleep apnea and weight and cardiovascular changes, such as heart disease, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. He explains in detail the impact of sleep apnea on the muscles of the heart, and the role of nitric oxide in delivering oxygen to various parts of the body and reversing the damaging effects of sleep apnea and hypopnea. He discusses the relationship between the oral microbiome and oral health on the body’s level of nitric oxide, and ways of increasing the body’s production of it, which include more intake of essential substrates in the form of celery, spinach, and lettuce. Dr. Hassan is trying to come up with a program to optimize sleep and cardiovascular health through the establishment of regular sleep cycles, optimization of hormones and basic function of the body, exercise, and proper nutrition, not just for patients with sleep disorders, but for everyone. Check out https://www.luana.health/ for more information. Podcast Transcript Richard Jacobs: This is Richard Jacobs with the Finding Genius podcast. My goal here is to find the exceptional people in their fields, not just to run in the middle of people that have been licensed, but the ones that really go above and beyond and what I call the geniuses of their field. So I have Dr. Sharif Hassan, I think he definitely qualifies. He's an international physician from Washington DC with a focus on precision medicine means he incorporates integrative medicine with genomic mapping, a traditional as well as nutritional and lifestyle management. It's geared to the individual patient. So he's also a keynote speaker and we're going to go into his approach to sleep medicine. So Sharif, thanks for coming. Dr. Sherif Hassan: Thank you. Thank you for inviting me. Jacob. Richard Jacobs: Yeah. Tell me about your work in sleep. What first got you interested in it? Dr. Sherif Hassan: Well, actually I'm trained as a critical care physician from the UK. I used to work in a transplant unit up in Newcastle upon Tyne before I moved over to the US so I have been working in the intensive care unit managing patients pre and post-transplant, on ventilators. So I'm quite familiar with assisted respiration and once I came here to the US because of that I had an interest in working with sleep medicine as a sleep disorder. Richard Jacobs: Okay. Well, what kind of sleep disorders particularly fascinates you? Dr. Sherif Hassan: Actually the most common one is obstructive sleep apnea. So I go out of the studies in my office. But my interest goes beyond that. I meant I don't stop at treating the patient w...

Dr. Arianne Missimer Discusses The Movement Paradigm, Functional Medicine, and Healing

Mar 27, 2020 34:00

Description:

Cancer-survivor and expert on physical therapy, nutrition, and mindfulness, Dr. Missimer shares her story with listeners. She recounts what lead her to create The Movement Paradigm, from supporting her dying brother to appearing on American Ninja Warrior, her intake process and questions for new patients at the center, and Why almost every health and pain concern she treats is ultimately about inflammation and what to do about it. Dr. Missimer has her Doctor of Physical Therapy and is a Registered Dietitian. She's an inspirational speaker who has appeared on such outlets as TEDX and is the founder of The Movement Paradigm, an integrative health center that bases treatments on mindfulness benefits, nutrition, movement, and the importance of meditation. She uses a blend of eastern and western philosophies in combination with her physical therapy and dietitian training to serve her clients. She begins by describing her journey towards founding the center, one that includes caring for her brother who later passed from cancer, undergoing her own cancer diagnosis and treatment, and then a full realization of her desire to make an impact. She appeared on the American Ninja Warrior show while undergoing cancer treatment, which was quite a challenge, and explains her success by describing the importance of movement for her. She remarks that working and moving have always given her strength. Her work at the center starts with having clients fill out a very detailed functional medicine-themed form that can help her develop some simple first steps. She tells listeners that ultimately she is trying to figure out a patient's antecedents (such as family autoimmune history), triggers (like stress), and mediators (lifestyle factors). Then she picks one place to start so as not to overwhelm. She says she sees lots of SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) and yeast overgrowth as well as food sensitivities and intolerances. Regardless of what the issue is, she asserts, the foundation of most problems is one of inflammation. She brings clients to a healthier, pain-free place through simple steps of movement, diet, an understanding of mindfulness benefits, the importance of meditation, and other techniques. For more, see the The Movement Paradigm web page at https://themovementparadigm.com/.

Confronting Inadequate, Unsafe Methods of Medication Tracking in U.S. Hospitals—Gordon Krass—IntelliGuard

Mar 26, 2020 25:35

Description:

Gordon Krass, CEO of IntelliGuard, discusses how the late-stage startup company is making the medication supply chain within U.S. hospitals safer and more efficient. You will learn the following: How inadequate tracking and tracing systems for medications and weak medical inventory control within U.S. hospitals is allowing for the clinical use of counterfeit, recalled, or expired drugs, as well as theft of controlled substances How the automation of tracking and inventory offered by IntelliGuard will be providing a huge relief to pharmacists and anesthesiologists, and improving patient experiences What a full rollout of this technology will look like, and what kind of feedback IntelliGuard is receiving from the 500 hospitals they already serve With the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology and data analytics, IntelliGuard has one ultimate goal in mind: maximizing positive healthcare outcomes for patients. Krass explains that while hospitals in the U.S. today are on the cutting-edge of the clinical side of the business with the use of AI in surgeries, new procedures, and advanced imaging technology, the infrastructure that’s responsible for running hospitals is outdated, relying far too heavily on paper-based documentation and human interaction. “People think the supply chain of medications is secure, the truth is it’s not,” says Krass, citing a 60 percent accuracy rate for inventory of critical medications used in surgeries and other complex procedures. This inadequacy is a dangerous one, leading to the administration of expired, recalled, incorrect, or counterfeit drugs. Aside from labor, drugs and supplies are the highest cost items in hospitals, but despite this, hospitals don’t know where medications are or how much they have on hand at any given time. “Most businesses would not be in business if they operated in this way,” says Krass. He continues by explaining the details of how IntelliGuard is working to address these issues, where some of the greatest weaknesses lie in the current system, and how IntelliGuard technologies will transform hospital infrastructure in the U.S. for the better. Press play for all the details. For more info, visit https://ig.solutions/.

Shining a Light on the Fourth Phase of Water—Gerald H. Pollack—Author and Professor at the University of Washington Department of Bioengineering

Mar 25, 2020 50:47

Description:

Dr. Pollack discusses the ways in which the water in your body’s cells isn’t the same type of water in your cup. Tune in to learn the following: How an alternative understanding of the electrical potential of cells could be explained by the fourth phase of water, and how the magnitude of electrical charge of a pathological cell differs from that of a normal or “healthy” cell What type of energy is critical for the transition from ordinary water to the fourth phase of water, and where and when we get that energy What features and properties can be assigned to the fourth phase of water Dr. Gerald H. Pollack is a professor at the University of Washington Department of Bioengineering, and author of award-winning books The Fourth Phase of Water and Cells, Gels, and the Engines of Life. On today’s show, he explains how the water in biology differs from “ordinary” water that we drink each day, and what implications this has for human health and biology at large. He begins by sharing how he discovered the idea that water might have a “fourth” phase, which was through the work of Gilbert Ling, a physiologist and author of over five books on the topic. Inspired by Ling’s work, Dr. Pollack decided to dive into this area of research and eventually write a book that dealt with Ling’s ideas (Cells, Gels, and the Engines of Life). He discusses the experimentation he’s done showing that when water molecules are ordered, they form a crystal-like structure that excludes other substances from entering. This was a critical observation because it proved that there can be regions of water molecules that are not free to bounce around millions of times in a second like they do in ordinary water. Investigating further through multiple experiments, Dr. Pollack and his team found that every feature examined in the exclusion zone of water was different from the features of ordinary water. According to him and many others, this is the type of water that exists in our cells, and it plays a role in nearly every important reaction that occurs inside our cells. He continues by explaining the details of his experimentation, the conditions for exclusion, and the manner or pattern in which exclusion occurs. He also describes how infrared light is the source of energy that allows for the transition from ordinary water to this fourth phase of water, commonly called exclusion zone (EZ) water. He notes the sources of infrared energy in our environment, the ways in which diurnal variation of the amount of infrared energy may be affecting us, and the use of infrared energy as a therapeutic approach for cancer and other illnesses. To learn more, visit https://www.pollacklab.org/.

Virus Expert Dr. Frank Ryan Discuss Behaviors of Viruses and Our Coevolution

Mar 24, 2020 51:58

Description:

Author Dr. Frank Ryan has spent a lifetime researching, speaking on, and writing about virus behaviors. His book Virusphere: From Common Colds to Ebola Epidemics--Why We Need the Viruses That Plague Us was just released in paperback. In this exploratory conversation, he explains why calling viruses parasitic is too simplistic and confining, why this is so as he discusses the history of the AIDS virus evolution with humans as an example, and how different mechanics we use to survive, such as placental membranes, are virus derived. Dr. Frank Ryan is an Honorary Senior Lecturer in the Department of Medical Education at The University of Sheffield in the UK. He has authored numerous books, including Virusphere. The conversation begins with an explanation of the behaviors of viruses as symbionts, existing at a continuum between parasite and mutualistic symbiont.  Among many other examples he presents, he discusses AIDS, one of the worse epidemic viruses in our lifetime. Yet even at the height of the epidemic, scientist didn't ask if it were a parasite or not. Rather, they asked what aspect of the virus is changing as a result of the human interaction and vice versa. What they found was a change in the patient gene antigen that had to do with the virus evolution—both virus and human genome were actually altering each other's genome; so while this may be a virus near the parasitic end of the continuum, human and virus are still changing each other—it's not just a one-sided relationship. Dr. Ryan offers other examples of the behaviors of viruses to flesh out this coevolution, from viruses and the Brazilian wood rabbit in Australia to mammal placental development. He explains how retroviruses function, replicate, and become infectious. He also explains the process of the Coronavirus, its mechanics within human cell cytoplasm and the replication process. He finishes by explaining the ubiquitous nature of the behavior of viruses having effects we may be unaware of, such as keeping the bacteria from taking over the ocean. For more, you can find his book for sale at https://www.amazon.com/Virusphere-Common-Epidemics-Why-Viruses-Plague/dp/1633886042

Microscale Manufacturing – Rahul Panat, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University – An Overview of Modern Manufacturing and Technology’s Important Role

Mar 22, 2020 31:55

Description:

Rahul Panat, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, provides an overview of his work in microscale additive manufacturing, microelectronics, and much more. Podcast Points: How has 3D printing improved manufacturing? What’s on the horizon for technological advances for the medical industry and patient care? An overview of nanoparticles and applications Panat received an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and secured his PhD in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Panat discusses his work on micro and nanoscale 3D printing using nanoparticles to fabricate devices with new functionality and features. As he explains, their goal is to use this technology to develop new types of biomedical devices or to provide additional functionality to devices already in use. Dr. Panat’s research seeks to enhance fundamental scientific knowledge in an effort to create engineering breakthroughs for critical applications. He discusses printed electronics products and the advanced materials impact factor. Dr. Panat provides examples of some of the work they are doing currently, such as creating three dimensional structures that can build microscale needles that are used as brain computer interfaces. The research PhD goes on to explain how they use their advanced technology in varied ways, for example, they are able to create complex 3D structures with high surface area which can help enhance sensitivity in detecting biomarkers. Dr. Panat gets into the details on several of his research areas and provides an analysis of their work goals, providing specific examples on structures, density, customization, and material manufacturing improvements. Dr. Panat explains his background at Intel, in microprocessing. He delves into his work studying micro and nanoscale manufacturing techniques and 3D printing, and his success combining different materials to develop microstructures. Wrapping up, the research expert talks in depth about the practical applications in medicine that can improve patients’ lives. 

Fighting Chronic Bacterial Infections in Lung Disease Patients: Dr. Jennifer Bomberger Shares Her Research

Mar 21, 2020 34:53

Description:

Dr. Bomberger tries to understand why patients get chronic bacterial lung infections from microbial pathogenesis, especially Cystic Fibrosis patients. She discusses key elements, such as why lung disease patients lack the effective mucosa latory clearance system of healthy patients, how epithelial cells sequester nutrients and send signals to disrupt viral replication to combat bacterial and viral infections, and why this sequestration led to an understanding of how viral infections might engender chronic biofilms in patients with lung disease.  Dr. Jennifer Bomberger is an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh in The Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. Her lab recently made an important discovery in a microbiology study that may help combat chronic bacterial infection due to biofilm formation in Cystic Fibrosis patients by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus aureus bacteria.  First, she explains some basic tenants of microbial pathogenesis, such as whether healthy lungs have microbiomes and how respiratory tracts might expel bacteria. Then, she establishes why patients with Cystic Fibrosis lack these mucosa latory elevator actions and how the composition of their mucus is also a barrier to the fight. Eventually the toxic substances their immune system emits is ineffective and the toxins end up scaring the lungs instead. She then describes the nutrient sequestering the immune system undergoes in healthy patients, how cells may "hide" nutrients like iron from bacteria to fend off the microbial pathogenesis. She explains other processes the body undergoes to protect itself and the mechanics of various bacterial and viral infestations. Finally, she explains that in her lab's particular microbiology study, they examined why patients with Cystic Fibrosis tend to get the decade-long bacterial infections soon after a viral infection. They found that the viral infection process disturbs the body's ability to undergo this nutrient sequestration.  Now, they continue to study why and how this happens. For more, see her lab's web page at http://www.mmg.pitt.edu/person/jennifer-bomberger

Gut Bacteria Diversity and Health: Dr. H.J. M. Harmsen Offers Listeners a Solid Explanation

Mar 20, 2020 25:31

Description:

Dr. Harmsen exemplifies the importance of medical microbiology by describing the mechanics and vital nature of gut microbiome diversity. When you listen, you'll learn how aerobic and anaerobic gut bacteria have different functions and effects,  how anaerobic bacteria presence translates to the upkeep of anti-inflammatory compounds, and what eating habits we can maintain to feed those important anaerobic bacteria. Dr. H.J.M. Harmsen is an associate professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands.  In this discussion he tells listeners about gut bacteria, microbes, and bacteria ecology. He begins by explaining exactly what diversity means in terms of the gut microbiome and correlating health. He articulates the need for a balance of bacteria species, and more specifically, short chain fatty acid-making anaerobic bacteria like faecalibacterium. In fact, a proliferation of aerobic bacteria can bode bad news for bodily health and lead to an increase in pathogens. These short chain fatty acids like acetate, propionate, and butyrate have important functions in our body such as energy sources and anti-inflammatory effects. They help maintain the important gut mucin, which is a type of mucus our gut needs to function. He then explains that these anaerobic gut bacteria, which exist further down in our colon, feed off of fresher foods that are harder to digest and therefore able to make it that far into the digestive process. This includes fresh fruits and vegetables that provide fibers, pectin, and cellulose, foods our gut microbiome depends on for sustenance. Dr. Harmsen is exhibiting the importance of medical microbiology by using these digestive mechanics to better understand Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or IBS, which has an inflammatory component. When patients have low butyrate, one of these short chain fatty acids, doctors see leaky gut syndrome for example, when the gut barrier is not functioning properly. He explains how this research may also help cancer patients as they understand how to remove and retransplant a patient's gut micobiome post chemotherapy. For more, see Dr. H.J.M. Harmsen's faculty page at https://www.rug.nl/staff/h.j.m.harmsen/ and search for his publications at PubMed and other research publication listings by his name: H.J.M. Harmsen .

The Bat Microbiome: Part of the Bacterial Ecology Puzzle with Dr. Jack Gilbert

Mar 19, 2020 22:11

Description:

Dr. Gilbert studies microbes and recently examined an element of the bat microbiome. In this podcast, he explains what the size of a bat's gut has to do with their different relationship with bacteria and what that implies about their evolution, how humans and bacteria have coevolved, and  why this information may help manipulate microbiomes to further our health. Dr. Jack Gilbert is a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, San Diego. He specializes in microbial ecology and recently published a paper specific to the bat microbiome. He explains what is significant and interesting about the ecology of the bat and bacteria, namely that unlike human animals, their short gut disallowed for coevolution with bacteria in the same manner as humans. Rather the microbes that live on bats depends on their external environment.  He explains more about how this is similar to birds and what the implications are. He carries this into a larger picture of what goal scientists may have when studying microbial ecology. Dr. Gilbert and his colleagues would like to gain a closer understanding of how we can shape bacterial proportions by altering their food. They are trying to understand how we can selectively choose the growth  of certain organisms by what we feed them—how we can change the course of a human infection by selectively promoting the growth of specific microbes that might make the human host less susceptible to the harm the infection causes. For more, search research collections such as Google Scholar for his name and see his laboratory web site at http://www.gilbertlaboratory.com/

Fascinating Fungi—Nicholas P. Money—Professor, Author, and Expert on Mycology and Microbiology

Mar 18, 2020 41:35

Description:

Nicholas P. Money is a professor, author, and expert on mycology and microbes. He joins the podcast today to discuss a number of fascinating topics. Tune in to learn about them all, including the following: How fungi move so successfully without musculature In what ways the reproductive lives of fungi are so unique What role serious fungal infections play in human health each year, and the search for new forms of antifungal medications How genetically modified fungi is used to develop some of the most common drugs in medicine, as well as industrially useful chemicals   As a first-year undergraduate attending the University of Bristol in the UK, Nicholas P. Money was captivated by descriptions of a vast group of organisms he’d hardly even heard of: fungi. Since then, he’s passionately pursued a knowledge and understanding of how these organisms work, and has authored a number of books on microbes in general. His area of expertise is in the biomechanics of fungi, which deal with the ways in which fungi move, grow, and reproduce. He dives into the details of his expertise on fungi and shares insights he’s gained from a variety of research he’s carried out in the field. This includes the distance and hydrostatic pressure with which spores are released by fungi, how microscopic filaments on fungi manage to penetrate some of the toughest material that exists, and so much more. Learn more at https://www.themycologist.com/.

Toxoplasma Gon ‘n Did It Again (A Microscopic Look at the Behavior of Toxoplasma Gondii)—William J. Sullivan, PhD—Showalter Professor of Pharmacology & Toxicology at Indiana University School of Medicine

Mar 17, 2020 38:27

Description:

Professor and author of Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are, joins the show for a second time today to discuss parasites, focusing on one in particular that affects a significant number of people: Toxoplasma gondii. By tuning in, you’ll discover the following: How Toxoplasma gondii enters a cell and then replicate exponentially Why brain tissue is a common place for Toxoplasma gondii to end up, how the parasite behaves once in neurons and nuclei, and how these locations protect it from the host’s immune system and drug interventions How Toxoplasma gondii initiates a starvation response in a host cell in order to obtain even more food without further effort As a graduate student at University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Sullivan had already had a longstanding interest in microbiology when he began doing lab rotations that would ultimately help him develop his PhD thesis. It was during that time that he discovered toxoplasma gondii, microscopic banana-shaped organisms squirming their way through fibroblast cells and growing exponentially until blowing apart the host cell. At the time, Dr. Sullivan was absolutely fascinated by these organisms, and decided to pursue research on them from there on out.  He wanted to know the details of how Toxoplasma gondii functions and how it could be impacting human health, so he was particularly excited to learn that a professor in the lab was working on turning Toxoplasma gondii into one of the first model systems for all of parasitology. This would allow for modern-day cell and molecular genetic techniques to be employed—a feat impossible for most other parasites. This would pave the way for avenues of unprecedented research in parasitology. “Toxoplasma gondii is pretty remarkable…many people call it the most successful parasite on the planet because it can infect any nucleated cell in virtually any warm-blooded vertebrate…most parasites have a single host, maybe two hosts,” he explains. Among many topics, Dr. Sullivan explains what type of evidence suggests that Toxoplasma gondii is able to recognize what type of host cell it is in, how the active invasion process works, how long it takes before a host immune response is initiated by the presence of Toxoplasma gondii, how this parasite can affect host behavior and personality, how long the latent stages of the infection can last, and what’s being done to address human health concerns posed by this parasite. Check out www.sullivanlab.com for more information.

On the Current and Future State of Organ Transplantation Technology and Medicine—Professor David Mulligan, MD—Yale University

Mar 16, 2020 26:04

Description:

David Mulligan, MD from Yale University joins the show to discuss organ transplantations. Tune in to learn the following: How kidney and liver transplantations currently work and the potential of growing livers and other organs from a patient’s stem cells What kind of progress has been made with regard to limiting immunosuppression and minimizing side effects of immunosuppressive drugs How robotic transplantation programs could improve transplantation success rates in at-risk patient populations Aside from trying to develop technologies and techniques for successful transplantations, Dr. Mulligan has helped implement robotic transplantation programs for kidney transplants, which have shown great success in reducing the risk of post-surgical infections that impede the healing process and overall success of the transplant. He is also working on research involving normothermic and hyperthermic perfusion of solid human organs on ex vivo machines to assess their function and determine whether they can be sufficiently repaired or rejuvenated for use as transplants for human patients in need. “Transplantation…is truly a field that embodies almost every aspect of healthcare,” says Dr. Mulligan. He discusses details about kidney and liver transplants, how immunosuppression works and what’s being done in an attempt to mitigate its negative consequences, as well as what type of research is being done to determine what type of patients may actually do well without the use of side effect-inducing immunosuppressive medications. He talks about the differences between acute and chronic rejection of transplants, the extent to which the liver and gut microbiome may be related to immune system performance, how the choice of which antibiotic to use could be affecting the microbiome and immune system’s ability to recover post-transplantation, and what he believes will happen in the near and long-term future of organ transplantation. Learn more about the work being done at Yale University by visiting https://medicine.yale.edu/surgery/transplantation/about/ and visit https://unos.org/ for more general information about transplants.

Mini-Brains: The Cutting Edge of Neurological Disorders Treatment Research

Mar 15, 2020 23:03

Description:

Dr. Paula Barreras and her colleagues create spheres of living brain cell tissue from skin cells. They are proving that these brain organoids can offer testing and research platforms normally reserved for animals. This podcast explores the process of growing the organoids, from skin cells to spherical clumps, the brain cell structures these spheres have been able to produce, such as myelin-wrapped axons, and the possible neurological disorders treatment and neurotoxicity issues they will be able to research with these organoids. Pursuing a postdoc at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Paula Barreras talks about the research involved in creating BrainSpheres. Their mission is to create approximations of the brain to use for testing to predict how a real brain might work. They create small sphere of human cells that they then manage to convert to neurons and glial cells in a cold culture in vitro process, an extremely challenging process to uphold. Applications for this breakthrough include studies into neurotoxicity and neurological disorders treatment. Most brain studies are on animal models, which is an inherently problematic model because of the different biology. Because the organoids are human-based models, they can improve scientists' understanding of brain function and treatment. Dr. Barreras explains that these models have shown evidence of synapses (neurons are talking to each other), myelination, and spontaneous electrical activity. She explains the creation process to listeners, including the move from adult skin cells to stem cells and then to neuro progenitor cells. These then develop into neurons and other brains cells. After explaining additional technical nuances, she articulates some of the most pivotal aspects of this work. For example, because these organoids produce myelin, scientists may use this research to make inroads into treating diseases like multiple sclerosis, which is a demyelination disease. There's also potential for virus treatmenst, such as the Zika virus and a better understanding of the JC virus, which as a human-only virus, has no animal model study possibility. For more, see this Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health web page, which includes a video about the mini-brain: https://www.jhsph.edu/yearlook/2016/mini-brains-made-to-order/

Finding the Rhythm: Dr. Lee Bartel Talks Neuroscience Music Therapy

Mar 14, 2020 43:12

Description:

Dr. Lee Bartel is a leading researcher and expert on how our cells are affected by sound. In this podcast, he discusses the intellectual journey that brought his music therapy focus to this point, how different soundwave frequencies affect different goals for the patient, from achieving deep sleep to helping attention issues, and how these methods are backed up by research, including for treatment for Alzheimer's, back pain, and depression. Lee Bartel is a Professor Emeritus of Music and a former Associate Dean of Research with the Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto. He's also Founding Director of the Music and Health Research Collaboratory. He begins by telling listeners about his road to this point in his career. His graduate work explored the basics of music therapy. As he moved into clinical work, he interacted with kids who'd undergone brain injuries, using music to rehabilitate various cognitive functions. He became more interested in music in relationship to brain circuits and functions. He then began working with Summerset Entertainment, using specific rhythmic structures for brain training, entering further into neuroscience music therapy. These steps in his career expanded his own ideas of how music affected people. He intensified this concept of music as a sound vibration or a pulse stimulus that might affect states like Delta brain waves (our deepest sleep state). In fact, researchers found they could document brain cells firing at the frequency of the stimulus. Therefore, they could use a stimulus to bring about desired brain states like Delta sleep, which measures at about 40 hertz. Dr. Bartel and fellow researchers explored other cell reactions. They found that when blood vessels were exposed to a certain stimulus rates, the vessels would repeat that rate, which had implications for more medical conditions. He explains how these stimulus pulses affect multiples levels of bodily functions and brain patterns, even to the point of intra brain communication, helping one side of the brain synchronize with the other. Such neuroscience music therapy was shown to help kids who'd gone through cancer treatments help renew gamma activity. As the conversation continues, Dr. Bartel gets more specific about the various ways music therapy treats sleep disorders. He notes that typical sleep studies focus on oxygen levels and less on brain cell frequency. But when Dr. Bartel and researchers worked with people who had reported not sleeping well, they found that patients rated their sleep as deeply improved after playing them recordings of pulse rates conducive to brain waves for deep sleep. Dr. Bartel says, however, that what he's most excited about and what's most newsworthy are the studies in pain alleviation and sleep with fibromyalgia patients. They used a pulse stimulus of 40 hertz and saw a dramatic change in sleep, pain, depression, and quality of life ratings for these patients. The implications are substantial: he says this means that we can reregulate brain circuits and cellular function rather than just brain states.  He goes on to explain how these studies and methods are also applied to patients who experience depression with satisfying results as well as Alzheimer's patients. He describes the methods for each, and includes details about longevity, how the results are cumulative yet need consistent exposure to the pulse stimulus for the treatment to continue holding.  Finally, he points listeners to resources, including his website at http://www.bartelcameronassoc.com/, which has a link to his popular Tedtalk, a link to buy four of his soundtracks, and a link to buy the tactile and sound device called The Sound Oasis VTS1000, which was used in his research. He notes that his CDs are available on ITunes and Amazon.

Metal Metabolism – Svetlana Lutsenko, PhD, Professor of Physiology at Johns Hopkins Medicine – Human Disorders Associated With Copper Metabolism

Mar 13, 2020 30:23

Description:

In this podcast, Svetlana Lutsenko, PhD, Professor of Physiology, Associate Director for Basic Science and Clinical Relations, Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine, discusses monogenic human diseases, Wilson's disease diagnosis, and copper’s effects on the body. Podcast Points: Does copper play an important role in the body? An overview of metals, and how copper in animal diets has an effect on fat Should I be worried about getting enough copper in my diet? Dr. Lutsenko talks about her interest in human disorders that are associated with copper metabolism. Copper plays a vital role in the production of neurotransmitters as well as in the maintenance of bones, nerves, and blood vessels. Dr. Lutsenko discusses imbalances in the body, genetic disorders, and copper’s role. The PhD continues her discussion of copper deficiency disease and the treatment of genetic disease, with an emphasis on drugs that can remove copper from the body. Dr. Lutsenko’s research has delved into many important areas of science, such as Menkes disease; animal models for Wilson’s disease; proteomics; metal biology (iron, zinc and copper); as well as membrane proteins biochemistry, etc.  Dr. Lutsenko discusses the many things they have observed in animals that exist on a high copper diet. As the PhD states, these animals absorb more fat. She goes on to explain that more copper in the diet can actually end up producing less fat in the body. Additionally, Dr. Lutsenko discusses various treatments and therapies, and the balance that the body needs overall, discussing drugs for treatment, and improvements that could benefit the liver.

Treating Ankylosing Spondylitis – Dr. Scott A. Johnson, Author of Beating Ankylosing Spondylitis Naturally – Why Essential Oils May Be Just What You Need to Treat Your Condition

Mar 12, 2020 32:31

Description:

Dr. Scott A. Johnson, a health and wellness advocate, and author of Beating Ankylosing Spondylitis Naturally, discusses his personal battle and ankylosing spondylitis causes. Podcast Points: What is ankylosing spondylitis? Common treatments for ankylosing spondylitis How can essential oils help? Dr. Johnson discusses his personal journey and he explains in detail the symptoms and issues that come from the condition known as, ankylosing spondylitis, such as significant neck and back pain, especially after resting. The condition can also affect the heart, lungs, and eyes, and reduce overall quality of life. Dr. Johnson is a bestselling author, natural health expert, and naturopath. Dr. Johnson’s book provides valuable information on the connections that link AS, eating, and gut health. Additionally, it teaches sufferers how this knowledge can help reduce their AS symptoms. The doctor’s book looks at evidence-based natural remedies as a means to quiet inflammation, combat and ease pain, as well as manage the difficult complications typically associated with AS. The doctor explains that ankylosing spondylitis is considered to be an autoinflammatory condition, slightly different than autoimmune diseases. He discusses the genetic pathways, and modern treatment techniques, as well as some negative effects of various medicines used to treat the condition. He talks about drugs, injections, and surgery, and how each treatment can be used to help people maintain a higher quality of life. Dr. Johnson explains how he came to the current methods that he utilized to heal his own ankylosing spondylitis condition. He talks about the published papers that he studied, as well as clinical trials for essential oils and what he learned about the significance of them. Engaging in an informative conversation about lavender specifically, he extols the virtues of it, discussing physical and emotional improvement possibilities. As he states, most natural solutions are not designed to stop something as much as they are designed to simply promote natural health balance. Wrapping up, Dr. Johnson talks about case studies and how essential oils have been shown to improve conditions for many, but not necessarily all, patients.

Oral Appliances with Sleep Apnea Dentist Dr. Mark Abramson

Mar 11, 2020 35:05

Description:

Dr. Abramson is a dentist who specializes in sleep apnea and created a specific oral appliance called the Oasys. In this discussion, he explains the health risks associated with sleep apnea, the differences between success rates for CPAP machines and oral appliances, and the three zones oral appliances need to manage and why that makes a difference with sleep apnea. As someone who has researched and applied various techniques to treat sleep apnea through dentistry, Dr. Mark Abramson is able to discuss the process and benefits of oral appliances with effective clarity. In this conversation he explains first why it is important to seek solutions to sleep apnea, from general health issues to a correlation between lack of deep sleeping and dementia.  He then describes the blocking that causes apnea and the mechanics for different treatment approaches. He highlights the success rate of oral appliances for several reasons, including the rates at which people stop using or won't even try CPAP machines because of the discomfort and difficulty of wearing the device.  He then articulates the approach through dentistry in more detail, describing how oral appliances bring the jaw forward and can also treat other areas that may need addressing such as nasal dilation and small pads that reposition the tongue. His Oasys system is able to mechanically treat all three issues with one device. Finally, he answers additional questions about oral appliances and dentistry such as effects on TMJ, the efficacy of over-the-counter products, and more.   For more information, see his practice website: Dr. Mark Abramson DDS in Redwood City, CA, at https://www.drtmjsleepapnea.com/. You can learn more about the Oasys device at Dream Systems Dental Lab in Rosewood, CA: https://www.dreamsystemsdentallab.com/ and at http://www.oasyssleep.com/. Dr. Abramsons' office can also help locate dentists in your area that offer oral appliance treatment.

A Discussion with Leading Expert on Adrenal Gland Surgery, Dr. Tobias Carling

Mar 10, 2020 33:17

Description:

Dr. Tobias Carling performs more adrenal gland surgeries than any other surgeon in America. In this podcast, he offers an overview of the basic functions of the adrenal system, the types of tumors and cancers in the adrenal glands as well as adrenal tumor diagnosis, and  the difficulties and goals for adrenal gland surgery as well as ways for patients to educate themselves. Dr. Tobias Carling left his position as Chief of Endocrine Surgery at Yale in 2020 to open the Carling Adrenal Center in Florida. Early in his medical schooling he found the endocrine system worthy of advanced study.  Eventually the challenges and diverse array of tumors the adrenal gland presents kept his interest and he made it his specialty. After being at Yale for almost 18 years, he started the Carling Adrenal Center in Tampa to continue giving patients exceptional care. In this podcast he begins by explaining the biology of the glands, such as the three hormones they produce: aldosterone, cortisol and catecholamines.  He explains how common it is for tumors to form in the glands and what risks they pose. Primarily, different tumors produce different degrees of hormone levels in the body in excess, which can be toxic. This, he adds, is why adrenal tumor diagnosis is important and sometimes tricky. Some cases, like Conn's Syndrome, can be a silent disease hidden by the presentation of symptoms attributed to high blood pressure. Finally, he explains various issues related to adrenal gland surgery such as when cortical-sparing surgery is advisable and when it's not. Such decisions take into account issues such as the risk of spilling tumors into the body as well as the state of the other gland. He comments that the surgery must be done as quickly as possible yet as precisely as possible because of the vital nature of the surrounding area. To learn more, see the Carling Adrenal Center Website at  https://www.adrenal.com/, which includes  a lot of information to help readers better understand everything from lab numbers to different issues to consider. They've made a concerted effort to help patients educate themselves.

How Your Dad’s Environmental Responses Could Be Impacting Yours—Oliver Rando—Rando Lab, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Mar 9, 2020 37:18

Description:

Oliver Rando is a professor and head of the Rando Lab at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He joins the show to discuss his research on epigenetic inheritance. You’ll learn the following: How the research being done in Rando’s lab has shown that in mouse models, a father’s environment can influence some phenotypes in children When the first example of epigenetic inheritance was discovered in mammals, and how it adds to the understanding of both Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome Whether or not the evidence suggests that changes through epigenetic inheritance may be additive in nature or have the ability to be “locked in” after multiple generations are exposed When data that doesn’t belong to the DNA sequence itself affects the phenotype of an organism in some way, and when that phenotypic change is passed on from a parent to a child, epigenetic inheritance is said to occur. It was only two or three decades ago that there was near consensus in the scientific community that epigenetic information could not be passed between generations. However, a growing number of research studies are now showing that that’s simply not the case. One such study is taking place in Oliver Rando’s lab, where he and his team are using mouse models to demonstrate that the environmental conditions of a father can impact the phenotype of the father’s offspring. In addition to discussing the details of his research, Rando touches on the nature of some other interesting types of research going on in the area of epigenetic inheritance. He also talks about the limitations and gaps in this type of research, and what he aims to accomplish in the coming years. Tune in for the full conversation and learn more at https://www.umassmed.edu/randolab/.

The Fat Burning Man Opens Up about His Process: A Conversation with Abel James

Mar 8, 2020 36:31

Description:

Health coach, author, and top-ranking podcast host Abel James discusses his journey towards health and fitness. When you listen in, you'll hear How a health crisis in his twenties led to today's healthy approach, What his personal daily eating habits are in terms of interval fasting, and Tips on starting a similar path for your own health and fitness goals. Abel James hosts the popular podcast Fat Burning Man, writes a blog, and has published several books including The Wild Diet. In this conversation, he shares why he first decided to shift away from popular eating trends towards a direction that made more sense for what his body was telling him. As he turned away from the carb-loading habit runner's magazines were advising and embraced whole foods, he found a dramatically different health and fitness level.  He talks about the fear-based approach mainstream voices lend to eating choices as well as the circular nature of eating processed foods and experiencing increased cravings for more unhealthy foods. Abel notes that when we step back and eat more as our grandparents might have with a focus on less processed ingredients and more substance, we end up healthier. He also brings in how this different eating emphasis lends itself to interval fasting. By eating more satisfying foods that don't induce craving, ultimately he's able to spend less time eating and more time being active and productive.  For more, see his web page at https://fatburningman.com/, which links to his blog, podcasts, and books. It also provides a way to contact him for coaching opportunities and links to courses.

The Latest in Liver Regeneration Research: DR. Sanjeev Gupta Zeros in on Liver Diseases

Mar 8, 2020 40:54

Description:

Dr. Gupta, a leading expert on liver processes and gastroenterology, explains both the science behind how the liver works and the latest efforts towards treating liver diseases. He discusses:  The types of damage that preclude liver regeneration, such as Tylenol overdoses, and why doctors then turn to liver transplants, How liver transplants work across different liver damage scenarios, and  Additional new treatments and research such as tissue engineering, liver regeneration through drug-based approaches, and therapy through cell transplants. Dr. Gupta is a professor of medicine specializing in gastroenterology and liver diseases at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and serves as the Eleazar and Feige Reicher Chair in Translational Medicine. In this podcast, he answers questions about how the liver works, what makes it stop working, and the many ways doctors can then approach medical treatments.  He explains that understanding how the liver is divided, from lobes and sub-compartments to drainage ducts and blood vessels, is important in how a successful transplant and then regeneration can move forward for both the donor and the patient with the damaged liver in cases of liver diseases. But he also explains the immense variety of approaches therein, such as some patients having a "temporary liver" implanted for use until their native liver has more time to regenerate and heal.  Dr. Gupta also explains how the gastroenterology system initiates liver regeneration in conditions of liver diseases. He describes the two pathways toward self-regeneration: hepatocyte division and stem cell or progenitor cell activation. But he also explains how these pathways are connected to liver cancers alongside additional risk factors. Finally, Dr. Gupta comments that researchers can learn from how the liver functions and apply this activity to cures for other organ diseases such as diabetes when the cells stop making insulin. There's hope that the liver regeneration system can lead to the successful regeneration of the insulin-making cells. He finishes the conversation by discussing recent breakthroughs in treating liver diseases such as drug-based therapies to enhance liver regeneration.  For more, including links to his papers, see his web page at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/faculty/8041/sanjeev-gupta/

Magnifying the Genome: Dr. Prashanth N. Suravajhala Takes a Closer Look

Mar 7, 2020 36:11

Description:

Dr. Suravajhala works as a dry biologist in next-generation genome-sequencing research. In this podcast, he explains  what we still don't know about the human genome despite the first sequencing in 2003, the difference between introns and exons, and what exactly next-generation sequencing offers scientists in locating mutations that lead to disease. Dr. Suravajhala is a Senior Scientist of Systems Biology in the Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics at Birla Institute in Jaipur, India. He works on next-generation sequencing to better-identify disease-causing mutations. Specifically, this means he works with the protein-coding exome, which makes up about 1.8% of the genome in an arrangement of exons.  As a dry biologist working in systems biology and clinical exomes, he utilizes the newest technology to get a closer look at these exons for sequencing, separating out what is called exon "chunks." To explain next-generation sequencing compared to the initial sequencing, he uses an aerial view analogy, likening the next-generation work as akin to 100x while the 2003 view is more of a 10x magnification. He explains this in more detail and describes how this larger map of about 150 bases at a time can help identify disease-causing mutations, such as a case he worked on that involved the rare disease pouch colon. He and his team were able to identify the mutations that were only present in affected family members. For more information, search pub med and google scholar for papers by Dr. Prashanth N Suravajhala.

A Conversation About the Building Blocks of Life with Roy A. Black, PhD

Mar 7, 2020 35:26

Description:

Roy A. Black holds a Ph.D. in biochemistry and is a professor at the University of Washington. His research expertise has to do with something that almost every human being has wondered at one point or another: how did life as we know it comes to be? On today’s podcast, Dr. Black talks about the following: What explanation might account for the development and survival of cells despite harsh environments in early life How the relationship between complexity and stability might explain the aggregation of the building blocks of life (e.g. RNA, proteins, fatty acids) How it comes to be that forces like natural selection act upon a molecule Before diving into the field of research on the origin of life, Dr. Black spent many years in biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Having always felt a drive toward understanding our history, he became increasingly compelled to research something that’s been largely unaddressed by scientists: how life began. Answering this question or at least getting closer to an answer will not only satisfy human curiosity but allow for us to say with more confidence what probability there is of other forms of simple or complex life in the universe. Among a number of interesting topics, Dr. Black talks about his hypothesis as to how the building blocks of RNA and protein first came together, and how the answer might explain cell division and molecular stability. He explains the component parts of a cell, similarities between the biochemistry of different species on earth, and what he wants to answer as a researcher on the origin of life.

The Latest in Genomic Data Analysis and Bioinformatics—Simon Sadedin—Victorian Clinical Genetics Services

Mar 6, 2020 29:56

Description:

Over the course of the past decade or so, there’s been a huge influx of genomic data due to better and more affordable sequencing technologies. How does anyone make sense of it all? Simon Sadedin joins the show to answer this question and explain his role as a bioinformatician at Victorian Clinical Genetics Services. He talks about the following: How useful bioinformatics is and why it’s become increasingly necessary in recent years What types of difficulties and philosophical dilemmas are encountered by clinical geneticists How short-read sequencing differs from long-read sequencing in important ways Victorian Clinical Genetics Services perform genetic and genomic testing for patients who have or are at risk of developing rare genetic disorders. The amount of data that can be gathered in this field of work is significant, which can complicate the process of providing patients with easy-to-understand, useful information that applies to their lives and the lives of their loved ones. This is where bioinformatics aims to be most useful. Sadedin explains the three primary roles of the bioinformatic work he carries out at Victorian Clinical Genetics Services, and explains that the ultimate goal is to improve patients’ experiences and the quality of healthcare on the whole. He also talks about the ways in which it can be a challenge or even impossible to elucidate what a certain genetic or genomic result means for a specific person, the advantages and drawbacks of current versus emerging sequencing technologies, and how useful it is to obtain genomic data from people who are unaffected by certain rare genetic disorders. For more, visit https://www.vcgs.org.au/ and https://www.mcri.edu.au/.

Understanding and Treating a Food Allergy Epidemic—Dr. Onyinye Iweala—University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology

Mar 6, 2020 32:04

Description:

Dr. Onyinye Iweala is a professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine whose expertise lies in environmental allergies, including allergic rhinitis, chronic hives, and food allergies. She joins the show to talk about a number of interesting topics, such as: What factors might be causing or contributing to a food allergy epidemic in developed countries The relationship between microbiota and food allergy, allergic rhinitis, and chronic sinusitis Hypotheses as to why some food allergies can be outgrown by a certain percentage of those affected, and why others cannot How the new and only FDA-approved treatment for food allergy works What happens physiologically during an alpha-gal allergy As a junior in college, Dr. Iweala took her first basic immunology class and pretty much knew that that was the path she wanted to pursue as a doctor. Not only did she find it complicated and fascinating, but also very relevant to human health. In recent years, food allergy has been on the rise, particularly in industrial countries like the U.S. This has caused concern for many people, especially since there has only very recently been a food allergy treatment on the market. Dr. Iweala discusses how this new drug functions in the body, and how it is based on the principles of oral immunotherapy.  She also explains the standard understanding of IgE-mediated allergy responses, and how a non IgE-mediated allergy response prompted by an alpha-gal allergy is unique and challenging to detect. She touches on a number of other interesting subjects, such as how multiple food allergies in a single person might be treated, the goal of recent and ongoing studies in the field, and much more. Links to Dr. Onyinye's Lab and research work: https://iwealalab.web.unc.edu/ https://www.med.unc.edu/tarc/research/basic-and-translational-research/labs/dr-iwealas-lab/

Obesity Issues – Dr. Holly Kramer, Professor of Public Health Sciences and Medicine, Loyola University – Obesity and Disease Overview

Mar 5, 2020 34:48

Description:

In this podcast, Dr. Holly Kramer, Professor of Public Health Sciences and Medicine at Loyola University, Chicago, talks about her research in nephrology, and the links between obesity and kidney disease.  Podcast Points: What is the kidney’s primary function? What exactly is nephrology? An overview of obesity-related diseases and problems Dr. Kramer discusses the alarming escalation of obesity in America, and its association to kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, and other health problems. Dr. Kramer focuses her research on important areas that have an affect on public health. She talks about the interconnections between nutrition and obesity and kidney disease.  Dr. Kramer talks in detail about her current research, and why she is so intensely interested in the role obesity plays in so many diseases. Throughout her career she has worked with many other nephrologists and focused her attention on new ways to treat health ailments, such as kidney stones, kidney failure, and hypertension. Dr. Kramer explains how we lose kidney function as we grow older. She provides a wealth of information on muscle movement and creatine. As she details, when creatine gets old it loses an important water group and thus becomes creatinine, which is actually a waste product produced by muscles from this breakdown. When creatinine leaks into the bloodstream it is then filtered by the kidney. Dr. Kramer states that by looking at levels of creatinine in the blood, they can get a sense of how well the kidney is actually functioning. Continuing, the research doctor provides extensive information on diabetes, discussing insulin, medication, and how ketones are created.

Psychology, Sleep, and Treatment – Michelle Mullaley, PhD, Child Psychology Expert – Modern Psychology, and Why We Sometimes Suffer from Sleep Problems

Mar 5, 2020 23:10

Description:

In this podcast, Michelle Mullaley, PhD, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, discusses sleep issues, psychology, child psychology, and the techniques and tools she utilizes to help people at her clinic. Podcast Points: Do kids have different sleep problems than adults? Can ADHD impact sleep? Which cognitive tools can help with calming, relaxation, and anxiety relief? Dr. Mullaley is a seasoned clinical psychology expert. She specializes in child and family psychology. She earned her doctorate at Catholic University in Washington, DC. Dr. Mullaley discusses her background and current focus. As an active researcher, Dr. Mullaley does a lot of testing in addition to her regular schedule of therapy.  Dr. Mullaley talks in detail about sleep problems, specifically sleep deprivation that kids and teens struggle with. As she states, falling asleep can be difficult for some, especially in kids who have ADHD. She provides a wealth of information on circadian rhythms and how they can shift through our lives. As a result of this shifting, some teens tend to feel very awake even late at night, but when they have to get up early to get to school, their bodies feel sleep deprived because they are craving that full nine hours of relaxing sleep but aren’t getting it.  Dr. Mullaley discusses cases she deals with, in regard to sleep problems and issues. The clinical psychologist discusses multiple techniques and treatments—including cognitive challenging, which is a cognitive behavior technique used to bring on calming and relief from anxiety. Continuing, Dr. Mullaley discusses breathing, yoga, various imagery techniques, and even some apps that can help kids, and adults, to relax and calm themselves, which can assist with falling asleep, and getting better sleep. Expanding her discussion on sleep issues, Dr. Mullaley talks about melatonin and how it can play a role in sleep and why we have different issues as we get older. Wrapping up, she talks about the impact of technology, and how smartphones are one thing we should detach ourselves from when we want to fall asleep, and get quality sleep.

On How to Age Healthfully—Brendan Egan, PhD—School of Health and Human Performance and the National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology at Dublin City University

Mar 4, 2020 42:23

Description:

Associate professor of sport and exercise physiology, Brendan Egan, PhD has studied physiology and nutrition since he was an undergraduate student. On today’s episode, he discusses how training and nutritional interventions can help slow the loss and decline of muscle mass, function, and strength in ageing adults. Tune in to learn the following: At what ages muscle mass, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness tend to start decreasing, and what types of exercise and diet-related interventions can help Why it can be challenging for adults to consume the recommended amount of protein per meal, and some innovative ideas for addressing this What Dr. Egan has learned from working with elite athletes, and how it’s translated to his work with older adults “I don’t think there’s an example of a society or a population that’s physically inactive and healthy. We have to acknowledge that physical activity is imperative to health when it comes to the human condition,” says Dr. Egan. He explains that while an adult—without the appropriate interventions—can lose 30 to 50 percent of their muscle mass between the ages of 40 to 80, it is a process that ultimately tapers out. In contrast, muscle strength and function can decline until a person is rendered unable to take care of themselves or even walk. For this reason, he and his group are primarily focused on interventions that address and slow the decline of muscle strength and function that occurs with age. Dr. Egan talks about the importance of resistance and strength-based training and extra protein intake in slowing the decline of muscle function and strength. He explains that some people can benefit even from a single hour of strength training per week, while others might require more frequent training sessions. Press play for the full conversation and view Dr. Egan’s profile at https://www.dcu.ie/researchsupport/research-profile?PERSON_ID=1631629.

Researching the Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Physical and Mental Health—Dr. Alex Richardson—Food and Behavior (FAB) Research

Mar 4, 2020 50:15

Description:

Without long chain omega-3 fatty acids, the development of the brain and nervous system would be impossible. This begs the question: what effects arise from long chain omega-3 fatty acid deficiency? Dr. Alex Richardson joins the show to discuss the following: What has caused nutritional imbalances globally and particularly in those who consume a Western diet In what ways omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids differ How short chain fatty acids differ in important ways from long chain fatty acids What the data suggests about the use of long chain omega-3 fatty acids as antidepressants Dr. Alex Richardson is a research associate in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics at the University of Oxford, and founder of Food and Behavior (FAB) Research. Her interest in researching the role of nutrition in physical and mental health was triggered during her postdoctoral studies when she discovered how impactful long chain omega-3 fatty acids are on vision. Since then, she’s been investigating how this essential nutrient may be related to conditions like ADHD, dyslexia, and disorders that fall on the autism spectrum. Dr. Richardson published her first study about two decades ago, which demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids could lower impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity in children with above average levels of these. Through a second study, she showed that omega-3 fatty significantly improved reading, spelling, and symptoms of ADHD in children. Dr. Richardson already has protocols set for two more studies: one that will look at the effects of omega-3 on sleep, and how sleep may be associated with ADHD and autism, and a second that will look at the relationship between omega-3 and sleep health, and common mental health conditions like stress and depression. Tune in for a compelling show that’s full of eye-opening and powerful information. Learn more by visiting https://www.fabresearch.org/viewItem.php.

Sleep Disturbance – Richard J. Schwab, MD, DABSM, Head of Sleep Medicine, University of Pennsylvania – Why Does Sleep Apnea Exist, and How Can We Correct It?

Mar 3, 2020 34:17

Description:

Richard J. Schwab, MD, DABSM, Head of Sleep Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and the Co-Medical Director, Penn Sleep Center, discusses the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea, and obstructive sleep apnea treatment. Podcast Points: What is obstructive sleep apnea? What causes sleep apnea in some, when others seem to avoid it, and what can you do about it? How do soft tissues impact sleep? Dr. Schwab provides some background on his work and the various sleep problems that exist. He talks about sleep apnea, and why there is so much left to understand. Why does it happen when we sleep? He discusses soft tissue structures and lateral walls and other factors that can lead to airway paths collapsing. Dr. Schwab’s extensive research seeks to target the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea by using advanced upper airway imaging techniques. His studies help further explain the motion of various key structures of the upper airway and the role they play in airway closure. Dr. Schwab talks about the biomechanics of apneic events. He provides information on how they utilize magnetic resonance imaging and electronic beam computed tomography during sleep, as well as wakefulness, to study patients. Dr. Schwab talks about abnormal craniofacial structures as well as soft tissue, and how they can potentially impact sleep apnea occurrences. He discusses mouth breathing, studies they conducted on tongue fat, and how it all could impact breathing issues. As he states, if you naturally have a narrow airway, as movement occurs when you sleep, apnea could be initiated. He provides an in-depth discussion of how tissues move, and studies they have done on wakefulness. But he states there are more studies on sleep and breathing that they plan to do in the near future. Dr. Schwab, through his exhaustive research annually, collaborates regularly with members of the Departments of Radiology and Biomechanical and Computer Engineering. And together, the scientific researcher/developers have designed an extremely advanced, computer graphics-based analysis software that can assist with modeling, in three dimensions, of the biomechanical interrelationships that exist between soft tissue structures and the upper airway.

Functional RNA Types and Their Many Roles: Dr. Nils Walter Discusses Discoveries

Mar 3, 2020 43:56

Description:

Dr. Walter studies the many functions of RNA, which combines into the most copious enzyme on our planet. RNA research is catching up with the rest of our genetic findings after DNA dominated the field for so long. Dr. Walter plows into this knowledge by discussing how the extra base oxygen in RNA gives it different abilities than DNA; the many different functional RNA types, from general assembly instructions to specialized directions for unique adjustments; and  how RNA may have been the first spark igniting life at the bottom of the oceans. Dr. Nils Walter is the Francis S. Collins Collegiate Professor of chemistry, biophysics, and biological chemistry at the University of Michigan. He's also the founding codirector of the Center for RNA Biomedicine. The center researches foundational biological RNA discoveries and translates them for use towards future medicines. Dr. Walter has been researching at the University of Michigan for 20 years; for the most part, his work has been focused on functional RNA types. In this conversation he offers a non-coding RNA review and recounts numerous discoveries, such as the structure and function connection and why it’s important that RNA has a more transient nature than DNA. He expands on this review by reminding listeners that when the human genome was sequenced in 2003, researchers discovered that just 1.5% of the genome codes for proteins while the rest is transcribed into RNA. These RNAs form multiple structures that become functional RNA types. As he continues with his non-coding RNA review, he explains that RNA folds into intricate 3D architectures, which enables them to take on complex functions such as the formation of ribosomes. Dr. Nils describes additional jobs of the RNA molecule and articulates how these discoveries will lend themselves to future medicines. For more, see his lab page at https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/walter-lab/ as well as the Center for RNA Biomedicine page at https://rna.umich.edu/.

Biology Basics – Larry Simpson, PhD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, UCLA – Thoughts on the Molecular Biology of the Mitochondrial Genome

Mar 2, 2020 27:51

Description:

In this podcast, Larry Simpson, PhD, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, UCLA, provides an overview of his long career in scientific research. Podcast Points: A discussion of RNA editing What’s in a genome?  How does RNA modification occur? Dr. Simpson has long been interested in the molecular biology of the mitochondrial genome of trypanosomes. He was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and throughout his extensive and celebrated career, Dr. Simpson was elected as a Foreign Member of the Brazilian Academy of Science, as well as a distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, and as a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Simpson provides some information about his background, past work, and current research. He talks about his career studying the molecular biology of the mitochondrial genome of trypanosomes, and why this area of study interested him so intently. Continuing, Dr. Simpson discusses the types of molecules he studied in past research.  Throughout the years of research, Dr. Simpson spent a fair amount of time investigating a novel type of RNA modification phenomenon known as ‘RNA editing,’ which occurs in the single mitochondrion. Dr. Simpson goes on to discuss DNA molecules, modification, translation, gene sequences, bacteria and function, and ‘guide RNAs.’ He provides an overview of enzymes within the mitochondrion, discussing types of gene editing. And he goes into an in-depth discussion of how mRNA transcripts of the mitochondrial maxicircle DNA molecules are modified, after transcription, by the insertion, and deletion, of uridine residues at exact sites within coding regions to form a translatable sequence. A list of web sites where people can get information on the parasites and the diseases: Information on kinetoplast DNA with some micrographs of the network: https://kdna.net/parasite_course-old/kDNA/new_page_1.htm Larry Simpson's lab home page: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/index.html List of published papers: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/mybib.html Larry Simpson's online course on Molecular Parasitology: https://kdna.net/parasite_course-old/default.htm One of Larry Simpson's lectures on molecular parasitology: https://kdna.net/168-2011/168.html A database for U-insertion/deletion RNA Editing: https://kdna.net/trypanosome/database.html A web site with information on the research in Larry's laboratory: https://kdna.net/simpsonlab/research.html

Clinical Psychology Answers – Babak Govan, PhD, MAOB, Psychologist at Integrative Northwest – Accelerating Change in Moderative Psychotherapy, Thoughts on Insomnia Treatment and Psychopathology

Mar 2, 2020 44:21

Description:

Bio: A Los Angeles native, Babak holds a clinical doctorate in clinical psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology, where he also obtained a master’s in organizational behavior. He is the originator of the moderative psychotherapy. Currently living in Portland, Oregon with his wife and children, he is in private practice at Integrative NW as a clinical and health psychologist. Babak is also a fiction author and, as Secret Arcade, a music artist. Babak’s writing debuted in North American Review (“Fighting Fish”), and he was a finalist for a Glimmer Train award. His story “Glow,” published in Palo Alto Review, was deemed “flawless” and “brilliant” by Shenandoah literary review. His book, a dystopian psychological novel, A-Void, examines accelerating (exponential) change and information overload, and was selected as a Top Ten Book of 2018. Secret Arcade’s debut electronic rock album, Quarter Century, skyrocketed on college radio. A popular docu-series on A&E/Lifetime recently offered him a role, but he turned it down to focus on his theory, his writing, his music, and his family.   In this podcast, Babak Govan, PhD, MAOB, psychologist at Integrative NW, provides an overview of insomnia treatment, psychopathology, and more. Podcast Points: Could too much ‘bad’ news in our daily feed be bringing on depression? Can insomnia be cured? Treatment options An overview of psychological issues Dr. Govan is actively engaged in helping people manage their anxiety and depression, ADHD, self-defeating behaviors, and substance abuse. Dr. Govan talks about his background and discusses health psychology, the interface of medical and psychological issues. Going deeper, Dr. Govan explains how his practice subspecializes in treating insomnia. Dr. Govan explains just how common depression is today in America, and he discusses the various sociogenic factors that may be exacerbating the rise in depression cases nationally. Dr. Govan discusses tools to manage psychological issues, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, but he stresses that cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT, is only one possible avenue for treatment. The PhD elaborates on the importance of limiting our negative influencers, such as the preponderance of negative news that is seemingly always breaking. He discusses his thoughts on the relative impact of modern technology that delivers news 24/7, and ways we can limit our exposure to negative influences. Continuing, the doctor discusses the concept of loneliness, and how technology may be severely disconnecting us. Dr. Govan talks about the kinds of clients they work with. He discusses the problem of insomnia, which can be a psychodynamic, deeper issue. He discusses abrupt insomnia versus cases in which people have had chronic sleep problems for a long period, and how the latter understand that it could be a long term issue for them to solve over time. Dr. Govan reiterates the importance of taking control of the environments in which we exist. He talks about time management, as well as journalistic errors, and how so often in our modern society, things fall through the cracks. Wrapping up, Dr. Govan provides information on the specific types of cases they deal with at Integrative NW, and how they seek to help people manage their many and varied issues.

Chiropractic Care – Dr. Ty Carzoli, Chiropractor at Denver Upper Cervical Chiropractic – The Current State of Chiropractic Care

Feb 28, 2020 24:59

Description:

In this podcast, Dr. Ty Carzoli, chiropractor at Denver Upper Cervical Chiropractic, discusses his facility and their work, providing information on chiropractic orthospinology, treatment, and care. Podcast Points: What are some of the reasons we have neck or back pain? Too much sitting: not a good thing! Overview of the kinds of testing used to assess who should receive cervical chiropractic care Denver Upper Cervical Chiropractic provides chiropractic care to people who suffer from pain and discomfort. Dr. Carzoli earned a doctorate of chiropractic and he holds a master’s degree in sports health science. Dr. Carzoli discusses neck and back problems, explaining the many issues his team treats at their facility, such as migraines and headaches, post-concussion syndrome, neck and back pain, seizures, and more. Dr. Carzoli explains how they exam new potential clients, starting with a complete and thorough digital x-ray analysis to fully assess the current structure, position, and motion of their spine. Testing motor skills and grip strength, Dr. Carzoli makes an assessment and decides if the incoming potential client would benefit from treatment. Further, Dr. Carzoli talks about adjustments, and discusses how the body keeps us aligned, and why alignment issues may happen. He talks in detail about the unnatural forces we can experience at times, from high-impact collisions to excessive sitting, etc. These events, activities, or non-activities, can definitely cause damage to our bodies, and it is Dr. Carzoli’s mission to assist everyone with their pain and discomfort.

Mental Mindset – Marni Amsellem, PhD, Psychologist – Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques

Feb 28, 2020 25:35

Description:

In this podcast, Marni Amsellem, PhD, psychologist, talks about her work treating clients with cognitive behavioral therapy tools and techniques. Podcast Points: How can cognitive behavioral therapy help with anxiety issues? Can cognitive behavioral therapy help combat negative thoughts? The anxiety/insomnia connection Dr. Amsellem works with many clients, helping them to develop tools to manage their anxiety, depression, health-related challenges and life changes. Dr. Amsellem talks about her areas of focus in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). She discusses insomnia, and explains how anxiety is sometimes the reason for poor sleep. CBT, she states, can help with underlying anxiety. Continuing, Dr. Amsellem discusses the triggers that can bring on anxiety in some people. There are multiple factors that can impact us negatively, and Dr. Amsellem discusses the many statements and thoughts that we communicate to ourselves, sometimes far below our conscious level even.  Dr. Amsellem provides an overview of various themes she hears from her clients regularly, such as concerns over failure, concerns over rejection, to feelings of worthlessness, and others. She breaks down some of the techniques she utilizes and explains how cognitive behavioral therapy can assist with those negative thoughts we sometimes have by helping us reframe them and overcome them. She talks about the importance of increasing our awareness of thoughts and triggers, and the patterns we gravitate toward. Wrapping up, Dr. Amsellem explains CBT in detail, and how it can be applied to real world situations and problems and help us create changes in our lives, for the better. 

Game Over – Niles Eldredge, Evolutionary Biologist and Renowned Paleontologist – Thoughts on Biological Issues, Global Problems, and Extinction Event Causes

Feb 27, 2020 29:57

Description:

In this podcast, Niles Eldredge, evolutionary biologist and renowned paleontologist, discusses parallel causation in oncogenic and anthropogenic degradation and extinction, his thoughts on biological theory, and other topics. Dr. Eldredge holds a PhD from Columbia University. He is the Curator Emeritus, Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History. Podcast Points: How does overpopulation impact the environment? Does evolution occur gradually? What can we do about environmental damage and species extermination? Dr. Eldredge discusses his long background, and his noted career in the fields of biology and paleontology. Dr. Eldredge has contributed significant work in the study of mid-Paleozoic phacopid trilobites, and along with Stephen Jay Gould of Harvard, formulated an interesting theory that challenged Darwin's very premise that evolution occurs gradually. The theory they put on the table was known as Punctuated Equilibria, and it states that evolution occurs in dramatic spurts mixed in with extended periods of stasis.  Dr. Eldredge says there isn’t much evolution really unless, and until, the ‘clock’ is turned over, such as what occurs when an extinction event happens. Evolution, in fact, is a rebound from an extinction event. When all is working properly, he states, things tend to stay the same. Dr. Eldredge provides information on climate change and the recipe for stability. He discusses some of the grave environmental dangers, discussing disruption and degradation, and the terrible damage being done to various species globally. He discusses how we have changed the environment considerably, and how more people globally will ultimately lead to more damage. Dr. Eldredge talks about urban environments and how they relate to the natural world, and the real possibility that we are on a track toward extinction.

How Spirituality Lends Itself to Quality of Life Healthcare: Donnie Yance Explains

Feb 27, 2020 49:01

Description:

This is a follow-up interview with Natura-brand founder and Mederi Foundation leader Donnie Yance. He offers a closer glimpse into the spiritual side of his journey. When you listen, you will her Donnie explain how liturgy, attitudes, and theology differ in the East and West, from an approach that is more comfortable with mystery in the East to a more brain-centered process in the West; the extensive variety of the prayer process and what different approaches can mean, from one style that's particularly healthy for the vagus nerve to what theologians mean when they say being quite enough to hear "God's whisper; and how the Mederi Foundation is able to bring the spirit and body together to treat the whole person. Donnie Yance is the founder, president, lead clinician, and chairman of the Mederi Foundation. The foundation works with cancer patients in conjunction with oncologists, but also teaches quality of life healthcare and provides tips to live longer. Earlier in life, Donnie spent time at a Franciscan monastery and other spiritual centers. This time informs his current healing practice. Still a Franciscan monk of the third order, he has extensive knowledge of numerous religious practices and explains some of the more meaningful elements. He recounts details like Eastern orthodox street greetings during the Easter season to how the Beatitudes differs from the Ten Commandments.  Finally, he describes his approach at the Mederi Foundation, how he delivers a handout to clients that explains his spiritual approach and what it means to heal the whole person. For more, such as tips to live longer, see his website and a blog at https://www.donnieyance.com/ and the Mederi Foundation site at https://medericenter.org/

Dr. Li Discusses a New Treatment for Allergy and Immunology Diseases

Feb 26, 2020 35:24

Description:

Allergic airway disease treatment may get better results from the use of antifungals. Dr. Li explains how this treatment seeks to eradicate fungi that may be accountable for some allergic symptoms. He describes how fungi in airways can cause allergic inflammation and increase reactions to pollen, the pervasive nature of these fungi and what methods the clinic uses to diagnose the conditions, and issues antifungal treatments in themselves can cause but how at a certain point such risks are worth the relief for some patients. Dr. Evan Li, faculty member at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas specializing in allergy and immunology diseases, treats patients in their clinic who have severe asthma symptoms. He discusses the nature of these fungi—how easy it is to take them in yet only certain patients have these stronger reactions.  For example, people are exposed to these fungi just by walking outside yet all don't have extreme reactions and infections. For some, however, these fungi can produce infections that reveal themselves as allergy and immunology diseases. While antihistamines are the standard issue for allergic airway disease treatment, they don't address the root cause of the fungal infection. Dr. Li explains further that they only use this type of treatment for more severe cases, or what's termed severe persistent asthma. Because these patients come to the clinic with symptoms that are barely relived by standard treatment, the risks associated with antifungal treatment are outdone by the benefits. For more such as a listing of papers he's authored, search for his name in pubmed and see his page at the Baylor College of Medicine: https://www.bcm.edu/people/view/evan-li-m-d-b-s/b177c08a-ffed-11e2-be68-080027880ca6 Email him with questions as well at eli@bcm@edu. Finally, his lab accepts sputum samples in a clean cup or zip lock bag, frozen and delivered to: The Baylor College of Medicine Clinic 8th Foor, Suite 8A 7200 Cambridge St. Houston, TX 77030

A Pediatrician’s View of California’s Wildfires: Allergy and Immunology Specialist Dr. Sydney Leibel Shares His Concerns

Feb 26, 2020 24:05

Description:

Dr. Leibel and colleagues investigated what California's wildfire's meant in terms of health effects. He explains more by discussing why we need to put more energy into preventative efforts, what can be down about small particulate matter once it has entered the lungs, and  additional allergy concerns such as theories on prevention. Board-certified pediatric allergist and immunologist at Rady's Children's Hospital in San Diego and Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine, Dr. Sydney Leibel is an allergy and immunology specialist. His work brings his interest in pediatrics and immunology together.  In this conversation, he recounts a group study on health effects and wildfires in southern California. Researchers gathered population-level information on hospital visits and combined it with the timing of the fires. In most cases with fire in a close area, no matter how small the fire, they noted an increase in hospital visits, particularly in patients 0 to 12 years old. Dr. Leibel talks about the challenge of removing the small particulate matter from the lungs that comes from smoke. He notes that the best way to protect these kids is with prevention. This means keeping allergy suffers inside when conditions are bad, but also we need to do better work on mitigating effects of wildfires before they even start.  He also describes different reasons for why allergies seem to be a larger issue today and offers theories for how to change this. He comments that we now have better asthma medicines available, but need to reach more patients: he and other allergy and immunology specialists are working to reach under-served populations. To learn more and find links to his research, see his web page profile at Rady's Children's Hospital, San Diego: https://www.rchsd.org/doctors/sydney-leibel-md-mph/ Find him on twitter as well: @saleibel.

Is Your Gut Microbiome Healthy, and Is Your Baby’s?—The Latest in Microbiome Research from Hein Min Tun, PhD, Public Health Veterinarian

Feb 25, 2020 26:38

Description:

Hein Min Tun, PhD, is a public health veterinarian and researcher who is currently leading research efforts at the University of Hong Kong School of Public Health. He discusses the details of his work, including the following: What methods are used by bacteria in order to resist antibiotics How changes in gut microbial communities are correlated with the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the gut What factors might influence microbiome development trajectories during the first three years of life How the gut microbiome may be affected by the health of the mother and the way in which the child is birthed (i.e. vaginally v. C-section) After obtaining his PhD at the University of Hong Kong, Dr. Hein Min Tun conducted post-doctoral research on the microbiome and resistome in food animals, humans, and the environment at the Gut Microbiome Laboratory of the University of Manitoba. Following that, he joined the team at SyMBIOTA, where he studied gut microbiota during infancy. His latest work has two main focuses: understanding how the gut microbiome is related to the colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and what early microbiome development might reveal about the characterization of “healthy” microbiomes. He is the head of a team of researchers at the University of Hong Kong School of Public Health who aim to investigate these topics. With the use of several statistical and machine learning approaches, Dr. Tun is analyzing population data on different cohorts of infants in order to tease out what factors are at play in the development of early microbiome trajectories and disease outcomes. For example, how does the health of the mother affect the health of the baby? How does the gut microbiome differ between a baby born vaginally and by cesarean section? Does exposure to chemicals or toxins in the environment influence the development of the microbiome? These are just a few of the questions Dr. Tun and his team are exploring. On today’s podcast, he shares what they’ve discovered thus far, which areas need the most attention, and what’s on the horizon for the field of microbiome research in general. Learn more and view Dr. Tun’s publications at https://sph.hku.hk/en/about-us/faculty-and-staff/academic-related-staff/tun,-hein-min.

Exploring Loops in the Human Genome: Dr. Erez Lieberman Aiden Explains His Research

Feb 25, 2020 36:00

Description:

Dr. Aiden works on analyzing the bending of our human genome, a 3-D complex arrangement that, in part, regulates our cells. This conversation explores how each chromatid forms unique loops and bends while patterns emerge across similar cell types, the mechanism that forms these loops—a protein complex that works almost like a lariat knot of a lasso, and why a better understanding of this molecular genetics architecture is important for medical treatments. Dr. Erez Lieberman Aiden is an assistant professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. Over the course of the podcast, he describes how this architectural feat of our cells' genome is formed and the accompanying implications of the nature of this formation. As he explains the complexity of molecular genetics, he begins with a description of how this two-meter-long DNA strand fits inside each of our nuclei. Further, because the sequencing of the human genome is such a recent scientific accomplishment, our understanding of these bending twists and loops is growing almost daily. He explains that this intricate packing of the human genome is not just a storage mechanism. Rather, as is the case with proteins, shape is essential to function—these physical loops form and bring enhancer elements in relation to a significant gene, for example. He adds that typically loops bring promoters of genes in contact with other elements in the genome to exchange information. All this gives rise to genetic regulation, which includes turning genes on and off. Dr. Aiden also explains the practicalities of how these molecular genetics studies are accomplished, such as what microscopy enables them to see. Finally, he discusses some of the implications of this research: scientists ask why we have the same genome in the brain and the heart yet the cells do different jobs. It's clear the gene changes how it folds in different organ systems and that fold changes how each cell functions. For more, see his lab page at https://www.aidenlab.org/ , which includes links to all the data from their research, and a recent article he published in Scientific American that explores aspects of these themes: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/human-genome-3-d/. 

On the Latest in Single-Molecule Research—Markita Landry, PhD—University of California, Berkeley, College of Chemistry

Feb 24, 2020 25:57

Description:

Assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at UC Berkeley, Markita Landry, joins the podcast to discuss her latest research on nanoparticles and single molecule fluorescence methods. She explains the following: How nanoparticles can be used as DNA, RNA, or protein-delivery vessels in a way that confers important advantages to crops What is fluorescence, why it’s useful, and why some materials are naturally fluorescent What dopamine imaging studies using nanoscale probes have revealed about the way individual neurons respond to a certain psychoactive drug In Dr. Landry’s lab, she and her team are researching the uses and advantages of being able to control molecules that are on the scale of the building blocks of life—single nanoparticles the size of a single molecule of water. She discusses the two primary focuses of her research, the first of which uses nanoparticles to deliver DNA, RNA, and protein into plants to improve their ability to resist pathogens and drought conditions. She explains that the technology they’ve created is different than conventional approaches which genetically modify plants, and as a result, the plants they alter will not be subject to lengthy and strict regulatory processes. In turn, this means that they will be easier to bring to market. The second focus of her lab involves chemically altering nanoparticles in a way that will make them responsive to dopamine, an important signaling molecule in the brain that is a target for antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs. Dr. Landry and her team have created probes that fluorescently image dopamine in healthy and diseased brains, and this has led to surprising findings about the way in which individual neurons respond to certain substances. Tune in for the full conversation and visit http://landrylab.com/ to learn more.

Working to Better Understand the Genetics of Endocrine Tumors—Dr. Lawrence Kirschner—Clinical Endocrinologist and Scientist

Feb 24, 2020 23:01

Description:

Dr. Lawrence Kirschner has over 20 years’ worth of experience as a physician-scientist and clinical endocrinologist, which has allowed him to see directly how research impacts patients on an individual level. On today’s podcast, he shares the details of his work. Tune in to learn the following: What types of adrenal tumors and diseases exist and how they manifest in patients Why an understanding of the genetics of endocrine tumors is important in order to understand how cancers develop and/or how tumors produce excess hormones Why it’s been difficult to conduct clinical trials involving adrenal cancers, and what’s been happening on a national scale in recent years to address this Dr. Kirschner’s sub-specialty is on diseases of the pituitary gland, with particular emphasis on the adrenal glands. Only about one in one million people will eventually develop malignant adrenal tumors, but it’s an aggressive and difficult-to-treat type of cancer. In part, the absence of a good treatment approach for adrenal cancer is due to the fact that it’s so rare, because this makes it difficult to conduct clinical trials. In recent years, however, a national collaborative effort to address this has been set in motion, which Dr. Kirschner sees as very promising for those who currently suffer from adrenal cancer or those who will in the future. He discusses the details of his research, which aims to develop a better understanding of the genetics of endocrine tumors in order to determine how these genes function, and what particularly allows them to cause cell proliferation and/or the excess production of hormones. He talks about the many types of tumors and disease that can affect the adrenals, and the ways in which they can wreak havoc on the body. He dives into the science behind what his research has already discovered and where it’s headed in the near future. Tune in for all the details. For general information about ongoing clinical trials, visit clinicaltrials.gov.

Evolutionary Partners: Dr. Ryan Explains How Symbiont Viruses Engage in Our Development

Feb 21, 2020 53:37

Description:

For close to 30 years, Dr. Frank Ryan has investigated theoretical evolutionary biology. In this conversation he discusses the genomic creativity of virus-host coevolution. Listeners will hear Dr. Ryan recount findings that prompted our current concepof symbiont viruses, including hantavirus –rodent research, how AIDs and the coronavirus  evolve alongside human survival rates and what that implies about immunity, and how animals have adapted some of the abilities of viruses down to how the placental membrane protects itself from the maternal immune system. Author Dr. Frank Ryan is Honorary Senior Lecturer of the Department of Medical Education at the University of Sheffield, UK, and an emeritus consulting physician with the affiliated Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. He's also a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of England and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Linnaean Society of London.  He recounts incidences of genomic creativity from his research into symbiont viruses and host coevolution. Early in his academic career, he studied bacteria phages in rabbits, and thus began a lifelong interest. He discusses relevant findings such as the mechanics of the coronavirus and its use of the host's ribosomes to replicate itself. As he discusses the behavior of symbiont viruses, he explains how a virus like AIDS uses a selective pressure on its hosts through survival rates. He explains that if there were no medical involvement, Aids would have changed the human genome to benefit itself.  Finally, he talks about such controversial issues as the consideration of viruses as living vs. nonliving and explains what the ocean would like without viruses to keep the bacterial population in check. For more information, see some of Dr. Ryan's books including Virolution and his most recent book, Virusphere.

Helminths Treatment and Resistance: Dr. Nielsen Talks Equine Parasites

Feb 21, 2020 41:37

Description:

Dr. Martin K. Nielsen works as an equine veterinarian researching parasites. He talks about his mission to control parasites in horses through helminths treatment. In this podcast, he explains anthelmintic resistance in horses and what it means regarding a horse's health; why a  parasite's life cycle still holds a great deal of mystery for scientists, but what they might think is significant; and  why pharmaceutical companies haven't released new anthelmintic products for years and why they need to.   Dr. Martin K. Nielsen is an associate professor with the Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. The center takes on key issues regarding horse biology, but he specializes on helminths treatment, which means he also researches anthelmintic resistance in horses. Dr. Nielsen affirms the ubiquitous nature of parasites in animals and also emphasizes that there's no such thing as eradication. Rather, he says, it's important to seek means of control and balance. When a healthy equilibrium is lost, the host animal suffers. Because today's veterinarian faces the challenge of anthelmintic resistance in horses, researchers are working on finding new means of controlling the parasite population. This podcast also offers Dr. Nielsen an opportunity to discuss some of the mysteries of parasites, such as their ability to release compounds that deescalate their host's inflammatory immune response. Parasites also exhibit a dormant state over their lifecycle and researchers are trying to understand if this is triggered by the parasite or the host, and in either case, what benefit it may offer the organism. He also describes some new detection technology his lab has created to identify parasite counts through a special app.  Dr. Nielsen is active in social media and encourages listeners to find him on Twitter (@MartinKNielsen) and at his YouTube channel (Martin K. Nielsen Equine Parasitology), where he takes on parasite myths among other topics. His lab page at the university also has more information: http://vetsci.ca.uky.edu/person/martin-nielsen-dvm-phd-dipl-acvm-dipl-evpc

The Fungi Factor – Nicholas P. Money, Professor, Western Program, Department of Biology, Miami University – Fungi and the Future of the Earth

Feb 20, 2020 26:55

Description:

Nicholas P. Money, professor and director, Western Program, Department of Biology, Miami University, Ohio, discusses mycology and microbes. Podcast Points: What important information can we learn by observing fungi? The important points about climate change How does overpopulation impact the environment? Money, an expert in mycology, is the prolific author of multiple books and articles that detail the microbial world. Money’s latest book titled, The Selfish Ape: Human Nature and Our Path to Extinction, has created a buzz in the scientific community. In the book, he set out to counter many of the dominant narratives that exist in regard to homo sapiens. Money talks about the damaging effects humans have upon the environment as well as our negative impact on various species. Money discusses carbon footprints, and he talks about his reasons for penning The Selfish Ape. Humans need to treat species more sensitively, and that’s the bottom line. Money outlines many of the actions that have taken place in our time, and historically, that have impacted the environment overall. He discusses population growth, and comments on how little we hear about it when leaders talk of climate change. Continuing, Money explains how fungi relate to our existence as humans. He discusses his career spanning more than 30 years, studying fungal reproduction. Money explains how fungi are different, and how they move, and he talks about the various qualities they have that typically do not exist in other places in the natural world. We can learn a lot about our own problems, as humans, by looking at, and studying, how fungi have solved theirs.

Nature, Nurture, and Genetics: Author Dr. Sullivan Explores Our Complicated Determinates

Feb 20, 2020 35:04

Description:

Dr. William J. Sullivan, featured on several media outlets including National Geographic and CNN, talks about his latest book Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces that Make Us Who We Are. In this interview, he explains his designation of the four major themes that operate as hidden forces in our biological makeup, why his "Meet Your Demons" chapter speaks to trends in our criminal system, and  why readers find more empathy for addiction sufferers after gaining a better understanding of genetics and epigenetics.  Dr. Sullivan is the Showalter Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Indiana University School of Medicine where he studies infectious diseases and genetics. His new book stems from research in his university lab that studies Toxoplasma gondii, which can affect the brains and behavior of several organisms. He began investigating how microbes we don't know about might affect our own brains and personalities in undiscovered ways. Over the course of the podcast, he describes the many ways that human personality and behavior is extraordinarily complicated. He explains some of the genetics and epigenetics that make our reactions to our environment more outside of our control than we’d like to believe. Our DNA, the effects of epigenetics, microbes that live inside and on us, and our evolutionarily-derived brain reactions all have different influences on our behavior, from how we vote to our eating habits to our ability to control impulses. In addition, his web site links to articles that take a deeper dive into some of the science he explores in his book. See more at https://authorbillsullivan.com/

New Discoveries about the Life Cycle of Toxoplasma Gondii—Laura Knoll, PhD—Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Feb 19, 2020 40:50

Description:

Professor Laura Knoll is a parasitologist who joins the podcast today to discuss some of her research on a type of parasite called toxoplasma gondii. She explains the following: Where toxoplasma gondii is found and why the sexual stage of its life cycle is only found in cats How humans can become infected with toxoplasma gondii, and why most people will never know they are affected and may never need toxoplasma gondii treatment How toxoplasma gondii has evolved mechanisms to manipulate the host, such as a rodent that loses its fear of predator urine and actually becomes attracted to it Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect every warm-blooded animal on the planet, including humans. This parasite has the fascinating ability to enter muscle tissue and neurons in the brain to enact behavioral changes in the host. For example, a rodent infected with toxoplasma gondii will be attracted to the scent of predator urine rather than fearful of it, thereby exposing themselves to predation and allowing the parasite to continue thriving in other hosts—such as the cat. Interestingly, the cat intestine is the only place where the sexual life cycle stage of toxoplasma gondii is found, which means the cat can shed infectious oocysts which can potentially put humans at risk of contracting toxoplasma gondii. However, Dr. Knoll explains that the vast majority of people who are chronically infected with this parasite have no idea, and suffer no negative consequences. She explains how it can become a problem in people who have compromised immune systems, and the mechanism of host-parasite interaction that can occur in non-human animals and pregnant women who have never before been exposed to the parasite. Until this past year, there was no way to research the sexual life cycle of toxoplasma gondii without using cats as research subjects, but thanks to Dr. Knoll and her team, the specific reason that the sexual stage only occurs in cats has been identified, which has enabled them to induce the sexual stage in mice. With a mouse model, the opportunities for research have increased significantly and paved the way for the potential development of vaccines that could be administered to cats and livestock that carry and can pass on infectious oocytes. For more, visit https://mmi.wisc.edu/staff/knoll-laura/.

The Vast Diversity of Parasite Cell Biology: Dr. Lilach Sheiner Talks Variety and Utility

Feb 19, 2020 24:22

Description:

Because the parasites that cause toxoplasmosis and malaria are somewhat similar and are accessible, they offer researchers important information. Dr. Sheinber explains her work by discussing  why the untapped variety of parasite cell biology might offer further understanding, how different types of mitochondria—human versus parasite—keep cells alive in very different ways and why that's important, and how parasites have maneuvers that could improve medicine, such as the toxoplasmosis  parasites' ability to cross the barrier between blood and brain.  Senior lecturer at the Royalty Society of Edenborough, research fellow in parasitology, and leading expert in eukaryotic cell biology, Dr. Lilack Sheiner runs a lab that closely studies the parasites responsible for toxoplasmosis and malaria. This close examination of parasite cell biology has revealed a better understanding of how they function and how we might better prevent disease caused by these parasites. Her incentives for this study is twofold: the diversity in parasite cell biology itself is an important part of understanding organisms in the larger picture of biology. Additionally, because parasites are responsible for some human diseases, a better understanding of parasite cell biology may lead to disease prevention. She describes numerous examples that reveal this diversity and explains how useful the knowledge is in turn. For example, because mitochondria have different mechanisms for different organisms, doctors can implement a drug that kills the malarial parasite by mitochondrial harm while leaving the human cell alive. Dr. Sheiner also talks about abilities parasites have that may help us create new drugs. For example, she describes scientists studying how the toxoplasmosis parasite is able to do something scientists haven't been able to implement in drugs: crossing the blood/brain barrier. If scientists could create drugs that can do this, they might make headway into treating many neurological conditions. Therefore, if researchers learn more about this parasite's ability, they may discover a drug-delivery technology. For more, see her website: http://lilachsheiner.wixsite.com/sheinerlab-wtcmp She's also on twitter: @SheinerLab

Discussing Disease – Dr. Daniel Griffin, Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University – Studying and Treating Infectious Diseases

Feb 18, 2020 30:10

Description:

Dr. Daniel Griffin, physician, and associate research scientist/instructor (clinical medicine) Columbia University, provides an overview of infectious disease research and treatment, and his career in clinical medicine. Podcast Points: Treatment and research for infectious diseases An overview of parasitic diseases found in the United States and around the world The current state of the HIV epidemic   Dr. Griffin discusses his important work and research in infectious diseases, including HIV, tropical medicine, and especially parasitic diseases. Dr. Griffin has a long history in the field of medical and clinical research and he has a particular interest in HIV, stem cells, and malignancies. As a medical doctor he provides care for patients with infectious diseases, in addition to his role as an educator, teaching medical students, residents and fellows in NYC. Dr. Griffin discusses New York City as the center of the developing world, and as he explains, people come in from all over the world, for tourism, but also for treatment and ongoing medical care. The research doctor talks about his experiences and cites examples of patients he sees regularly through the year, who come to NYC for their healthcare treatment. Dr. Griffin discusses tropical diseases, and he speaks about the many cases of malaria, Zika, and more, and the ill patients that find their way to his office seeking treatment. Dr. Griffin talks about public health issues, how they are handled, detailing specific diseases such as TB and others. He discusses the types of therapies that are effective and how some nations handle disease management better than others seemingly. The research physician continues his discussion, providing information about the impact of HIV in the United States versus abroad. And he explains how many parasitic diseases exist right here in the United States, and how they can be recognized and subsequently treated.

Dr. Richard J. Johnson Talks about the Role of Fructose in Obesity and Diabetes

Feb 18, 2020 36:59

Description:

Researcher and author Dr. Richard J. Johnson has looked into the role fructose plays in many modern disease epidemics. He discusses this by describing.  what fructose can do to help some animals survive harsh conditions, how those assets turn into dangers in our modern world of plenty, and what alternatives we might use to ease the cravings and replace fructose in our daily diet.   Dr. Richard J. Johnson is a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado. He researches how fructose causes diseases like hypertension, kidney disease, and obesity and diabetes. He's written two books about this epidemic—The Fat Switch and The Sugar Fix—and has written numerous papers on fructose as well.  Dr. Johnson discusses the role fructose plays in the excessive obesity and diabetes rates in our society. He talks about how hard to avoid, from an ingredient in table sugar to the ubiquitous high fructose corn syrup, an easy addition for manufactures looking for something cheap and appealing to put in processed foods. He also explains why it is so dangerous by first explaining it evolutionary role. Dr. Johnson discusses how it can be helpful to animal systems in dire survival mode. He uses an analogy to explain its function, commenting that it's akin to an alarm system for our body: it sends a signal to our system that we're in trouble .In order to protect ourselves, we become insulin resistant to guard our brain and increase inflammation to protect our physiology. Of course these measures completely undermine our health in times of plenty and increase risks for obesity and diabetes. He finishes the discussion with suggestions for ways to ween ourselves, from more effective ways to eat fruits to what alternatives to fructose are best.  For more, find his papers in pub med, his books and, see his lab web site at https://physiology.case.edu/person/richard-j-johnson/

Understanding Biological Soil Crust and the Problem of Algal Blooms—Aaron Kaplan—The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Science

Feb 18, 2020 38:43

Description:

Professor Aaron Kaplan studies ecological processes in photosynthetic organisms, and is looking particularly close at green algae—the fastest growing photosynthetic organism on the planet. On today’s podcast, he talks about the “crust” that this cyanobacteria helps form, called biological soil crust. He explains a number of interesting topics, including the following: How biological soil crust is formed, why it varies in thickness, and what it’s composed of Why it is so important to understand cyanobacteria in order to eliminate toxic algal blooms that are destroying ecological systems What mechanisms organisms acquire in order to grow in the harshest environments on Earth What is meant by saying that organisms use “languages”   Professor Kaplan discusses a range of compelling, technical details about some of the most unique habitats on Earth characterized by biological soil crust, which is a complex system comprised of many organisms which thrive off the metabolites produced by cyanobacteria or green algae. He talks about the effects of algal blooms on ecological systems—particularly lakes in parts of China, why he aims to better understand the biological role of toxic secondary metabolites, oxidative stress and signaling between different organisms, and how one toxin can actually bind to and protect proteins from oxidative stress. Professor Kaplan expounds on the technical aspects of the science behind his work, and emphasizes the importance and relevance of it to the health of both humans and the environment.

It’s a 3D World – Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry – Innovations in Manufacturing Processes for Increased Efficiency and Quality

Feb 18, 2020 35:48

Description:

Greg Paulsen, the Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry (xometry.com), discusses on-demand manufacturing services, materials, trends, and 3D printing processes. Podcast Points: How is 3D printing changing the way we manufacture products? Current trends in manufacturing Can 3D printing utilize all kinds of materials, or just plastics and metals?   As the leader of the Applications Engineering team, Paulsen handles special projects pertaining to material selection, design-for-manufacturing, and technical engineering resources as well. The team at Xometry is heavily involved in pushing technology, communication, and integration, and helping clients to improve their manufacturing supply line.  Paulsen provides an overview of Xometry, and how they help to make manufacturing easier. Xometry has been innovating in the space for years, and has assisted the established manufacturing industry through the introduction of AI (artificial intelligence) and machine learning, just to name a few of the areas they excel in. Paulsen talks about 3D printing technologies in detail. From metals to plastics to composites, the world of 3D printing is expanding and has evolved many times since its introduction in the mid 80s. He discusses the goals of Xometry and their approach to additive technologies, and the maturity of the tech innovations.  Paulsen explains molds used in traditional manufacturing versus what new technologies such as 3D printing can do to eliminate a lot of set up work and costs. It’s an accessible technology that can be distributed to localized manufacturing sources, which improves efficiency. Continuing, Paulsen discusses materials in detail, and the processes and post-processes in parts and products manufacturing. He talks about resin-based printers and the finishes that they can deliver versus how robust they are in terms of structure and engineering.  The manufacturing efficiency expert continues his discussion by discussing software options in the 3D printing and manufacturing arena, the evolution of the industry, and what’s on the horizon.

Solutions from Space—Arnaud Runge—European Space Agency ARTES Program

Feb 18, 2020 25:58

Description:

The European Space Agency (ESA) ARTES Program is an optional program for members of ESA that supports a number of projects, products, and applications. Instrumentation Engineer, Arnaud Runge, discusses an ESA business application program line called Business Space Solutions. Tune in to learn the following: What type of devices and products have been created by ARTES-supported companies and how they’ve provided a significant benefit to the wider community  In what ways an ARTES-supported laboratory helped to clear an Ebola outbreak in an African village The threat of ice crystals for pilots and air flight, and how predictive satellite data and monitoring can help   The Business Space Solutions program line at the ESA is focused on how to go about using all things space-related, such as communications via satellite, positional data, and various technologies to create new products and services for the enhancement of existing services or to meet new needs from different user communities. The types of projects supported by ARTES fall into many categories, including health, telemedicine, insurance, tourism, and precision farming that will help farmers better utilize resources such as water and fertilizer. Runge discusses a few specific examples of the products they’ve supported, which include a product capable of measuring parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, and temperature that can be placed in aircrafts and connected to medical doctors on the ground. This would eliminate the need for countless and costly flight diversions. He also talks about a laboratory that specializes in taking biological measurements in the context of epidemics like the recent Ebola outbreak. The technology works by utilizing satellite-based communication methods to connect various specialists with experts on the ground, and by facilitating the development of healthcare and treatment for the patients met. This method of communication would prove invaluable in the event that a natural disaster rendered conventional forms of communication impossible. Learn more about the work being done by visiting https://artes.esa.int/.

Investing in the Mind-Training Field: Bridge Builders’ Charlie Hartwell Discusses Trends

Feb 18, 2020 23:06

Description:

Bridge Builders supports companies that work towards accessible mind-training technology through investments. He explains some of these steps from idea to implementation by discussing: How Bridge Builders is a collaborative group rather than a fund and why that makes a difference for investments. Some of the most popular apps they've supported like Headspace to some newer ones with great potential like Insight Timer.  Future projects that fit several needs such as mental health support applications.   Operating Partner of Bridge Builders, Charlie Hartwell describes the more fluid style of the collaborative investment model. He touches on the 12 companies his group supports and then goes into more detail about some of the applications they've helped bring about, further explaining their steps from idea to implementation. He describes in particular one app that's growing in popularity called Insight Timer. It offers mindfulness inspiration, meditations, and music from over 5,000 teachers around the world. Additional projects include an app that helps with addiction, the Muse headband, and Fabriq, an app that helps organize and enable better intentionality with relationship building, both social and professional. Mr. Hartwell also addresses projects that need more attention and may come under their purview such as research into psychedelic drug potential to treat various struggles such as PTSD. He mentions as well the rise in alternatives to nonwestern medical practitioners—and would like to see the development of that field become more mainstream.  For more see https://bbcollaborative.com/. He also posts frequently to LinkedIn and publishes Medium articles.

Environmentalist Rick Smith Talks about Indoor Pollutants We All Encounter

Feb 18, 2020 24:35

Description:

From shampoo to carpeting to baby bottles, chemicals are prevalent in our everyday items. Author Rick Smith discusses accompanying concerns such as: The depth of this issue, calling it the second great pollution problem facing humanity. Why the health effects of pollution from such chemicals are prevalent and should be taken seriously. Alternatives for many everyday products that are available. Co-author of Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things and director of Canada's Broadbent Institute, environmentalist Rick Smith describes the research he and co-author Bruce Lourie underwent to see common results of living in close quarters with chemicals. The prevalence of chemicals such as BPA in eating containers raised alarms and he wondered about the health effects of pollution on our bodies from such chemicals. He tells how he and his co-author experimented on themselves over 10 years with their own blood and urine samples. They would establish a baseline first, and then, for example, cook with plastic and retest themselves to see if there was an increase in chemical levels. In most cases, the answer was yes.  Mr. Smith details various other household products to be aware of, from shampoo to cosmetics to paint. He explains the danger and prevalence of phthalates and discusses how it can work as a hormonal disruptor in our body. Finally, he offers good news about the results of consumer pressure and tells the listener about safe alternatives for many of these products.

Intelligently Building Community in the AI and Data Science Space—Dr. Alex Liu—RMDS Lab

Feb 18, 2020 16:41

Description:

Former IBM Chief Scientist, Dr. Alex Liu, discusses the services provided by RMDS Lab, a community-based ecosystem provider in the artificial intelligence (AI) and big data sector. You will learn: Why AI and data-related projects rarely succeed when handled only by a few data scientists and/or one method or approach How the RMDS platform works and what benefits it provides to data scientists and businesses alike Common misconceptions regarding data sets, data analysis, and the usefulness of data, and how RMDS Lab can help For the past 10 years or so, RMDS Lab has been building a data science and AI community using an ecosystem approach, guided by the belief that little can be accomplished in the field of big data and AI without utilizing multiple approaches, multiple methods, considering many algorithms, and combining the minds of more than just a handful of data scientists. Ultimately, the goal is to make data science-driven projects more adaptable and accessible and thereby increase the benefit they can serve to individuals, communities, organizations, and companies. RMDS Lab invites clients and partners to enter the RMDS platform where they can build profiles and explore projects in the field while counting on an RMDS AI algorithm that will select the right data sets, algorithms, coworkers, and data scientists for a particular project-related goal. In essence, the platform intelligently scans all available tools and resources and selects the ones best suited to a particular problem in the AI and data science field. According to Dr. Liu, this ecosystem-based approach is absolutely necessary when dealing with so many possible approaches, and such massive amounts of data—much of which is dirty or fake. In light of this reality, the RMDS platform also provides tools for cleaning and organizing data. Tune in for the full conversation and check out grmds.org/ to learn more or sign on to the platform.

On the Study of Parasitic Diversity and Life Cycles—Stephen Greiman, PhD—Department of Biology at Georgia Southern University

Feb 17, 2020 30:56

Description:

Stephen Greiman, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Georgia Southern University where he studies diverse groups of parasitic organisms. He discusses the following: How a pork or beef tapeworm could find its way into the brain, spinal cord, organ, or a body cavity of a human being What the difference is between the parasite’s role in an intermediate host and a final or definitive host What types of treatments are available to humans who have been invaded by a parasite Dr. Greiman focuses on the study of tapeworms and flukes, which have complex life cycles and use at least one intermediate host before reaching the final or definitive host. He explains the difference between parasitic function in intermediate versus definitive hosts and the pathologies that can be caused by parasites in both types of hosts. He gives an example of how parasites change the behavior of intermediate hosts as a way of making them more susceptible to predation, such as parasitic flukes which cause a snail’s tentacles to pulsate and change colors, making them look more like maggots. In other cases, a fluke may cause a snail to crawl on vegetation and thereby become more visible by predators. Dr. Greiman also talks about how the consumption of undercooked beef or pork can cause a human to become an incidental intermediate host for tapeworm larvae which can cause all kinds of diseases and pathologies, such as seizures. Currently, there is a lot of interest in host-microbiome and parasite microbiome interactions, and this research is being aided by genomic sequencing and transcriptomics. For more information about Dr. Greiman’s research, visit http://www.stephengreiman.com/.

Extracellular Vesicles Might Cause Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Dr. Soekmadji’s Explains Her Research

Feb 17, 2020 19:49

Description:

Dr. Carolina Soekmadji studies different types of extracellular vesicles, specifically trying to understand their connection to prostate cancer. In this discussion, she describes how different types of extracellular vesicles seem to react differently to the same substance, why the CD9 vesicle- driven proliferation under different androgen conditions is important, and what this means in how doctors can individualize prostate cancer treatment. Dr. Carolina Soekmadji works as a senior research officer at QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane. She is currently an Adjunct Board Member for the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV). She discusses the typical therapy for prostate cancer where doctors decrease the androgen presence, also called ADT. While this usually has the desired effect, there's always a group of patients that don't seem to show an effective response. While cancer cells initially die in this group, the cancer cells return and start growing again. Dr. Soekmadji has located a specific vesicle that appears to grow under both conditions: androgen presence or absence. She thinks that this vesicle may make the difference between these two populations and their response. Dr. Soekmadji covers the general causes of prostate cancer as well. She continues to study the activity of extracellular vesicles, and how and why this particular vesicle responds as it does and why this happens in some patients but not others. Dr. Carolina Soekmadji offers a general course on extracellular vesicles and health issues through Coursera and the University of California that's open to the general public. For more about her work and contact information, see https://www.qimrberghofer.edu.au/people/dr-carolina-soekmadji/

The Mission of Microbes – Eugene B. Chang, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago – The Microbiome, What We Know Thus Far

Feb 17, 2020 44:05

Description:

In this podcast, Eugene B. Chang, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, discusses his team’s research studying the microbiome and microbes. Podcast Points: How does the microbiome impact health? What is the mission of microbes? How do probiotics work, and are they effective? Chang’s lab is interested in the important connection between intestinal microbiota and their human host, and what happens when there is conflict. Chang was an important voice in the Human Microbiome Project, a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) research initiative created to increase understanding of the microbial flora that play a pivotal role in human health and disease progression. Chang discusses the uniqueness of a person’s microbiome. But he states that we all actually share some types of microbes. Chang explains core microbiomes, and their important functions. He provides examples of how the microbiome works, and the role of microbes. Continuing, Chang discusses stability issues regarding the microbiome and their need for resiliency. He talks about the many factors that are involved, outlining and detailing how select microbial communities function, in regard to networks and stability. And he explains that the interplay between dietary and environmental issues can certainly affect the stability of the microbiome. He talks about diversity within the microbiome, and how it may not be as important as many have proposed. Chang talks about immune disorders and he provides an overview of what microbial communities can do to maintain stability. He continues, discussing probiotics, and why they may not stay around as long as we’d like because nonresident microbes often have trouble breaking into very established microbial communities.

Extracellular Vesicles Vantage Point – Andreas Baur, Fairmont State University, College of Science & Technology – The Role of Extracellular Vesicles

Feb 14, 2020 24:35

Description:

Andreas Baur, of the College of Science & Technology at Fairmont State University, talks in detail about his interesting research studying extracellular vesicles (EVs). Podcast Points: What is the role of extracellular vesicles in the progression of neurodegenerative disease and cancer? What is protease? Looking at enzymatic activity. What can be learned? Dr. Baur earned his doctorate in organic chemistry from the University of Regensburg before settling into his current duties, and lab work, at Fairmont State. Dr. Baur talks about his research, past, and present. Some of his current work in the lab focuses on the systematic analyzation of vesicles in patients (in plasma). And as a medical doctor, Baur has the kind of access to patients that is necessary for this work. Dr. Baur discusses his past work studying HIV and proteins, considering in vitro studies and the pivotal role of vesicles. He discusses his curiosity, and the questions about why certain proteases were found within, why are certain vesicles in plasma, and why are there even more in HIV, that drove him to dig deeper into his research to find the answers. The research investigator and medical doctor talks about various types of cancers, discussing relapse factors, select patterns, and the continuing role of vesicles. Dr. Baur explains how they use purified vesicles for two types of important diagnostic tests—measuring enzymatic activity as well as looking at proteases, and also in the analysis of factors found in these vesicles. Wrapping up, Dr. Baur discusses coronavirus, transmission, and disease conditions. He talks in-depth about neurodegenerative diseases, other types of diseases, and the various connections, pertaining to vesicles.

Extracellular Explorations—David Greening—Molecular Proteomics at the Baker Institute

Feb 14, 2020 30:47

Description:

As Head of Molecular Proteomics at the Baker Institute and Senior Research Fellow at La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, David Greening brings a significant amount of insight to the podcast today, discussing the following: How proteomics can lead to a better understanding of the role of proteins in disease and health statuses, key regulators in biology, and what components might be found in extracellular vesicles (EVs) Whether EVs appear to be active or passive, and whether there might be some level of EV agency involved The promising field of imaging using fluorescently tagged proteins, vesicles, and RNA Greening’s molecular proteomics group focuses mainly on two areas: the study of extracellular vesicles, the components they contain, and the role they serve in cell communication and signaling, and proteomics, which is a field of study that looks at thousands of proteins in the body at a particular time, seeks to identify where they are located, and how they are expressed in states of health and disease. Greening expounds on the many ways in which proteomics can advance our understanding of key regulators in biological processes, diseases such as cancer, what types of proteins are packaged in different EVs released by different cell types, and which components are secreted all at once from particular cells. He also discusses one of the main challenges in the field of proteomics, which is how to identify and analyze low expressed vesicle components. When it comes to EVs and proteomics, Greenings is a wealth of knowledge. Tune in for all the details. For more, visit https://www.baker.edu.au/research/laboratories/molecular-proteomics.

Epigenetic Inheritance in Humans: Studies with Nematodes

Feb 14, 2020 20:37

Description:

Dr. Rechavi's lab studies C elegans nematodes to explore the heritability of memories-- how reactions to encounter could be passed down through multiple generations. In this podcast, you'll hear him explain: New revelations about heritable capabilities for response behaviors. Why researchers believe a small RNA molecule is the foundation for this heritable behavior and how they've tested heritability of responses to starvation, temperature stress, bacteria pathogenic stress, and more. Where this small RNA message must travels to make it into the gametes' coding and how they've traced the inheritance of such traits for three to five generations. University of Tel Aviv professor Oded Rechavi details his research with C elegans worms to discover more regarding epigenetic inheritance in humans. He clarifies that generally we think of memories as encodings that stay in our brain rather than being passed along. It had been thought that parental responses to some environmental stresses such as starvation wouldn't mark their offspring's reaction. But studies show this notion was incorrect and these responses do travel and make their mark in the germline, being passed down for at least three more generations. He discusses why they believe small RNAs are responsible for this heritable process. He also explains generally the different types of small RNAs and how this involves a particular type with this specialized behavior. What they don't understand but are attempting to further research is the process by which the environment changes the small RNAs. These studies may change the way we understand epigenetic inheritance in humans. For more, including links to papers they've written, see his lab's web site at http://www.odedrechavilab.com/#about .

Improving Coping Mechanisms, Treating All Forms of Addiction—Cali Estes, PhD—Addictions and Recovery Professional

Feb 13, 2020 24:17

Description:

For 23 years, Cali Estes, Ph.D. has been working with all types of people struggling from all kinds of addictions—from heroin or cocaine or alcohol to food or shopping or pornography. She discusses the following: What type of signs to look for in yourself or others in order to determine whether there is likely a problem with addiction What is meant when someone is said to have an “addictive personality” Why traditional methods of treatment and recovery often fail or don’t work for people Dr. Estes works with a wide range of individuals, from the ordinary person to the NFL athlete to some of the most popular celebrities, all of whom struggle in one way or another with some type of addiction. It is her belief that addiction cannot be resolved simply by getting a person to remove the addictive substance or behavior from their life, but by digging deeply until the root cause of addictive behaviors is uncovered; only then can an addiction truly be addressed. She discusses why many conventional approaches to recovery don’t work for a lot of people, and what’s wrong about the fundamental assumptions such programs rely upon. Dr. Estes’ approach is a combination of several methods, including talk therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, life coaching, addiction coaching, motivational interviewing, and techniques that address brain damage from years’ worth of substance use. She discusses how she helps people with her Sober On-Demand program, and proprietary uses of a machine which repairs damaged receptors in the brain. Dr. Estes truly takes a holistic approach to each and every client, addressing their personal and unique needs and goals. In her opinion, the goal isn’t just to be sober or free from addiction: the goal is to be happy while sober, and happy while free from addiction. For more information, visit https://caliestes.com/ and https://theaddictionscoach.com/.

EV Conversations – Dr. Mehdi Soleymani-Goloujeh of the Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR in Tehran, Iran – Learning About Extracellular Vesicles and Their Important Roles in the Body

Feb 13, 2020 24:30

Description:

In this podcast, Dr. Mehdi Soleymani-Goloujeh, Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology at Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, in Iran, discusses regenerative medicine, types of extracellular vesicles and the current state of extracellular vesicles research. Podcast Points: What are exosomes? What are the most important roles of extracellular vesicles within the body? An overview of insulin-producing cells Dr. Soleymani-Goloujeh discusses exosomes. Exosomes are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles (EVs), produced in the endosomal compartment of nearly all eukaryotic cells. EVs, unlike cells, cannot replicate. Dr. Soleymani-Goloujeh talks about the roles that extracellular vesicles can play in the body, and he expounds upon issues regarding insulin and discusses how the pancreas utilizes EVs. Dr. Soleymani-Goloujeh’s work covers multiple areas. His work has included research in the area of diabetes, cell-penetrating peptides, extracellular vesicles, and stem cells, cell therapy, nanotechnology, and tissue engineering. Dr. Soleymani-Goloujeh provides an overview of the process of insulin delivery and the delivery of drugs throughout the body. He continues by discussing EV engineering and the various factors that are involved to facilitate efficient delivery. Dr. Soleymani-Goloujeh talks in detail about multiple technologies that pertain to type 1 diabetes, discussing the important roles of exosomes, as well as signaling, and the power of nature.

Investing in the Mind-Training Field: Bridge Builders' Charlie Hartwell Discusses Trends

Feb 13, 2020 23:05

Description:

Bridge Builders supports companies that work towards accessible mind-training technology through investments. He explains some of these steps from idea to implementation by discussing:

How Bridge Builders is a collaborative group rather than a fund and why that makes a difference for investments.Some of the most popular apps they've supported like Headspace to some newer ones with great potential like Insight Timer. Future projects that fit several needs such as mental health support applications.

 

Operating Partner of Bridge Builders, Charlie Hartwell describes the more fluid style of the collaborative investment model. He touches on the 12 companies his group supports and then goes into more detail about some of the applications they've helped bring about, further explaining their steps from idea to implementation.

He describes in particular one app that's growing in popularity called Insight Timer. It offers mindfulness inspiration, meditations, and music from over 5,000 teachers around the world. Additional projects include an app that helps with addiction, the Muse headband, and Fabriq, an app that helps organize and enable better intentionality with relationship building, both social and professional.

Mr. Hartwell also addresses projects that need more attention and may come under their purview such as research into psychedelic drug potential to treat various struggles such as PTSD. He mentions as well the rise in alternatives to nonwestern medical practitioners—and would like to see the development of that field become more mainstream. 

For more see https://bbcollaborative.com/. He also posts frequently to LinkedIn and publishes Medium articles. 

Healthy Living Without Compromising Christian Values—Dr. Eric

Feb 12, 2020 27:59

Description:

From a business perspective, the Christian market is one of the most underserved markets in the natural health space. Eric Zielinski (commonly called Dr. Z) is a doctor of chiropractic, public health researcher, best-selling author, and producer of the Hope for Breast Cancer documentary, and he joins the podcast to discuss a number of interesting topics, such as the following: How and why essential oils, energy healing practices, yoga, CBD, chiropractic therapy, aromatherapy treatment, and even massage therapy can cause concern for many Christians How the lack of emphasis on physical health among Christians is leading to sickness and impeding the ability to fulfill people’s missions for God What Dr. Z sees as a double standard regarding religiously-driven avoidance and acceptance of certain substances Biblical health is about healthy living without violating Christian beliefs, and if you ask Dr. Z, he’ll tell you it’s being severely overlooked and undervalued by many Christians. He argues that this is in large part due to the many concerns and lack of awareness surrounding certain practices and substances becoming increasingly popular in the natural health sector, such as aromatherapy, CBD, essential oils, yoga, and energy healing. One of the biggest problems he sees in this regard is a detrimental double standard: “This is the double standard: I don’t see a lot of folks…Mormons, or Jews or Christians or Muslims concerned about opioids or concerned about chemotherapy or highly addictive, potentially damage-causing pharmaceutical drugs, so I’m trying to put things into perspective for people. Why are you so concerned about a plant…an essential oil, when you’re going to take a pharmaceutical without a second thought?” he says. He goes on to explain that the key is in educating people and raising awareness about a variety of practices and substances used in health and wellness, and modern medicine. Press play for more.

Solutions from Space—Arnaud Runge—European Space Agency

Feb 12, 2020 25:58

Description:

The European Space Agency (ESA) ARTES Program is an optional program for members of ESA that supports a number of projects, products, and applications. Instrumentation Engineer, Arnaud Runge, discusses an ESA business application program line called Business Space Solutions.

Tune in to learn the following:

What type of devices and products have been created by ARTES-supported companies and how they’ve provided a significant benefit to the wider community In what ways an ARTES-supported laboratory helped to clear an Ebola outbreak in an African villageThe threat of ice crystals for pilots and air flight, and how predictive satellite data and monitoring can help

 

The Business Space Solutions program line at the ESA is focused on how to go about using all things space-related, such as communications via satellite, positional data, and various technologies to create new products and services for the enhancement of existing services or to meet new needs from different user communities.

The types of projects supported by ARTES fall into many categories, including health, telemedicine, insurance, tourism, and precision farming that will help farmers better utilize resources such as water and fertilizer.

Runge discusses a few specific examples of the products they’ve supported, which include a product capable of measuring parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, and temperature that can be placed in aircrafts and connected to medical doctors on the ground.

This would eliminate the need for countless and costly flight diversions. He also talks about a laboratory that specializes in taking biological measurements in the context of epidemics like the recent Ebola outbreak. The technology works by utilizing satellite-based communication methods to connect various specialists with experts on the ground, and by facilitating the development of healthcare and treatment for the patients met.

This method of communication would prove invaluable in the event that a natural disaster rendered conventional forms of communication impossible.

Learn more about the work being done by visiting https://artes.esa.int/.

It’s a 3D World – Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry – Innovations in Manufacturing Processes for Increased Efficiency and Quality

Feb 12, 2020 35:47

Description:

Greg Paulsen, the Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry (xometry.com), discusses on-demand manufacturing services, materials, trends, and 3D printing processes.

Podcast Points:

How is 3D printing changing the way we manufacture products?Current trends in manufacturingCan 3D printing utilize all kinds of materials, or just plastics and metals?

 

As the leader of the Applications Engineering team, Paulsen handles special projects pertaining to material selection, design-for-manufacturing, and technical engineering resources as well.

The team at Xometry is heavily involved in pushing technology, communication, and integration, and helping clients to improve their manufacturing supply line. 

Paulsen provides an overview of Xometry, and how they help to make manufacturing easier. Xometry has been innovating in the space for years, and has assisted the established manufacturing industry through the introduction of AI (artificial intelligence) and machine learning, just to name a few of the areas they excel in.

Paulsen talks about 3D printing technologies in detail. From metals to plastics to composites, the world of 3D printing is expanding and has evolved many times since its introduction in the mid 80s. He discusses the goals of Xometry and their approach to additive technologies, and the maturity of the tech innovations. 

Paulsen explains molds used in traditional manufacturing versus what new technologies such as 3D printing can do to eliminate a lot of set up work and costs. It’s an accessible technology that can be distributed to localized manufacturing sources, which improves efficiency.

Continuing, Paulsen discusses materials in detail, and the processes and post-processes in parts and products manufacturing. He talks about resin-based printers and the finishes that they can deliver versus how robust they are in terms of structure and engineering. 

The manufacturing efficiency expert continues his discussion by discussing software options in the 3D printing and manufacturing arena, the evolution of the industry, and what’s on the horizon.

Microbes & More – Alejandro Reyes, Associate Professor, Microbiologist and MSc in Biological Sciences, the University of the Andes – What’s in the Gut?

Feb 10, 2020 38:02

Description:

Alejandro Reyes, Associate Professor, Microbiologist and MSc in Biological Sciences, the University of the Andes, discusses microbes and the importance of gut health. Podcast Points: How do viruses affect the gut? What is a phage? How does the microbiome impact our health? Reyes holds a Ph.D. in Computational and Systems Biology at Washington University in San Luis, MO, United States. Reyes discusses his background and work, and his more than ten years of research studying the microbiome. Reyes’s work is focused on Applied Computational Biology, in the development of many tools that can be used for the analysis of data that is derived from current technologies of optical studies, such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, etc. for the characterization and classification of microbial communities and their interactions with the environment. He is interested in applications that can be applied to human health outcomes. He discusses viruses and the microbiome in detail, touching on the many viruses that may not make you sick, but stay with you nonetheless, over time. The microbiologist discusses what he specifically studies, regarding the microbiome, detailing information on phages. Bacteriophages, commonly referred to as simply, phages, are the most plentiful organisms within the biosphere. They are an ever-present feature of prokaryotic existence. A bacteriophage, specifically speaking, is a virus that infects a bacterium. Viruses, as we know often infect bacteria, are perhaps the most diverse components of the biosphere, genetically speaking. And the characterizing of phage diversity within the human gut is creating a buzz in the science community in regard to how we view ourselves as supra-organisms. Reyes discusses phage therapy in detail, and he talks about how phages are triggered, providing information on bacteria and how they sacrifice themselves. Reyes continues his discussion by providing information on his thoughts regarding cell attachment. Additionally, he discusses phage population, and some other studies they conducted, and he states there is so much that they still must learn about viruses, genes, and phages.

Understanding Animal Foraging Habits Dr. Carolyn Kurle Discusses Tropic Interactions Ecology

Feb 10, 2020 29:39

Description:

Dr. Carolyn Kurle describes how a biogeochemical tool can explain the foraging patterns and locations of animals to improve ecosystem management strategies. She explains: How stable isotope analysis looks at ratios of stable nitrogen and carbon isotopes in animal tissues to understand where that animal is foraging. Why this knowledge can be passed to wildlife managers to increase animal conservation success. Why understanding animal foraging is even more important now because of the effects of climate change. Associate professor in the ecology and behavior and evolution sections at UC San Diego, Dr. Carolyn Kurle works with animal foraging data to improve wildlife management efforts. In this conversation, she explains in particular how stable isotope analysis presents ratios of light to heavy nitrogen and carbon isotopes that tell researchers where an animal has eaten and what they have eaten. She elucidates this complex system by first explaining trophic interactions ecology—a level system from producers up to herbivores, than omnivores, and finally to top predator carnivores. The heavier isotope accumulates at each level and the resulting ratio of heavy to light gives specific-enough information to make foraging inferences. Wildlife managers can create ecosystem management strategies by using this data to understand, for example, how essential the white bark pine needle tree is to grizzly bears. Therefore as this tree is facing disease and pest infestation with reduced numbers, managers know to plan for more effective and specific grizzly bear management. Dr. Kurtle discusses many other examples, including those that show how troubling biomagnification issues for California Condors might be better managed by understanding which populations depend on marine life with high toxic levels. For more, see her website at http://biology.ucsd.edu/research/faculty/ckurle

Microbes & More – Alejandro Reyes, Associate Professor, Microbiologist and MSc in Biological Sciences, the University of the Andes – What’s in the Gut?

Feb 10, 2020 38:01

Description:

Alejandro Reyes, Associate Professor, Microbiologist and MSc in Biological Sciences, the University of the Andes, discusses microbes and the importance of gut health.

Podcast Points:

How do viruses affect the gut?What is a phage?How does the microbiome impact our health?

 

Reyes holds a PhD in Computational and Systems Biology at Washington University in San Luis, MO, United States. Reyes discusses his background and work, and his more than ten years of research studying the microbiome.

Reyes’s work is focused on Applied Computational Biology, in the development of many tools that can be used for the analysis of data that is derived from current technologies of optical studies, such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, etc. for the characterization and classification of microbial communities and their interactions with the environment.

He is interested in applications that can be applied to human health outcomes. He discusses viruses and the microbiome in detail, touching on the many viruses that may not make you sick, but stay with you nonetheless, over time. 

The microbiologist discusses what he specifically studies, regarding the microbiome, detailing information on phages. Bacteriophages, commonly referred to as simply, phages, are the most plentiful organisms within the biosphere. They are an ever-present feature of prokaryotic existence. A bacteriophage, specifically speaking, is a virus that infects a bacterium.

Viruses, as we know often infect bacteria, are perhaps the most diverse components of the biosphere, genetically speaking. And the characterizing of phage diversity within the human gut is creating a buzz in the science community in regard to how we view ourselves as supra-organisms. Reyes discusses phage therapy in detail, and he talks about how phages are triggered, providing information on bacteria and how they sacrifice themselves. 

Reyes continues his discussion by providing information on his thoughts regarding cell attachment. Additionally, he discusses phage population, and some other studies they conducted, and he states there is so much that they still must learn about viruses, genes, and phages. 

Understanding Animal Foraging Habits Dr. Carolyn Kurle Discusses Tropic Interactions Ecology

Feb 10, 2020 29:39

Description:

Dr. Carolyn Kurle describes how a biogeochemical tool can explain the foraging patters and locations of animals to improve ecosystem management strategies.

She explains:

How stable isotope analysis looks at ratios of stable nitrogen and carbon isotopes in animal tissues to understand where that animal is foraging.Why this knowledge can be passed to wildlife managers to increase animal conservation success.Why understanding animal foraging is even more important now because of the effects of climate change.

 

Associate professor in the ecology and behavior and evolution sections at UC San Diego, Dr. Carolyn Kurle works with animal foraging data to improve wildlife management efforts. In this conversation she explains in particular how stable isotope analysis presents ratios of light to heavy nitrogen and carbon isotopes that tell researchers where an animal has eaten and what they have eaten.

She elucidates this complex system by first explaining trophic interactions ecology—a level system from producers up to herbivores, then omnivores, and finally to top predator carnivores. The heavier isotope accumulates at each level and the resulting ratio of heavy to light gives specific-enough information to make foraging inferences.

Wildlife managers can create ecosystem management strategies by using this data to understand, for example, how essential the white bark pine needle tree is to grizzly bears. Therefore as this tree is facing disease and pest infestation with reduced numbers, managers know to plan for more effective and specific grizzly bear management.

Dr. Kurtle discusses many other examples, including those that show how troubling biomagnification issues for California Condors might be better managed by understanding which populations depend on marine life with high toxic levels.

For more, see her website at http://biology.ucsd.edu/research/faculty/ckurle

Morphogenetic Fields – Rupert Sheldrake, PhD, Biologist & Author – Plant and Animal Development, Morphic Resonance, and Form Development

Feb 10, 2020 44:12

Description:

Rupert Sheldrake, PhD, biologist, and author, known for his hypothesis of morphic resonance, discusses morphogenetic fields, morphic resonance, evolutionary biology, and much more.

Podcast Points:

What is morphic resonance?Does the brain store memory?A discussion on developing structures and collective memory 

 

During his tenure at Cambridge University, Dr. Sheldrake worked in developmental biology as a Fellow of Clare College. Dr. Sheldrake discusses his background and his lifelong love of biology, starting out as a young boy—cultivated through his connections to animals and interest in plants. He discusses his thoughts on science throughout his studies at Cambridge and Harvard.

He talks about form development, and the many questions of science, detailing some of his research in cells and cell death. He provides a detailed analysis of his thoughts on morphogenetic fields. A morphogenetic field, simply defined, is a group of cells that are able to respond to separate, local biochemical signals that lead to the development of precise morphological structures, or organs.

Continuing, Dr. Sheldrake talks about plant and animal development, and modules that are organized by morphogenetic fields. Expanding his discussion, he explains how fields work, discussing electromagnetic fields and gravitational fields. As he explains, fields are spread out, in and around, a developing plant or animal, and they contain a formal structure, which is what molds or shapes the developing structures.

He cites examples that substantiate his theories, regarding fields and the wholly integrative nature of those fields. He discusses his theories on morphic resonance, and how individual organisms can draw on collective memories of the form of their ancestors. 

Going further, Dr. Sheldrake explains his other thoughts on form and other hypotheses regarding memory, and the brain’s memory storage abilities, detailing morphic resonance and how the evidence, he states, points to the fact that the brain actually tunes in to memory, but that memory is not actually ‘stored.’

Morphogenetic Fields – Rupert Sheldrake, PhD, Biologist & Author – Plant and Animal Development, Morphic Resonance, and Form Development

Feb 10, 2020 44:13

Description:

Rupert Sheldrake, PhD, biologist, and author, known for his hypothesis of morphic resonance, discusses morphogenetic fields, morphic resonance, evolutionary biology, and much more. Podcast Points: What is morphic resonance? Does the brain store memory? A discussion on developing structures and collective memory During his tenure at Cambridge University, Dr. Sheldrake worked in developmental biology as a Fellow of Clare College. Dr. Sheldrake discusses his background and his lifelong love of biology, starting out as a young boy—cultivated through his connections to animals and interest in plants. He discusses his thoughts on science throughout his studies at Cambridge and Harvard. He talks about form development, and the many questions of science, detailing some of his research in cells and cell death. He provides a detailed analysis of his thoughts on morphogenetic fields. A morphogenetic field, simply defined, is a group of cells that are able to respond to separate, local biochemical signals that lead to the development of precise morphological structures, or organs. Continuing, Dr. Sheldrake talks about plant and animal development, and modules that are organized by morphogenetic fields. Expanding his discussion, he explains how fields work, discussing electromagnetic fields and gravitational fields. As he explains, fields are spread out, in and around, a developing plant or animal, and they contain a formal structure, which is what molds or shapes the developing structures. He cites examples that substantiate his theories, regarding fields and the wholly integrative nature of those fields. He discusses his theories on morphic resonance, and how individual organisms can draw on collective memories of the form of their ancestors. Going further, Dr. Sheldrake explains his other thoughts on form and other hypotheses regarding memory, and the brain’s memory storage abilities, detailing morphic resonance and how the evidence, he states, points to the fact that the brain actually tunes in to memory, but that memory is not actually ‘stored.’

Holistic Health Approaches to Thyroid Conditions: Dr. Shames Discusses More Treatment Alternatives

Feb 9, 2020 30:18

Description:

Many suffers of thyroid issues that are only offered one medicinal choice, but Dr. Shames says there are several natural supplements that provide meaningful holistic wellness. In this conversation, you'll hear:


His personal experience through his wife's struggles with treatment and how that opened his eyes to a vacuum in the medical community for thyroid care.The degree to which these thyroid conditions are an epidemic and what environmental conditions may be causing them.What connections between thyroid conditions and mental health exist and how treating our hormone glands with holistic health measures can achieve balance.


Author Dr. Richard Shames has been in private practice for 25 years but shifted his focus after witnessing his wife's search for relief from symptoms due to irregular thyroid measures. The Synthroid prescription the endocrinologists she first saw did not ease her symptoms, but after being connected with a university research group, she found relief from holistic health treatment. They wrote the book Feeling Fat, Fuzzy, or Frazzled? to educate readers about better options to treat and balance our three hormone-producing glands: the thyroid, adrenal, and reproductive glands.


He discusses why the diabetes epidemic may have overshadowed thyroid treatment's need for fuller attention. Because the medical system is less apt to look at hormone balance from a broader perspective, often the standard T3 medicine lacks the holistic wellness available from natural thyroid medicine. 


Furthermore, he explains how the thyroid, adrenal glands, and reproductive glands make for a hormone system that needs to be balanced in concert with each other. For example, women are often prescribed estrogen, which actually increases thyroid-binding agents in your bloodstream. By treating patients through a holistic wellness lens, these three hormonal-producing systems can work more effectively together. 


For more information such as recommended doctors, see the Top Docs list at http://www.thyroid-info.com/index.htm. He also recommends seeking out a nutritional practitioner in addition to supplemental information. Dr. Shames also has a website at http://thyroidpower.com/

Holistic Health Approaches to Thyroid Conditions: Dr. Shames Discusses More Treatment Alternatives

Feb 9, 2020 30:18

Description:

Many suffers of thyroid issues that are only offered one medicinal choice, but Dr. Shames says there are several natural supplements that provide meaningful holistic wellness. In this conversation, you'll hear: His personal experience through his wife's struggles with treatment and how that opened his eyes to a vacuum in the medical community for thyroid care. The degree to which these thyroid conditions are an epidemic and what environmental conditions may be causing them. What connections between thyroid conditions and mental health exist and how treating our hormone glands with holistic health measures can achieve balance. Author Dr. Richard Shames has been in private practice for 25 years but shifted his focus after witnessing his wife's search for relief from symptoms due to irregular thyroid measures. The Synthroid prescription the endocrinologists she first saw did not ease her symptoms, but after being connected with a university research group, she found relief from holistic health treatment. They wrote the book Feeling Fat, Fuzzy, or Frazzled? to educate readers about better options to treat and balance our three hormone-producing glands: the thyroid, adrenal, and reproductive glands. He discusses why the diabetes epidemic may have overshadowed thyroid treatment's need for fuller attention. Because the medical system is less apt to look at hormone balance from a broader perspective, often the standard T3 medicine lacks the holistic wellness available from natural thyroid medicine. Furthermore, he explains how the thyroid, adrenal glands, and reproductive glands make for a hormone system that needs to be balanced in concert with each other. For example, women are often prescribed estrogen, which actually increases thyroid-binding agents in your bloodstream. By treating patients through a holistic wellness lens, these three hormonal-producing systems can work more effectively together. For more information such as recommended doctors, see the Top Docs list at http://www.thyroid-info.com/index.htm. He also recommends seeking out a nutritional practitioner in addition to supplemental information. Dr. Shames also has a website at http://thyroidpower.com/

Environmentalist Rick Smith Talks about Indoor Pollutants We All Encounter

Feb 8, 2020 24:35

Description:

From shampoo to carpeting to baby bottles, chemicals are prevalent in our everyday items. Author Rick Smith discusses accompanying concerns such as:


The depth of this issue, calling it the second great pollution problem facing humanity.Why the health effects of pollution from such chemicals are prevalent and should be taken seriously.Alternatives for many everyday products that are available.


Co-author of Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things and director of Canada's Broadbent Institute, environmentalist Rick Smith describes the research he and co-author Bruce Lourie underwent to see common results of living in close quarters with chemicals. The prevalence of chemicals such as BPA in eating containers raised alarms and he wondered about the health effects of pollution on our bodies from such chemicals.


He tells how he and his co-author experimented on themselves over 10 years with their own blood and urine samples. They would establish a baseline first, and then, for example, cook with plastic and retest themselves to see if there was an increase in chemical levels. In most cases, the answer was yes. 


Mr. Smith details various other household products to be aware of, from shampoo to cosmetics to paint. He explains the danger and prevalence of phthalates and discusses how it can work as a hormonal disruptor in our body. Finally, he offers good news about the results of consumer pressure and tells the listener about safe alternatives for many of these products.

Intelligently Building Community in the AI & Data Science Space—Dr. Alex Liu—RMDS Lab

Feb 7, 2020 16:41

Description:

Former IBM Chief Scientist, Dr. Alex Liu, discusses the services provided by RMDS Lab, a community-based ecosystem provider in the artificial intelligence (AI) and big data sector. You will learn:


Why AI and data-related projects rarely succeed when handled only by a few data scientists and/or one method or approachHow the RMDS platform works and what benefits it provides to data scientists and businesses alikeCommon misconceptions regarding data sets, data analysis, and the usefulness of data, and how RMDS Lab can help


For the past 10 years or so, RMDS Lab has been building a data science and AI community using an ecosystem approach, guided by the belief that little can be accomplished in the field of big data and AI without utilizing multiple approaches, multiple methods, considering many algorithms, and combining the minds of more than just a handful of data scientists. Ultimately, the goal is to make data science-driven projects more adaptable and accessible and thereby increase the benefit they can serve to individuals, communities, organizations, and companies.


RMDS Lab invites clients and partners to enter the RMDS platform where they can build profiles and explore projects in the field while counting on an RMDS AI algorithm that will select the right data sets, algorithms, coworkers, and data scientists for a particular project-related goal. In essence, the platform intelligently scans all available tools and resources and selects the ones best suited to a particular problem in the AI and data science field.


According to Dr. Liu, this ecosystem-based approach is absolutely necessary when dealing with so many possible approaches, and such massive amounts of data—much of which is dirty or fake. In light of this reality, the RMDS platform also provides tools for cleaning and organizing data.


Tune in for the full conversation and check out grmds.org/ to learn more or sign on to the platform.

Finding a Way to Turn Back Time—Vittorio Sebastiano—Turn Biotechnologies

Feb 6, 2020 40:47

Description:

At Turn Biotechnologies, the team is attempting the seemingly impossible: the reversal of ageing.

On today’s podcast, you’ll learn the following:

What role epigenetic drift plays in the process of ageing at the cellular level, and what can trigger itHow the team at Turn Bio is reprogramming the epigenetic signature of age, and the promising results that have already been shown in mouse modelsHow the process of extracting, rejuvenating, and returning cells to tissue worksHow the work being done could eventually address the effects of ageing and/or prevent age-related diseases

 

“It is possible to reverse the epigenetic landscape of the cells and bring it back in time so that a cell, which by the process of aging becomes dysfunctional with time, can actually be reprogrammed or reversed in a way that it becomes more youthful, and more functional, and this could have repercussions on the cell itself, but also broadly speaking, systemically in the individual,” says Vittorio Sebastiano, explaining the premise of Turn Bio, a company for which he serves as both co-founder and scientific advisory board chairman.

Sebastiano expounds on a number of interesting subjects, including what causes genes to express certain types of cells and what types of environmental stimuli may disrupt this programming, leading to the creation of dysfunctional cell types (i.e. what he calls the process of ageing), various methods of epigenetic regulation, the hallmarks of cellular ageing, the important distinction between ageing and senescence, and what he sees in terms of both short-term and long-term goals with this work.

Visit https://www.turn.bio/ to learn more.

Breaking into Biology – Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, Celebrated and Outspoken British Biologist, Physiologist, and Prolific Author – Concepts in Genetics and the Level of Causation in Biology

Feb 6, 2020 51:03

Description:

Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, the celebrated and outspoken British biologist, physiologist, and prolific author, discusses his incredible, noteworthy career in biology, exciting concepts in genetics, and the level of causation in biology. 

Podcast Points:

What is the current state of evolutionary theory?What do we know about cells and how they work?Issues regarding the genome and how diseases might originate

 

British biologist, Noble has long been a major voice in modern biology. Dr. Noble was the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology at the University of Oxford for more than two decades. He was later named Professor Emeritus. Additionally, Dr. Noble was appointed the Co-Director of Computational Physiology.

Dr. Noble is one of the earliest researchers in systems biology and he played an integral role in the development of the first mathematical model of the human heart. His thoughts on evolutionary theory have been part of a growing movement, a sort of revolution in evolutionary biology.

Dr. Noble discusses his background and talks about what got him interested in his areas of research and study. As a self-described ‘card carrying reductionist scientist,’ Dr. Noble was interested in the concept of a privileged level of causation. And as he states, it was really always about, and is about, simply molecules. He recounts some early experiments he engaged in, attempts to reproduce the rhythm of the heart, with differential equations representing the molecular event.

Which molecules are involved? This was an important question for the research. After much experimentation and study, he came to the conclusion that the cell itself is partially causing what happens. Rhythm only occurs by something that is constrained by the cell membrane. He explains the complex details of how the process works and how differential equations will not lead to answers unless the appropriate information is added into the mix. 

The research scientist discusses how DNA is produced, and how cells have mechanisms for controlling errors. Cells, in short, have great control over what happens within systems. Dr. Noble goes on to discuss other important experiments, in the nervous system and other systems such as the immune system. Continuing, the PhD expert talks about the genome.

He discusses the origin of diseases and the fact that we know very little about biology above the level of the genome, in contrast to what we know about molecular biology in general. But remarkably, we still don’t know exactly how cells work. 

All about Sleep with Dr. Dholakia: A Neurologist for Sleep Disorders Explores Concerns

Feb 6, 2020 28:35

Description:

One-third of our population faces some type of sleep disorder. Dr. Dholakia strives to increase awareness.

In this podcast, he explains:

The differences between disorders such as narcolepsy, insomnia, idiopathic hypersomnia, obstructive apnea, and more, and how sleep apnea treatments might improve.Connections researchers are making between Parkinson’s disease and sleep disorders, as well as other health concerns.The mechanics of how our body functions during REM sleep and how some disorders affect this with potentially dangerous outcomes.

Board-certified neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Swapan Akhilesh works as a physician at the Atlanta VA Medical Center and is the medical director of the Atlanta VA sleep laboratory as a neurologist for sleep disorders.

He focuses on the whole spectrum of sleep disorders from snoring to sleep apnea to insomnia. He discusses that while obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia are the most common disorders, there are numerous other disorders worthy of study because their effects can be dangerous. 

Because of the overlap of neurology and sleep, Dr. Dholakia is able to bring the science of each together for better understanding. As a neurologist for sleep disorders, he is able to explain neurological complications that lead to these disorders.

For example, the inability of some brains to decompartmentalize waking versus sleeping states causes narcolepsy. Because these lines are blurred for the brain, sleeping intrudes into wakeful times.

He also explains many of the mysteries in sleep disorders such as idiopathic hypersomnia: they don't understand why these patients are constantly sleepy and are undergoing research to try and understand this better.

Finally, Dr. Dholakia explains possible improvements into more common issues like sleep apnea treatments, but also warns of the commonness of sleep disorders that can affect our health. Therefore, he's working to educate and encourage the public to seek treatment.

He advises veterans who want to learn more to seek out the VA's specialized sleep centers. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the American Alliance of Healthy Sleep are also good resources.

Watching for Eye Disease – Dimitra Skondra, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Director, The University of Chicago Medicine – Understanding the Connections—the Microbiome, Eye Disease, and the Future of Treatment

Feb 6, 2020 32:01

Description:

Dimitra Skondra, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Director, J. Terry Ernest Ocular Imaging Center at The University of Chicago Medicine, discusses the microbiota, diseases of the eye, macular degeneration, and eye health.

Podcast Points:

Is there a connection between the microbiome and eye health?Does diet play a role in macular degeneration?What do we now understand about the gut microbiome that we didn’t in past years?

 

Dr. Dimitra Skondra is a sought-after and respected, board-certified retina specialist, and she primarily focuses on medical and surgical treatments of vitreoretinal diseases.

Dr. Skondra talks about why she was particularly interested in studying the eye. As she states, it’s a fascinating organ and greatly affects the quality of life. Dr. Skondra provides a thorough overview of the microbiome and eye-specific issues.

She explains issues about the sterility of the eye, discussing what is sterile and what is not. Many microbes exist on the surface of the eye, and Dr. Skondra provides an overview on the various diseases and conditions that impact the surface of the eye. 

Continuing, Dr. Skondra talks about genetic mutations and genetic risks for macular degeneration. As she explains, lifestyle and diet can increase risk factors. She cites examples from her work as a postdoc, and details some of the information she gathered that indicated high fat diets, especially when combined with genetic predisposition, could accelerate degeneration.

As she states, the microbiota affects disease, but her focus is on how can she and other researchers use that information to help patients? She talks about the promotion of a healthy gut microbiome, and the connections between the gut and the retina.

Her research seeks to understand all these connections and how altering the gut microbiome affects various conditions or risks.

Breaking into Biology – Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, Celebrated and Outspoken British Biologist, Physiologist, and Prolific Author – Concepts in Genetics and the Level of Causation in Biology

Feb 6, 2020 51:04

Description:

Denis Noble, CBE, Ph.D., FRS, the celebrated and outspoken British biologist, physiologist, and prolific author, discusses his incredible, noteworthy career in biology, exciting concepts in genetics, and the level of causation in biology. Podcast Points: What is the current state of evolutionary theory? What do we know about cells and how they work? Issues regarding the genome and how diseases might originate British biologist, Noble has long been a major voice in modern biology. Dr. Noble was the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology at the University of Oxford for more than two decades. He was later named Professor Emeritus. Additionally, Dr. Noble was appointed the Co-Director of Computational Physiology. Dr. Noble is one of the earliest researchers in systems biology and he played an integral role in the development of the first mathematical model of the human heart. His thoughts on evolutionary theory have been part of a growing movement, a sort of revolution in evolutionary biology. Dr. Noble discusses his background and talks about what got him interested in his areas of research and study. As a self-described ‘card-carrying reductionist scientist,’ Dr. Noble was interested in the concept of a privileged level of causation. And as he states, it was really always about, and is about, simply molecules. He recounts some early experiments he engaged in, attempts to reproduce the rhythm of the heart, with differential equations representing the molecular event. Which molecules are involved? This was an important question for the research. After much experimentation and study, he came to the conclusion that the cell itself is partially causing what happens. Rhythm only occurs by something that is constrained by the cell membrane. He explains the complex details of how the process works and how differential equations will not lead to answers unless the appropriate information is added into the mix. The research scientist discusses how DNA is produced, and how cells have mechanisms for controlling errors. Cells, in short, have great control over what happens within systems. Dr. Noble goes on to discuss other important experiments, in the nervous system and other systems such as the immune system. Continuing, the Ph.D. expert talks about the genome. He discusses the origin of diseases and the fact that we know very little about biology above the level of the genome, in contrast to what we know about molecular biology in general. But remarkably, we still don’t know exactly how cells work.

Track to the Future – Tim Sylvester, CEO & Chief Technology Officer of Integrated Roadways – Digital Roadways: Connectivity and Communication for the Modern Driver

Feb 6, 2020

Description:

If you’re of a particular age, you may remember watching a Saturday morning cartoon in which drivers blasted through space in levitating vehicles. And if you’re a curious type, you may have wondered when that day would become a reality. While we’re not quite there yet, technology is bringing the future to our highways and byways.Tim Sylvester, CEO & Chief Technology Officer of Integrated Roadways takes us on an amazing journey to the crux of technology-based, next-generation roads. With growing demands for smart cities, 5G cellular, and applications to connect electric-powered and autonomous vehicles, the need for powerful networks based in and around roadways is tremendous.The tech CEO provides an insider look into his company’s strategies to turn physical roads into active digital networks. An obvious and immediate benefit of these digital networks would be in the area of driver safety. Auto accidents could be instantly identified and pinpointed and first responders such as police and EMT would be immediately notified, cutting down on time lag and possibly saving lives. And real time traffic data could modify signal timing and increase traffic flow during periods of congestion.Additionally, analytical data regarding traffic could enable small businesses to get a sense of how much traffic their potential business location might see on average, which could bolster rates of success.The digital network expert also helps to allay some of the misconceptions about the application of this technology. While some may think that building new roads to implement a digital strategy could be an excessive, unnecessary task, Sylvester explains that 50% of American roads are in desperate need of replacement right now. Integrated Roadways has patented a Smart Pavement system, which is created from precast concrete sections that can be embedded with digital technology and fiber optic connectivity that will transform everyday roads into smart roads. By targeting the commercial demands for data and wireless service, Sylvester expects to reinvigorate highway and road funding and step away from the traditional method of funding solely with tax dollars.Sylvester discusses the incredible advances that digital network roads will bring to the autonomous driving industry. The CEO explains that as smartphones go, so should the autonomous vehicle. In that he clarifies that just as the network technology that drives smartphones exists outside of the actual physical phone, autonomous vehicles should follow suit.Autonomous vehicles of the near future should begin to rely on digital network information in the actual roadways, not in the vehicle itself. And with a peek into the near future, the technology expert reveals his company’s current plans for activating this digital system in multiple areas of the country. The future has arrived.

Finding a Way to Turn Back Time—Vittorio Sebastiano—Turn Biotechnologies

Feb 6, 2020

Description:

At Turn Biotechnologies, the team is attempting the seemingly impossible: the reversal of ageing. On today’s podcast, you’ll learn the following: What role epigenetic drift plays in the process of ageing at the cellular level, and what can trigger it How the team at Turn Bio is reprogramming the epigenetic signature of age, and the promising results that have already been shown in mouse models How the process of extracting, rejuvenating and returning cells to tissue works How the work being done could eventually address the effects of ageing and/or prevent age-related diseases “It is possible to reverse the epigenetic landscape of the cells and bring it back in time so that a cell, which by the process of aging becomes dysfunctional with time, can actually be reprogrammed or reversed in a way that it becomes more youthful and more functional, and this could have repercussions on the cell itself, but also broadly speaking, systemically in the individual,” says Vittorio Sebastiano, explaining the premise of Turn Bio, a company for which he serves as both co-founder and scientific advisory board chairman. Sebastiano expounds on a number of interesting subjects, including what causes genes to express certain types of cells and what types of environmental stimuli may disrupt this programming, leading to the creation of dysfunctional cell types (i.e. what he calls the process of ageing), various methods of epigenetic regulation, the hallmarks of cellular ageing, the important distinction between ageing and senescence, and what he sees in terms of both short-term and long-term goals with this work. Visit https://www.turn.bio/ to learn more.

All about Sleep with Dr. Dholakia: A Neurologist for Sleep Disorders Explores Concerns

Feb 6, 2020 28:35

Description:

One-third of our population faces some type of sleep disorder. Dr. Dholakia strives to increase awareness. In this podcast, he explains: The differences between disorders such as narcolepsy, insomnia, idiopathic hypersomnia, obstructive apnea, and more, and how sleep apnea treatments might improve. Connections researchers are making between Parkinson’s disease and sleep disorders, as well as other health concerns. The mechanics of how our body functions during REM sleep and how some disorders affect this with potentially dangerous outcomes. Board-certified neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Swapan Akhilesh works as a physician at the Atlanta VA Medical Center and is the medical director of the Atlanta VA sleep laboratory as a neurologist for sleep disorders. He focuses on the whole spectrum of sleep disorders from snoring to sleep apnea to insomnia. He discusses that while obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia are the most common disorders, there are numerous other disorders worthy of study because their effects can be dangerous. Because of the overlap of neurology and sleep, Dr. Dholakia is able to bring the science of each together for better understanding. As a neurologist for sleep disorders, he is able to explain neurological complications that lead to these disorders. For example, the inability of some brains to decompartmentalize waking versus sleeping states causes narcolepsy. Because these lines are blurred for the brain, sleeping intrudes into wakeful times. He also explains many of the mysteries in sleep disorders such as idiopathic hypersomnia: they don't understand why these patients are constantly sleepy and are undergoing research to try and understand this better. Finally, Dr. Dholakia explains possible improvements into more common issues like sleep apnea treatments but also warns of the commonness of sleep disorders that can affect our health. Therefore, he's working to educate and encourage the public to seek treatment. He advises veterans who want to learn more to seek out the VA's specialized sleep centers. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the American Alliance of Healthy Sleep are also good resources.

Watching for Eye Disease – Dimitra Skondra, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Director, The University of Chicago Medicine – Understanding the Connections—the Microbiome, Eye Disease, and the Future of Treatment

Feb 6, 2020 32:02

Description:

Dimitra Skondra, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science Director, J. Terry Ernest Ocular Imaging Center at The University of Chicago Medicine, discusses the microbiota, diseases of the eye, macular degeneration, and eye health. Podcast Points: Is there a connection between the microbiome and eye health? Does diet play a role in macular degeneration? What do we now understand about the gut microbiome that we didn’t in past years? Dr. Dimitra Skondra is a sought-after and respected, board-certified retina specialist, and she primarily focuses on medical and surgical treatments of vitreoretinal diseases. Dr. Skondra talks about why she was particularly interested in studying the eye. As she states, it’s a fascinating organ and greatly affects the quality of life. Dr. Skondra provides a thorough overview of the microbiome and eye-specific issues. She explains issues about the sterility of the eye, discussing what is sterile and what is not. Many microbes exist on the surface of the eye, and Dr. Skondra provides an overview of the various diseases and conditions that impact the surface of the eye. Continuing, Dr. Skondra talks about genetic mutations and genetic risks for macular degeneration. As she explains, lifestyle and diet can increase risk factors. She cites examples from her work as a postdoc, and details some of the information she gathered that indicated high-fat diets, especially when combined with a genetic predisposition, could accelerate degeneration. As she states, the microbiota affects disease, but her focus is on how can she and other researchers use that information to help patients? She talks about the promotion of healthy gut microbiome and the connections between the gut and the retina. Her research seeks to understand all these connections and how altering the gut microbiome affects various conditions or risks.

Abed Ajraou- AIEVE- Introducing the First Real AI Product on the Ethereum Blockchain

Feb 5, 2020

Description:

Abed Ajraou, Chief Data Officer and Co-Founder of AIEVE, discusses the first savings platform in cryptocurrency, which will utilize artificial intelligence on the Ethereum blockchain in order to better predict trends in cryptocurrency. The result? Consumers will be able to save and grow their money on a transparent platform while paying much lower fees than they would on other platforms. Rather than relying on trading bots, AIEVE uses artificial intelligence in order to cater to a market of people whose primary goal is to watch their funds increase in value rather than expend their energy on trading itself. While it’s still a work in progress, Ajraou expects the platform to become fully functional in 2019. To stay up to date with the latest and for a detailed explanation of how the AIEVE platform will work, visit AIEVE’s Telegram and YouTube channels.

Healing the Mind and Body: Ameet Aggarwal Explains Naturopathy Benefits

Feb 4, 2020 33:22

Description:

Dr. Aggarwal, ND, Naturopathic doctor, Bowen therapist, and psychotherapist talks about the mind-body connection and his corresponding work with patients all over the world. He describes: 


The three physical pillars of bodily health and how each functions.Why the liver is the most important of these three and what symptoms indicate liver problems.Why relieving emotional trauma through EMDR can substantially affect bodily healing.


Ameet Aggarwal, ND, is originally from Kenya, but spent time in Canada obtaining his Naturopathic Medicine degree. He has clients all over the world and has recently returned to Kenya to engage in mobile homeopathy work for poor communities. His book, Heal Your Body, Cure Your Mind, was written to help fund this outreach project. In addition, Dr. Aggarwal works in private practice and runs health retreats.


He describes how he uses a combination of the psychotherapy treatment called EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), as well as family constellations and gestalt to engage emotional healing as well as physical protocols. His goal is to bring clients a place of emotional release that will free the body from damaging the results of emotional pain. He discusses the kinds of clients he's had, from suffers of sexual abuse to those who've encountered terrorist attacks. 


He then emphasizes health for what he describes the three pillars of the body: the gut, the adrenal system, and the liver. He describes naturopathy benefits that stem from his supplements, vitamins, herbs, and other forms of homeopathy. Finally, he explains the huge factor liver toxicity plays in disease, how problems in the gut lead to inflammation, and why the adrenal system gets wiped out from constantly making cortisol to handle these stressors. By treating each of these bodily systems, he offers clients the best in naturopathy benefits.


For more about contacting him, his services, and his book, see his website: https://health.drameet.com/.

Healing the Mind and Body: Ameet Aggarwal Explains Naturopathy Benefits

Feb 4, 2020 33:22

Description:

Dr. Aggarwal, ND, Naturopathic doctor, Bowen therapist, and psychotherapist talks about the mind-body connection and his corresponding work with patients all over the world. He describes: The three physical pillars of bodily health and how each function. Why the liver is the most important of these three and what symptoms indicate liver problems. Why relieving emotional trauma through EMDR can substantially affect bodily healing. Ameet Aggarwal, ND, is originally from Kenya, but spent time in Canada obtaining his Naturopathic Medicine degree. He has clients all over the world and has recently returned to Kenya to engage in mobile homeopathy work for poor communities. His book, Heal Your Body, Cure Your Mind, was written to help fund this outreach project. In addition, Dr. Aggarwal works in private practice and runs health retreats. He describes how he uses a combination of the psychotherapy treatment called EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), as well as family constellations and gestalt to engage emotional healing as well as physical protocols. His goal is to bring clients a place of emotional release that will free the body from damaging the results of emotional pain. He discusses the kinds of clients he's had, from suffers from sexual abuse to those who've encountered terrorist attacks. He then emphasizes health for what he describes the three pillars of the body: the gut, the adrenal system, and the liver. He describes naturopathy benefits that stem from his supplements, vitamins, herbs, and other forms of homeopathy. Finally, he explains the huge factor liver toxicity plays in disease, how problems in the gut lead to inflammation, and why the adrenal system gets wiped out from constantly making cortisol to handle these stressors. By treating each of these bodily systems, he offers clients the best in naturopathy benefits. For more about contacting him, his services, and his book, see his website: https://health.drameet.com/.

Restoring Human Health and Ecology—Humphrey Bacchus—Invivo Diagnostics & Therapeutics

Feb 4, 2020 34:15

Description:

Invivo provides diagnostic testing services that analyze the microbiome, host immune status, and genomic data. Humphrey Bacchus joins the podcast to discuss the following: Why it’s important to understand the ways in which the internal microbiome is reflective of or correlated with the wider environment and ecosystems in which we live (e.g. soil, weather systems) What is unique about the approach being taken at Invivo, which includes a look at two microbiome types on which little commercial work has been done How the widely varying data sets in the field of microbiome research require clinicians to be well-read, well-versed, and well-supported to tease out the pertinent information and use it to the benefit of patients on an individual basis How vaginal microbiomes could affect or be related to female infertility, miscarriage, and preterm birth About 10 years ago, Humphrey Bacchus joined Invivo, which at the time was just starting out in the field of microbiome research, testing microbiomes and figuring out how to apply what they were learning to the clinical arena for the benefit of patients. Bacchus quickly came to understand and appreciate the inseparable connection between our internal microbial ecosystems and the ecosystems within which we all live. “If we nurture these microbes rather than treat them as invaders, then we can watch after the wider environment in which we live,” says Bacchus. Ultimately, the focus at Invivo is on trying to help clinicians and patients understand the relationship their bodies have with various microbes in the development of the disease. While quite a lot of attention is being given to gastrointestinal microbiomes, Bacchus talks about the useful data being derived from a look at vaginal and oral microbiomes. He explains what markers are being looked at in order to evaluate host immune responses, and how necessary it is to understand that microbes do not exist in and of themselves but in relation to and in contact with the host’s immune system. Informed by this view, Bacchus and the team at Invivo aim to continue gathering as much data as possible while keeping in mind the dynamic complexity that cannot be ignored. To learn more, visit invivohealthcare.com.

Extracellular Examination – Lesley Cheng Sim, PhD, Research Officer, Biochemistry, at La Trobe University – Can Extracellular Vesicles be the Key to Recognizing Early Stage Diseases?

Feb 4, 2020 27:20

Description:

Lesley Cheng Sim, Ph.D., Research Officer, Biochemistry, at La Trobe University, discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs) and her work as a Molecular Biologist. Lesley received her Ph.D. from Monash University in 2008; she is a postdoctoral researcher. Before attaining her Ph.D., Lesley earned a Bachelor of Medical Science from La Trobe University. She has extensive training as a Cell and Molecular Biologist, specifically in the area of neuronal death and survival. Podcast Points: What are extracellular vesicles? Can exosomes be utilized to deliver therapeutics? New paths to understanding Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Lesley talks about her background and the field of extracellular vesicles. As she states, her lab is one of the early labs to do research in the field. She talks about cellular issues and neuronal death. And she provides information on the methods they use to isolate exosomes from the blood. The research Ph.D. discusses the three primary areas of research in their lab—the role of exosomes in the pathology of degenerative diseases, the isolation of exosomes from the blood to be used as diagnostic tools, and the exploitation of exosomes to be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutics. She goes on to discuss the degenerative diseases they focus a great deal of their research upon, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. She talks about early diagnosis options, and how they use exosomes to find disease indicators. Continuing, the Ph.D. EV expert talks in detail about the detection of RNA changes, their experimentation in the lab, and how this information can provide valuable insight, illuminating important disease indicators and markers. Lesley's innovative research is clearing a path for new and important knowledge of degenerative diseases and various health conditions, to be harvested and implemented as we move forward into personalized medicine.

Restoring Human Health and Ecology—Humphrey Bacchus—Invivo Diagnostics & Therapeutics

Feb 4, 2020 34:14

Description:

Invivo provides diagnostic testing services that analyze the microbiome, host immune status, and genomic data.

Humphrey Bacchus joins the podcast to discuss the following:

Why it’s important to understand the ways in which the internal microbiome is reflective of or correlated with the wider environment and ecosystems in which we live (e.g. soil, weather systems)What is unique about the approach being taken at Invivo, which includes a look at two microbiome types on which little commercial work has been doneHow the widely varying data sets in the field of microbiome research requires clinicians to be well-read, well-versed, and well-supported to tease out the pertinent information and use it to the benefit of patients on an individual basisHow vaginal microbiomes could affect or be related to female infertility, miscarriage, and preterm birth

About 10 years ago, Humphrey Bacchus joined Invivo, which at the time was just starting out in the field of microbiome research, testing microbiomes and figuring out how to apply what they were learning to the clinical arena for the benefit of patients. Bacchus quickly came to understand and appreciate the inseparable connection between our internal microbial ecosystems and the ecosystems within which we all live. “If we nurture these microbes rather than treat them as invaders, then can watch after the wider environment in which we live,” says Bacchus.

Ultimately, the focus at Invivo is on trying to help clinicians and patients understand the relationship their bodies have with various microbes in the development of disease.

While quite a lot of attention is being given to gastrointestinal microbiomes, Bacchus talks about the useful data being derived from a look at vaginal and oral microbiomes. He explains what markers are being looked at in order to evaluate host immune responses, and how necessary it is to understand that microbes do not exist in and of themselves, but in relation to and in contact with the host’s immune system.

Informed by this view, Bacchus and the team at Invivo aim to continue gathering as much data as possible while keeping in mind the dynamic complexity that cannot be ignored.

To learn more, visit invivohealthcare.com.

Extracellular Examination – Lesley Cheng Sim, PhD, Research Officer, Biochemistry, at La Trobe University – Can Extracellular Vesicles be the Key to Recognizing Early Stage Diseases?

Feb 4, 2020 27:19

Description:

Lesley Cheng Sim, Ph.D., Research Officer, Biochemistry, at La Trobe University, discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs) and her work as a Molecular Biologist.


Lesley received her Ph.D. from Monash University in 2008; she is a postdoctoral researcher. Before attaining her Ph.D., Lesley earned a Bachelor of Medical Science from La Trobe University. She has extensive training as a Cell and Molecular Biologist, specifically in the area of neuronal death and survival.


Podcast Points:

What are extracellular vesicles?Can exosomes be utilized to deliver therapeutics?New paths to understanding Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s


Lesley talks about her background and the field of extracellular vesicles. As she states, her lab is one of the early labs to do research in the field. She talks about cellular issues and neuronal death. And she provides information on the methods they use to isolate exosomes from the blood. 


The research Ph.D. discusses the three primary areas of research in their lab—the role of exosomes in the pathology of degenerative diseases, the isolation of exosomes from the blood to be used as diagnostic tools, and the exploitation of exosomes to be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutics. She goes on to discuss the degenerative diseases they focus a great deal of their research upon, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. She talks about early diagnosis options, and how they use exosomes to find disease indicators. 

Continuing, the Ph.D. EV expert talks in detail about the detection of RNA changes, their experimentation in the lab, and how this information can provide valuable insight, illuminating important disease indicators and markers. 


Lesley's innovative research is clearing a path for new and important knowledge of degenerative diseases and various health conditions, to be harvested and implemented as we move forward into personalized medicine.

A Chemist's Approach to Biofilms: Dr. Laura Sanchez Discusses Impeding Bacterial Diseases in Humans

Feb 3, 2020 37:09

Description:

Scientists in multiple disciplines are working on ways to circumvent antibiotic resistance. Dr. Sanchez explains why targeting biofilms requires more study.

She describes:

The composition and nature of biofilm behavior.What happens to bacteria when they try inhibiting the biofilm.How cheese has its own interesting biofilm study potential.

Dr. Laura Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy with a courtesy appointment in Chemistry at The University of Illinois at Chicago runs her lab to better understand the pathogen-biofilm interplay in order to fight bacterial disease in humans. Dr. Sanchez is attempting to use chemistry as an early warning detection system.

The lab uses specialized mass spectrometry to study biofilm behavior and understand the metabolites the pathogens emit in this biofilm state. The lab's state-of-the-art mass spectrometry technique allows them to study other elements of human disease, such as ovarian cancer, in the hopes that they can create a less invasive ovarian cancer diagnosis tool to enable earlier detection.

Their findings of biofilm behavior have indicated that trying to inhibit a biofilm has a negative result in terms of impeding the pathogen. In fact, in a study on moth infection, eradicating the biofilm actually accelerated the disease progression, making the bacteria increase its virulent nature.

The lab has also studied the nature of biofilms on cheese rinds and found interesting results regarding the same types of cheeses separated by geography as well as an association between salty brines on cheese and ocean bacteria.

For more, see Dr. Sanchez's lab page at https://www.sanchezlab.science/

Extracellular Vesicle Heterogeneity and Therapeutic Potential—Scott Bonner—Oxford University

Feb 3, 2020 39:06

Description:

As a PhD student at Oxford University, Scott Bonner’s work aims to examine extracellular vesicle (EV) heterogeneity and what it might teach us about the therapeutic function of EVs.

He explains the following:

How many EVs one cell can produce, and why it is difficult albeit possible to examine singular vesicle phenotypesHow significant a role EVs play in communication between cells, and what other methods cells use for intercellular communicationHow certain EV purification methods might disrupt the integrity of an EV itself by altering its shape and/or therapeutic potential

Extracellular vesicles hold great potential as a therapeutic delivery platform, and might provide therapy for everything from broken bones to complicated disease processes like cancer. In addition, they could be used to package and deliver drugs to very specific regions in the body without running the risk of being hindered by the immune system, thereby providing greater efficacy than what’s currently seen with drugs administered conventionally.

Scott Bonner shares what compelled him to pursue a career in EV-based research, and how his interest was jump-started by his time as a research assistant for Evox Therapeutics, a company that is now well-known in the field of exosome and EV-based therapeutics.

Bonner’s current research aims to better understand vesicle heterogeneity, and involves the creation of single-cell clones of a particular cell type that are grown separate from all other cells and cell types. Over time, the expectation is that the phenotypes of these cells will drift apart—even if only slightly—and that this could provide insight into how differences in EV phenotype affect EV function.

Ultimately, the findings could provide the industry with valuable information about the physical characteristics of EVs that hold potential to therapeutically affect specific disease processes, such as breast cancer.

A number of interesting topics are explored, so tune in, and email your questions or comments to scott.bonner@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.

Gastro Info – Christopher Chapman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy, University of Chicago – Gastroenterology, Endoscopic Procedures, and Improved Health

Feb 3, 2020 33:42

Description:

Christopher Chapman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy, Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago, provides an overview of his research, specifically detailing the area of gastroenterology, and his work with patients.

Podcast Points:

What are the medical procedures designed to help lose weight?Can I lose weight medically, but without surgery?What does an endoscopic procedure entail?

Dr. Chapman has extensive training and experience in Interventional Endoscopy and Gastroenterology. He is a noted gastroenterologist and member of the Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics (CERT), where he regularly treats patients who suffer from various gastrointestinal disorders, through the use of minimally invasive endoscopic techniques.

The research doctor discusses his background at Johns Hopkins University, and now at the University of Chicago, and also his current work, which he describes as about 80% clinical and 20% research. As he explains, a good deal of his work deals with endoscopic procedures designed to help people lose weight, so they can improve their health, and reduce or eliminate their obesity-related conditions. He explains how these procedures differ from bariatric surgery.

As he states, many of these procedures are done through the ‘natural orifice’ meaning they go in through the mouth while the patient is asleep. He provides an overview of the intragastric balloon procedure, which essentially inserts a balloon type device inside your stomach that allows you to feel fuller faster; endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG), which reduces the size of the stomach; and then aspiration therapy, which is a bariatric approach that can help to siphon ingested food out of the stomach through an implanted tube and port it to the outside of the body to then be discarded.

Dr. Chapman discusses the many ways they, as researchers and doctors, seek to innovate in the space, applying new procedures and techniques to aid their patients with a wide assortment of medical maladies. He talks about clinical trials for their balloon devices, devices that can help people lose more weight and/or make the balloon more tolerable to patients who have difficulty.

He talks about other options in clinical trials, that focus on diabetes, and also some that are endoscopy-free. Many new techniques are on the horizon that will be minimally invasive, yet still provide immense benefits to patients. 

Continuing, Dr. Chapman talks about the work they are doing to try to get insurance companies to cover certain procedures, which will help those who may be underinsured or facing financial struggles, to get procedures they need for their health. 

A Chemist’s Approach to Biofilms: Dr. Laura Sanchez Discusses Impeding Bacterial Diseases in Humans

Feb 3, 2020 37:09

Description:

Scientists in multiple disciplines are working on ways to circumvent antibiotic resistance. Dr. Sanchez explains why targeting biofilms requires more study. She describes: The composition and nature of biofilm behavior. What happens to bacteria when they try inhibiting the biofilm. How cheese has its own interesting biofilm study potential. Dr. Laura Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy with a courtesy appointment in Chemistry at The University of Illinois at Chicago runs her lab to better understand the pathogen-biofilm interplay in order to fight bacterial disease in humans. Dr. Sanchez is attempting to use chemistry as an early warning detection system. The lab uses specialized mass spectrometry to study biofilm behavior and understand the metabolites the pathogens emit in this biofilm state. The lab's state-of-the-art mass spectrometry technique allows them to study other elements of human diseases, such as ovarian cancer, in the hopes that they can create a less invasive ovarian cancer diagnosis tool to enable earlier detection. Their findings of biofilm behavior have indicated that trying to inhibit a biofilm has a negative result in terms of impeding the pathogen. In fact, in a study on moth infection, eradicating the biofilm actually accelerated the disease progression, making the bacteria increase its virulent nature. The lab has also studied the nature of biofilms on cheese rinds and found interesting results regarding the same types of cheeses separated by geography as well as an association between salty brines on cheese and ocean bacteria. For more, see Dr. Sanchez's lab page at https://www.sanchezlab.science/

Extracellular Vesicle Heterogeneity and Therapeutic Potential—Scott Bonner—Oxford University

Feb 3, 2020 39:06

Description:

As a Ph.D. student at Oxford University, Scott Bonner’s work aims to examine extracellular vesicle (EV) heterogeneity and what it might teach us about the therapeutic function of EVs. He explains the following: How many EVs one cell can produce, and why it is difficult albeit possible to examine singular vesicle phenotypes How significant a role EVs play in communication between cells, and what other methods cells use for intercellular communication How certain EV purification methods might disrupt the integrity of an EV itself by altering its shape and/or therapeutic potential Extracellular vesicles hold great potential as a therapeutic delivery platform and might provide therapy for everything from broken bones to complicated disease processes like cancer. In addition, they could be used to package and deliver drugs to very specific regions in the body without running the risk of being hindered by the immune system, thereby providing greater efficacy than what’s currently seen with drugs administered conventionally. Scott Bonner shares what compelled him to pursue a career in EV-based research, and how his interest was jump-started by his time as a research assistant for Evox Therapeutics, a company that is now well-known in the field of exosome and EV-based therapeutics. Bonner’s current research aims to better understand vesicle heterogeneity and involves the creation of single-cell clones of a particular cell type that are grown separate from all other cells and cell types. Over time, the expectation is that the phenotypes of these cells will drift apart—even if only slightly—and that this could provide insight into how differences in EV phenotype affect EV function. Ultimately, the findings could provide the industry with valuable information about the physical characteristics of EVs that hold the potential to therapeutically affect specific disease processes, such as breast cancer. A number of interesting topics are explored, so tune in, and email your questions or comments to scott.bonner@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.

Gastro Info – Christopher Chapman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy, University of Chicago – Gastroenterology, Endoscopic Procedures, and Improved Health

Feb 3, 2020 33:42

Description:

Christopher Chapman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy, Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago, provides an overview of his research, specifically detailing the area of gastroenterology and his work with patients. Podcast Points: What are the medical procedures designed to help lose weight? Can I lose weight medically, but without surgery? What does an endoscopic procedure entail? Dr. Chapman has extensive training and experience in Interventional Endoscopy and Gastroenterology. He is a noted gastroenterologist and member of the Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics (CERT), where he regularly treats patients who suffer from various gastrointestinal disorders, through the use of minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. The research doctor discusses his background at Johns Hopkins University, and now at the University of Chicago, and also his current work, which he describes as about 80% clinical and 20% research. As he explains, a good deal of his work deals with endoscopic procedures designed to help people lose weight, so they can improve their health, and reduce or eliminate their obesity-related conditions. He explains how these procedures differ from bariatric surgery. As he states, many of these procedures are done through the ‘natural orifice’ meaning they go in through the mouth while the patient is asleep. He provides an overview of the intragastric balloon procedure, which essentially inserts a balloon-type device inside your stomach that allows you to feel fuller faster; endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG), which reduces the size of the stomach; and then aspiration therapy, which is a bariatric approach that can help to siphon ingested food out of the stomach through an implanted tube and port it to the outside of the body to then be discarded. Dr. Chapman discusses the many ways they, as researchers and doctors, seek to innovate in the space, applying new procedures and techniques to aid their patients with a wide assortment of medical maladies. He talks about clinical trials for their balloon devices, devices that can help people lose more weight and/or make the balloon more tolerable to patients who have difficulty. He talks about other options in clinical trials, that focus on diabetes, and also some that are endoscopy-free. Many new techniques are on the horizon that will be minimally invasive, yet still, provide immense benefits to patients. Continuing, Dr. Chapman talks about the work they are doing to try to get insurance companies to cover certain procedures, which will help those who may be underinsured or facing financial struggles, to get procedures they need for their health.

More than Meets the Eye: Dr. St. Leger Explains Eye Microbiome and Disease

Feb 2, 2020 24:36

Description:

More than Meets the Eye Dr St.Leger Explains Eye Microbiome and Disease

Feb 2, 2020 24:36

Description:

Most of us have heard about intestinal microbiomes, but researchers found that eyes have their own bacteria presence as well. Dr. St. Leger discusses his findings, such as:


The part of the eye that works as a niche for the beneficial bacteria.The roles elements like tears and dry eye play in this micro ecology.Future therapies researchers hope to initiate based on these findings as they better understand eye microbiome and disease.


Anthony St. Leger is an assistant professor of Ophthalmology and Immunology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. About three years ago, he and his lab found the presence of bacteria in a mouse’s diseased eye that seemed to serve the same function as the bacteria we have in our intestinal tract. In other words, these bacteria appeared to modulate the susceptibility to infectious disease and immunity. This prompted a more intensive study to understand more fully the purpose for its stable coexistence with the eye.


Dr. St. Leger explains that the bacteria is only present under the eyelid. The rest of the eye, especially the center, is bacteria free, but the area under the lid seems to support this niche ecology of beneficial bacteria. After he and his lab were given permission to use isolates from numerous past patients at the university clinic, they found that the mouse and human eye had enough similarity in the bacterium that researchers could apply what they learned from the mouse eye to the human eye.


Therefore, these researchers hope to use their studies to see if these bacteria can be beneficial drug carriers and offer other solutions regarding eye microbiome and disease, including pro-biotic-like therapies. 


For more information and links to Dr. St. Leger’s papers, see his lab’s web page at http://ophthalmology.pitt.edu/people/anthony-st-leger-phd

Lung Life – Robert Quinn, Assistant Professor at Michigan State University – Discussing Bacterial Lung Infections & Cystic Fibrosis

Feb 1, 2020 27:25

Description:

Lung Life – Robert Quinn, Assistant Professor at Michigan State University – Discussing Bacterial Lung Infections & Cystic Fibrosis

Feb 1, 2020 27:24

Description:

Robert Quinn, Assistant Professor at Michigan State University, discusses his research, detailing information on rare bacterial lung infections, anaerobic bacteria infection, and especially cystic fibrosis.

Podcast Points of Discussion:

What exactly is cystic fibrosis?How might pure oxygen impact bad bacteria?What are the long term possibilities for a cystic fibrosis patient?

Quinn’s education includes: a PhD in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in Lafayette, LA, an MSc in Microbiology from the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, and a BSc in Microbiology, also from the University of Guelph in Canada.

Quinn discusses cystic fibrosis, which he states is a classic genetic disease, and those who are afflicted with it have various mutations in a particular gene. As he explains cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease that affects the lungs and digestive system.

The body produces thick and sticky mucus that can clog the lungs and obstruct the pancreas. He goes on to discuss some of the commonalities that exist between sick people with cystic fibrosis and the healthy. He discusses the issues in detail, discussing the oral cavity and upper airways. 

Quinn continues his discussion by recounting some experiments he was involved with during his time at San Diego State University. In the experiments, patients would not only breathe oxygen, but they would actually sit in a hyperbaric chamber full of oxygen.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen while inside a pressurized room or tube. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a commonly used treatment for decompression sickness, which is a hazard of scuba diving. While there were potential risks due to the pressurization, the idea was that this environment could possibly kill some unwanted bacteria, such as anaerobic organisms, or anaerobes, which are organisms that do not require oxygen for growth, and thus they may respond negatively or perhaps even die if free oxygen is presented.

Quinn goes on to discuss cross contamination concerns between cystic fibrosis patients due to the fact that they have highly resistant bacteria. He explains broad-spectrum antibiotic use and talks about the pros and cons of various treatments.

On the Commercialization of New and Promising Technologies For Tackling Climate Change—Stephan Ouaknine—Inerjys

Feb 1, 2020 25:50

Description:

On the Commercialization of New and Promising Technologies For Tackling Climate Change—Stephan Ouaknine—Inerjys

Feb 1, 2020 25:49

Description:

Inerjys is a private equity fund investing in companies and technologies in the clean energy and climate change arena. Founder and managing partner, Stephan Ouaknine, discusses the following:

Why the commercialization of technologies is crucial in order for products to make a real impact on climate change, and why commercialization can be difficultWhat types of new clean energy and agricultural technologies are being developed and how they workWhat would be necessary in order to lower the cost of solar energy

Ouaknine understands that a budding technology company needs more than just the funds to develop its product: it needs early adopters and proof points in order to reach a greater market and actually have a tangible effect. In the world of technological developments designed to tackle climate change, this is even more important, since the cash risk is substantial for early adopters.

In order to address this challenge, Inerjys ensures that they not only fund companies, but invest in projects that will use the products those companies create, thereby commercializing the products and making them significantly more likely to be used as a feasible climate solution.

Ouaknine shares information about some of the products in the Inerjys portfolio, including a new, cost-effective approach to hydropower turbines in the ocean and vertical farming in response to urbanization. He also discusses emerging techniques for carbon capture and conversion, why the price of solar power is still high and how it could be lowered, and the technologies that are becoming increasingly commonplace.

He details the ways in which these technologies have a positive impact on the environment, and how further commercialization of emerging technologies might stave off an otherwise imminent and devastating increase in global temperature.

Tune in and learn more by visiting https://www.inerjys.com/.

Allergy Treatment – Dr. Claudia Gray, Paediatrician and Allergologist, Kids Allergy Paediatric & Allergy Centre – Allergy Treatment & New Research

Jan 31, 2020 36:37

Description:

Allergy Treatment – Dr. Claudia Gray, Paediatrician and Allergologist, Kids Allergy Paediatric & Allergy Centre – Allergy Treatment & New Research

Jan 31, 2020 36:37

Description:

In this podcast, Dr Claudia Gray, PhD, Paediatrician and Allergologist, Kids Allergy Paediatric & Allergy Centre—South Africa, talks in detail about allergy issues and research, discussing many common child allergies, child skin allergy treatment, and what’s coming in the future for allergy testing and treatment.


Podcast Points of Discussion:

How do allergy tests work?Why do certain allergies improve over time, but some actually worsen?Do allergy shots work as an effective treatment?


Dr Gray has an extensive history and background in her field, as a paediatrician with a subspecialist accreditation in allergology, and as a noted researcher. She received her medical degree from the University of Cape Town, then continued studies in London, specializing in paediatrics, paediatric clinical pharmacology, and paediatric allergy. Additionally, she holds a PhD related to the specific study of eczema and food allergy. 


Dr Gray talks about her background, why she decided to specialize in paediatrics and allergies, and some of the current research in the field. Allergologists have a wide range of studies that includes eczema, asthma, environmental allergies, drug allergies, food allergies, gut allergies, and insect venom allergies. Dr Gray provides detailed information on why some allergies improve over time, but others worsen. 

The research doctor and professor explains how allergy shots work, and why they are successful with some patients. She discusses the various mechanisms through which allergies can improve over time, discussing the artificial processes (such as allergy shots) that are designed to trick the body into producing protective antibodies. She explains how they work with their patients, discussing medicines, and specific allergies—such as peanut allergies, detailing how early oral exposure can help to build up a tolerance. She describes how desensitization for bee allergies, and other allergies, can sometimes work and explains why exposure is only becoming accepted as a method of treatment lately, in some circles. 


Dr Gray discusses eczema management, and the importance of discussing issues and information with your doctor, as opposed to trusting what you might find on the internet. 


As a respected speaker and noted authority, Dr Gray has contributed to more than 70 publications in her fields of expertise and she is a regular speaker at many international and local conferences.

Meltdown as Teaching Moment: Journalist Katherine Lewis Discusses Her Research into Children’s Behavior

Jan 30, 2020 26:09

Description:

Meltdown as Teaching Moment: Journalist Katherine Lewis Discusses Her Research into Children's Behavior

Jan 30, 2020 26:08

Description:

This podcast explores essential principals in childhood emotional development as researched by journalist Katherine Lewis. She discusses her book on this subject by explaining:


Her discovery process that leads to combing the ideas of experts, observations, and studies together in her book.Unique behaviors children exhibit today such as lack of self-regulation, which was less common 30 years ago.Practical ways we can engage with children to help them learn better self-regulation skills.


Katherine Lewis had been a journalist for 20 years covering business and policy issues when she became concerned by her own children's challenging behavior. She began intensive researching that led to a popular article and eventually a book: The Good News about Bad Behavior discusses parent's misguided attempts to correct behavior rather than offer behavioral skills.


She found that the current generation of young people has fewer self-regulation skills than past generations. This means younger people have difficulty managing their behavior, thoughts, and emotions in a way that is unmanageable. We see high rates of anxiety, addiction, and suicide by teens as a result.


Katherine Lewis explains that there are ways parents can address this to ease the gap between children's behavior then and now, from that meltdown moment and beyond, that will make space for these self-regulating skills to grow. She covers impediments to this from technology to social strata extremes and how connection, communication, and emotional capability building are key principals toward stronger emotional development.


For more information, see her web site at https://www.katherinerlewis.com/

Marine Microbial Musings—Joseph Vallino—Marine Biological Laboratory

Jan 30, 2020 40:50

Description:

Marine Microbial Musings—Joseph Vallino—Marine Biological Laboratory

Jan 30, 2020 40:49

Description:

Marine biogeochemistry is the study of how microscopic organisms like bacteria and phytoplankton modify the chemistry of the ocean, and at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Joseph Vallino’s work as Senior Scientist revolves around it.

Tune in to learn:

How microbes are distributed in the ocean and what kinds of processes and metabolic functions they carry outHow the differences and similarities between living and nonliving systems is helping Vallino elucidate how living organisms might organizeHow the theory of maximum entropy production relates to marine chemistry and microbial function

In a single liter of ocean water, there are billions of bacteria, which makes it difficult to identify all the players at any one time. In turn, this makes it difficult to understand the overall chemistry of the ocean, since each microbial process contributes to it.

In an attempt to overcome this challenge, Joseph Vallino is developing different approaches based on ideas derived from thermodynamics. His aim is to develop a better understanding of ocean chemistry and the ways in which biological systems organize.

He explains his unique approach to this problem and discusses a number of fascinating topics, including areas of active research in the field such as energy utilization science and microbial energy research.

For more, visit https://www.mbl.edu/ecosystems/vallino/.

Immunological Reactions and Heart Disease: Dr. Naveed Akbar Explains How our Body Hurts and Helps

Jan 29, 2020 34:24

Description:

Immunological Reactions and Heart Disease: Dr. Naveed Akbar Explains How our Body Hurts and Helps

Jan 29, 2020 34:23

Description:

While working at his post doc at Oxford University, Dr. Akbar focuses on the signals the immune system uses and resulting actions through extracellular vesicles research.

He discusses:

How our body’s healing mechanisms post-heart attack can both benefit and undercut healthy arteries through immune-induced inflammation.The difference between a healthy blood vessel and atherosclerosis plaque build up and how the epithelial cell cascade that the body sends to heal the area ends up progressing the inflammatory condition.Why his research to turn on and off these inflammatory signals may aid in better healing from heart disease.

Dr. Naveed Akbar focuses on extracellular vesicles research and how the vesicles relate to metabolic disease. Atherosclerosis, which causes heart attacks and strokes, tends to be much thicker in a diabetic patient. He believes this junction of immunological and metabolic disease is an important crossroads. 

He explains that while atherosclerosis builds up over decades due to many other lifestyle causes, we don't understand is why diabetic patients are more apt to get fattier plaques that are more aggressive and more prone to rupture, which ends in the heart attack and stroke events.

Therefore, he has studied how immune systems responds to damage within the blood vessel and why immune cells accumulate within the wall of an artery to drive these attacks. They’ve discovered that as the monocytes try and engulf the fat in an artery, this action attracts more immune cells, causing more inflammation. Trying to understand what signals turn on and off the message to cause inflammation may lead to better healing.

Finally, he describes a current project: extracellular vesicles research into what happens after a heart attack and splint placement. Immune cells go to the heart and create more inflammation, which is harmful—a healing that has a defective element. Understand what’s controlling their switch is important therapeutically.

For more information, see his page on the Oxford University site: https://www.rdm.ox.ac.uk/people/naveed-akbar

The Molecular Language of Parasites: Dr. Timothy Geary Explains Parasite Ecology

Jan 29, 2020 43:08

Description:

The Molecular Language of Parasites: Dr. Timothy Geary Explains Parasite Ecology

Jan 29, 2020 43:07

Description:

In order to create anti-parasitic medications like filariasis treatment, researchers like Dr. Geary study how parasites hide from their hosts. When you listen in to this discussion, you'll learn:

How parasites are closer in cell type to us than bacteria and why that makes them harder to kill.Why the coevolution of humans and malaria has made it unique among parasites.Why molecules that parasites release like micro RNAs may be the key to their ability to hide from their host and survive.

Dr. Timothy Geary serves as Chair in Parasite Biotechnology at McGill University and also has an appointment at Queen's University in Belfast. His background is in pharmacology, but he has developed a specialty in anti-parasitic medication discovery. This includes genomic work on the host-parasitic interface, especially for filariasis treatment and gastrointestinal nematode infections.

In this podcast, he explains several aspects of how parasites function and how vertebrates and arthropod vectors maintain the parasite's sometimes-complex lifecycle. Adaptive pressures affect parasites to the same extent as most animal life and Dr. Geary describes some interesting results of this such as the lower instance of immunological bowel diseases in regions where parasites are more common. 

He also helps differentiate parasitic nomenclature in a way that explains how and why many parasites can continue their life cycle so successfully. He catalogs the difference between single-celled protozoan parasites like the originators of toxoplasmosis and multi-celled nematode creatures.

Finally, he explains his work to understand how parasites go into "stealth mode" and why this may lead to better anti-parasitic medication and treatment.

Learn more about contacting Dr. Geary and find a list of his publications at https://www.mcgill.ca/parasitology/faculty/geary

Exosomes & Cancer – Raghu Kalluri, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Seeking to Understand How Extracellular Vesicles Work and Why They Exist

Jan 29, 2020 28:33

Description:

Exosomes & Cancer – Raghu Kalluri

Jan 29, 2020 28:32

Description:

Raghu Kalluri, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Cancer Biology University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses exosomes cancer, cancer stages, and his life’s work in research and medicine. 

Podcast Points of Discussion:

Why do cells generate extracellular vesicles?What are exosomes and how might they affect cancers?Can extracellular vesicles alter the cells around them?

In addition to being a professor and chairman of the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dr. Kalluri is also Adjunct Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine, and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at Rice University.

Dr. Kalluri earned his PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Kansas Medical Center, earned an MD degree from Brown University Medical School, and was a Post-doc fellow, and research associate as well, at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

Dr. Kalluri has devoted much of his career to the study of immunology and mechanisms associated with tissue injury and repair utilizing advanced organ fibrosis. Dr. Kalluri talks about his current work as a professor and researcher, and his study of exosomes as it relates to cancer. He provides his thoughts on the research question: why do cells generate extracellular vesicles, commonly referred to in the medical research world as simply, EVs.

Interestingly, these EVs seem to have the capacity to alter cells around them, which makes this area of study particularly important. Dr. Kalluri states that they could play a role in cancer progression. 

Dr. Kalluri discusses the differences in exosomes in varied individuals that might serve as biomarkers. He discusses the possible exosome content differences in regard to not only disease but also pregnancy. And as he states, much more research needs to be done in order to better understand what is happening in and around these cells and how it all affects tumors, and more. Dr. Kalluri discusses the areas they hope to understand, from the basic biology, to how release happens, how exosomes protect themselves, and more. 

Continuing, the research PhD talks about accelerated growth and the various experiments that are happening with exosomes. He explains why they think metastasis may happen, and some of the questions they hope to answer. Why do cells generate exosomes in such large numbers, he asks, and this is one of the primary issues they study.

Furthering his discussion, Dr. Kalluri talks about translational research, and the tremendous potential to utilize exosomes for drug delivery systems if they can figure out exactly how they function, and how to exploit them.

Mysteries of the Microbiome – Dr. Abby Johnson

Jan 29, 2020 32:55

Description:

Dr. Abby Johnson, Postdoctoral Associate, Knights Lab at the University of Minnesota, discusses her work in research, including detailed information on nutrition and a healthy gut diet.  


Podcast Points of Discussion:


Phytochemicals, and fiber compositions of certain foodsCan we actually change the stability of the microbiome?How does what we eat impact the bacteria in our gut?


Dr. Johnson studies the relationship between diet and the microbiome. She holds a Ph.D. in Nutrition from the University of Minnesota and devotes much of her time to research. Since 2010, Dr. Johnson has been heavily interested in gut issues and the microbiome. While studying in Chicago, she learned a great deal about fats in the gut, bowel disorders, and more, and her interest was triggered. She states that what we eat can literally change the bacteria in our guts. She talks about the foods we eat and the many microbes that are within. Her research begs the questions: can we change the stability of the microbiome? How do antibiotics have an effect? Dr. Johnson discusses diet in terms of macro and micronutrients, and what exactly is in the food we eat. What is it composed of? She goes into detail about phytochemicals and fiber compositions in foods, and how the gut handles it all. 


Continuing, she explains some of their studies and the data they derived from the diet and nutritional intake of study participants. She explains how nutritional status is maintained in hospital patients and the effect of the microbiome. Dr. Johnson goes on to discuss their findings in other studies. She states that the same food in different participants had various effects and that responses to foods were different in individuals. Interestingly, our personal microbiome may respond quite differently to foods. 

Wrapping up, Dr. Johnson discusses shifts in eating patterns, and how they may impact your gut microbiome. Additionally, Dr. Johnson talks about the areas she hopes to explore in future studies. 

On the Role of RNA in Epigenetic Gene Regulation and Inheritance—Upasna Sharma, PhD—Assistant Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz

Jan 28, 2020 37:59

Description:

On the Role of RNA in Epigenetic Gene Regulation and Inheritance—Upasna Sharma, PhD—Assistant Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz

Jan 28, 2020 37:58

Description:

Epigenetics is a mechanism for regulating gene expression, and Professor Upasna Sharma at the University of California, Santa Cruz defines epigenetic inheritance as the inheritance of phenotypic changes in the absence of changes in the underlying DNA.

She explains her research by exploring the following:

The three primary ways in which gene regulation can take placeWhat function small non-coding RNA play in epigenetic gene regulation and intergenerational inheritance, and how their location in the cell is dependent upon their function within the cellIn what ways RNA is more complex than DNAWhat impact stress, environmental toxins, and diet might play in sperm small RNA and transfer RNA

Dr. Sharma is studying the role of small non-coding RNAs in epigenetic inheritance by examining RNA in sperm. How is the environment being signaled to these small RNAs? When do tRNA fragments become abundant in sperm?

Through the research she and her team have already done, they’ve found that testicular sperm or germ cells do not have tRNA fragments, but as sperm enters the epididymis, it acquires a high abundance of tRNA fragments. Based on the data they’ve gathered, Dr. Sharma is confident in saying that tRNA fragments are created in the epididymis and then shipped to sperm. Why is this the case?

Dr. Sharma explores possible answers to this question. She also discusses how the female reproductive tract secretes extracellular vesicles and how sperm might be further altered by the female reproductive tract. The overarching aim of her research is to determine how sperm small RNA are generated, how the environment can influence their levels, and what the functional consequence is of the abundant small RNA payload of sperm, as this might help elucidate how epigenetic information is intergenerationally transferred by small RNAs.

Press play for the full conversation.

Using 3D Patient-Derived Organoids to Better Understand and Treat Pancreatic Cancer—Herve Tiriac, PhD—Associate Project Scientist at UC San Diego Health

Jan 28, 2020 35:12

Description:

Using 3D Patient-Derived Organoids to Better Understand Pancreatic Cancer—Herve Tiriac

Jan 28, 2020 35:12

Description:

Organoid modeling can be done using adult human tissues, mouse models, or by engineering induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). At UC San Diego Health, Associate Project Scientist, Herve Tiriac, is using adult tissues to create 3D patient-derived pancreas-like organoids.

He discusses the following:

What portion of the pancreas is modeled in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor organoidsWhat happens when different cell types are cultured togetherHow models can be created using only the tissue from fine needle biopsiesWhat types of variation are present in pancreatic tumors

Driven by both professional and personal reasons, Dr. Tiriac is interested in using 3D patient-derived organoid modeling in order to better understand pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, a type of cancer that’s both very deadly and understudied. He sees this research as an opportunity to implement meaningful clinical improvement in the lives of those affected, and build a precision medicine technology platform in doing so.

Dr. Tiriac discusses the origination of the term “organoid” and the types of organoid modeling that can be done, the process of the development of organoids based on patient-derived pancreatic tumors, the challenge of organoid contamination by yeast and/or fungi, what types of new experimentation will be done in the near future, such as those dealing with the problem of treatment resistance and improving existing approaches to the development of tumor organoids, and so much more.

Tune in to hear the full conversation

Mysteries of the Microbiome – Dr. Abby Johnson, Postdoctoral Associate, Knights Lab at the University of Minnesota – Foods, Effects, and the Microbiome’s Diversity

Jan 28, 2020 32:55

Description:

Mysteries of the Microbiome – Dr. Abby Johnson, Postdoctoral Associate, Knights Lab at the University of Minnesota – Foods, Effects, and the Microbiome’s Diversity

Jan 28, 2020 32:55

Description:

Dr. Abby Johnson, Postdoctoral Associate, Knights Lab at the University of Minnesota, discusses her work in research, including detailed information on nutrition and a healthy gut diet.  


Podcast Points of Discussion:


Phytochemicals, and fiber compositions of certain foodsCan we actually change the stability of the microbiome?How does what we eat impact the bacteria in our gut?


Dr. Johnson studies the relationship between diet and the microbiome. She holds a Ph.D. in Nutrition from the University of Minnesota and devotes much of her time to research. Since 2010, Dr. Johnson has been heavily interested in gut issues and the microbiome. While studying in Chicago, she learned a great deal about fats in the gut, bowel disorders, and more, and her interest was triggered. She states that what we eat can literally change the bacteria in our guts. She talks about the foods we eat and the many microbes that are within. Her research begs the questions: can we change the stability of the microbiome? How do antibiotics have an effect? Dr. Johnson discusses diet in terms of macro and micronutrients, and what exactly is in the food we eat. What is it composed of? She goes into detail about phytochemicals and fiber compositions in foods, and how the gut handles it all. 


Continuing, she explains some of their studies and the data they derived from the diet and nutritional intake of study participants. She explains how nutritional status is maintained in hospital patients and the effect of the microbiome. Dr. Johnson goes on to discuss their findings in other studies. She states that the same food in different participants had various effects and that responses to foods were different in individuals. Interestingly, our personal microbiome may respond quite differently to foods. 

Wrapping up, Dr. Johnson discusses shifts in eating patterns, and how they may impact your gut microbiome. Additionally, Dr. Johnson talks about the areas she hopes to explore in future studies.  

Biomarkers and the Microbiome in the Early Detection of Disease in Pets—Kay O’Donnell—WALTHAM Petcare Science Institute

Jan 27, 2020 27:03

Description:

Biomarkers and the Microbiome in the Early Detection of Disease in Pets—Kay O’Donnell—WALTHAM Petcare Science Institute

Jan 27, 2020 27:03

Description:

At WALTHAM Petcare Science Institute, the goal is to understand what drives health and wellbeing in our pets—whether cats, dogs, fish, or horses. Vice president of the institute, Kay O’Donnell, discusses the following:

How an identification of biomarkers and an understanding of the microbiomes of different species can elucidate what drives health and sickness in pets (e.g. a recently discovered biomarker helps identify cats at high risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) two years earlier than it would otherwise be detected)The importance of routine health checks and microbiome testing for petsWhat factors cause the microbiome to change in pets (e.g. age, environment)

Through the use of vast amounts of data from veterinary practices and the implementation of an AI algorithm, the WALTHAM Petcare Science Institute has developed a method for obtaining useful information from samples of blood, urine, and feces collected from pets over the course of many years. This has given way to the ability to identify biomarkers that indicate pet health statuses and the likelihood of these statutes changing over time.

More broadly, O’Donnell sees this as evidence of a new approach emerging in pet healthcare—one that not only values proactivity and early intervention, but that mirrors the approach that’s emerging in human healthcare.

She also discusses the role of diet and nutrition in the activity and composition of the microbiome, how the comparison of oral microbiomes between dogs and humans differ and how this is influenced by differences in diet, and what the future of pet health and animal-human interactions might look like.

For more, visit https://www.waltham.com/.

Antibiotic Resistance Emergency – Paul Turner & Robert McBride, Co-founders of Felix Biotechnology – The Troubling Rise of Antibiotic Resistance, Finding Solutions to Fix the Problem

Jan 27, 2020 34:07

Description:

Antibiotic Resistance Emergency – Paul Turner & Robert McBride, Co-founders of Felix Biotechnology – The Troubling Rise of Antibiotic Resistance, Finding Solutions to Fix the Problem

Jan 27, 2020 34:07

Description:

Paul Turner & Robert McBride, co-founders of Felix Biotechnology (felixbt.com), discuss the growing problem of antibiotic resistance and the new therapies on the horizon.

In this podcast they’ll discuss:

The ways in which targeted biotherapeutics could change modern medicineWhat regulatory hurdles do biotech companies face as they march to the marketplace?Just how bad is the antibiotic resistance problem globally?

Turner & McBride’s biotech company, Felix Biotechnology, is heavily focused on progressing the deployment of novel biotherapeutics that can target urgent microbial challenges within human health, and much more.

Turner & McBride discuss the greatest challenges they face in the biomedical field, including the widespread failure of traditional antibiotics. They discuss some of the older technologies they are in the process of updating, such as developing viruses that specifically kill bacteria. Turner & McBride believe that this option will give the medical community greater control as they seek to combat the antibiotic resistance problem. 

The biotechnology researchers and entrepreneurs discuss antibiotic sensitivity, and the use of their solutions in therapy. They discuss some of the more troubling bacterial pathogens, discussing cells and proteins. Continuing, the Felix co-founders provide detailed information on bacteriophages or phages as they are called informally, which are the most abundant organisms within the biosphere, a common feature of prokaryotic existence.

Turner & McBride explain the regulatory hurdles that they and other biotech researchers and developers face, and how they can move forward. As they state, clinical trials data is going to be key to getting their phages further developed and released into the medical/healthcare industry. Expanding the discussion, they provide info on the cocktail approach in treatment and therapy. 

As many research and development biotechnology companies fail, Felix Biotechnology seeks to find a way to be financially solvent so they can bring their therapy concepts to the market.

Mycobiomes: Dr. Iliyan Iliev Devlves into the Importance of Understanding Gut Fungi

Jan 24, 2020 32:27

Description:

Mycobiomes: Dr. Iliyan Iliev Devlves into the Importance of Understanding Gut Fungi

Jan 24, 2020 32:26

Description:

Only recently do scientists understand the prevalence and importance of fungi in our digestive system anatomy. Dr. Iliev tells listeners about:

How fungal microbiota, or mycobiota, changes under conditions of inflammation in the bowel.What this might mean regarding the relationship between fungi, bacteria, and bowel disease.Why a mutation of cells with a receptor sensitive to fungi might hold a key to Crohn's Disease.

Dr. Iliyan Iliev is Assistant Professor of Immunology in Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. As a mucosal immunologist, he and his lab are focusing specifically on how mycobiota impacts bowel inflammation. Their work has lead them to examine how components of fungi, bacteria, and cell interaction may lead to relief from immunological bowel diseases. The balance between fungi and bacteria appears to be important in the suppression of these diseases, but more work needs to be done.

The presence of gut fungi made itself known after detecting a fungal message while undergoing cellular primer researcher. Once microbiome work became more prevalent in digestive system anatomy and deep gene sequencing became possible, scientist went back and applied this knowledge, discovering a community of different fungi in the gut.

Dr. Iliev's lab works at the strain and species level of fungi of various patients, then connecting these strains and species to the patient’s condition. This gut fungi focus may help treat these inflammatory bowel diseases.

See the Ilieve Lab page at Weill Cornell Medicine for more information: https://ilievlab.weill.cornell.edu/

Process of a Dying Cell Holds Potential for Disease Treatment: Dr. Ivan Poon Explains His Research

Jan 24, 2020 23:54

Description:

Process of a Dying Cell Holds Potential for Disease Treatment: Dr. Ivan Poon Explains His Research

Jan 24, 2020 23:54

Description:

Dr. Poon's research into the mechanism of cell death reveals that what was long thought a random process actually has signs of regulation. In this podcast, you'll learn:

What about the process signifies regulation.What cells release in these extracellular vesicles when they die.Why understanding the process of cell death in disease settings may lead to disease-fighting drugs.

Dr. Ivan Poon of La Trobe University is a Senior Research Fellow in biochemistry and genetics. He specializes in extracellular vesicles and cell turnover, or the mechanisms of cell death. In this discussion, he explains his focus on trying to understand what happens when cells die. The amount of energy a cell puts into generating small vesicles, or apoptotic bodies, during turnover is significant. Therefore, he and other researchers are studying why cells invest in this process.

While researchers have known the basics of cell death for decades, only recently has this mechanism of cell death process been understood as highly regulated rather than random. Furthermore, each cell type follows a different process. Monocytes, for example, form a string-like protrusion like a beaded necklace that then generates apoptotic bodies. 

Most important for Dr. Poon is to understand the molecular mechanism of this process—what controls it. The answers may enable special treatment for diseases including drugs that either inhibit or accelerate cell deaths depending on the process needed to regain health. 

For more, see Dr. Poon's page on the La Trobe University web site: https://scholars.latrobe.edu.au/display/ipoon

Optical Biopsy: Using Cellular Autofluorescence to Noninvasively Image Tissue—Stephen Allen Boppart—Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Jan 24, 2020 43:01

Description:

Optical Biopsy: Using Cellular Autofluorescence to Noninvasively Image Tissue—Stephen Allen Boppart—Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Jan 24, 2020 43:01

Description:

In this podcast, the principal investigator at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dr. Stephen Boppart, details the development of a novel portable imaging system with research and clinical applications. He discusses:


How the laser they’ve developed is able to scan tissues and produce images without the use of potentially toxic dyes and contrast materialsIn what capacity this new imaging technology can be used in vivo and in the operating room, and how this could allow for a real-time determination of how aggressive a tumor isWhy standard procedures in histology miss critical information about tissues and metabolic activity, and how this new technology can bypass the problem


Dr. Boppart expounds on the many research and clinical applications of this new technology, which include exploration of fundamental questions in biology and carcinogenesis, and detection of biomarkers leading to earlier cancer diagnosis.


One of his main focuses has been on putting this technology on a portable medical card and bringing it into the operating room during breast cancer surgery in order to image a tumor as soon as it’s been excised. This will allow for a better understanding of breast cancer anatomy, including the cells present, the collagen structure, and the level of metabolic activity.


Dr. Boppart also discusses how the quantity and type of extracellular vesicles differ depending on whether it’s been produced by cancerous or healthy tissue, and how this discovery would have been impossible if only using standard methods in histology.


For more information, check out https://biophotonics.illinois.edu/.

Epigenetic Inheritance: Dr. Mansuy Discusses Research on Trauma and Neuroepignetics

Jan 23, 2020 38:35

Description:

Epigenetic Inheritance: Dr. Mansuy Discusses Research on Trauma and Neuroepignetics

Jan 23, 2020 38:35

Description:

Neuroepigenetics entails processes that involve the neuro system. Dr. Isabelle Mansuy explains her research by exploring:

How epigenetics determines cellular formation and is therefore fundamental in development.How life experiences can affect germ cells and how this is transmitted across generations.Why experiencing trauma at a young age will cause the strongest epigenetic effect.

Dr. Isabelle Mansuy runs the Laboratory of Neuroepigenetics at the University of Zurich. Her lab is interested in the long-term effects of stress through the epigenetic carryover. Their studies on mice have shown that young individuals exposed to trauma at a very vulnerable time, a time when their germ cells are less protected, can retain dramatic effects. These stress-induced traumas modify the germ cell epigenome and the traces left on the brain sometimes carry over across generations.

Through these studies, her lab has made a solid model that is reproducible where they can screen these epigenetic changes and plot which of the epigenetic-caused behavioral changes remain and specifically for how many generations. 

Dr. Mansuy explains the depth to which epigenetic inheritance affects all physiological elements, from metabolic organs to bones to skin. Everywhere they looked they saw effects from trauma affecting cellular production.

Her lab continues to try and understand how these changes are transcribed and are looking at the possibility that blood is probably the mediator between the signals. 

Finally, she asks us to consider that epigenetic inheritance research has been delayed by our belief that DNA sequencing would solve all genetic problems and this is not the case. Neuroepigenetics changes our concept of heredity.

For more, see her lab website: https://www.hifo.uzh.ch/en/research/mansuy.html

Additionally, her papers are located on Pubmed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

Early Cancer Detection: Quantgene’s Jo Bhakdi Discusses Emerging Liquid Biopsy Test

Jan 23, 2020 35:18

Description:

Early Cancer Detection: Quantgene's Jo Bhakdi Discusses Emerging Liquid Biopsy Test

Jan 23, 2020 35:17

Description:

Quantgene combines deep genomics with AI to detect cancer very early. When you listen, you'll hear Mr. Bhakdi explain:

What information they are able to glean from a blood test regarding cancer presence.The difference and benefit of a "liquid biopsy" or blood test compared with a conventional tumor biopsy.How this test is able to recognize mutational expressions despite the heterogeneity of most tumors.

Quantgene founder and CEO Jo Bhakdi discusses the company's focus on early cancer detection through blood testing to find its earliest markers. With a human genome sequence software-driven technology that also engages chemistry, machine learning, and laboratory processes, Quantgene is able to sequence and investigate cancer DNA one by one. This increases the accuracy and speed by an exponential degree compared to other detections that were based on protein marker identification.

The test can pick up somatic DNA mutations in the blood caused by tumors with a whole new level of precision by detecting individual molecules in cancer DNA. This human genome sequence work is superior to next generation sequencing because it's much more accurate. 

Quantgene's process can investigate every single DNA copy and eliminate any errors. They aggregated the world’s largest data set of tumor DNA and created a matching learning project to answer very specific questions like, what are the smallest number of locations one has to look at to still find any variant of a tumor? They can get a systemic reflection of the tumor and can tell exactly what the tumor is in mutational terms. The data they've generated and continue to generate is completely new in oncology.

Future plans include the launch of an early detection product in 2020 called Serenity. A simple blood test done once a year should guide physicians on detecting cancer early. The resulting data set will create much larger data sets ultimately, with a huge data flow to gain full scientific insight.

For more information on the company, see https://www.quantgene.com/

For more on the 2020 test release of Serenity, see https://www.quantgene.com/early-cancer-detection

Bacteriophages, the Microbiome, and Human Health—David Pride—Associate Director of Microbiology, Associate Professor of Pathology and Medicine, UC San Diego

Jan 22, 2020 46:20

Description:

On today’s episode, Dr. Price shares his insight and information on a range of fascinating topics, including the following:


How microbiota and viruses interactHow oral microbes in mice have been shown to produce different phenotypesWhat purpose is served by each of the two separate lifestyles carried out by viruses in bacteriaWhether or not viruses are considered to be alive, and whether or not it matters for Dr. Pride’s research aimsHow bacteriophages might function as antibiotic alternatives


The human virome is the collection of all of the viruses in and on the surface of the body. There are trillions of these viruses, and many of them are bacteriophages, which are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria. Over the past 15 years or so, there has been a lot of research and effort in trying to understand the function of microbes in the body and how they relate to states of health and disease.

At UC San Diego, Associate Director of Microbiology and Associate Professor of Pathology and Medicine, David Pride, is focused specifically on trying to understand how to utilize bacteriophages in a way that will improve human health.

Bacteriophages, the Microbiome, and Human Health—David Pride—Associate Director of Microbiology, Associate Professor of Pathology and Medicine, UC San Diego

Jan 22, 2020 46:21

Description:

Nanosized Contributions Making Big Impacts on Microbiome Research—Paul Weiss, PhD—UCLA Microbiome Center

Jan 22, 2020 27:37

Description:

Nanosized Contributions Making Big Impacts on Microbiome Research—Paul Weiss, PhD—UCLA Microbiome Center

Jan 22, 2020 27:37

Description:

“One of the unanticipated developments that really came from nano is that we evolved from chemistry, physics, engineering, medicine, toxicology, and so forth, and we learned to adopt each other’s approaches and adopt each other’s problems,” says Dr. Paul Weiss, UC Presidential Chair, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, and Distinguished Professor of Material Science & Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

He continues by explaining how the communication and collaborative approaches in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology have served the world of microbiome research, and how they might impact other fields of research as well.

After developing the BRAIN Initiative under the Obama Administration, Dr. Weiss and his team were asked to lead the technological roadmap effort for the National Microbiome Initiative, which gathered scientists and engineers from around the world with a common goal: to understand what technologies can be used to understand how different species interact in the microbiome of humans, oceans, and soils.

Dr. Weiss discusses a number of interesting topics and accomplishments of the Paul Weiss Lab, so tune in for all the details. You will discover:

How the BRAIN Initiative laid out which technologies would be necessary for measuring chemical signals in the brain and understanding how neural circuits workHow Dr. Weiss’ group is trying to address single gene mutation diseases like sickle cell and apply the same approach to cancer immunotherapyHow chemical cues and the ability to place functionality is useful in tissue engineering, for example in the creation of an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory periodontal membrane that encourages bone regrowth and controls degradation


Manufacturing Miracles – Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry – On-Demand Manufacturing Services and the Importance of New Tech Innovations to Increase Efficiency

Jan 22, 2020 33:48

Description:

Manufacturing Miracles – Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry – On-Demand Manufacturing Services and the Importance of New Tech Innovations to Increase Efficiency

Jan 22, 2020 33:48

Description:

Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry (xometry.com), discusses the work they do at Xometry, including an overview of on-demand manufacturing services.

Paulsen heads the Applications Engineering team that is responsible for handling special case projects that demand specialized attention to material selection, design-for-manufacturing, and technical engineering resources as well.

Paulsen discusses Xometry, and how they came to their company’s name. He provides an overview of what they do—making manufacturing easier. He discusses how they have sought to revolutionize the established manufacturing industry by introducing AI (artificial intelligence) and machine learning. Their system allows customers to procure parts in one location, yet still take advantage of the talents of thousands of people in a gigantic manufacturing network.

He discusses sourcing of parts, technical data packages, communications, and the entire process from start to finish as manufacturers bring all the necessary elements together. But the system is slow, and thus Xometry enhances the entire chain so manufacturers can get pricing quotes and information more efficiently and faster. 

Paulsen discusses customized manufacturing and set up costs, and as he states, there is a need for high level specification but quantities needed are not as high. He explains how Xometry can help customers find the right suppliers who can meet these specialized needs.

Continuing, Paulsen talks about quantities needed, touching on the processes in 3D printing and how improvements can speed up manufacturing times. Paulsen goes on to discuss the feedback customers can get right away after they input their data, and manufacturing/parts needs. As Paulsen states, they seek to create a ‘knowledge nucleus’ for clients and customers, so they can make all sorts of important decisions that will bring multiple, more efficient technologies to their manufacturing process. 

Wrapping up, the manufacturing expert details how their solutions help customers to streamline their process for manufacturing. He discusses their typical and atypical clients, and he provides further information on raw goods, milling, and prototypes.

In this podcast:

3D printing uses in manufacturingWhat methods can manufacturers use to speed up their manufacturing times?How can AI make manufacturing more efficient?

 

Improving Early Detection and Treatment of GI Cancers—Sharmila Anandasabapathy, M.D.—Baylor Global Innovation Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

Jan 21, 2020 28:25

Description:

Improving Early Detection and Treatment of GI Cancers—Sharmila Anandasabapathy, M.D.—Baylor Global Innovation Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

Jan 21, 2020 28:25

Description:

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers such as esophageal and stomach cancer are on the rise worldwide, with under-resourced populations being particularly affected. Early detection of GI changes that can lead to cancer requires endoscopy, a procedure that involves the insertion of a thin tube into the body to image the tissues, identify signs of disease, and deliver treatment. When endoscopy is either too expensive or simply unavailable in certain populations, otherwise preventable cancers can emerge. 


In her work, gastroenterologist and director of the Baylor Global Innovation Center in Houston, TX, Dr. Sharmila Anandasabapathy, has two primary research interests: how to better prevent the development of GI cancers, and how to make early detection and treatment more accessible to underserved populations around the world. In order to address this very issue, Dr. Anandasabapathy and her team have developed an affordable, portable endoscopic tool capable of detecting precancerous cellular changes and acting as the medium through which treatments are delivered.


She discusses a range of important issues, including the following: 

What contributes to the development of the two main types of esophageal cancerWhat happens to the cells of the esophagus when repeatedly exposed to acid over a period of timeRisks associated with taking proton pump inhibitors for acid reflux on a long-term basisHow the use of innovative healthcare apps can improve awareness, education, and treatment of GI diseases worldwide

Insight from an Expert on Expertise—Karl Ericsson—Author of Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise

Jan 21, 2020 48:21

Description:

Insight from an Expert on Expertise—Karl Ericsson—Author of Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise

Jan 21, 2020 48:21

Description:

Is natural talent a real thing? Are human beings fundamentally different in that some are born with special capabilities, and others just aren’t? How are very high levels of performance attained? And how would the answer to these questions impact who receives access to limited resources? These are a few of the questions that Karl Ericsson has been researching for almost 40 years now.

Ericsson joins the podcast to talk about a number of topics in this field of research, including child “prodigies,” possible hallmarks of continuous success from childhood into adulthood in a particular domain, savants, in what ways certain abilities might actually be “natural” (or not), and the lack of overall evidence suggesting that genetics play a role in high levels of performance.

On today’s podcast, you will discover:

How purposeful or deliberate practice differs in significant ways from simply “putting in the hours”Why it can be hard to find a good measure of current performance and how to become more successfulLearning methods and techniques that foster better performance in different fields

Press play for the full conversation, and check out Ericsson’s book, Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.

Food Power – Ben Atkinson, Nutritionist, Podcaster (the Functional Health Podcast) – Nutrition, Our Bodies, and How We Can Improve Health

Jan 21, 2020 28:03

Description:

Food Power – Ben Atkinson, Nutritionist, Podcaster (the Functional Health Podcast) – Nutrition, Our Bodies, and How We Can Improve Health

Jan 21, 2020 28:03

Description:

Ben Atkinson, of the Functional Health podcast (FunctionalHealthInfo.com), is a nutritionist and health enthusiast. In this informative podcast, Ben talks about holistic wellness, functional medicine, and overall holistic health

Ben’s podcast, and site, is a complete resource guide for all kinds of important information regarding professional recognition, health events, training, and more—happening across the country—for clinicians in the field, as well as trainees and the public.

Ben discusses his background and how he came to be interested in nutrition. As an overweight child, Ben became interested in body building at the age of 16, and this interest led him to learn about high protein diets—low in carbs and low in fat. When he saw fast results he became excited about this power of nutrition and decided to make it a part of his ongoing work. But over time he added in carbs and fats to increase energy, which provided clarity of mind. Taking from everything he learned, he began to see that nutrition was the key to not only how you look and feel, but also to prevent illness and restore health. 

Ben discusses his intensive studies, and what he learned while gaining his master’s. He discusses various modalities and the separations in the medical field, which he states need to come together and be more synchronized in order to best deliver options for good health practices. Ben discusses genes and how they contribute to various health outcomes, and he talks about the different people/cultures around the world and the diets that they exist upon. He discusses allergens, and how to eliminate them, and the various ways we can fine tune our bodies. Continuing, Ben talks about DNA testing, and other methods people can use to learn more about their bodies, markers, and health information.

In this podcast:

What can we learn from DNA testing?The power of nutrition and good foods for the bodyHow genetics play a role in health

 

Plant Medicine: How Donnie Yance Uses Plants to Improve Healthcare and Quality of Life

Jan 20, 2020 50:50

Description:

Plant Medicine: How Donnie Yance Uses Plants to Improve Healthcare and Quality of Life

Jan 20, 2020 50:50

Description:

Renowned herbalist and nutritionist Donnie Yance talks about plant-based treatments with a focus on cancer management specifically. When you listen, you'll better understand

How plants, by enduring stress during growth, develop compounds that help humans bodies handle their own stress.Why plant medicine can work together with traditional cancer treatments for more effective care, combatting issues such as drug resistance and nutritional deficits.What plant medicine can offer you in terms of tips to live longer through Mederi's five-stage system.

Founder, President, Chairman, and Lead Clinician at the Mederi Center, Donnie Yance has been involved in plant medicine for decades. He founded the Natura brand to make high quality botanical medicine. 

At the Mederi Center, Yance works with cancer patients and their doctors from a quality of life and healthcare perspective under a specific order: first, they focus on the health of the patient with plant medicine to strengthen their healing capacity; then, they assess and alter accordingly the patient's micro environment and how it relates to the disease; and last, they targeting the cancer after identifying its molecular characteristics. Ultimately, the goal is to create a medicinal approach that does the most harm to the unhealthy cells with the least harm to the healthy.

Yance uses his extensive knowledge of extracts and botanicals to inhibit the capacity of the cancer cells to build resistant pathways. The Mederi Center also focuses on quality of life, offering tips to live longer with better healthcare. 

For more, see the Mederi Center web site at https://medericenter.org/as well as a video featuring a Mederi Center patient called "That's Not Your Story" at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUVu354ujnc.

Donnie Yance also has a website and a blog at https://www.donnieyance.com/

Better Connections: Stewart Kantor of Ondas Network Talks Transforming Industrial Networks

Jan 20, 2020 25:03

Description:

Better Connections: Stewart Kantor of Ondas Network Talks Transforming Industrial Networks

Jan 20, 2020 25:03

Description:

Consumer wireless broadband connection uses better technology than the industrial sector. Mr. Kantor explains why and how Ondas is changing this through software defined radio projects and other technologies. When you listen, you'll hear:

Why consumer and industrial networks can't work with the same technology for wireless broadband connections.Why improvements in communication technology for first responders and electric companies will help consumer networks function in times of emergencies as well.How this technology comes from "licensed radio frequencies" and why that makes a difference.

President, CEO, and cofounder of Ondas Networks, Stewart Kantor, discusses "mission critical IOT" (internet of other things) for the industrial sector. Ondas focuses on network connectivity for the industrial sector, including utility, natural gas, transportation, and commercial drone companies. 

He explains that the technology in use by industrial companies has not been upgraded as it has for consumers because of a long list of challenges such as distance, cost, and data needs. Ondas is working on this upgrade through multiple means from software defined radio projects to specialized types of automation fitting the large geographical and upstream data needs. 

Mr. Kantor discusses the ways in which these vulnerabilities played out in the California wildfires of 2019 and how his company is developing technology that could improve the situation from multiple angles. He describes what "licensed radio frequencies" are in terms of these improvements and why wireless broadband connections may never be the same.

For more, see www.ondas.com and find links to additional information.

Biomarker Discovery – P. Shannon Pendergrast, PhD, Chief Science Officer at Ymir Genomics – Advanced Biomarker Identification Techniques

Jan 20, 2020 38:14

Description:

Biomarker Discovery – P. Shannon Pendergrast

Jan 20, 2020 38:14

Description:

P. Shannon Pendergrast, PhD, Chief Science Officer at Ymir Genomics (ymirgenomics.com), discusses his company’s work in biomarker identification techniques.


Dr. Pendergrast holds a PhD from the Rutgers University Waksman Institute of Microbiology in Molecular Genetics. He completed his post-doctoral training at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories. Dr. Pendergrast has over 12 years of experience as a scientist, executive, and entrepreneur.


Ymir Genomics seeks to provide new and innovative tools to facilitate the discovery of biomarkers from biofluids, to assist in the ongoing fight against human diseases. Dr. Pendergrast discusses the primary objectives of Ymir Genomics. Dr. Pendergrast talks in detail about their accomplishments and discoveries, including their efficient, rapid method for isolating extracellular vesicles, extracellular RNA, and/or extracellular protein directly from urine samples. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-derived vesicles that can be released via different cell types, including hepatic stellate cells, hepatocytes, and immune cells in normal as well as pathological conditions.


The science researcher CSO discusses how they compare proteins using mass spectrometry, and how they look at the data. He talks in detail about their work studying liver-specific vesicles, exosomes, stability issues, and more. He discusses their processes in detail, discussing how they work with structures, proteins, RNA, etc.


Among the many important offerings Ymir delivers, they can also provide extracellular vesicle isolation protocol and bioinformatics protocol to discover biomarkers for prostate and bladder cancer. Dr. Pendergrast wraps up by discussing their current and future work.


In this podcast:

What can we learn from extracellular vesicles?

What can biomarkers tell us?

An overview of biomarker identification techniques

Everything is Light: Professor Arto Annila Discusses How this Changes the Questions of Life’s Origins

Jan 20, 2020 32:06

Description:

Everything is Light: Professor Arto Annila Discusses How this Changes the Questions of Life's Origins

Jan 20, 2020 32:05

Description:

Dr. Annila, biophysics professor, explores the time and space relationship in this podcast. When you listen, you'll hear him discuss:

Why he thinks Darwin's theory of natural selection can be approached through physics.How questions we ask about aspects of human existence change if we consider that everything is quanta (photons).If everything is about motion, we can approach life and non-living factors the same way.

Early in his days as a new professor of biophysics, Dr. Annila of the University of Helsinki asked why there was no equation for evolution yet. After all, life is all about motion. That question took him on this voyage he explores in his book and in his research. He looks at the theory of evolution in terms of physics.

For example, he explains the time and space relationship like this: losing heat takes place over time. Photons that we lose as we cool off are not only carrying energy but also time. This means energy is carried over a period of time: energy and time go hand in hand and this can be a mathematical formula. Why? Because photons have a wavelength. A wavelength divided by the speed of light equals time. This makes time a concreate concept rather than an abstract.

He continues to explain that it is a contrived idea that evolution should be limited to animals and explains that there's nothing special in life versus nonlife according to his theories. Finally, this understanding changes how we approach many aspects of human existence. An understanding of everything as photons opens up a new understanding of all matter.

For more, see his university home page: https://www.mv.helsinki.fi/home/aannila/arto/index

A Foray into Nuclear Physics – Dr. Robin Smith, Lecturer in Physics, Sheffield Hallam University, UK – The Current State of Nuclear Physics Research

Jan 20, 2020 52:27

Description:

A Foray into Nuclear Physics – Dr. Robin Smith, Lecturer in Physics, Sheffield Hallam University, UK – The Current State of Nuclear Physics Research

Jan 18, 2020 52:26

Description:

Dr. Robin Smith, Lecturer in Physics at Sheffield Hallam University, UK, delivers an insightful overview of his work in nuclear physics research topics and experiments in nuclear physics.


Dr. Smith earned his Ph.D. in nuclear physics at the University of Birmingham under the guidance of Dr. C. Wheldon and Prof. M. Freer. He is a distinguished lecturer in physics and specializes in multiple fields, including the following: nuclear data, nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, radiation detection, atomic nuclei and more.


Dr. Smith talks about nuclear physics and general physics and how he came to his areas of specialty. As he explains, he undertook projects in his senior year at university that involved smashing nuclei, which really got his interest moving in the direction of nuclear physics. Dr. Smith explains why he studies the atomic nucleus in detail, discussing the building blocks—atoms, and historical perspectives on the atom. He explains the atom’s structure and the density of the atomic nucleus, citing examples for comparison. Dr. Smith goes on to explain that in nature we have four fundamental forces that govern all matter within the universe—gravity, the electromagnetic force, the weak force, and the strong force. Dr. Smith details how these forces work, discussing gravity and its effects and the binding structures. 


The nuclear physics expert discusses quantum mechanics, and how it is derived from the Schrödinger equation, which is a linear partial differential equation that precisely describes the general wave function, or state function, etc., of a quantum-mechanical system. Continuing, Dr. Smith discusses stars in our galaxy, the heavy elements, and the forces that exist, detailing how his research relates. He discusses carbon and excited states within nuclei and some of the theories that exist regarding molecules and molecular physics in general. 


As Dr. Smith extends his discussion, he explains some of the methods they use to gather their scientific data. He explains how they study energies and what the data reveals in regard to decay processes. Regarding his research in colliding, Dr. Smith states that decay behavior, specifically regarding carbon-12, the most common of all-natural carbon isotopes, does appear to change dependent upon what projectile is being fired at the carbon-12. In essence, the environment does appear to affect the outcome of the reaction.

Wrapping up, Dr. Smith discusses the work and theories of Sir Fred Hoyle, the English astronomer who famously formulated the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis.


In this podcast:

What exactly is quantum mechanics?An overview of the atomic nucleusWhat are the forces that exist in our galaxy?


Epigenetic Impact – Anita Öst, Medical Faculty at Linköping University – Gene Expression and Epigenetic Inheritance

Jan 17, 2020 30:25

Description:

Epigenetic Impact – Anita Öst, Medical Faculty at Linköping University – Gene Expression and Epigenetic Inheritance

Jan 17, 2020 30:24

Description:

Anita Öst, Medical Faculty at Linköping University, provides an overview of the current state of epigenetics research as she discusses

epigenetic inheritance in humans.

Anita seeks to understand and thereby manipulate epigenetic metabolic programs that are set up by parental cues as well as early life events in an effort to design new treatments for obesity and obesity-related diseases, etc.

Anita discusses the concept of epigenetics, which is the study of changes in organisms that can be caused by a modification of gene expression, as opposed to an alteration of the genetic code. She details the specific area of epigenetics she focuses on, which looks at how offspring will inherit information or change their phenotype based on their parents’ environment, or stress. She explains why starvation or stress may lead to changes, and talks in depth about experiments with fruit flies that provided further information on theories related to epigenetic inheritance.

She discusses how weight affects flies, and how they look at fat by observing and measuring their triglycerides. And the research scientist explains what they learned by experimenting with weight gain in the test subjects and how that impacts offspring. 

Continuing, the Linköping University researcher talks about experiments they performed with humans related to diet and sugar intake. She discusses their results, and how it affected sperm motility. Wrapping up, the researcher explains how these dietary and other effects have impacted their research and their considerations for other experimentation.

In this podcast:

Can diet affect sperm motility?What can we learn from epigenetics?How offspring inherit information or change phenotype based on parents’ environment

 

The Secrets to Aging – Michael D. West, PhD, Founder and CEO of AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. – Aging and the Cellular Aging Mechanisms

Jan 17, 2020 41:38

Description:

The Secrets to Aging – Michael D. West, PhD, Founder and CEO of AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. – Aging and the Cellular Aging Mechanisms

Jan 17, 2020 41:37

Description:

Michael D. West, PhD, founder and CEO of AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (agexinc.com), delivers an insightful overview of the effects of aging and the cellular aging mechanism.

Dr. West received his PhD from Baylor College of Medicine with a concentration in the biology of cellular aging. He has spent the better part of his academic and business career focused on the application of developmental biology to various age-related degenerative diseases.

Dr. West discusses the premise of his company, AgeX Therapeutics. As he explains, aging is a national and international priority. He explains how the post WWII population surge has made chronic degenerative diseases a major focus. And the goal at AgeX Therapeutics is to develop new and innovative therapies to combat these chronic degenerative diseases. AgeX Therapeutics is interested in the development and commercialization of unique therapeutics that will target human aging issues. Working forward from their current proprietary technologies, such as PureStem® and induced Tissue Regeneration (iTR™), Age X Therapeutics seeks to further develop innovative medicines that can have a significant positive impact on the many and various unsolved problems in aging.

Dr. West talks about aging in detail, framing his conversation upon the current information that exists regarding various diseases such as Alzheimer’s and diabetes, etc. He states that as they study the basic clockwork elements that lead to aging in the brain, skin, lungs, etc., they then apply this information and research to the unmet needs in medicine. Dr. West goes on to explain telomerase, an important enzyme that adds nucleotides to telomeres, most especially in cancer cells. He explains how telomerase resets the clock. Further, he talks about some of the information they learned from cloning experiments. The evidence, he states, suggests that by putting an aged cell back into an egg cell, the aging process could be set in reverse. And today, after further experimentation, researchers know this to be true. Telomerase can in fact rewind the clock of cellular aging.

The aging researcher explains how the aging process is the same throughout the body, which is encouraging because having a common mechanism makes the outlook for discovery of treatment and therapies better. Continuing, Dr. West explains how change is observed, discussing the science of aging, and he states that changes seem to be systemic thus far in current experimentation with animals.

In this podcast:

New chronic degenerative disease therapies

How can telomerase reset the clock?

Can aging be reversed at the cellular level?

The Gut: The Biggest Sensory Organ That We Have—Dr. Emeran Mayer—UCLA Microbiome Center

Jan 17, 2020 34:48

Description:

The Gut: The Biggest Sensory Organ That We Have—Dr. Emeran Mayer—UCLA Microbiome Center

Jan 17, 2020 34:48

Description:

It’s a belief that can be traced to the Ancient Greeks and Egyptians: the gut is the seat of emotion. Until recently, however, this idea hasn’t been given much attention in the world of modern science and research. On today’s podcast, gastroenterologist, author of over 320 peer-reviewed articles, and professor of physiology at the UCLA Microbiome Center,

Dr. Emeran Mayer, gives us a look into his current work on understanding how the microbiome lends itself to brain-gut interactions, influences emotion, and even paves the way for the development of obesity.

Tune in for the details on all this and more, including:

How microbes might synthesize serotonin, and what effect serotonin might have on microbial behavior and gene expressionWhat causes us to feel “full” or reach satiety while eating, and how microbes may influence the mechanism of satietyWhat Dr. Mayer believes will happen in the world of microbiome research and applications within the next 10 yearsHow Dr. Mayer’s current research seeks to bridge the gap between the findings in mouse studies and human studies on the microbiome, digestive diseases, and the gut-brain interaction

For more information on these topics, visit https://emeranmayer.com/.

Sleep Medicine: Expert Dr. Jose Colon Describes Sleep Disorders Treatment

Jan 16, 2020 29:40

Description:

Sleep Medicine: Expert Dr. Jose Colon Describes Sleep Disorders Treatment

Jan 16, 2020 29:40

Description:

In this podcast, Dr. Jose Colon explains


The different types of sleep interferences we may face.The efficacy of home-sleep studies versus sleep facility studies.Short and long-term sleep health benefits like significant concentration improvement.


Triple board-certified author Dr. Jose Colon brings his expertise to this podcast by addressing many common questions about the current state of sleep science. He describes different types of sleep disorders treatment from C-Pap machines to oral devices and when one may be more beneficial than another.


Dr. Colon practices full time sleep medicine for adults and children, incorporating a holistic outlook that includes mindfulness and science-driven approaches. In an effort to bring his ideas together, he wrote Sleep Diet: A Novel Approach to Insomnia for adults and The Magic Ice Cream Palace for kids, both of which are more creative approaches to the issue rather than to-do lists. He explains some of the most common sleep disorders like obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia to less common but equally harmful disorders that disturb our sleep health benefits. 


He then weighs the plus and minus for different sleep disorders treatments and even describes his own experience with an oral appliance to improve sleep quality. Dr. Colon also points to upcoming advances in improving sleep health benefits such as comfort level improvements of C-Pap machines and an implant in the works. 


For any next steps, he recommends reaching out to your primary care physician but also a search for a locally accredited sleep center.

On the Relationship Between Vitamins and the Microbiome—Dr. Stasha Gominak—Neurologist and Expert on the Human Microbiome

Jan 16, 2020 56:48

Description:

On the Relationship Between Vitamins and the Microbiome—Dr. Stasha Gominak—Neurologist and Expert on the Human Microbiome

Jan 16, 2020 56:47

Description:

In today’s episode, Dr. Stasha Gominak discusses the gut microbiome, the benefits of vitamin D in terms of the microbiome, the importance of B vitamins, and how the microbiome affects sleep in general. As a neurologist with restless leg syndrome, Dr. Gominak has interesting insight on what it feels like to experience involuntary movements that interrupt sleep, and how vitamins influence sleep in general.


She discusses the importance of the four main species that live in the human GI tract, and how they are affected by insufficient levels of vitamin D. She also explains why she considers the microbiome to be its own organ, and how to restore it once it's been damaged or depleted. Dr. Gominak is a wealth of knowledge on these topics.


Tune in for the details on all of this and more, including:


Whether or not B vitamins are coming from the microbiomeWhat is at play in the development of autoimmune diseasesWhy B100 and Vitamin D may help to resolve ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s diseaseWhy Dr. Gominak believes probiotics are a complete waste of timeHow vitamin D affects the thyroid


Learn more about Dr. Gominak’s work by visiting https://drgominak.com/.

Missing Women: Dr. Woitowich Talks about Implications of Leaving Sex and Gender Out of Health Research

Jan 16, 2020 23:01

Description:

Missing Women: Dr. Woitowich Talks about Implications of Leaving Sex and Gender Out of Health Research

Jan 16, 2020 23:00

Description:

Historically, researchers have performed clinical research studies exclusively on males. Dr. Nichole explains:

Why this was the case and how this led to less effective medicine and treatment.What are laws and measures the medical community has taken to correct this off balance look at gender in health care.Why it is important to consider sex and gender identification as well as race to achieve health equity.

Dr. Nicole Catherine Woitowich, Associate Director of Women's Health Institute Research at Northwestern University, discusses the issues using male-dominated research groups created in our present medical treatments. Because women's hormones fluctuate monthly and have the potential to become pregnant, they were left out of clinical research studies as a protective measure.

But this has led to a misunderstanding of how many medicines truly function for different sexes and genders. For example, Ambien metabolizes differently for men versus women. She discusses difficulties such as the ethics issues with randomized clinical trials for pregnant women, but also suggests solutions such as pregnant women who must take medicines for health reasons becoming involved in a system of self-reporting reactions.

The National Health Institute passed a mandate in 1993 and again a broader one in 2015 to try and correct these measures and transform the disregard for gender in healthcare. Dr. Woitowich talks about how this might change some practices and the hope form more changes to insure health equity across the board, including gender nonconforming , transgender, and nonbinary patients as well.

For more, see the Women's Health Institute page at https://www.womenshealth.northwestern.edu/

Dr. Wotowich can be found on Twitter @NikiWoitowich and her email address is nicole.woitowich@northwestern.edu

Fighting Infections with Genomic Testing: Evan Jones of OpGen Describes Exciting New Technology

Jan 15, 2020 20:33

Description:

Fighting Infections with Genomic Testing: Evan Jones of OpGen Describes Exciting New Technology

Jan 15, 2020 20:32

Description:

OpGen uses genomics and informatics to improve management of patient infections by detecting antibiotic-resistant microbes. Mr. Jones describes

How they do this by identifying the DNA of bacteria within hours rather than the days current tests take, and with more effective pathogen detection. Why this polymerase chain reaction test is able to be specific in recognizing the actual pathogen.What medicine this technology is specially designed for such as urinary tract infection antibiotics.

If a patient comes to the hospital with urosepsis from ineffective treatment, they don't have days to wait for information. OpGen's genomics testing and data from informatics will deliver accurate pathogen detection within hours, giving doctors the correct urinary tract infection antibiotics. 

Furthermore, the over use of antibiotics puts doctors in a difficult position of most likely under or over prescribing for patients when they won't know for days exactly what pathogen their patient is facing. This doesn't work for superinfections or broadly resistant pathogens. OpGen's genomics testing gives caregivers answers within hours to help the correct course of treatment through effective pathogen detection.

In addition to urinary tract infection antibiotics identification, they are also developing equivalent systems for respiratory tract infections. Mr. Jones expects this technology will be cleared for use in our medical system by the end of 2020.

For more, see their website at opgen.com and follow them on twitter: @OpGen

Generic Fail: Dinesh Thakur Discusses the Lack of Generic Drug Manufacturing Oversight and Actions to Take

Jan 15, 2020 44:13

Description:

Generic Fail: Dinesh Thakur Discusses the Lack of Generic Drug Manufacturing Oversight and Actions to Take

Jan 15, 2020 44:13

Description:

After Dinesh Thankur discovered the failings of a generic drug manufacturer in India, he's been on a campaign for change. When you listen to this discussion, you'll learn

Why overseas drug companies are able to get away with producing these spurious drugs.How the middle player in the United States generic drug market, the Pharmacy Benefit Manager, keeps the harmful system in play, dodging pharmaceutical quality assurance.What steps you can take to make small yet significant changes in our policy that might prevent these fraudulent practices. 

A pharmaceutical expert, Mr. Thakur discovered a company in India that hired him was falsifying data and practicing substandard manufacturing techniques with generic drugs. He left the company and helped the US FDA put the company through criminal prosecution. In this podcast, he discusses these efforts and other problems with the lack of oversight for pharmaceutical quality assurance of generic drugs produced overseas.

Featured in the book Bottle of Lies by journalist Katherine Eban, Mr. Thakur has continued his activism within the current generic drug consumption in the U.S. He discusses the holes in the system, such as difficulties in inspecting an overseas manufacturer, and how the lack of power Medicaid holds in negotiating drug prices produces further roadblocks.

He offers some tenable actions the average citizen can make to prevent the manufacture of these spurious drugs and shares his expertise on how small changes could improve the potentially dangerous generic drugs in our market.

For more about Dinesh Thakur and his contact information, see https://dineshthakur.com/.

Vaccination Victories – Peter Jay Hotez, Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine – Vaccinations and the Troubling Anti-Science Movement

Jan 15, 2020 40:48

Description:

Vaccination Victories – Peter Jay Hotez

Jan 15, 2020 40:47

Description:

Peter Jay Hotez, Dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses vaccinations, the anti-science movement, and other critical issues regarding modern medicine. Additionally, the discussion covers global health issues, vaccination for hookworm infection, and other important information on vaccines.

As a vaccine scientist, pediatrician, and parent, Hotez discusses his great concern over the rising anti-science and anti-vaccine movements that are sweeping the nation. He discusses the chatter in the anti-science community that has tried to make the case that vaccines cause autism. He explains how this false narrative has pushed its way through and gained steam.

As a parent of a child who has autism and disabilities, he states that he has become a voice in this dialogue, due to his certainty that his child did not in any way develop autism due to any vaccines. He explains how the anti-vaccine community has pushed this false narrative, and how they have no facts to back their assertions. With hundreds of anti-vaccine websites, and media exposure, Hotez states that this movement is beginning to impact public health negatively. 

Hotez recounts some of the cases he has handled as a pediatrician, discussing some of the diseases that have diminished over time due to successful vaccines. From anti-vaccine movements to genetically-modified organism movements to climate denial, and more, the war being waged against real, proven science is growing at an alarming rate. And Hotez states that the ‘new normal’ is dangerous, as anti-science takes hold in the wider public discourse. 

Continuing, Hotez discusses his recommendations to patients and the public about how to get correct information on science and vaccines. He states that pharmacists and pediatricians/doctors should be the trusted sources for vaccine and medical information. And he states that people should be very cautious when they source information from the internet. Wrapping up, he discusses some of the most important vaccinations that people should be getting, and other information about protecting your health. 

In this podcast:

What vaccines are the most critical?How did the anti-vaccine movement gain momentum?What can you do to ensure you are getting accurate information regarding vaccines? 


Helping People Identify and Resolve Their Sleeping Issues—Jonathan Parker—Sleep Performance Institute

Jan 14, 2020 29:51

Description:

Helping People Identify and Resolve Their Sleeping Issues—Jonathan Parker—Sleep Performance Institute

Jan 14, 2020 29:50

Description:

The truth is that most people who have sleep problems don’t really need to see a doctor about it; they just need to understand the problem, understand the challenges they’re having, and understand sleep, and then be given some ways to resolve it without using medications or medical devices or surgery,” says Jonathan Parker, who has worked as a dentist for over 36 years. For the past seven years, he's been collaborating with a sleep physician by the name of Mike Howell.


With their combined experience of nearly four decades and a mutual interest in reaching large numbers of people who sleep poorly but don’t know why or what to do about it, Dr. Howell and Dr. Parker started the Sleep Performance Institute, which helps enable people with simple, fun, and engaging methods of resolving their sleep issues.


Interested in learning more? Tune in, and discover the details of all this and more, including:


What percentage of the population has a chronotype difficult to deviate fromHow the Sleep Performance Institute assessment tool, app, and algorithm gets to the root of the sleep issue and improves sleep and athletic performanceSuccess stories of athletes who have benefited from the Sleep Performance Institute app


Check out https://www.sleepperformanceinstitute.com/ to learn more.

The Future of AI – Robert Munro, Author, Expert in Human and Machine Intelligence – Artificial Intelligence—What’s On the Horizon?

Jan 14, 2020 26:24

Description:

The Future of AI – Robert Munro, Author, Expert in Human and Machine Intelligence – Artificial Intelligence—What’s On the Horizon?

Jan 14, 2020 26:23

Description:

Robert Munro, author, expert in human and machine intelligence, discusses his work, and the intersection between artificial intelligence (AI) and human intelligence.

Munro discusses his background and what drove him to dig into AI, detailing the data side of AI and machine learning algorithms. He cites the example of autonomous vehicles, in that thousands of hours of driving data have been created by people, critical driving data that provides valuable and necessary information, such as ‘this is the middle of the street,’ this is a stop sign,’ etc.

Therefore, the quality of the data is often times more important than the algorithm itself. And it was this construct that motivated Munro to devote his time and research into the nexus between artificial intelligence (AI) and human intelligence

The AI data guru discusses active learning, the analysis of data and algorithms to determine how accurate and up to date they are, to suss what is missing, etc. It is the process of trying to decide which is the best data for humans to review, and is a major topic in Munro’s latest book.

Munro goes on to discuss languages and algorithmic functioning from a historical perspective, touching on bad data and large volumes of data, and the impact of both. As he states, sometimes it is best to use a smaller amount of data, a batch of data that is carefully curated, as opposed to simply a large data set that is more generic. 

Munro furthers the conversation, discussing the differences between various languages and how adaptable systems are created. Munro provides information on raw data and the methods to utilize it, discussing the specifics in regard to natural language processing and machine learning. He discusses task creation and models for prediction in AI.

Wrapping up, Munro provides further information on computer vision models for autonomous driving, and other issues such as predictive maintenance, identifying cracks in machinery, the integration of robotics and more.

And Munro provides his thoughts on the future of artificial intelligence, where we are currently, and the prospects for the coming years. 

 

Extracellular Vesicle Endeavors—Veronika Kralj-Iglic—Chair of Biomechanics, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Jan 14, 2020 29:35

Description:

Extracellular Vesicle Endeavors—Veronika Kralj-Iglic

Jan 14, 2020 29:34

Description:

Veronika Kralj-Iglic, PhD is a physicist and Chair of Biomechanics at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia who has done a variety of work in the field of medicine, classical physics, quantum physics, and orthopedics, but who says her favorite work has revolved around extracellular vesicle research. Why? According to Dr. Kralj-Iglic, it’s because of the amount of potential that extracellular vesicles hold for the future of medicine and biology.

"These little vesicles present a hope that maybe we will get to an understanding of the function of living systems,” she says, commenting on the many questions that remain regarding the mechanism underlying the causes of cancer.

She shares insight from years' worth of research, and touches on the following:

The details of two clinical trials involving EVs that she is currently working onHow cells have the ability to use parts of their cell membrane to create vesicles that help catalyze their actionsHow the behavior of EVs is similar to artificial and biological membranes


Health & Wellness – Nick Horowski, Holistic Health Professional and Founder of Evolution, Health & Fitness – Consider Your Health, and Improve it!

Jan 13, 2020 23:34

Description:

Health & Wellness – Nick Horowski, Holistic Health Professional and Founder of Evolution, Health & Fitness – Consider Your Health, and Improve it!

Jan 13, 2020 23:33

Description:

Nick Horowski, Holistic Health Professional and founder of Evolution, Health & Fitness (www.evo-health.com), delivers his thoughts on good health and offers tips for those who want to lead a healthier life. In this podcast, Horowski provides detailed information on holistic health and wellness, including the importance of nutrition in life.

Horowski works as a consultant, health coach, and physical therapist. Horowski talks about his background and the reasons he was drawn to a career in health. He recounts how his childhood was filled with sports and health-conscious activities. Additionally, he saw the importance of eating healthy, from the garden, at a young age. 

Horowski describes how important it is to have balance of good sleep, good emotional and physical health, and diet. Horowski talks about the ways he connects with clients, some who may have troubling health issues already. As he states, what’s important is to get his clients moving, and thinking, about the ways they can make improvements daily, from posture to activities, and more. Step by step is the key, taking steps toward your goal, even if they are small steps.

Horowski talks about breaking old habits and patterns, and the importance of simple things, such as hydration and nutrition. Horowski explains how every client, every person, is different, and therefore any program for good health must be tailored to the individual. 

Wrapping up, Horowski discusses the spectrum of clients he works with, and their individual struggles and goals. Finally, Horowski talks about the keys to success in health goals, and how they can be achieved.

 

In this podcast:

How to improve health through dietHow to live a holistic lifestyleIs diet as important as exercise?


Technology, Disease, and the Bacteria in Your Mouth—Priya Nimish Deo—Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Bharati Vidyapeeth Dental College and Hospital in India

Jan 13, 2020 22:02

Description:

Technology, Disease, and the Bacteria in Your Mouth—Priya Nimish Deo—Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Bharati Vidyapeeth Dental College and Hospital in India

Jan 13, 2020 22:01

Description:

Researchers, physicians, and the layman alike are becoming more and more interested in understanding the role and function of the microbiome, and how it may be contributing to different states of health and disease.

In the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology at Bharati Vidyapeeth Dental College and Hospital in India, assistant professor Priya Nimish Deo is collecting data and reviewing the current literature on the composition of the oral microbiome and how it may cause a variety of human diseases.

Until the relatively recent development of a number of sequencing methods, only microbes capable of being cultured in the lab could be identified, but all of that is changing quickly.

This will open the door to an unprecedented amount of information about the bacteria in our mouths and the diseases throughout our bodies.

Tune in for the details on all of this and more, including:

How proteomics, metagenomics, and metabolomics differ from one another and are contributing to the identification and understanding of the oral microbiomeWhat useful functions microbes provide in the mouthHow microbial dysbiosis leads to changes in the function of microbes


Certifiably Sound Sleep—Dr. Jonathan Greenberg—Sleep Certified

Jan 13, 2020 35:36

Description:

Certifiably Sound Sleep—Dr. Jonathan Greenberg—Sleep Certified

Jan 13, 2020 35:35

Description:

Stroke, heart attack, autoimmune diseases, weight gain and the inability to lose it, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and cancer: what do all of these have in common? According to Dr. Jonathan Greenberg, one of the foremost authorities in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), as well as a growing body of evidence, they can all occur as a result of snoring or sleep apnea. This is a significant problem, especially considering the fact that tens of millions of people in the U.S. have sleep apnea, and most of them either don’t know it or aren’t being treated.


Dr. Greenberg discusses the barriers to diagnosis and treatment when it comes to snoring and sleep apnea, and why so few people comply with what their doctors recommend. He also explains how his company, Sleep Certified, is making the process of receiving treatment more convenient for people, as well as encouraging awareness and education on the connection between sleep health, dental health, and overall health among dentists and physicians through a Sleep Certified training program that leads to multiple levels of certification. Contrary to popular belief, the CPAP machine is not the only option for those who snore and/or have sleep apnea.


Press play to hear the full conversation and learn about all of this and more, including:

What type of treatment options are available aside from the CPAP machine, and how effective they’re proving to be (including an oral appliance by Sleep Certified called Zyppah)Why snoring and sleep apnea worsen with age, regardless of what kind of shape a person is inWhat you could expect by seeing a dentist who has been certified at Level 9 of the Sleep Certified training program


https://sleepcertified.com/

Extracellular Vesicles Research: Dr. Dmitry Ter-Ovanesyan Explains the Exciting Potential and Challenges Ahead

Jan 10, 2020 42:58

Description:

Extracellular Vesicles Research: Dr. Dmitry Ter-Ovanesyan Explains the Exciting Potential and Challenges Ahead

Jan 10, 2020 42:58

Description:

After a discovery ten years ago showed that extracellular vesicles (EVs) contain RNA rather than just cell waste, Dr. Ter-Ovanesyan has studied these cellular products. This discussion explores:


Why it's significant that RNA is shown to exist outside of cellular boundaries.What puzzles scientists need to solve to use EVs for new solutions in synthetic biology research.The significant advances in health that EVs, also called exosomes, may offer, such as ways to address dementia, and already-developed technology such as detecting prostate cancer through finding EVs in the urine.


Dr. Dmitry Ter-Ovanesyan is working as a post-doc at Harvard with the Wyss Institute in extracellular vesicle research. He's drawn to the great potential and challenges these exosomes offer scientists in solving multiple health issues.


While EVs were discovered about 40 years ago, it wasn't until two studies published in 2007 announced that they contained RNA that the scientific community focused more energy their way. Dr. Ter-Ovanesyan was a student at the time and was immediately drawn to these RNA-carrying vesicles.


He explains why RNA is so significant in the complexity of messages it might carry from one cell to another. He also describes the multiple challenges these exosomes present because of their heterogeneous nature and difficulties in isolating them. But he recounts the great potential they may offer, from offering doctors information about the brain or heart by supplying RNA information to RNA drug possibilities through synthetic biology research.


For more information, see his contact information on the Wyss Institute page (https://wyss.harvard.edu/team/research-scientists-engineers/dima-ter-ovanesyan/_ and Harvard's Church Lab page (https://genetics.med.harvard.edu/lab/church/dter-ovanesyan). His publications are listed on PubMed as well.

Musings of the Microbiome—Michael G. Surette—Professor, Division of Gastroenterology at McMaster University, Michael G. Surette Laboratory

Jan 10, 2020 41:17

Description:

Musings of the Microbiome—Michael G. Surette—Professor, Division of Gastroenterology at McMaster University, Michael G. Surette Laboratory

Jan 10, 2020 41:16

Description:

As a gastroenterology specialist and professor at McMaster University, Michael G. Surette, PhD centers his work on a variety of aspects of the human microbiome, including its development and role in early life, what happens to it with age, and how it’s related to chronic diseases such as those of the airway, as well as Crohn’s, colitis, and IBS.

On today’s episode, Dr. Surette shares fascinating insight on the research he’s conducting, what he’s learned over the years, and the future of microbiome science.

Tune in for the details on all of this and more, including:

How the interaction between microbes changes depending on physical, functional, and/or taxonomic closenessWhy it is difficult to define dysbiosis, and why it may never be possibleHow environmental stimuli impact the microbiomeHow to understand the relationship between the microbiome and the immune system, and why this understanding can help to explain why diseases like Crohn’s and colitis are harder to overcome than infections like C. diff

Learn more by visiting http://www.surettelab.ca/lab/.

Physics Foundation – Wolfgang Smith, Scholar, Author, and Researcher in Mathematics and Physics – Physics, Answers to the Big Scientific Questions, and God

Jan 10, 2020 43:11

Description:

Physics Foundation – Wolfgang Smith, Scholar, Author, and Researcher in Mathematics and Physics – Physics, Answers to the Big Scientific Questions, and God

Jan 10, 2020 43:10

Description:

Wolfgang Smith, scholar, author, and researcher in mathematics and physics, presents an overview of his long and storied career in the sciences. 


From a young age, Smith was fascinated by the concept that physics could literally explain all that happens on Earth. Entering the prestigious Cornell University at the age of 15, Smith majored in physics, mathematics, and philosophy, and graduated at just 18 years old; and from there he began to question all that he had learned, and began to dig deeper. Smith provides an overview of the history and current state of physics. As he states, in regard to physics, we are approaching the end of an era, the end to the era of such scientific minds as Galileo and Newton. 


The scientific expert explains his thoughts on physics, expounding upon his views on testing and discovery, including the quantum realm and Newtonian physics. He discusses the philosophical thoughts of Rene Descartes. Continuing, he discusses the problems with the science that are not validated or supported by mathematics. He talks about beliefs in science, and the concept of enlightenment, citing examples of scientistic beliefs (those that are characterized by an exaggerated belief in the principles, and methods, of science). He states that we must differentiate between authentic science (the science that powers our technology, etc.) and the scientistic beliefs (science that the public knows about). 


Smith, unsatisfied with much of what contemporary science presented, sought to dig further, which culminated with his writing of the book, The Quantum Enigma. Smith discusses his book in detail and his arguments and findings that are written on the pages. As Smith states, the world that we perceive through our five senses is in fact very real. Logic is the basis of his thoughts… and he discusses how all of physics can be accomplished by working in the corporeal world and the physical world. 


Continuing, the scientific researcher discusses his specific thoughts on DNA and life, and the origins of organisms. Smith explains his thoughts on the biological world and the origin of life. As he states, the origin of everything is in God, and this is recognized. And he states that this belief will become the leading paradigm going forward, basing science on God the creator. 


Liquidizing Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Diagnostics—Chamindie Punyadeera—Queensland University of Technology

Jan 9, 2020 37:23

Description:

Liquidizing Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Diagnostics—Chamindie Punyadeera—Queensland University of Technology

Jan 9, 2020 37:22

Description:

Biopsies for the diagnosis of cancer are usually invasive and potentially dangerous. In addition, there’s no guarantee that this method will even result in a sample of tumor cells, due to the heterogeneity of tumors.

In today’s episode, Chamindie Punyadeera from the Queensland University of Technology discusses a new non-invasive tool called a liquid biopsy to detect early cardiovascular disease and three types of cancers. Rather than relying upon a sample of tumor tissue retrieved through biopsy, this new tool uses saliva or blood.

This is a cost-effective and less dangerous process for the patient, and it eliminates the chances of missing cancer cells that are there, but just weren’t accessed by the needle. This method makes early detection of cancer in the premalignant stage possible, as well as the stratification of patients at diagnosis to determine the stage of cancer.

Tune in for all the details on this and more, including:  

What cell-free DNA is, where it’s found, and how it can provide valuable information for cancer patientsHow biomarkers in saliva may be used to identify patients at high risk of heart failure (such as those suffering from type 2 diabetes or obesity)How this research will impact human health and medicine in the coming years


Cross-Discipline Research on Bowel Disease: Dr. Paul Moayyedi Discusses the Promise of an Expansive Collaboration

Jan 9, 2020 33:40

Description:

Cross-Discipline Research on Bowel Disease: Dr. Paul Moayyedi

Jan 9, 2020 33:40

Description:

Gastroenterology specialist Dr. Paul Moayyedi describes why a network of researchers across Canada is studying causes and possibilities for relief for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). This podcast explores:

Why Dr. Moayyedi is a proponent of evidence-based medicine and how this directs the nature of his studies on bowel diseases and how gut bacteria affects health.How the Imagine Network, a live cohort study involving at least 8,000 participants, is the appropriate way to tackle the complicated microbiome of the bowel. What are roadblocks to current handling of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis and how fecal transplants may be the best immediate solution.

Dr. Moayyedi, Professor, Division of Gastroenterology at the Department of Medicine with MacMaster University, is principal investigator with Imagine Network, a study encompassing multiple disciplines, from gastroenterology specialists to psychiatrists, observing what changes in variables over time for IBS and IBD patients.

While the study centers on bowel diseases, it looks at aspects in addition to the gut microbiome such as mental health, diet, and inflammation. Findings many benefit patients from Crohn's disease suffers to those testing for gastric cancer. 

He explains that the human gut, with the highest concentration of bacteria on the planet, is very difficult to study. Most diagnostics only offer a small snapshot. A colonoscopy, for example uncovers only a single element in gastric cancer, while many bowel diseases are for more complex. The Imagine Network approaches these diseases through multiple angles instead to get a fuller picture.

One promising aspect of their work involves fecal transplants (which more accurately means the introduction of fecally-contaminated water), which changes the gut bacteria. They were the first to start randomized trials with fecal transplants and its effect on ulcerative colitis.

They've found about a quarter of the patients found relief from the disease through these transplants. Dr. Moayyedi hopes they will encounter what drives such diseases through these studies.

To get in contact or find out more, see www.imaginespor.com.

Dirty Electricity: Diana Jabour Discusses How to Make a Healthier Home

Jan 8, 2020 53:37

Description:

Dirty Electricity: Diana Jabour Discusses How to Make a Healthier Home

Jan 8, 2020 53:37

Description:

Diana Jabour describes the "building biology" of our homes. She explains:

How bodily health connects to our building choices, from light bulbs to hard-wiring versus wireless systems.How electromotive forces, or EMF pollution, and electromagnetic radiation dangers affect the quality of our sleep and anxiety levels.What are some solutions, from quick and easy devices like foil screens to better design choices from the ground up.

Diana Jabour, Environmental and Electromagnetic Radiation Specialist and owner of Jabour Environmental, believes we can be CEOs of our health. Her mother modeled research-driven selections alongside common sense for healthy choices in food and materials, and Jabour continues practicing what she learned from this inspiring figure.

When she noticed her own family experiencing troubling symptoms after moving into a new home, she began researching. She then attended the Building Biology Institute in Santa Fe and Jabour added to her already solid understanding of EMF pollution and electromagnetic radiation dangers.

She discusses the ways our homes handle the four elements of building biology: air quality, water quality, lighting quality, and electromagnetic fields. 

Jabour offers the good news that we can control our space and she explains how, from techniques to ensure we are sleeping in electric fields that are close to nature to understanding why "anything that says 'smart' is stupid," and how we can better protect ourselves from EMF pollution and electromagnetic radiation dangers. Finally, she describes how she does a walk-through for her clients and types of solutions she typically recommends.

For more about these issues, see her company's web site at https://www.jabourenvironmental.com/;

Mapping Microbes: How Dr. Laura-Isobel McCall Uses Chemical Cartography to Fight Disease

Jan 8, 2020 35:06

Description:

Mapping Microbes: How Dr. Laura-Isobel McCall Uses Chemical Cartography to Fight Disease

Jan 8, 2020 35:05

Description:

This podcast describes a cutting-edge application of analytical chemistry. When you listen, you will learn:


How Dr. McCall's lab uses liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry together to identify and locate pathogen microbes in bodily organs.How identifying their location leads to creating compounds that help the body fight their effects.Why this new pathogen management is centered on metabolomics testing rather than killing the microbes.


Laura-Isobel McCall, Assistant Professor at the University of Oklahoma, specializes in chemical cartography of host-microbe interactions. She runs the McCall Lab, where they practice the application of analytical chemistry to map disease-causing microbes in mammalian organ systems.


The McCall Lab explores the interaction between pathogens, the microbiome, and the host to develop drugs that are capable of metabolism modulation. Through metabolomics testing and chemical cartography, Dr. McCall's lab is working on compounds to counter the effects of pathogens such as parasites. Much of their work focuses on neglected diseases, often potentially deadly, such as trypanosoma cruzi, which is present in the United States.


Dr. McCall explains how locating and mapping microbes with 3D technology and metabolomics testing opens up an understanding of how these pathogens function. This has led to identifying how important timing is in treating against the effects of such pathogens: the extent of tissue damage and the eventual dormant stage of a parasite are factors of time, for example. Furthermore, developing compounds to bolster how the host deals with the energy demand of the pathogen is more effective than simply targeting the pathogen.


Future work of the lab includes applying these techniques to other types of pathogens, improving the compounds to help patients, and connecting this work to other location-centered diseases.


For more information, see the McCall Lab page at http://mccall-lab.oucreate.com/ and find them on twitter as @LabMccall.

Sleep Disorder Solutions – Jordan Stern, MD, Founder & CEO of BlueSleep – Sleep Conditions and Disorders, Treatment

Jan 7, 2020 36:06

Description:

Sleep Disorder Solutions – Jordan Stern, MD, Founder & CEO of BlueSleep – Sleep Conditions and Disorders, Treatment

Jan 7, 2020 36:06

Description:

Jordan Stern, MD, Founder & CEO of BlueSleep, a successful sleep health and wellness company, talks about the diagnosis of sleep apnea and his company’s solutions for better sleep.


Dr. Stern is an award-winning head and neck surgeon, and a New York Times bestselling author. He is board-certified in otolaryngology and sleeps medicine. Dr. Stern discusses his background and the massive epidemic of sleep apnea, a condition of which most people do not even know they have. The sleep expert and researcher discusses various sleep conditions including hypopnea, which is shallow breathing, an abnormally low respiratory rate. The condition is regularly defined by a significantly decreased amount of air movement into the lungs, so much so that it can cause oxygen levels in the blood to drop. Hypopnea is often due to partial obstruction of the upper airway. Dr. Stern describes how the oxygen in your blood drops when you suffer from hypopnea.


The sleep doctor discusses the various risk factors for sleep apnea, the primary one being weight gain. He states that as we age, many people tend to gain weight, and this weight gain can often bring about sleep apnea. Continuing, Dr. Stern explains how BlueSleep can provide testing and treatment for various sleep disorders, as he discusses snoring causes and effect and snoring treatment in detail. The sleep doctor goes on to discuss CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) devices, oral appliances, snoring causes and effect, snoring treatment and more.


In this podcast:

How snoring treatment can help many people get a better night’s sleepWhat you can do to beat sleep apneaHypopnea vs apnea


Dentistry for Sleep Apnea and TMJ Pain: Dr. Mark Abramson Talks about Innovations to Treat Pain

Jan 7, 2020 29:15

Description:

Dentistry for Sleep Apnea and TMJ Pain: Dr. Mark Abramson Talks about Innovations to Treat Pain

Jan 7, 2020 29:14

Description:

In this podcast, Dr. Abramson will explain:


How the pain in the jaw, ears, face, and head can have multi-dimensional causes that can be treated through TMJ dentistry.How TMJ treatments involve hands-on manipulations and a specially-designed splint that can free up the jaw to settle in a pressure-free position.Why Dr. Abramson's Oasys appliance is unique among sleep apnea treatments because of its ability to enable nasal breathing.


Dr. Mark Abramson is sleep apnea and TMJ specialist in Northern California. After facing an injury in his teen years, his resolve to pursue healing strengthened and he has spent 40 years developing a treatment program that brings together the mind-body connection in dentistry.

In this podcast, he describes the complex ways the mouth and jaw, two main centers of growth, interact within the muscular-skeletal complexes of our upper body. The extent to which we are mouth breathers, how our tongue grows, and what types of orthodontics we've had an all affect TMJ pain we may experience or whether we struggle with sleep apnea.


Dr. Abramson describes the numerous medical evaluations patients will undergo before they seek TMJ treatments or sleep apnea treatment. Because pain is multi-dimensional with primary and referred pain, patients struggle with understanding causes. Dr. Abramson uses a comprehension of these interplays to develop special splints and sleep apnea appliances as well as cranial osteopathic manipulation to treat patients.


For more information, see Dr. Abramson's office web site: https://www.drtmjsleepapnea.com/


For information on practitioners that use his Oasys system, see: http://oasyssleep.com/

Helping You Harness the Power of Your Real-Time Biochemical Data—Ben Hwang—Profusa

Jan 7, 2020 35:02

Description:

The Power of Your Real-Time Biochemical Data—Ben Hwang—Profusa

Jan 7, 2020 35:02

Description:

Most of us go to the doctor about once a year, or at least we should in order to get a routine check-up and some blood tests done. This visit allows for an important dialogue about our health, including information about our biochemistry such as how much sodium, potassium, or glucose is in our system at the time of the appointment. However, it can be hard to keep up with the changes the doctor recommends because it’s easy to forget about them when life seems to get in the way.


What if there was a way to monitor your own personal biochemistry in real-time? You had a salad for lunch instead of a donut, and you went for a walk after work instead of sitting on the couch; if you could get the biochemical data associated with those lifestyle changes in real-time, you might be more likely to continue implementing healthful changes and paying attention to the way your body responds to different stimuli.

Until now, the technology that would allow for this simply hasn’t existed.


On today’s episode, CEO of Profusa, Ben Hwang, talks about a new and affordable technology that puts the power of biochemical data in the hands of the user. Unlike other biochemical sensors that don’t last longer than a couple of days or weeks, the Profusa sensor can last for years, which means it’s affordable and more convenient for you. Interested in learning more?


Tune in to discover:

How the Profusa sensor overcomes the body’s foreign body response, which allows it to remain in the body for yearsWhat iochemical the Profusa sensor is currently able to detect, and which biochemicals it will be able to detect in the near futureHow the Profusa technology can be developed further


Learn more at https://profusa.com/.

A Solution to the Unchecked and Unbalanced Spread of Toxic Algal Blooms—Eyal Harel—BlueGreen Water Technologies Ltd

Jan 6, 2020 41:31

Description:

A Solution to the Unchecked and Unbalanced Spread of Toxic Algal Blooms—Eyal Harel—BlueGreen Water Technologies Ltd

Jan 6, 2020 41:31

Description:

Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms that release toxins, and they’re also the building blocks of life itself. Under healthy conditions, the environment in which cyanobacteria live serves as a system of checks and balances wherein cyanobacteria do not overpopulate. When this system of checks and balances is disturbed, such as by human intervention, changes in temperature, or any number of other factors which influence the rate at which cyanobacteria grow, the toxins they produce end up dominating the whole ecological sphere in which they exist, and continuously change the chemical and biological conditions in the water.


This overpopulation is happening globally in nearly every place you can find water, whether in the sea, lakes, or reservoirs for irrigation, and it’s having devastating consequences for environmental and human health.


BlueGreen Technologies Ltd has developed the first-ever solution to dealing with large-scale algal blooms and restoring the health and use of bodies of water around the world. Eyal Harel is the CEO and co-founder of this company, and he joins the podcast to explain how their products work, and why they show so much more promise than any solution which has come before it.


By tuning in, you will learn:


How BlueGreen Water Technologies Ltd has manipulated previously-used algaecides in a way that allows them to float on water and release over time By what standards water is deemed safe for drinking, and why they are problematicHow BlueGreen Technologies Ltd products are performing so far, and what the company is working to accomplish in the near future


Learn more by visiting http://bgtechs.com/about/.

Sleep Well Again – Janet Bennett, Author and Sleep Expert – Snoring Causes, Treatment, and the Path to Better Sleep

Jan 6, 2020 37:58

Description:

Sleep Well Again – Janet Bennett, Author and Sleep Expert – Snoring Causes, Treatment, and the Path to Better Sleep

Jan 6, 2020 37:58

Description:

Janet Bennett, author and sleep expert, provides an overview of her comprehensive sleep program (ijustwanttosleep.com) that is helping people find a way to get better, more restful sleep.

Bennett is an experienced, successful Speech Pathologist in private practice who is passionate about helping people end their suffering and find new pathways to quality sleep. Bennett explains that snoring is a definite sign that a person’s sleep is not ideal. Snoring indicates mouth breathing which may be preventing one’s body from going into that deep REM sleep that we all need to feel refreshed come morning. 

Bennett explains how snoring can lead to sleep apnea, and she talks about the importance of educating people about the signs. While many people seem to think they cannot breathe well through their nose, and thus resort to mouth breathing, the truth is—they can, and simply need to relearn or train themselves on how to nose breath again. Bennett explains how her program trains people to put the tip of their tongue at a certain spot on the palette, which can help them immensely. The good sleep entrepreneur talks about CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machines, and provides information about the changes in the industry. 

Bennett discusses mouth breathing in detail, and she expounds upon the various tongue exercises that anyone can use to retrain their tongue to hold itself at the roof of the mouth, which enables you to breathe naturally through the nose. She talks about snoring causes and effects, snoring treatment, and the hundreds of snoring sufferers she has worked with through the years. And her work produces results, which she discusses. Bennett provides some impressive stats regarding improvement and the results seen after people utilize her program.

In this podcast:

What are the signs of poor sleep?Techniques to prevent mouth breathingHow to retrain your tongue to help with better airway flow

 

On Faith and Religion—Jay Wesley Richards—Research Assistant Professor, Author of Eat, Fast, Feast

Jan 6, 2020 38:56

Description:

On Faith and Religion—Jay Wesley Richards—Research Assistant Professor, Author of Eat, Fast, Feast

Jan 6, 2020 38:55

Description:

Around the world, there are thousands of variations on religion and faith-based practices, and religion itself can happen on many levels—within your own self, within your family, within your church, within different churches of the same sect, and so on. Today’s episode is the first in a new series on religions around the world.


Richard Jacobs will explore all aspects of the continuum on which religions and faith fall, and dive into a number of topics with guests who are eager to share their personal experiences with faith and religion. Tune in for a discussion with Jay Wesley Richards, Research Assistant Professor in the Busch School of Business at the Catholic University of America, and New York Times bestselling author.


You will discover:


What led Jay Wesley Richards to convert from a follower of Protestantism to CatholicismHow to reconcile the notion of papal authority and abuse of power with the Catholic faith and the Catholic churchHow Jay Wesley Richards perceives and approaches his interactions with people of different faiths and religions


On the Development of Novel Antibiotics—Ted Schroeder—Nabriva Therapeutics

Jan 3, 2020 18:39

Description:

On the Development of Novel Antibiotics -Ted Schroeder - Nabriva Therapeutics

Jan 3, 2020 18:39

Description:

For over 30 years, Ted Schroeder has been involved in the sales, marketing, and development of antibiotics, and he currently serves as the CEO of Nabriva Therapeutics. He joins the podcast today to discuss the current work being done at Nabriva, which involves the development of a new class of IV antibiotics for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults—the first of its kind in the US in over two decades.


 The second product Nabriva is working on has been around for nearly four decades but has never been available in the US, and it’s been shown to be effective in tackling complicated urinary tract infections and multidrug-resistant strains of bacteria. These antibiotics could limit or altogether eliminate the need for hospital stays for many people. To learn more about the work being done, tune in.


You’ll discover the details of all this and more, including:


What makes gram negative bacterial infections so much more difficult to treat than gram-positive bacterial infectionsHow strong the clinical-based evidence is for the effectiveness of these antibioticsWhat’s on the horizon in the near future for Nabriva Therapeutics, pharmacology, and anti-infective agents


For more information, visit https://www.nabriva.com/.

Oral Overview – Ronald C. McGlennen, M.D., President & Medical Director of Access Genetics – Making Sense of the Microbiome

Jan 3, 2020 47:13

Description:

Oral Overview – Ronald C. McGlennen, M.D., President & Medical Director of Access Genetics – Making Sense of the Microbiome

Jan 3, 2020 47:12

Description:

Ronald C. McGlennen, M.D., President & Medical Director of Access Genetics, delivers an interesting overview of oral issues, discussing the microbiome and bacteria.

In addition to his work with Access Genetics, Dr. McGlennen is also the Associate Professor of Pathology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Dr. McGlennen is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, and by the American Board of Medical Genetics with a Specialty in Clinical Molecular Genetics as well.

The internationally-recognized expert in Molecular Biology and Genetics discusses his thoughts on the oral microbiome, periodontal disease, and conditions of the mouth. Dr. McGlennen states that the microbiome has earned its place as an organ in our bodies and must be recognized for its role that is central to good health. Changes in the gut flora can provide answers to intestinal health, and the microbiome truly holds many answers to medical issues. In regard to bad bacteria, he states, much of it comes from our environment—intimate contact, foods, surfaces, etc. He explains how, over time, due to age and lack of exercise etc., we move into a state of dysbiosis, which is essentially a microbial imbalance on or inside the body—such as an impaired microbiota. Dr. McGlennen discusses the ways in which our microbiome can be affected, and he delves into an overview of periodontal disease and its causes. He discusses disease markers and pathogens, and the indicators of disease. 

The doctor provides intricate detailed information on gum disease, plaque build up, bad bacteria in the mouth, other specific detrimental issues of the mouth, and mouth bacteria treatment. He discusses the eleven bacteria that make up the ‘quantitative DNA analysis’ and how they can utilize this information to understand cumulative bacterial load, and to grasp how to best provide treatments and therapies.

Dr. McGlennen has published over 70 important scientific articles and book chapters and he is the distinguished editor of five journals.

In this podcast:

What is a quantitative DNA analysis, and how can it help you on your path to better health?What are the effects of microbial imbalance?How does a body connect with bacteria? 

 

Philosophical Foundations – Wynand De Beer, Author, Researcher & Philosopher – Philosophy, Metaphysics, and New Thoughts on Old Thoughts About Who We Are and Why We Are

Jan 3, 2020 36:46

Description:

Philosophical Foundations – Wynand De Beer, Author, Researcher & Philosopher – Philosophy, Metaphysics, and New Thoughts on Old Thoughts About Who We Are and Why We Are

Jan 3, 2020 36:46

Description:

Wynand De Beer, independent researcher and philosopher, specializing in Hellenic philosophy and Patristic theology, discusses philosophy; socio-political discourse; and metaphysics, the specific branch of philosophy that pertains to the nature of existence, being, and the world.

De Beer is a member of the Russian Orthodox Church and he has written numerous articles for Orthodox publications and various websites, penned under his Orthodox name, Vladimir de Beer. He is the author of From Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle, and Neoplatonism.

De Beer discusses his thoughts on philosophical, socio-political, theological, and metaphysical issues. He explains that much of the mindset regarding issues of this nature has been lost due to rationalism, secular humanism, and materialism. He talks about the important works of others who have come before him, such as Albert Camus, the French Algerian philosopher, author, and journalist.

De Beer talks in detail about some of the areas of his latest book, analyzing big issues from various chapters, from well being and love, to good vs evil, to consciousness, and the three manifestations of consciousness. Digging deeper, De Beer provides an analysis of gender, as it relates to our current and historical interpretations.

He states that the traditional understanding of man and woman, male and female, must function as polar opposites in order to constitute the reality that we live in. He provides an interesting account of the views on feminism, and the militant forms of feminism, and male chauvinism… all of which must be rejected as wrong, as they present an imbalanced view. There is no subordination or domination he states.

De Beer explains that the views and function of gender and sexuality, etc. are often taken to the extreme, perhaps as a form of rebellion, but ultimately too extreme. De Beer continues, discussing the details of other areas of his book, including a salient discussion on modern liberalism. He discusses his views on the immortality of the soul, referencing early Greek mythology from significant voices such as Plato. 

The influential author and philosopher provides further details on his thoughts on politics and conflict. He discusses his next book, currently titled, Origins, and expounds upon some of the topics he will touch upon in the upcoming work.


In this podcast:

An overview of metaphysicsWhat would Plato do: various thoughts on the great philosopherMan vs Woman: the gender divide

 

Sleep and Snoring Struggles—Erin Elliott—Dentist and Sleep, Snoring, and Sleep Apnea Expert

Jan 3, 2020 24:21

Description:

Sleep and Snoring Struggles—Erin Elliott—Dentist and Sleep, Snoring, and Sleep Apnea Expert

Jan 3, 2020 24:20

Description:

Snoring is so common these days that some people either think it’s normal or just learn to live with it, but many encounter all kinds of problems as a result of snoring, including relationships and serious health problems. When Erin Elliott began asking her dental patients how they sleep at night and whether or not they snore, she was given a lot of strange looks. That was 10 years ago when the connection between dental signs and symptoms weren’t really considered to have anything to do with sleep or snoring. Today, many more dentists are acknowledging how they are intertwined and integrating this understanding into their practice.


Erin Elliott is a dentist who is so well known for this that many of her patients are referred to her for snoring problems by physicians or existing patients. On today’s episode, she discusses the varying causes and effects of snoring and how essential it is to identify the cause before implementing a snoring treatment, what kinds of dental signs and symptoms indicate the presence of a sleep or breathing problem, what’s happening physiologically when someone snores, and so much more.


By tuning in, you will discover:


How and why snoring can lead to tooth decay and poor gum healthWhy losing weight could significantly improve snoring for one person, and not make a difference for anotherSurgical, therapeutic, and lifestyle changes which could help reduce snoring


Learn more by tuning in and emailing your questions to erinelliottdds@gmail.com.

The Skinny on Skin – Richard Gallo, MD, PhD, a Leading Expert in Human Immunology, Skin Biology, and the Microbiome – Modern Discoveries: Skin and the Microbiome

Jan 2, 2020 35:56

Description:

The Skinny on Skin – Richard Gallo

Jan 2, 2020 35:55

Description:

Richard Gallo, MD, PhD, a leading expert in human immunology, skin biology, and the microbiome, delivers an interesting overview of skin issues, the microbiome, antimicrobial peptides, skin microbiome acne, and so much more.

Gallo earned his PhD from Harvard and has pursued a life in the sciences. Gallo talks about his background and how he came to be so interested in dermatology and immunology, and as he states, the big question for Gallo was, how does a host protect itself? He provides an overview of ‘resistance’ and how it differs, discussing how humans and plants, etc. can be affected by a microbe. Gallo comments that the skin is the first layer separating the inside… from the outside, and that’s a pretty important job. 

What do microbes do to benefit us, speaking of those microbes that our skin tolerates? Gallo’s current research and discovery revolves around this question. Gallo states that microbes can become trapped within the skin’s pores, and once they are they are nurtured, kept in check by the immune system so they don’t become an infection. Gallo discusses the broad range that exists in the cells of the microbial community. Gallo provides an overview of the microbial community and he explains what different genes are doing at the bacterial level. Continuing, Gallo talks about the kinds of inflammation that exist and how improvement of the microbiome can permit the human environment to correct and flourish. 

The immunology expert describes an ideal scenario of future medical approaches to combatting certain diseases. And he discusses some of the new issues and discoveries that show great promise, and how the skin, its microbes, and cells are all important to the understanding of how to treat disease.


In this podcast:

What can we learn from the microbiome?How does the skin react to microbes?The future of disease treatment

 

 

Reactor-Free Neutrons: Medical & Industrial Advances with Dr. Sengbusch

Jan 1, 2020 45:25

Description:

Reactor-Free Neutrons: Medical & Industrial Advances with Dr. Sengbusch

Jan 1, 2020 45:25

Description:

This podcast discusses exciting innovations in neutron production:

How Phoenix generates neutrons with a thousand times less nuclear material than a reactor and includes the safety of an “off-switch.”Why this technology is essential to the medical, air travel, and aerospace fields.How in addition to radioisotopes in medicine like the molybdenum 99 production, Phoenix can produce neutrons with tremendous flexibility key to industrial needs.What else Shine Medical plans to make, including isotopes with therapeutic potential for diseases like cancer.What else Phoenix is working on including an electronic machine to replace the difficult-to-handle isotope Californium 252.

Even Sengbusch, PhD, MBA, and president of Phoenix, discusses the history of Shine Medical and Phoenix and how their work to produce neutrons through new technology leaves the danger and limitations of nuclear reactors far behind. Greg Piefer, founder and CEO of Shine Medical was unable to join the conversation because of travel issues, but Dr. Sengbusch discusses both companies and what they accomplish. Shine Medical spun from Phoenix in 2010 to focus specifically on radioisotopes in medicine. Phoenix produces neutron generators that Shine then uses for isotopes useful in medical technology imaging procedures.

Phoenix focuses on molybdenum 99 production, which has been the workhorse in nuclear medicine. Currently only two places worldwide manufacture molybdenum 99, and Phoenix will soon be able to make this isotope without a nuclear reactor. 

When it decays, Moly 99 emits detectable gamma rays that work as markers for imaging techniques. For example, it can attach to heart-specific glucose and then provide organ information through imaging. It can also attach to cancer cells and give a clear image for cancer detection.

For more information, see https://phoenixwi.com/ and https://shinemed.com/.

Resilient Plants: Drought & Pest Resistance through Gene Editing with Dr. Voytas

Jan 1, 2020 28:24

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Resilient Plants: Drought & Pest Resistance through Gene Editing with Dr. Voytas

Jan 1, 2020 28:29

Description:

When you listen, you’ll learn about these innovations and more:

How genome editing in plants can lead to soybean oil that replaces environmentally-problematic oils like palm oil or coco butter. How Dr. Voytas is creating wheat with higher dietary fiber and more healthful benefits.Why gene editing can produce crops immune to pathogens and insects.How gene editing can increase food supply across the globe.

In this podcast, Dr. Daniel Voytas, McKnight Presidential Endowed Professor, Director of the Center for Precision Plant Genomics at the University of Minnesota, and founder of Clayxt, shares these and other exciting advances in genome editing in plants.

Dr. Voytas’ work with the Center for Precision Plant Genomics centers on improving genome editing in plants through precise editing, substitution, and mutation techniques. The center's goal is to create plants that can withstand challenges like drought and insect predation while maintaining more healthful components. At the university, most of this work involves model plants that work well for experimentation. 

About ten years ago, Dr. Voytas started the company Calyxt, which transfers that technology into developing new food crops like soybeans with altered genes that offer various benefits. For example, gene editing allowed them to inactivate the gene that converts the oil in the soybean seeds from monounsaturated to polyunsaturated fat. The company produced their first gene-edited product for sale with this monounsaturated soybean oil that has a much longer life for deep frying.

For more information on how to contact Dr. Voytas, see https://cbs.umn.edu/contacts/daniel-voytas-phd.

Discoveries in Dentistry – Mark A. Cruz, D.D.S, Dental Expert – Oral Health and Airway Issues

Jan 1, 2020 56:30

Description:

Discoveries in Dentistry – Mark A. Cruz, D.D.S, Dental Expert

Jan 1, 2020 56:29

Description:

Mark A. Cruz, D.D.S, a pioneer in the dental industry, shares information on modern dentistry, snoring causes and effect, snoring treatment, rhinitis, and stuffy noses.

Dr. Cruz is a seasoned, trusted family dentist who approaches all dental issues with a macro lens, considering his patients’ overall health, instead of simply treating problems as they occur. Dr. Cruz graduated from the UCLA School of Dentistry. A few of his outstanding accomplishments include serving on the National Institute of Health/National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Grant Review Committee in Washington D.C., and being an integral part of the editorial board for the Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice. Dr. Cruz is motivated by learning and is continually expanding his knowledge to better serve his patients.

Dr. Cruz discusses teaching and orthodontics, and the importance of nasal breathing. He provides detail on why we as humans can and do breathe nasally and orally as well. He explains oral breathing, the exchanging of gas, and the processes our bodies go through. He provides an overview of nasal breathing and discusses the inflammatory response that the body exhibits when nasal breathing is cut off or compromised. Expanding on this discussion he discusses the importance of teaching kids the proper ways to breathe and blow their noses, etc. While mucus has a purpose, we do not want it to obstruct nasal breathing to the point that we are always breathing through the mouth. He discusses practical methods to increase nasal breathing, such as the neti pot, etc. for rinsing debris or excess mucus from the nasal cavity.

Continuing, Dr. Cruz provides information on studies that have observed breathing. Breathing rate was documented over decades, and surprisingly we have, overall, increased breathing rates. And unfortunately, this increase may be a key link to increases in inflammatory diseases. The doctor discusses exercises and specifically touches on facial exercises, which could decrease sagging, and other detrimental effects of aging. And Dr. Cruz provides detailed information on snoring and breathing issues, and how medicine practitioners are now paying more attention to airway issues perhaps than before.

In this podcast:

What causes snoring?

What happens when nasal breathing is diminished?

How can we improve airway problems?

A Look Inside the Animal Mind—Marc Bekoff, PhD—Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder

Dec 31, 2019 42:00

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A Look Inside the Animal Mind—Marc Bekoff, PhD—Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder

Dec 31, 2019 42:00

Description:

“The second you think you know everything, you realize there’s a lot you don’t know,” says Marc Bekoff, who has spent his entire career studying animal behavior and biology and playing an integral role in animal rights organizations.

As Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder and Fellow of the Animal Behavior Society, Dr. Bekoff values productive conversation with people who bring different opinions to the table, and advocates for the importance of understanding the complexity of all other species on planet Earth.

He joins the podcast today to discuss the surprising similarities and differences between and within different species, the role domestic dogs play in our lives and vice versa, how personality variation contributes to the formation and maintenance of groups of animals, and so much more.

Tune in to learn:

How common myths about domestic dogs are perpetuated in societyWhat he’s learned through long-term studies on coyotes in Grand Teton National ParkObservations that demonstrate fair behavior within a species, whether in terms of playing, eating, or grooming (and how “cheaters” in the system tend to do in the long run)

Learn more by visiting marcbekoff.com.

Snoring: It’s Nothing to Snooze At—Dr. Jay Khorsandi—Dentist and Sleep and Snoring Expert

Dec 30, 2019 31:15

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Snoring: It’s Nothing to Snooze At—Dr. Jay Khorsandi

Dec 30, 2019 31:14

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Out of the 100 million people in the U.S. who snore, more than half of them have sleep apnea, a condition which causes the cessation of breathing up to hundreds of times per night during sleep. In addition, snoring itself is a gateway to sleep apnea, meaning that most people who snore regularly are at risk of developing sleep apnea.

Dr. Jay Khorsandi is a general dentist and snoring and sleep expert who joins the show today to discuss the causes and effects of snoring, and how age and weight contribute to sleep apnea and poor overall sleep health.

He also discusses his approach to diagnosing and formulating individualized plans for the treatment of different snoring and sleep issues. This approach begins in the patient’s home rather than the clinical environment of a sleep lab.

He explains why this is beneficial and what type of information he is able to gather.

Tune in to discover:

Why people tend to dream more when they breathe better during sleepHow a laser can be used to treat snoring and breathing problems in a non-invasive, quick, and effective wayHow snoring progresses through stages to ultimately become sleep apnea


The Airway Analysis – Dr. Theodore Belfor, Dental Innovator and Expert – Snoring Causes and Effect, Snoring Treatment, and Modern Practices

Dec 30, 2019 49:34

Description:

The Airway Analysis – Dr. Theodore Belfor

Dec 30, 2019 49:34

Description:

Dr. Theodore Belfor, dental innovator and expert, discusses a wide variety of dental issues with a special emphasis on airway issues, snoring causes and effect, as well as snoring treatment. Dr. Belfor graduated from the New York University School of Medicine. He works in Catskill, NY and specializes in General Dentistry.

Dr. Belfor discusses airway issues, daytime and nighttime, from stuffy noses to more serious airway problems. As Dr. Belfor states, chronic rhinosinusitis is an extremely common problem. This persistent, nagging health issue is defined by the presence of at least two of four major symptoms, such as facial pain and/or pressure, hyposmia/anosmia, nasal drainage, and sometimes nasal obstruction, for at minimum—12 consecutive weeks.

He explains how the cilia (tiny hairs in our noses) along with mucus, trap the bacteria. But when our sinuses are working properly, these bacteria can be neutralized in most cases. However, when chronic rhinosinusitis occurs, there is a sort of broken link in this chain of defense, and the body will go into its normal defenses, which equates to swelling and inflammation. Dr. Belfor explains the function of nitric oxide, and the jaw, and how the system can become overextended, enabling polyp growth possibilities and more.

Dr. Belfor discusses misalignment, airway and snoring issues, etc. including information on breathing systems. Further, he explains the many possibilities for care and treatment, often without surgical procedures. He talks about the ways to ‘turn the genes on’ to get the body to respond, and improve functioning. He expounds upon the processes of ‘toning the airway’ as well as the difficult problems posed by snoring and sleep apnea. Continuing, the airway expert talks in detail about anatomy, and the physical components that contribute to dental and airway issues.

In this podcast:

What are the main contributors to airway breathing issues?

How to ‘turn genes on’ to get the body to respond to issues

How does a nasal obstruction impact breathing?

Can We Beat Bacteria? – Dr. Eleftherios Mylonakis, the Charles C.J. Carpenter Professor of Infectious Disease at Brown University – Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Responses

Dec 25, 2019 46:18

Description:

Can We Beat Bacteria? – Dr. Eleftherios Mylonakis, the Charles C.J. Carpenter Professor of Infectious Disease at Brown University – Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Responses

Dec 25, 2019 46:17

Description:

Dr. Eleftherios Mylonakis, the Charles C.J. Carpenter Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University as well as Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Brown, delivers an in-depth overview discussing microbial pathogenesis and host responses.

Dr. Mylonakis is an infectious disease specialist who has brought his wealth of experience to multiple hospitals in the New England area, including Massachusetts General Hospital and Miriam Hospital. Dr. Mylonakis earned his medical degree from University of Athens and has been practicing medicine for over 20 years.

Dr. Mylonakis discusses his extensive work in infectious diseases and drug discovery. He explains the types of diseases, and their research in resistant bacteria, with special attention given to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which refers to a group of Gram-positive bacteria that are distinct, genetically, from other types/strains of Staphylococcus aureus. And MRSA, unfortunately, is resistant to numerous antibiotics. The research doctor discusses this particular bacteria, where it lives, and how it functions. As he states, our skin works as an effective barrier from this bacteria entering our bloodstream, but a scratch on the skin, and trauma from an accident, etc. can help the bacteria penetrate and then it can possibly spread through the bloodstream. Dr. Mylonakis explains how to identify virulence factors, and he expounds upon the current research regarding the microbiome, and how disruption could lead to colonization. Resistance traits are an important part of the research, and it is crucial to study the relationships.

The noted doctor talks in detail about diagnostics, and the time we wait for cultures, to understand what is going on. Most labs wait up to 5 days, which creates a difficult situation because time is of the essence in order to effectively treat toxicity and infection. Wrapping up, Dr. Mylonakis explains the process to treat infections after diagnostics.

In this podcast:

How to identify virulence factors

What types of bacteria are resistant to antibiotics

An explanation of microbial pathogenesis

Planet of Plants – Greg Lowry, the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University – Plant Sustainability and Efficient Growth

Dec 25, 2019 27:06

Description:

Planet of Plants – Greg Lowry, the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University – Plant Sustainability and Efficient Growth

Dec 25, 2019 27:05

Description:

Greg Lowry, the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, provides an overview on the importance of nanotechnology, environmental science nano impact factor, considerations regarding current research, and more.


Lowry is deputy director of the NSF/EPA Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT). Additionally, he is on the editorial board for Environmental Science: Nano and Nature: Scientific Data. Lowry earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California at Davis (UC Davis), and an M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from University of Wisconsin in Madison. Continuing his education path, Lowry earned a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University.


Lowry’s intensive research focuses on multiple scientific areas, such as environmental geochemistry, environmental nanotechnology, and nanochemistry. Lowry discusses their research and goal to make agriculture more sustainable. He states that agriculture is very inefficient, and as world populations are expanding at an incredible rate, more work has to be done to increase sustainability, making plants more efficient, making them more resilient to climate change, etc. Lowry talks about his work on wheat, corn, tomato, and more, discussing how they engineer nano materials to deliver nutrients to plants more efficiently, aiding in their growth, especially in difficult climate or soil conditions.


Lowry discusses specific examples of their work, with plants and trees, and the effectiveness of getting nutrients into them. He explains how they have developed coatings on their nano particles that allow them to infiltrate the plant, which overrides the plant’s systems that may fight infiltration, and thus successfully providing nutrients while avoiding any detrimental effects to plant health. Continuing, Lowry states that as we increase population in the billions, plant sustainability will be key to feeding the world’s population.


In this podcast:


What are nanoparticles and what can they do?

How will increasing populations put a strain on food supplies?

What can we do to increase plant sustainability?

Let’s Talk About Breathing Issues—Steven Park, MD—Author of Sleep Interrupted: A Physician Reveals the #1 Reason Why So Many Of Us Are Sick and Tired

Dec 24, 2019 43:04

Description:

Let’s Talk About Breathing Issues—Steven Park, MD—Author of Sleep Interrupted: A Physician Reveals the #1 Reason Why So Many Of Us Are Sick and Tired

Dec 24, 2019 43:03

Description:

All humans are susceptible to breathing problems—regardless of age, health status, or lifestyle. Why is this so? According to Dr. Steven Park, it’s a pretty simple reason: we can talk. In order to talk, the soft tissues in the throat have to be exactly that—soft or “floppy.” This softness, while allowing for speech, also makes the tissue susceptible to caving while we sleep, which leads to snoring.

When the tissues cave entirely, a person stops breathing altogether, and may or may not develop sleep apnea. Both snoring and sleep apnea expose people to a greater risk of stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, diabetes, weight gain, acid reflux, sinus infections, fatigue, anxiety, headaches…the list continues.

Over the course of his career as an ear, nose, and throat doctor, Steven Park has seen countless patients whose problems were in one way or another related to their quality of sleep, and he aims to educate people on the causes and effects of snoring.

On today’s episode, Dr. Park discusses a number of fascinating topics that likely have some relevance to your life or the lives of your loved ones. Tune in to discover:

How the temporary cessation of breathing during sleep tells the body that it’s under stress, thereby invoking a physiologic stress responseWhy someone who experiences breathing cessation multiple times in a single night might not be found to have sleep apnea, but something called upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS)The many ways in which you can address your breathing problems or seek obstructive sleep apnea treatment

Press play to learn more and be sure to check out Dr. Park’s book, Sleep Interrupted: A Physician Reveals the #1 Reason Why So Many Of Us Are Sick and Tired.

Increasing Awareness and Understanding of Diabetes and Obesity—Rob Taub—Diabetes Advocate and Host of CORE Conversations Podcast

Dec 24, 2019 39:32

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Increasing Awareness and Understanding of Diabetes and Obesity—Rob Taub—Diabetes Advocate and Host of CORE Conversations Podcast

Dec 24, 2019 39:32

Description:

Rob Taub is not only a respected figure in film, radio, television, and journalism but also an advocate for type 2 diabetes and ambassador for a joint venture between the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association called Know Diabetes By Heart, which aims to educate people about diabetes and heart disease.

Taub believes that a lack of understanding surrounding the body and how it functions in sickness and in health, as well as what it needs in order to function properly, greatly contributes to the growing sickness of American adults and kids today.

On today’s episode, you will learn:

The degree to which genetics contribute to the development of diabetesWhat Taub has personally found to be the best treatment for type 2 diabetes treatmentWhy diabetes is on the rise despite an increase in the availability of pharmaceuticals to treat it

Learn more by visiting knowdiabetesbyheart.org.

Tissue Regeneration Using Low-Level Laser Therapy—Dr. John Hendy

Dec 20, 2019 27:17

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Tissue Regeneration Using Low-Level Laser Therapy—Dr. John Hendy

Dec 20, 2019 27:17

Description:

Nearly half of the adult U.S. population suffers from some form of periodontal disease, which can result in the rapid destruction or slow reduction of bone, inflamed soft tissues, abscesses, and tooth loss. In the past, bone grafting—a procedure which is both time-consuming and expensive—was the only known method of getting bone back in the places where it should be.

Now, a different technology is available: low-level laser therapy (LLLT). With the use of LLLT, bone regrowth can be obtained for less money, in less time, and provides more comfort to the patient than bone grafting and accelerated orthodontics techniques. But that’s not all: the benefits of low-level laser therapy are wide-ranging, and have been shown to be effective in treating nearly any ailment which can improve with tissue regeneration. The technology has been used in both human and veterinary medicine, and shows great promise as a safe, affordable, and effective medical treatment.

On today’s episode, Dr. John Hendy joins the podcast to discuss all the ins and outs of LLLT, including how he has incorporated it into his work with patients.

By tuning in, you will learn:

What it feels like to receive LLLTHow LLLT can direct nerves away from tooth decay, thereby potentially preventing the need for root canal proceduresHow the combination of high-energy and low-level energy laser therapy work to combat even the most severe cases of periodontal disease


On the Latest in Organoid Technology—Robert Vries, PhD—Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB)

Dec 20, 2019 39:31

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On the Latest in Organoid Technology—Robert Vries, PhD—Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB)

Dec 20, 2019 39:30

Description:

In recent years, interest in organoid technology has exploded. More than ever before, scientists, researchers, and the public at large are beginning to appreciate the value that organoids can contribute to the understanding and clinical treatment of diseases, as well as drug development.

In 2009, the first-ever paper on this technology was published, and on today’s episode, CEO of Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB) in the Netherlands, Robert Vries, PhD dives into the details and complexity of how it's grown since then. He explores with us the different types and functions of organoids, how they are made, and where this field of research is headed in the near future.

Interested in the details of all this and more? Tune in to discover:

Why mimicking a cancer tumor is virtually impossible without the use of adult stem cellsHow organoid technology could change the gold standard in drug development and research in toxicologyHow induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differ from adult stem cells

For more information, check out https://hub4organoids.eu/.

Where Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience Meet—Irina Rish, PhD—University of Montreal

Dec 19, 2019 35:35

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Where Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience Meet—Irina Rish, PhD—University of Montreal

Dec 19, 2019 35:35

Description:

Associate Professor in the Computer Science and Operations Research Department at the University of Montreal, Irina Rish, PhD focuses her work on the intersection between artificial intelligence (AI) and neuroscience, researching the ways in which our knowledge of neuroscience can improve AI, and how AI models can aid our understanding of neuroscience.

On today’s podcast, you will discover:

How the brain differs from artificial neural networks and deep learningWhat will be needed in order to achieve broad AIUnder what conditions neurogenesis occurred in a study using rat models

Learn more about Dr. Rish’s work by visiting https://mila.quebec/en/person/irina-rish/.

Extracellular Engagements – Eduard Willms, Postdoctoral Scientist at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia – An Interesting and Informative Overview of Extracellular Vesicles

Dec 19, 2019 40:03

Description:

Extracellular Engagements – Eduard Willms, Postdoctoral Scientist at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia – An Interesting and Informative Overview of Extracellular Vesicles

Dec 19, 2019 40:03

Description:

Eduard Willms, Postdoctoral Scientist at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, provides an overview of the types of extracellular vesicles, and the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs).

Willms research is focused on the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in cellular communication. Willms holds a BSc in Pharmacy and a DPhil in Physiology. He has intensively studied EV heterogeneity in an effort to more fully understand the specific roles of various types of EVs released by cells.

Willms explains how he got into the study of exosomes—membrane bound extracellular vesicles that are created in the endosomal compartment of nearly all eukaryotic cells. Starting with some fascinating early experiments during his education years studying pharmacy, Willms was intrigued by what he was learning, and was hooked on cellular study from then on. Willms explains cellular communication, discussing hormones and neurotransmitters, etc. Willms talks about his interest in extracellular vesicle heterogeneity, and looking at what types of vesicles are secreted by cells. What kind of vesicle is able to enter a cell and deliver its messages? Willms talks about how the systems work, and how EVs might be used to deliver therapeutics or drugs into the cells. As he states, it is important to know which kinds of vesicles could be successful in delivering these messages, and ultimately—deliver therapeutics.

Continuing, the noted research scientist expounds upon the cellular environments and discusses possible stability issues in regard to EVs. He talks about biodistribution in lab studies and the life of EVs, essentially concerned with how long they can perform these important duties. Wrapping up, Willms discusses what they have observed in various populations of vesicles, and the relative possibilities, explaining organelles and structures.

In this podcast:

What are extracellular vesicles?

How can EVs be used to deliver therapeutics into cells?

How do cells communicate?

Artificial Intelligence-Accelerated Development of Cancer Drugs—Panna Sharma—Lantern Pharma

Dec 18, 2019 35:22

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Artificial Intelligence-Accelerated Development of Cancer Drugs—Panna Sharma—Lantern Pharma

Dec 18, 2019 35:21

Description:

Not more than twenty years ago, only four or five blood cancers could be defined; today, hundreds of different types of lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma cancers have been characterized—each one with a unique molecular structure and genome. As a result, an enormous amount of data has become available in the area of research and development for cancer drugs.

According to Panna Sharma, CEO of Lantern Pharma, there is no better place to apply the tools of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). “There could be more permutations of chemical compounds than there are galaxies, so it’s a perfect problem area for AI,” says Sharma.

He goes on to explain why some drugs—despite being extremely effective for some people—don’t stay on the market. In addition to depriving patients access to a drug which could truly help them, this also represents a significant financial loss, considering that hundreds of millions of dollars can go into the development of a single cancer drug.

The technology being employed by Lantern Pharma has the ability to identify which drugs have worked for some people in the past, why they worked, and how to use this information as a predictive measure of what may (or may not) work for any given patient with a particular type of cancer. Sharma is a wealth of knowledge, and discusses the details of all this and more, including:

How many cancer drugs are already built in to the Lantern Pharma modelHow many gene expression profiles there are within a given tumorThe importance of understanding a tumor’s response to a given drug and how Lantern Pharma is trying to elucidate this in prostate cancer

Learn more at https://www.lanternpharma.com/.

Psychedelics for Addiction Recovery—Matthew Johnson, PhD—Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins

Dec 17, 2019 33:03

Description:

Psychedelics for Addiction Recovery—Matthew Johnson, PhD—Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins

Dec 17, 2019 33:02

Description:

When you think of what addiction recovery looks like, you probably don’t envision the consumption of psychedelic drugs. On today’s episode, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins and author of 47 articles on psychedelic drugs, Matthew Johnson, PhD, explains why and how psychedelic therapy might have a place in addiction recovery after all.

His area of expertise lies in understanding the ways in which psychedelic drugs can serve as behavior change agents. This idea is consistent with neuroscience research findings, countless anecdotal stories, and ceremonial use of psychedelic substances in a variety of indigenous cultures. Intrigued by the idea? Tune in to hear all the details and learn more, including:

How Dr. Johnson characterizes the commonality between people who benefit from the use of psychedelics (and it’s not about religion or spirituality)How psychedelic drug use could help those who suffer from addiction to cocaine, alcohol, or tobacco, as well as cancer-related depression, anorexia, and PTSDWhen psilocybin pills could become an FDA-approved option for clinical treatment of a variety of disorders

Tune in to hear the full discussion.

Cell Culture – Dr. Christian Regenbrecht, Shareholder, CEO, CELLphenomics – Assisting the Researchers, New Drugs for Disease Treatment

Dec 17, 2019 35:52

Description:

Cell Culture – Dr. Christian Regenbrecht, Shareholder, CEO, CELLphenomics – Assisting the Researchers, New Drugs for Disease Treatment

Dec 17, 2019 35:51

Description:

Dr. Christian Regenbrecht, shareholder, CEO, of CELLphenomics, provides an overview of his company’s important work that could assist researchers as they strive to develop new drugs to treat disease.

Regenbrecht studied biology and philosophy at the University of Bonn, and continued his postdoc with noted scientist, Hans Lehrach, at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genomics in Berlin. Regenbrecht has focused some of his time on improved patient-derived in vitro models, culture technologies, and preclinical efficacy studies.

Regenbrecht discusses his extensive work and the innovations that are happening at CELLphenomics. With greater than 400 proprietary patient-derived 3D (PD3D®) cell cultures, CELLphenomics can offer researchers an opportunity to test compounds with a comprehensive screening approach in an, up to, 384 well format. In simplest terms, patient-derived cell cultures are essentially novel multicellular systems newly isolated from primary organs through mechanical and enzymatic dissociation. Within a system such as this, cells that are grown on a proprietary matrix can develop as 3D organoids which are composed of cell clusters preserving the uniquely complex composition of the tissue of origin.

Regenbrecht discusses cell types in tumors, specifically focusing on colon tumors. Continuing, he discusses the ways that tumors can metastasize. Regenbrecht explains how they are able to use their processes to isolate exosomes that are secreted into the cell culture. By studying this information, researchers may be able to predict where the next site of metastasization could occur. Regenbrecht explains their mission at CELLphenomics, as a state-of-the-art in vitro service provider positioned to offer high-quality, sensibly priced cell culture models and ultimately assist the biotech and pharma industries to create innovative testings of new anti-cancer drugs.

In this podcast:

What makes some tumors metastasize?

A detailed explanation of exosomes

Innovative practices in the biotech industry

Using AI to Boost Your Business’ Retention Rate—Matt Moody—Bellwethr

Dec 16, 2019 20:13

Description:

Using AI to Boost Your Business’ Retention Rate—Matt Moody

Dec 16, 2019 20:12

Description:

Imagine increasing your business’ retention rates by 28.9%, and increasing them by over 20% within the first week of making an investment. With a new machine learning application from Bellwethr, you can.

CEO and founder, Matt Moody, joins the podcast to discuss the importance of customer retention and how Bellwethr is making it happen. Compelled by the belief that everyone should have access to the power of artificial intelligence (AI) and the motivation to show his customers the range of problems that AI can solve, Matt Moody and his team at Bellwethr are making it easier than ever for businesses and individuals to benefit from this technology. Tune in to learn more, including:

How the Bellwethr win-back engine, upsell engine, and retention engine workWhy Bellwethr products offer so much more than other business intelligence and data analytics toolsWhat’s on the horizon for Bellwethr in the coming year

Check out https://www.bellwethr.com/ to learn more.

World Health – Tjasa Zajc, Podcaster, Entrepreneur, Head of the “Faces of Digital Health” Podcast – A Closer Look at the State of Healthcare in Developed as Well as Developing Nations

Dec 16, 2019 26:17

Description:

World Health – Tjasa Zajc, Podcaster, Entrepreneur, Head of the “Faces of Digital Health” Podcast – A Closer Look at the State of Healthcare in Developed as Well as Developing Nations

Dec 16, 2019 26:16

Description:

Tjasa Zajc, podcaster, entrepreneur, head of the “Faces of Digital Health” podcast, a podcast about digital health and healthcare systems technology adoption, talks about the current state of healthcare in developed and developing countries.


Zajc talks about her background and the troubling early medical condition that led her to dig deeper into learning about health. After her diagnosis with IBD, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (which in name covers many disorders that can generate chronic inflammation of the digestive tract), Zajc was compelled to learn more, eventually studying healthcare management and economics in order to better understand healthcare beyond the patient perspective.


Zajc talks about the modern healthcare experience in various countries and digital technology in healthcare, covering issues such as availability, chronic conditions, and financial expenses. She discusses private insurance versus public healthcare. She provides detailed information on retirement funds and the concept of saving money for health problems that could come later in life, as the issues relate to various cultures and countries. She explains healthcare models, and how people perceive healthcare solutions around the globe. Zajc explains how some countries have a serious lack of qualified medical personnel and thus access to healthcare is a problem in many corners of the globe. Zajc explains how some people have distrust of their own providers or doctors and may travel many miles to see doctors in larger hospital facilities.


The business developer entrepreneur and healthcare expert discusses her current work assisting pharmacies with drug management processes and hospital admittance procedures. She discusses how systems can be made more efficient by going digital, which can decrease some potential problems with medical records, drugs, etc.


In this podcast:


How digital technology could change healthcare for the better, if only…

Is private health insurance doing the best job it can to provide coverage for everyone?

The tough problem of scant medical access in some countries

A Picture is Worth Thousands of Restful Nights—Nicola Beer with Richard Jacobs—The Good Night’s Sleep Project

Dec 13, 2019 14:51

Description:

A Picture is Worth Thousands of Restful Nights—Nicola Beer with Richard Jacobs—The Good Night’s Sleep Project

Dec 13, 2019 14:50

Description:

Small, medium, large, soft, firm; when it comes to finding a pillow that works for us, these adjectives are pretty much all we have to work with. For this reason, it can be difficult if not impossible to find a pillow that properly supports your head, neck, and shoulders and retains its integrity over time. After years of dealing with this problem, serial entrepreneur Richard Jacobs decided to do something which had never been done before: design the world’s first custom-tailored pillow that is both simple and sensical, as well as easy for a person to get.


No complicated measurements or calculations are necessary: all that’s required is a picture or two of your upper body, which can be sent through The Good Night’s Sleep Project app. From there, you can just sit back and wait for your custom-tailored pillow to arrive. With the use of AI computer vision, 14 measurements will be extracted from your photos and serve as a guideline for the creation of a pillow that’s completely unique to you.


Tune in to learn about all the details and more, including:


How and why the wrong pillow could be contributing to your sleep apnea or snoringHow the wear on a mattress over time can actually impact the shape of your pillow, and how the custom-tailored pillow accounts for this How the right pillow could be the solution to a variety of sleeping problems


Visit https://www.goodnightssleepproject.com/ to learn more and order one for yourself.

Organoids: Regrowing Tumors Before Treating Them—Senthil K. Muthuswamy— Muthuswamy Lab

Dec 13, 2019 28:01

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Organoids: Regrowing Tumors Before Treating Them—Senthil K. Muthuswamy— Muthuswamy Lab

Dec 13, 2019 28:00

Description:

Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, Director of Cell Biology at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Principal Investigator at Muthuswamy Lab, Senthil K. Muthuswamy, Ph.D. is working to better understand the molecular biology of cancer and the most effective method of treating it by creating organoids from patient tumors. When cultured under the proper conditions, a sample of tissue from a patient’s tumor will grow into a 3D structure that resembles the patient’s tumor.


Once that’s been accomplished, the organoid can be used to determine which drugs will most effectively treat the specific tumor at hand. This approach addresses one of the main challenges to chemotherapy and targeted therapy, which is that not all patients will respond to the same drug in the same way—even if they have the same type of cancer. Dr. Muthuswamy’s lab is currently working with breast and pancreatic tumors.


On today's episode, you will learn:


Why two people with a certain type of cancer respond differently to the same treatmentWhat types of research are being done with the use of organoidsWhat the next five years will bring for Dr. Muthuswamy’s lab and organoid-based drug and immunotherapy research

Bioscience Breakthroughs – David Freedman, Co-founder and Founding CEO of NanoView Biosciences – New Methods for Research and Discovery

Dec 13, 2019 36:02

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Bioscience Breakthroughs – David Freedman, Co-founder and Founding CEO of NanoView Biosciences

Dec 13, 2019 36:02

Description:

David Freedman, a co-founder and the founding CEO of NanoView Biosciences, discusses noninvasive diagnostics and extracellular vesicles.

Freedman was essential to NanoView’s entry into the expanding extracellular vesicle market with the development and subsequent launch of the ExoView™ R100. He has been a successful entrepreneur for more than ten years, formerly as CTO of eHomes, and President of a computer services company. Freedman is interested in commercialization strategy and organizational build-out, product and services development, tech engineering, as well as automation. Freedman completed his Ph.D. and Postdoc in Electrical Engineering at Boston University.


NanoView Biosciences is at the leading edge of exosome discovery and they provide innovative solutions to detect and characterize extracellular vesicles. Freedman explains what extracellular vesicles are, for those who might not be familiar. As he states, extracellular vesicles are like the “Twitter of cells,” in that they are tiny messengers, providing a means for cells to transmit biological information from one cell to another. He discusses the history of cell discovery and what current research is finding in terms of exosome discovery. Exosomes, in simplest terms, are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles produced in the endosomal compartment of a typical eukaryotic cell.


Freedman explains NanoView Biosciences’ platform, which allows researchers to look at the outside and inside of the exosome. NanoView Biosciences’ research looks at many different avenues for their tech to provide new answers. Freedman discusses how this important area of bioscience research can potentially provide more information on the mechanisms of cancer cells.


He explains how they analyze samples, discussing nanoparticle size and count, as well as biological activity, which can help companies that are developing liquid biopsies and new therapeutics. Continuing, Freedman discusses other noninvasive diagnostics and therapeutic development.


In this podcast:

What are extracellular vesicles?What important functions do extracellular vesicles perform?The future of therapeutic development


The First Undergraduate Research Group to Send Their Studies to Space— Lauren Potterat and Michael O’Neill—USC Rocket Propulsion Laboratory

Dec 11, 2019 27:33

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The First Undergraduate Research Group to Send Their Studies to Space—Laura Potterat and Michael O’Neill—USC Rocket Propulsion Laboratory

Dec 11, 2019 27:33

Description:

The USC Rocket Propulsion Laboratory was founded in 2005 with the goal of putting an undergraduate student designed and built rocket into space—which is defined as being at least 100 km or about 330,000 feet above Earth’s surface. Just this past year, this goal was finally reached. On today’s episode, Michael O’Neill and Laura Potterat, media lead and avionics lead at the lab, respectively, share their experiences as members of the team who finally made this happen, the challenges they faced along the way, and what the accomplishment means for their future work. By tuning in, you'll discover:

How the work being done at USC Rocket Propulsion Lab could lead to a cheaper and simpler way of obtaining atmospheric dataWhat a peek into the design and function of space rockets looks like The challenge of characterizing the performance of the rocket, including its acceleration and position

Check out uscrpl.com to learn more.

Halitosis Gnosis—James Hyland, DDS—OraVital

Dec 11, 2019 45:22

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Halitosis Gnosis—James Hyland, DDS—OraVital

Dec 11, 2019 45:21

Description:

Do you ever notice a little bit of blood on your toothbrush while brushing? This isn’t uncommon, and most of us just “brush it off” you might say, but the truth is if your gums are bleeding, then you have a wound where bacteria is penetrating the tissue and entering your bloodstream, paving the way for systemic illness throughout your body. James Hyland, DDS, President and CEO of OraVital, discusses oral infections, how to eliminate them, and why traditional brushing and flossing isn’t the solution. He also explains the science behind halitosis (also known as bad breath), why it can occur even in the healthiest of mouths, how to address it in your daily oral hygiene routine, and why failing to do so could lead to plaque formation in your brain—the hallmark of Lyme disease, syphilis, and Alzheimer’s. On today’s episode, you will learn about all of this and more, including:

Where bad breath comes from and what it’s composed ofThe most effective way to clean your teeth and gumsWhat Dr. Hyland recommends as the protocol for mouth infection treatment and periodontal disease treatment

Learn more by tuning in and visiting www.oravital.com.

Fertility Fundamentals – Audrey Gaskins, Assistant Professor, Epidemiology at Emory University – Studying Semen Quality and Fertility Issues

Dec 10, 2019 29:07

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Fertility Fundamentals – Audrey Gaskins, Assistant Professor, Epidemiology at Emory University – Studying Semen Quality and Fertility Issues

Dec 10, 2019 29:06

Description:

Audrey Gaskins, Assistant Professor, Epidemiology at Emory University, delivers an interesting overview of normal sperm motility, causes of abnormal sperm morphology, and the various factors involved with fertility and semen quality.

Gaskins’ extensive research has focused heavily upon the connections between environmental, dietary, and lifestyle factors with fertility and fecundity in women and men.

She has published on the many benefits of folic acid, exceeding levels well above the current recommendations, in regard to preventing anovulation and incident pregnancy loss as well as boosting the success probability of infertility treatment. She is currently working on an NIH grant that is primarily focused on extending her research to study the possible interactions between diet, air pollution, and fertility among groups of women.

Gaskins talks about semen quality in men, and some research has shown that male semen quality globally is on the decline, which is of course an area of concern for researchers. She talks about the possible factors that could play a role in the decline in sperm count, discussing lifestyle and environmental exposures, etc. She discusses fertility in detail, and her interests have driven her to study men because men have been understudied in this regard she states. She talks about DNA fragmentation and genetics, in regard to her studies.

The professor goes on to discuss how age plays a role and factors into their studies. She talks about semen samples that they study and how they collect information on important variables that could be determinants in studies. And Gaskins discusses seasonal impacts, and other possible pollutants, etc. that could impact semen quality.

In this podcast:

What environmental factors could impact semen quality?

Reasons that semen quality could be decreasing globally

Does age play a role in semen quality?

On the Least-Talked-About Solution to Decreasing Climate-Changing Pollution—Mary Ellen Harte, PhD—Biologist, Author, and Biological Consultant

Dec 9, 2019 31:40

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On the Least-Talked-About Solution to Decreasing Climate-Changing Pollution—Mary Ellen Harte, PhD—Biologist, Author, and Biological Consultant

Dec 9, 2019 31:39

Description:

Most of know that the climate is changing, and it’s changing rapidly--in ways that will continue to cause environmental degradation and extinction. Most of us also want to do something about it, but have a hard time seeing how we can really tackle such a big problem on the individual level. How can MY choices actually affect the future? After all, I can’t just decide to ban deforestation or switch everything over to clean energy. What is it that I CAN do?


According to biologist, author, and environmental consultant Mary Ellen Harte, PhD, the answer lies in a solution that’s just as important as protecting the forests and becoming global leaders in clean energy technology, but not talked about nearly as often: family planning. By preventing unintended pregnancies through free and effective family planning services, we can slow the growth of the population.


This approach will not only address the problem of climate-changing pollution, but also the relationship between population growth and stress, physical and psychological problems, and higher crime rates. In her work, Dr. Harte emphasizes the importance of environmental economics, and encourages people to seek out and vote for the political leaders who do the same. 


On today’s podcast, you will learn:

Why the issue of climate change is so politicized in the U.S., but not in other countriesWhether or not technology can address the magnitude of climate change that’s occurringWhat will likely happen if the right solutions are implemented quickly, and what will likely happen if they aren’t


To learn more about how the environment is being affected by climate change, Dr. Harte recommends checking out The Daily Climate. To find a free online copy of the book she co-authored called Cool the Earth, follow this link http://www.cooltheearth.us/.

Microbiome Mechanics – Jonathan Hull, Head of Business Development at Thryve – Weight Loss, Probiotics, Microbiome Testing, and GI Health

Dec 6, 2019 19:48

Description:

Microbiome Mechanics – Jonathan Hull, Head of Business Development at Thryve – Weight Loss, Probiotics, Microbiome Testing, and GI Health

Dec 6, 2019 19:48

Description:

In this podcast, Jonathan Hull, Business Development Head at Thryve Inside (thryveinside.com), discusses probiotics weight loss, microbiome testing, the importance of gut health, and the latest evolution in microbiome products.


Hull talks about the early origins of Thryve, and explains how they grew from solely a microbiome testing company into a manufacturer of individualized probiotics designed for improving overall gut health. Hull describes the kinds of probiotics they offer, and how their offerings are based on testing results. As more people are discovering that GI health is an important key to overall health, new products are making their way to the marketplace, but it’s important to know which ones are right for you. Hull continues his discussion on gut health by discussing many various gastrointestinal conditions and gut distress. 


Hull expounds upon the latest evolution in microbiome products, and he explains how academic and business/industrial leaders alike are interested in expanding research of microbiome issues. Hull explains how the microbiome is incredibly influential with overall body health. Wrapping up, he discusses consumer-based genetic testing, and the ever-growing interest in microbiome issues.


In this podcast:


Which microbiome products could be right for you?Genetic testing and microbiome testing—what can they tell you?The expanding interest in gut health



Gut Microbiome – Dale R. Pfost, PhD, Director and Cofounder, Microbiome Therapeutics – The Microbiome, Gut to Brain Connections, Probiotics & Prebiotics

Dec 6, 2019 49:56

Description:

Gut Microbiome – Dale R. Pfost, PhD, Director and Cofounder, Microbiome Therapeutics – The Microbiome, Gut to Brain Connections, Probiotics & Prebiotics

Dec 6, 2019 49:56

Description:

Dale R. Pfost, PhD, Director and Cofounder, Microbiome Therapeutics, delivers an interesting overview of microbiome therapeutics, prediabetes treatment, and more.

Dr. Pfost has more than 25 years of solid leadership experience in the biotechnology industry. He has held many important executive positions at numerous respected companies, and was the Chief Executive of six biotechnology companies, most recently as the founding CEO of MicroBiome Therapeutics. Dr. Pfost earned a BS degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his PhD in physics from Brown University.

Dr. Pfost explains the premise of his company, Microbiome Therapeutics. As he states, the field of the microbiome encompasses a wide range of human health issues. With the increase in popularity of probiotic foods, clearly there is a strong interest in improving gut health through diet. Dr. Pfost states that through his 30 years of experience in the biotechnology field, the microbiome arena is one of the richest and broadest paradigm shifts in biotechnology and health food in particular.

The biotechnology expert talks in depth about cells, probiotics, and the processes that take place in our lower guts. He discusses caloric intake and “the loop” as he calls it, delving into the repopulation that takes place in the gut, using prebiotics, etc. to help the microbes produce short chain fatty acids. Continuing, he talks about the gut hormones, and the connection between the gut and brain. Dr. Pfost explains how it is important to increase the production of good things, such as short chain fatty acids, while decreasing the production of the bad things—such as hydrogen, gas, methane, and sulfide.

Dr. Pfost discusses intermittent fasting, in its various forms. And as he explains, you’re fasting not only yourself but the microbes as well. He discusses the keto diet and other nutritional aspects of various diets, and how they impact microbes.

In this podcast:

How prebiotics could help microbes produce short chain fatty acids

The benefits of probiotic foods

The connections between the gut and brain

Salivation Salvation—Dr. Kim Kutsch—CariFree

Dec 6, 2019 56:31

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Salivation Salvation—Dr. Kim Kutsch—CariFree

Dec 6, 2019 56:31

Description:

Did you know that about half of the bottled water on the market has a pH of four? You may be wondering what that even means and why it matters. On today’s episode, Dr. Kim Kutsch, owner of CariFree, is welcomed back to the show to discuss what he’s learned over the course of his career as a dentist, and how it can greatly benefit your health.


After spending years “drilling and filling” cavity after cavity, Dr. Kutsch finally had enough: he knew he needed to fill in the educational gaps left by the dental school, which meant he needed to understand the root cause of cavities and the disease mechanism at play. Why do some people get so many cavities despite flossing and brushing every day, while others go their whole lives with less-than-ideal oral hygiene and not one cavity? Are genetics or environmental factors at play in dentistry?


“It all goes back to the pH in the mouth,” he says. He continues by discussing the interplay between the drop in pH (i.e. the increase in acidity) that occurs every time we eat or drink, and the body’s mechanism of compensating for that by coating the mouth and teeth with saliva, an alkaline solution that decreases acidity, bringing the oral microbiome—the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in the mouth—back to neutral pH, which is about 6.5. When this interplay becomes unbalanced, it can wreak havoc in the mouth. This means that the less saliva someone produces, the less protected their teeth. This is troublesome, considering the fact that roughly 70% of the U.S. population is on at least one prescription medication, and the number one side effect of all prescription medications is dry mouth—a decrease in the production of saliva.


Tune in to learn about Dr. Kutsch’s preventative approach to this problem and so much more, including:


What the CariFree toothpaste, rinse, and gel are composed of and why they are so effective at preventing cavitiesHow poor oral health and having caries (i.e. cavities) is a risk factor for fatal diseasesHow the healthy oral microbiome functions in the mouth


Visit carifree.com to learn more.

How to Harmonize Humanity and the Planet—Gretchen Cara Daily, Ph.D.—Stanford Center for Conservation Biology

Dec 5, 2019 21:35

Description:

How to Harmonize Humanity and the Planet - Gretchen Cara Daily, Ph.D.—Stanford Center for Conservation Biology

Dec 5, 2019 21:34

Description:

You leave your house in the morning and are immediately hit with the acidic taste and smell of the thickest air you’ve ever experienced. You walk by ancient cathedrals and forests and lakes, only to notice them dissolving away and slowly dying from this thing called “acid rain.” For Gretchen Cara Daily, Ph.D., this became a part of her ordinary experience as a teenager growing up in Germany. At the time, millions of people were demonstrating in the streets, protesting the environmental degradation and corporate activities which were leading to the slow death of everything beautiful in their lives.


Dr. Daily was strongly impacted by these events, and she’s carried them with her as a source of motivation and insight throughout her life and career. She currently serves as Director of the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford University. “Looking back to my upbringing, we solved the problem of acid rain…and I feel we can rise to the task of changing the way we think about how we live on the planet, how we fit in with the rest of life, and we can crack open a path that harmonizes people and the planet, nature, the climate system, jobs, human well-being, so that’s what I’m focused on,” says Dr. Daily.


In today’s episode, she discusses the enormous value of investing in nature to secure vital natural infrastructure that contributes to our lives in ways we might not even acknowledge, but rely upon each day. This includes everything from our morning cups of coffee to our mental and physical health. She explains the goal of the global initiative called the Natural Capital Project, which is to shine a light on the connections between nature and our well-being, the causes of environmental problems, the importance of making education on environmental science accessible to everyone, and the need to quantify the value of nature in ways that can be integrated into financial and policy decision-making practices.


By tuning in, you’ll discover:

·  How to create better access to green space in otherwise totally urbanized environments, and how this can improve mental and physical health

·  What percentage of humanity now lives in cities, and the projected percentage by around 2050

·  How satellite images can indicate the economic status of a geographic region


Learn more by visiting https://naturalcapitalproject.stanford.edu/.

What’s in YOUR Gut? – Fedor Galkin, Project Manager at Insilico Medicine, Inc. – Advanced Study of the Microbiome

Dec 2, 2019 33:33

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What’s in YOUR Gut? – Fedor Galkin, Project Manager at Insilico Medicine, Inc. – Advanced Study of the Microbiome

Dec 2, 2019 33:32

Description:

Fedor Galkin, Project Manager at Insilico Medicine, Inc., discusses his work studying the microbiome, human genotypes, and aging/longevity.

Galkin graduated from Moscow State University with a degree in Bioengineering & Bioinformatics. His work focuses on human microbiome aging clocks based on deep learning. Interestingly, the microbiome can serve as an incredibly accurate biological clock, able to predict the age of many people within just years.

Galkin discusses the earliest microbiome aging clocks and recent advances, and the technology that is behind them. Some of these technologies can make assessments based on an individual’s blood biochemistry and gene expression levels, etc., but as he states there has never before been a clock that predicts age based on gut microbes. Galkin discusses their work in detail, discussing how they select and look at the microbes.

Galkin explains the correlations and organization in the microbes, and how with age, things fluctuate. He details how they observe the changes that show age, and how certain conditions, such as diabetes will make the gut microbes appear as a much older person. Continuing, the bioengineering expert talks about nutrients, and how supplements, etc. can impact the biological systems. And he explains how their work on the species level is ongoing, but that they hope to delve deeper into the functional and genetic level as well, in their continued study of the human microbiome.

In this podcast:

What is a microbiome aging clock?

How nutrients play a role in the gut microbiome

The role of supplements in biological health

Testing for Cancer – Gregory Kuehn, MBA, President and COO of Prescient Metabiomics – Colon Cancer, the Microbiome, Testing

Dec 2, 2019 23:05

Description:

Testing for Cancer – Gregory Kuehn, MBA, President and COO of Prescient Metabiomics – Colon Cancer, the Microbiome, Testing

Dec 2, 2019 23:04

Description:

Gregory Kuehn, MBA, President and COO of Prescient Metabiomics, formerly Metabiomics, discusses their innovative work in colorectal cancer treatment and the development of an advanced stool test for cancer.

Kuehn holds an MBA from the University of Colorado and a BS from the College of William and Mary in molecular biology and computer science. Kuehn talks about their advanced work studying the microbiome to predict or associate with disease.

Kuehn discusses their work at Prescient Metabiomics, a pioneer in the development of human microbiome and metagenomic technology. Their groundbreaking research has lead to the development of a non-invasive stool test for the early detection of colon polyps as well as colorectal cancer based on advanced examination of the human gut microbiome. Kuehn talks in-depth about their early work in inflammatory bowel disease, that led them to their current work studying how to prevent colon cancer. Kuehn discusses the detail that they have gone into studying the microbiome, looking at the complex relationships that the microbiome has with the entire body. He talks about biomarkers, toxins, and the functional relationship between the gut microbiome and human health.

The cancer prevention researcher talks in detail about the various hypotheses that exist in their area of research, and why colon cancer has persisted. And Kuehn explains carcinogenesis and the early screening options.

In this podcast:

The mechanisms of cancer development

How the microbiome can potentially provide insight into disease development

Stool tests for cancer, how do they work

Sitting, Kneeling, and Backbending the Line—Dustin Lindblad—Yoga Slacklining

Dec 2, 2019 27:03

Description:

Sitting, Kneeling, and Backbending the Line—Dustin Lindblad—Yoga Slacklining

Dec 2, 2019 27:03

Description:

You might be familiar with slacklining as the art of balancing and walking on what looks like a thin string between two anchor points, but it can actually involve much more than that, such as sitting, kneeling, laying down, backbending, side planking, squatting, and every move you might associate with yoga. How is that even possible? The answer might best be answered by yoga and slacklining teacher, Dustin Lindblad. She joins the podcast today to discuss how she became involved in slacklining, the myriad benefits she’s gained from slacklining, and why it’s not as esoteric or impossible as it might initially seem. In fact, most people who have a true desire to master it, can. Tune in to discover:

Why it’s important to be mindful of your breathing and how relaxed your body is while slackliningWhat type of shoes Dustin Lindblad finds most helpful when slackliningHow to get started as a total beginner


“The Most Important Diseases You’ve Never Heard Of”—Peter Jay Hotez, M.D., Ph.D.—National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine

Dec 2, 2019 22:08

Description:

“The Most Important Diseases You’ve Never Heard Of”—Peter Jay Hotez, M.D., Ph.D.—National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine

Dec 2, 2019 22:07

Description:

“We call them neglected tropical diseases…but the truth is, they’re really diseases of extreme poverty; you ordinarily do not get a neglected tropical disease unless you live in extremely impoverished conditions where there’s environmental degradation, poor-quality housing, inadequate sanitation,” says Dr. Peter Jay Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He continues by explaining that contrary to what many people may think, these diseases are not rare, and they’re not found only in developing countries: they are global health issues found right here in the United States, and affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Despite these numbers, the major pharmaceutical companies aren’t focused on developing drugs or vaccines to combat their spread. As a result, these responsibilities fall on the nonprofit sector. Dr. Hotez discusses the efforts within this sector and by the National School of Tropical Medicine toward implementing vaccination for some of the most common neglected tropical diseases, including hookworm infection, Chagas disease, and schistosomiasis. In today's podcast, you will discover:

Where some of the most common neglected tropical diseases originate, how they are contracted, and what they do to the bodyHow the significant financial barriers to the development of vaccines in the nonprofit sector might be mitigatedWhich neglected tropical disease is a major cofactor in Africa’s AIDS epidemicHow much progress has been made toward developing vaccines for neglected tropical diseases

Press play to hear the full conversation, check out Dr. Hotez’s book, Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases: The Neglected Tropical Diseases and Their Impact on Global Health and Development, and learn more by visiting https://www.bcm.edu/education/schools/national-school-of-tropical-medicine/.

A Conversation with The Monkey Doc on Host-Microbiome Interactions—Dr. Jonathan Clayton—Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska

Nov 27, 2019 43:40

Description:

A Conversation with The Monkey Doc on Host-Microbiome Interactions—Dr. Jonathan Clayton—Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska

Nov 27, 2019 43:40

Description:

“I certainly believe that without our microbes, our immune systems wouldn’t be primed, we wouldn’t be able to digest many of the foods that we consume…and we wouldn’t be able to protect from pathogens, so they basically do it all,” says Dr. Jonathan Clayton, assistant professor (better known as “The Monkey Doc”) at the University of Nebraska.

Despite a growing amount of evidence suggesting that the human microbiome impacts us in significant ways, there’s still so much we don’t know. For instance, what can be learned about site-specific microbial communities within our body, or even throughout a single organ such as the skin? What can be said about the relationship between the gut microbiome and the brain, or between stress and the microbiome? How does diet impact the microbiome? How quickly can the microbiome change in response to different environmental stimuli? These are just a few of the questions that Dr. Clayton is interested in answering.

By tuning in, you’ll hear his take on all of this and more, including:

What insights were gained from Dr. Clayton’s biomedical research on the differences between the microbiomes of wild versus captive non-human primatesHow dysbiosis and diversity is defined in terms of microbiotaWhat types of challenges are inherent in these areas of research, and where Dr. Clayton plans to direct future research


Minding Your Microbiome with Every Meal—Guru Banavar—Viome

Nov 27, 2019 39:31

Description:

Minding Your Microbiome with Every Meal—Guru Banavar—Viome

Nov 27, 2019 39:30

Description:

“In the developed world in the last few decades, there’s been a tremendous increase in the number of people who have chronic illness…if you look around you, every other person probably has some kind of chronic illness, whether it’s some kind of autoimmune disease, metabolic, neurologic…[or] cancer,” says Guru Banavar, Chief Technology Officer at Viome. The point he makes is hard to refute, but is it equally as hard to explain what’s contributing to the rise in chronic illness? According to Banavar, chronic illnesses are driven by the gut microbiome, and if for no other reason, that’s why we need to take a closer look at it. At Viome, chronic disease prevention is the central focus, and they believe that in order to do this, we first need to understand gene expression, and harness the power of the right kinds of foods and supplements—the kinds that work with and are required by the gut microbiome for the activation of important microbial pathways. The team at Viome is conducting microbiome research using stool samples from about 100,000 current customers and delivering app-based, personalized recommendations for what to eat to mind your microbiome. Tune in to discover:

How Viome can tell you which types of foods can turn on or off inflammatory pathways in your gut microbiomeWhat differs between the microbiomes of people who have a high versus low glycemic index, or normal GI phenotype versus irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)What we might learn from longitudinal studies of the microbiome currently being conducted by the team at Viome


An Analysis of Pancreatic Tumor Microbiomes—Florencia McAllister, MD—Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Center at the University of Texas

Nov 26, 2019 32:53

Description:

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressively malignant cancers that exist; despite all the knowledge we have about the mechanisms at play in pancreatic cancer and many attempts at finding a treatment that works, the survival rate is only nine percent in five years after diagnosis. In the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention at the University of Texas, Dr. Florencia McAllister’s goal is to change this by developing better preventative and therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. She is focused on understanding the interaction between the immune system and very early-stage cancer. How is it that cancer can emerge in the body yet remain undetected by the immune system? And if we can answer this question, can we also figure out how to change it? Part of this research involves a look at the microbiome of pancreatic tumors and a comparison to the microbiome of the gut. What, if any, are the associations between the gut and tumor microbiomes, and between the bacteria in tumors and the immune response? Answering these questions is the crux of Dr. McAllister’s work, and she joins the podcast today to discuss all the details. By tuning in, you will learn:

What Dr. McAllister and her team has learned by comparing the tumor microbiomes of long-term versus short-term survivors of pancreatic cancerHow the microbiome of pancreatic tumors differs from the microbiome of the rest of the pancreasWhat causes someone to be at high risk for developing pancreatic cancer


An Analysis of Pancreatic Tumor Microbiomes—Florencia McAllister, MD—Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Center at the University of Texas

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressively malignant cancers that exist; despite all the knowledge we have about the mechanisms at play in pancreatic cancer and many attempts at finding a treatment that works, the survival rate is only nine percent in five years after diagnosis. In the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention at the University of Texas, Dr. Florencia McAllister’s goal is to change this by developing better preventative and therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. She is focused on understanding the interaction between the immune system and very early-stage cancer. How is it that cancer can emerge in the body yet remain undetected by the immune system? And if we can answer this question, can we also figure out how to change it? Part of this research involves a look at the microbiome of pancreatic tumors and a comparison to the microbiome of the gut. What, if any, are the associations between the gut and tumor microbiomes, and between the bacteria in tumors and the immune response? Answering these questions is the crux of Dr. McAllister’s work, and she joins the podcast today to discuss all the details. By tuning in, you will learn: What Dr. McAllister and her team has learned by comparing the tumor microbiomes of long-term versus short-term survivors of pancreatic cancer How the microbiome of pancreatic tumors differs from the microbiome of the rest of the pancreas What causes someone to be at high risk for developing pancreatic cancer

Would You Trade Your Privacy for Information About Your Genome?—Kristen V. Brown—Futures of Health Reporter, Bloomberg News

Nov 25, 2019 19:16

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Would You Trade Your Privacy for Information About Your Genome?—Kristen V. Brown—Futures of Health Reporter, Bloomberg News

Nov 25, 2019 19:16

Description:

We’re living in an age of unprecedented access to genomic data; all we have to do is send off a sample of saliva in the mail to a company like 23andMe or Ancestry to get a comprehensive report containing information about our ancestral lineage, diseases we might pass on to our children, and diseases we might develop during our lifetime. There’s no question that understanding genomic data affords a great benefit to many people, but there’s a tradeoff that’s critical to acknowledge, and it’s one of privacy. Where does our information go once in the hands of these companies? Can it really be deleted at the press of a button, as we are led to believe?

If you have been under the impression that you have control over your genomic data, even after it’s been tested by a company, you aren’t alone. Most people don’t realize that once a sample of DNA undergoes health-related genomic data analysis, federal law dictates that it must be saved. In other words, it would be illegal for a company like 23andMe or Ancestry to delete it. If this were more widely understood by the public, it might change the frequency and ease with which we hand over our DNA. This might be particularly true if we were more cognizant of the fact that our DNA doesn’t just contain information about ourselves, but about those related to us. Kristen V. Brown, reporter with Bloomberg News, joins the podcast to discuss all of this and more, including:

What level of control you DO have over your genetic information, and how to exercise itWhy there is a federal law against the deletion of certain genomic information and genetic materialWhere your data is likely to go once you send it to a private company like 23andMe or Ancestry


Disarming Cancer Cells with the Safest Drugs Possible—Robin Bannister, Ph.D.—Care Oncology Clinic

Nov 25, 2019 38:47

Description:

Disarming Cancer Cells with the Safest Drugs Possible—Robin Bannister, Ph.D.—Care Oncology Clinic

Nov 25, 2019 38:47

Description:

“My reason for wanting to start the company was a very simple one actually, and a very personal one: my wife had cancer, she had breast cancer…misdiagnosed and then finally correctly diagnosed in 2005. She became metastatic in 2010,” says Robin Bannister, Founder and Director of Research and Development at Care Oncology Clinic.

Dr. Bannister had spent his entire professional life studying different pharmaceuticals and trying to understand the ways in which old drugs could be repurposed, but now there was a new level of urgency to his work. He knew he had to act quickly. To find the drug he was looking for, he first had to reduce the list of 5,000 or so drugs to a list that was more manageable, and he did this by focusing on those that had a long history of safe use and mild side effects, particularly in cancer patients.

The basis of the treatment provided at Care Oncology Clinic takes advantage of the Warburg effect—the metabolic processes used by cancer cells to stay alive and grow. The Care Oncology protocol employs drugs which, simply put, make it exceedingly difficult for cancer cells to survive by limiting the resources they use in order to defend themselves in harsh environments—environments created not only by the standard of care for cancer, but also the body’s own immune system. By tuning in to today’s episode, you will learn the details of this and more, including:

What an efflux pump is and how exactly it’s used by cancer cellsWhy the standard of care is not perfect, but often has a part to play in the treatment of cancerHow the Care Oncology protocol can serve as an adjunct to the treatment for all cancer types

Locate the Care Oncology USA website at https://careoncology.com/.

Hearing What You Treat: Insight from an Uncommon Audiologist—Jennifer Conlin, Au.D.—Love to Hear Again Audiology

Nov 22, 2019 36:10

Description:

Hearing What You Treat: Insight from an Uncommon Audiologist—Jennifer Conlin, Au.D.—Love to Hear Again Audiology

Nov 22, 2019 36:10

Description:

You hear a sound, and you absolutely hate it; as a result, your brain prioritizes that sound, further and more deeply ingraining it in your brain. This experience creates a very negative emotional and physiological reaction in you, and could be triggered by any number of sounds commonly encountered in modern life—the sound of someone chewing gum, tapping, dripping water…you name it. There’s a name for this, and it’s misophonia. 


In addition to misophonia, Jennifer Conlin, Doctor of Audiology, has tinnitus, which is a condition that involves hearing a high-frequency tone that becomes chronic, causes a negative emotional response, and leads to a negative feedback loop in the brain. It might be hard to see the good in having both of these conditions, but it’s what ultimately led Dr. Jennifer Conlin to not only identify her speech-language pathology specialty and foster her love of audiology but help others through a myriad of auditory problems in her role as an audiologist at Love to Hear Again Audiology in Texas.


In this episode, you will learn:


· In what ways different brands of hearing aids differ from each other


· How artificial intelligence is being implemented in hearing aids, to include language translations and fall detection


· How tinnitus and other auditory conditions can be treated


· How a person’s hearing can impact their mental state, including the development of dementia, social withdrawal, depression, and chronic fatigue  


Tune in and visit <a href="http://love2hearagain.com">love2hearagain.com</a> to learn more.

Extracellular Vesicles: A Second Look at What Was Once Deemed Waste—Joy Wolfram, Ph.D.—The Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Lab, Mayo Clinic in Florida

Nov 22, 2019 31:50

Description:

Extracellular Vesicles: A Second Look at What Was Once Deemed Waste—Joy Wolfram, Ph.D.—The Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Lab, Mayo Clinic in Florida

Nov 22, 2019 31:50

Description:

Not more than 10 years ago, the consensus among most scientists was that extracellular vesicles (EVs)—biological particles found in our urine, saliva, and throughout our bodies—were mere waste products with no role in communication between cells. Today, we know that’s simply not true: EVs certainly play a role in cell communication, but the extent to which they do so is still a topic of research. We also know that they have the potential to be used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, the identification of EVs in the blood can be diagnostic of cancer, and we know that metastatic cancer cells release EVs that are softer than other types of EVs. Additionally, EVs can be taken from fat tissue and used for therapeutic purposes.

This is just a fraction of what Joy Wolfram, Ph.D., Director of The Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Florida discusses on the podcast today. She also explains the work they are doing to synthesize nanoparticles which are capable of being modified in a way that allows them to transport therapeutic agents (e.g. cancer drugs, anti-inflammatory compounds) through the bloodstream and directly to the site of diseased tissue. By tuning in, you’ll learn about all of this and more, including:

What specific types of benefits can be conferred by nanomedicineHow an analysis of the sugars on the surface of EVs might predict whether a cancer is likely to metastasize in a patientHow an understanding of EVs could be applied to regenerative medicine


Food Allergy Fix—Dr. Richard Wasserman, M.D., Ph.D.—Dallas Food Allergy Center

Nov 22, 2019 40:14

Description:

Food Allergy Fix—Dr. Richard Wasserman, M.D., Ph.D.—Dallas Food Allergy Center

Nov 22, 2019 40:13

Description:

Hives, swelling of the eyes, mouth, or tongue, sneezing, wheezing, sudden vomiting, a sense of impending doom: these are just a few of the symptoms of an allergic reaction. For over 10 years, Dr. Richard Wasserman’s focus has been on developing a treatment for food allergies called oral immunotherapy (OIT), a method by which a very small amount of an allergen is given to an allergic individual as a way of prompting desensitization. Over time, the amount of allergen is gradually increased until the individual is able to consume a full, meal-sized portion of the allergen. To date, IOT has been used to treat allergies to 20 different foods, including peanuts, cashews, eggs, milk, wheat, chickpeas, and sunflower seeds. In today’s podcast, you will learn:

Why food allergy testing is often of no value or otherwise misleadingRisk factors for the development of food allergiesWhat exactly is going on when an allergic response occursWhy the gradual increase in amount of allergen works to treat allergies and extremely rarely causes an allergic reaction

Dr. Richard Wasserman has a medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and completed a pediatric residency and fellowship training in bone marrow transplant recovery and immunology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Tune in to hear the full conversation. Learn more about food allergy by visiting  foodallergy.org.

The Solution to Antibiotic Resistance Lysin Lysin —Vincent A. Fischetti—The Fischetti Lab at Rockefeller University

Nov 21, 2019 49:12

Description:

The Solution to Antibiotic Resistance Lysin Lysin—Vincent A. Fischetti—The Fischetti Lab at Rockefeller University

Nov 21, 2019 49:11

Description:

Antibiotic resistance—the ability of bacteria to survive even large doses of broad-spectrum antibiotics—is a growing problem in the modern world, one that threatens the safety of everyone on the planet. But this hasn’t always been the case; not more than 20 years ago, the idea of antibiotic resistance was not really on anyone’s radar, which is a testament to how quickly the problem has developed, and therefore how time-sensitive it is to develop a solution. According to Dr. Vincent A. Fischetti, head of the Fischetti Lab at Rockefeller University, as well as the results from phase 2 clinical trials which put it to the test, the solution lies in a bacteriophage enzyme called lysin.

On today’s episode, Dr. Fischetti explains how bacteriophages (commonly referred to as phages) kill bacteria, and how he and his team harnessed this knowledge in a way that’s led to the development of the first-ever alternative to antibiotics that’s been FDA-approved to enter phase 3 clinical trials. This potential treatment for bacterial diseases in humans could very well eliminate the daunting threat of antibiotic resistance. Dr. Fischetti brings an impressive amount of fascinating information to the conversation today. By tuning in, you’re bound to learn a number of things, including:

How significantly the use of antibiotics in farm animals (to fatten them up, treat them as food products, etc.) has contributed to antibiotic resistanceWhat bacteria do in order to avoid or resist being killed by a given antibioticWhere antibiotics come from and how they are used by the organisms that create themWhat the difference is between gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

Press play for all the details.

Skin & the Microbiome – Richard Andrews, SM, MS, President/CEO and Mark Sampson, Chief Scientific Officer, of Azitra – Skin Disease, Treatment and New Technologies

Nov 21, 2019 31:06

Description:

Skin & the Microbiome – Richard Andrews, SM, MS, President/CEO and Mark Sampson, Chief Scientific Officer, of Azitra – Skin Disease, Treatment and New Technologies

Nov 21, 2019 31:05

Description:

Richard Andrews, SM, MS, President/CEO, and Mark Sampson, Chief Scientific Officer, of Azitra, a clinical-stage medical dermatology company, provide an insightful overview of their work.

Andrews has vast experience as a top executive, leading the operations, finance, and development for biotechnology firms primarily focused on novel products to combat inflammatory disease. And Dr. Sampson, recently of Botanix Pharmaceuticals, has immense experience in the development of preclinical strategies as well as clinical development plans for new, advanced antimicrobial indications. He is a seasoned and sought-after researcher.

The disease researcher, and executive, provide an overview of how Azitra strives to address serious skin diseases. Azitra combines various technologies designed to repair disease problems, and utilizes the microbiome to deliver those, thus adding to the therapeutic benefit. They talk about cancer-associated rash, and the various kinds of skin problems that they see. The dermatology experts explain the diversity in a healthy microbiome, and how there are, remarkably, up to a million different bacteria per square centimeter of skin. They explain how this network can be disrupted, which can lead to problems—dysbiosis, which is a microbial imbalance on or inside the body, impaired microbiota for example.

The researchers explain their goal to reset the balance of the skin microbiome to help protect against harmful bacteria and pathogens. And they provide a wealth of information on various cancers and the relationships to the microbiome.

In this podcast:

How the microbiome is related to skin issues

Cancer-associated rashes

Microbial imbalance

Traditional Medicine – Oscar Sierra, L.Ac, Buckhead Acupuncture Atlanta, Georgia – Herbs, Acupuncture, and Holistic Approaches to Health

Nov 21, 2019 41:30

Description:

Traditional Medicine – Oscar Sierra, L.Ac, Buckhead Acupuncture Atlanta, Georgia – Herbs, Acupuncture, and Holistic Approaches to Health

Nov 21, 2019 41:30

Description:

Oscar Sierra, L.Ac, a Nationally Board Certified Acupuncture Specialist (NCCAOM), Dipl. O.M., provides an overview of the current trends in modern acupuncture and many interesting facts about its beneficial aspects that you may not have known.

Sierra received a BS in Nutrition from the University of Georgia. He is certified in Reiki, and has intensely studied Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture via an apprenticeship for nearly half a decade with Chinese Medicine practitioners in Atlanta.

Sierra discusses the medical world’s interpretations of what is conventional medicine versus traditional medicine. As Sierra states, he practices traditional medicine, practices that are backed by thousands of years of written history, and a track record. Whatever works that is safe and effective for the patient is what Sierra focuses on. Sierra explains how ancillary compounds work, as he discusses the benefits of vitamins, such as vitamin C, and more. Sierra talks about medicinal plants for cancer treatment. And he outlines certain chemo drugs that are based on phytochemicals, and how they are useful, how they are derived, etc.

Sierra talks about common treatments they use at his facility in Atlanta. Additionally, he discusses the importance of attending to our basic three, which he describes as: adequate and balanced activity (physical, mental, emotional, spiritual), sleep and downtime, and our diet (not just what we eat but how we eat it). Herbs are great, but they cannot be the complete solution if the ‘basic three’ are not being cared for.

Sierra goes on to discuss many accounts of cancer patients, and other disease sufferers who have taken a more natural path to healing and have seen dramatic improvements. Sierra’s approach to healing is based on the patient rather than the disease. It’s a holistic, natural, patient-centered approach to medicine that focuses on prevention.

In this podcast:

How medicinal plants are used for cancer treatment

The current trends in modern acupuncture

The 3 basic areas we need to focus on to form a foundation for good health

Airway Issues – Howard Hindin, DDS, of The Hindin Center – Modern Dentistry, Airway Sleep Problems, and More

Nov 20, 2019 48:47

Description:

Airway Issues – Howard Hindin, DDS, of The Hindin Center

Nov 20, 2019 48:47

Description:

Howard Hindin, DDS, of The Hindin Center (hindincenter.com), discusses airway preservation and other myofunctional dentistry issues that affect people.

Dr. Hindin is a graduate of the prestigious New York University College of Dentistry. He is trained in all areas of general dentistry, including surgery and endodontia. Additionally, Dr. Hindin assists people with cosmetic dentistry issues, and many types of oral and dental problems, including temporo mandibular joint disorders, and cranio facial pain.

Dr. Hindin discusses the typical treatments for patients, but he stresses that treatment must be personalized. He discusses airway issues and identifies some of the cardinal signs of airway problems, such as mouth-breathing. He provides valuable information on how nasal breathing can be restored. Dr. Hindin explains invasive and non-invasive treatments. And he discusses oral appliances which can be tried first, to see if improvement in nasal breathing can be achieved.

The Hindin Center dental expert talks about bad habits, and how light can be a factor in delayed production of melatonin, which makes sleep more difficult. Dr. Hindin recounts some experiments with rats that demonstrated how food affects body systems. Continuing, Dr. Hindin provides an overview of human processes and what would be considered an ideal example of functioning for the day, discussing eating, sleeping, bowel movements, and more. Dr. Hindin talks about hidden airway problems that many people are not aware they may have at all. And Dr. Hindin talks about reflux, cardiovascular issues, and other potential signs of airway sleep problems.

In this podcast you’ll learn…

Some of the signs of airway sleep problems

The importance of melatonin production

Why it’s important to have a regular body cycle throughout the day

 

Ovarian Overview – Monica M. Laronda, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) – Reproductive Biology and 3D Printed Ovaries

Nov 20, 2019 34:33

Description:

Ovarian Overview – Monica M. Laronda, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) – Reproductive Biology and 3D Printed Ovaries

Nov 20, 2019 34:33

Description:

Monica M. Laronda, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology), provides an overview of her research work in endocrinology, reproductive biology, and 3D printed ovaries.

Laronda is passionate about research and she has a keen interest in the reproductive biology and endocrinology that forms the foundation for the the development of treatments to protect or restore hormone function and fertility. Laronda received her PhD from Northwestern University and her Postdoctoral Fellow work was done at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine (Obstetrics Gynecology).

Laronda talks about their main patient focus: childhood cancer survivors whose treatment or disease may have rendered them infertile later in life. She talks about bioprosthetic ovaries and the uses of 3D printing. As she explains, their early work has shown success in mice, and she discusses what that means for future research. The PhD explains how egg cells work, and the natural decline that happens over time, as well as how disease can affect them. She discusses the complexity of the ovary, and her lab’s research in which they investigated biochemical differences, etc. to assist in the development of the best bioprosthetics. She discusses transplanted tissue and how long it can last once transplanted.

The endocrinology expert explains their scaffolding models and her team’s hopes for further study. And Laronda provides information on the micro-environment, scaffolding proteins, etc. that play a role in cellular functions.

In this podcast you’ll learn:

How 3D printing is helping to advance bioprosthetic development

The importance of primordial follicles

How disease can impact fertility

A Conversation with a Coffee Connoisseur and Roaster—Mackenzie Wells—Professional Coffee Roaster

Nov 20, 2019 38:06

Description:

A Conversation with a Coffee Connoisseur and Roaster—Mackenzie Wells—Professional Coffee Roaster

Nov 20, 2019 38:05

Description:

Mackenzie Wells has always had an interest in the science behind flavors and aromas, which led her to take a job right out of high school in the coffee roasting business. Over the past four years, she’s refined her skills and knowledge set in the world of coffee roasting and become quite the expert. She joins the podcast today to discuss the details of the roasting process, different coffee roasting techniques, three primary heat sources used in roasting, three methods of coffee decaffeination, how a coffee bean’s flavor profile is affected by the location in which it’s grown, the rising popularity of barrel-aged coffees, what it means to say that a coffee bean is of a “single origin” and so much more. In this episode, you will learn:

Why you shouldn’t grind and brew your coffee right after it’s been roastedHow different roasting styles create light versus medium versus dark roastsWhat’s meant by first and second “crack” in the world of coffee roasting


Dog Days – Jessica Pierce, PhD, Bioethicist, Lecturer, Professor, and Author – Dog Cloning, Dog Health, Bioethics, and More

Nov 20, 2019 35:48

Description:

Dog Days – Jessica Pierce, PhD, Bioethicist, Lecturer, Professor, and Author – Dog Cloning, Dog Health, Bioethics, and More

Nov 20, 2019 35:47

Description:

Jessica Pierce, PhD, bioethicist, lecturer, professor, and author, discusses her work, ethics, and the concept of dog cloning.

Her newest book, Unleashing Your Dog: A Field Guide to Giving Your Canine Companion the Best Life Possible is an interesting and popular read. Pierce received a Bachelor’s degree from Scripps College, an M.Div. from The Divinity School at Harvard University, and a PhD in Religious Studies from the University of Virginia.

Pierce digs deep into the concept of cloning (pets and other animals), etc. In regard to pets, she explains that although cloning could be possible, the temperament and behavior may be completely different than the original animal. Pierce discusses the impact on the ‘unseen’ class of dogs that would be used as tools to create the clone. She worries about the exploitation of other animals that would be needed, ‘donor dogs’ that would be used in a laboratory setting. Pierce explains the technical aspects of a dog cloning process, detailing cell division, fusion, and how embryos are embedded.

The bioethicist discusses the potential health problems that could arise. Pierce talks about her thoughts on the cloning industry’s pandering to audiences that may have elderly or ill animals. As she states, Pierce feels it’s a problem, because people who are anticipating loss may be vulnerable. Pierce goes on to talk about the olfactory senses of dogs, and what smells dogs may or may not prefer. Wrapping up, Pierce discusses dog health, dog weight, and how dogs learn to persuade humans to give them what they want, especially regarding food.

In this podcast you’ll learn:


What it takes to clone a dog

The potential disadvantages of cloning

What happens to ‘donor dogs’ during the process

Chiropractic Adjustments: Everything They’re Cracked Up to Be—Adam Lamb—Lamb Chiropractic

Nov 20, 2019 23:32

Description:

Chiropractic Adjustments: Everything They're Cracked Up to Be—Adam Lamb—Lamb Chiropractic

Nov 20, 2019 23:32

Description:

Suffering from chronic headaches, neck pain, back pain, sciatica, or some other ailment and been unable to find relief from your primary care provider? While some of us seek it as a first choice, others seek it only as a very last resort: chiropractic care. Whether the idea of going to see a chiropractor gives you anxiety or you’re eagerly awaiting your next appointment, there’s likely a lot you could learn about chiropractic and the natural healing methods it involves. 


On today’s podcast, Adam Lamb, DC discusses what he’s learned over the course of 18 years as a practicing chiropractor, shares with us his chiropractic adjustment techniques, explains the difference between dislocations and subluxations, as well as what makes that crack sound often associated with chiropractic work, and informs us that everything from the way we walk to the things we eat can lead to misalignments in the body. 


By tuning in, you’ll discover:


· How misalignments occur in the first place and what mechanisms are at play once they do 


· What factors determine how often the average person needs to be adjusted


· Why you feel better when your body is in alignment 


Potential Applications of Extracellular Vesicles in Diagnosing and Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases – Dr. Kenneth Witwer – Associate Professor of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology and Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicin

Nov 19, 2019 44:40

Description:

Potential Applications of Extracellular Vesicles in Diagnosing and Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases – Dr. Kenneth Witwer – Associate Professor of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology and Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicin

Nov 19, 2019 44:40

Description:

Imagine a world where doctors could screen for or diagnose Alzheimer’s with a simple blood or saliva test; identifying specific extracellular vesicles may be a key area of research to get us there. Dr. Kenneth Witwer, associate professor of molecular and comparative pathobiology and neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are small signaling particles that cells use to communicate with one another. 


Dr. Witwer’s research interests include: extracellular vesicles, RNA-mediated regulation, biomarker discovery, and therapeutic modulation of intrinsic and innate defenses. Tune in to discover how Dr. Witwer is integrating these areas of research into diagnostic tools and potential treatments for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.


In this episode, you will discover:


· How viruses such as HIV utilize EVs to infect, invade, and integrate themselves into host cells


· What role EVs have in cell-to-cell signaling in health and pathology


· How EVs may someday help doctors obtain accurate diagnoses of diseases that are difficult to detect with current diagnostic tools


For more information visit the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (<a href="http://www.isev.org/">www.isev.org/</a>) – This website includes information on extracellular vesicles, including two free courses on function of EVs in health and disease. The latest research on EVs is also published in the Journal of Extracellular Vesicles (JEV).

Developmental Biology – Thomas Bosch, Professor of General Zoology at Kiel University – The Microbiome, Metaorganisms, and the Elements of Life

Nov 19, 2019 47:52

Description:

Developmental Biology – Thomas Bosch, Professor of General Zoology at Kiel University – The Microbiome, Metaorganisms, and the Elements of Life

Nov 19, 2019 47:51

Description:

Thomas Bosch, Professor of General Zoology at Kiel University, discusses his intensive work studying animal life, cell and developmental biology, and more.

Fascinated by the sciences, Bosch studied Biology at the University of Munich and Swansea University College in the UK, earned a doctorate from the University of Munich, then held a postdoctoral position at the University of California, Irvine. Bosch is Senior Fellow of the prestigious Canadian Institute of Advanced Research (CIFAR).

As Professor of General Zoology at Kiel University, Bosch is heavily involved in groundbreaking research studying multiple areas, including healthy aging, stem cells therapy, and more. Bosch studies the multiple, complex interactions that take place within metaorganisms, between host cells and microbes. Bosch discusses his laboratory work, and some of the surprising findings they have discovered along the way. He discusses the study of organisms, from a historical perspective, with an emphasis on sequencing, the microbiome and microbe life. He explains the microbiota (diverse ecological communities of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that can be found in, and on, all multicellular organisms) and how different species maintain their microbiota.

Bosch explains how natural birthing provides babies with important microbes that are helpful, and thus C-section delivered babies have trouble as they are denied the natural microbes provided via a vaginal birth. He explains the intricacies of the various body microbiomes, and the “invisible armada” of microbes. Continuing, Bosch talks about some of the areas of study that are being intensely investigating that pertain to his field, cellular life, etc. And he talks about the new visualization techniques which allow researchers to dig deeper into their studies.

 

In this podcast you’ll learn about:

The importance of the microbiome

Why C-section delivered babies may have more troubles

How species maintain the microbiota

Let’s Get Physical – Santiago “Santi” Villamil, Elite Physical Therapist, Strength/Conditioning Coach and Core Specialist – The Power of Conditioning, Rehabilitation, and Therapy

Nov 19, 2019 26:28

Description:

Let’s Get Physical – Santiago “Santi” Villamil, Elite Physical Therapist, Strength/Conditioning Coach and Core Specialist – The Power of Conditioning, Rehabilitation, and Therapy

Nov 19, 2019 26:28

Description:

Santiago “Santi” Villamil, elite physical therapist, strength/conditioning coach and core specialist, talks about the fitness industry, and his philosophy of “Keep it simple, sweet and powerful.”

As a sought-after Physical Therapist and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with a long, successful career in orthopedic and sports rehabilitation, sports performance, and the fitness industry in general, Villamil works every day to find new ways to challenge people and help them live their best lives. Villamil is a graduate of the University of Florida, where he received a Masters in Physical Therapy and a Bachelors in Exercise Physiology with a minor in Nutrition.

Villamil’s highest goal and mission is to empower people to take control of their health and “inspire the athlete in everyone.” As he states, Villamil works with many people with various needs, from rehabilitation to pain relief, to getting people back to doing what they love. Villamil talks about the kinds of people he works with, from athletes, to women with autoimmune issues, to those who suffer from chronic pain. Villamil talks techniques, and the important element of getting back into good shape and conditioning. First, he states, they work on improving the mindset of an individual—performing simple tasks like getting up, being grateful, taking a walk. This process of shifting the mind involves steps that can get you there. Listening to clients is key, helping them channel their needs so they can accomplish their goals.

The conditioning expert talks in-depth about body movement, and changes that can happen over time. He states that sometimes people go too hard in the beginning and the body cannot compensate if the rush to a goal is too quick. The programs that Villamil focuses on always stress the importance of making individualized plans, and considering multiple factors. Wrapping up, Villamil talks about certifications and the qualifications of coaches and conditioning experts. He cautions that everyone should look carefully at the qualifications and experience before settling in with just any trainer or physical therapist for orthopedic work or physical therapy exercises.

In this podcast you will learn about:

The importance of working gradually toward a conditioning goal

How a good mindset is the first key step in resetting your life

How all certified therapists are definitely not equal, and what to look for in a therapist

Bypassing Gastric Bypass Surgery: A New Treatment for People with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes—Dr. Ali Tavakkoli—Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard University, Center for Weight Management and Metabolic Surgery

Nov 18, 2019 39:45

Description:

A New Treatment for People with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

Nov 18, 2019 39:45

Description:

As Dr. Ali Tavakkoli performed more and more gastric bypass surgeries, he made a remarkable discovery: for patients who had diabetes, the gastric bypass surgery almost invariably reversed the symptoms within a day or two, completely eliminating their dependence on medication for blood glucose regulation. Simply put, it seemed as though they’d figured out how to cure type 2 diabetes. Intrigued and excited by this observation, Dr. Tavakkoli made it his mission to figure out why this was happening. What was responsible for the mechanism underlying this effect, and how exactly did this mechanism work? Could the effects of gastric bypass surgery be replicated and enjoyed in a non-invasive way, such as by simply taking a pill? According to Dr. Tavakkoli, the answer is yes, and that pill is referred to as LuCI.

In this podcast, you will discover:

Where the name “LuCI” comes from and how exactly it worksWhy and how gastric bypass surgery seems to cure type 2 diabetesWhat percentage of people who qualify for gastric bypass surgery actually have the procedure done

Tune in for all the details.

The Enterprise of Rekindling Innovation—Gary Pisano—Author and Harvard Professor of Business Administration

Nov 18, 2019 30:45

Description:

The Enterprise of Rekindling Innovation—Gary Pisano—Author and Harvard Professor of Business Administration

Nov 18, 2019 30:45

Description:

“Just because small is beautiful doesn’t mean big has to be ugly,” says Gary Pisano, as he explains the main theme of his latest book, Creative Construction: The DNA of Sustained Innovation. At its core, this book overturns the idea that innovation can only really be achieved by small entrepreneurial companies. Pisano argues that instead of seeing the size of an enterprise as an impediment to innovation, large enterprises simply need to use their size to their advantage when forging and implementing innovative changes. The key, says Pisano, is in having a clear and concise definition of what innovation means to a specific company, and formulating specific plans for achieving different types of innovation.

On today’s episode, you will discover:

Three specific reasons why enterprises struggle to launch successful innovation initiativesWhat it is that determines who and what is considered valuable within large companies—and how to wield this knowledge to your advantage How to think systematically and strategically about innovation

Press play for all the details and buy Pisano's popular book on Amazon or a bookstore near you.

I Heard That! – Dr. Michelle Saltarrelli of Autumn Oak Speech, Voice & Hearing – Advances in Speech Language Pathology & Audiology

Nov 18, 2019 30:33

Description:

I Heard That! – Dr. Michelle Saltarrelli of Autumn Oak Speech, Voice & Hearing – Advances in Speech Language Pathology & Audiology

Nov 18, 2019 30:33

Description:

Dr. Michelle Saltarrelli of Autumn Oak Speech, Voice & Hearing, provides an overview of her services and the advances in speech language pathology, as well as the role of an audiologist.

Dr. Saltarrelli completed her audiology residency at The Methodist Hospital within the Texas Medical Center and also at Houston Ear Research Foundation (HERF). She earned a Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degree from Louisiana Tech University and a Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Southeastern Louisiana University with

undergraduate work at Southeastern Louisiana University as well.

Dr. Saltarrelli talks about her background as a licensed speech language pathologist, practicing nearly 20 years to date, and as a licensed audiologist, practicing for about 11 years. She works with many patients and also teaches. Dr. Saltarrelli discusses her interest in speech pathology and recounts how she got into it, and it was her desire to help people, as well as her interest in speech and audiology that motivated her to choose this exciting career path. She discusses the ways people lose their hearing, from head trauma, to viruses (such as meningitis, etc.) but sometimes the reasons are unknown.

Dr. Saltarrelli has extensive experience as a medical speech-language pathologist (SLP) and cochlear implant audiologist / SLP. She discusses in detail how the brain interprets messages and how damaged cells cause problems that she sees regularly. She talks about the regeneration of cells and the methods they can use to try to improve hearing. Continuing, Dr. Saltarrelli talks about issues such as tinnitus, hearing aids, and more.

The speech and hearing expert provides further information on the technology behind hearing aids and implants, and the variations that exist between the different types. With hearing aids, she explains, people have time to try them out before they are committed to them, and she states that it is important to try different brands to be sure that you get the right one for you.

In this podcast you will learn…

Why some hearing aids might work great for you when others don’t.

What are some of the reasons for hearing loss?

What happens when cochlear damage occurs.

Eat, Fast, Feast: Why Intermittent Fasting is Good for the Mind, Body, and Soul—Jay W. Richards—New York Times Bestselling Author and Assistant Research Professor

Nov 18, 2019 31:36

Description:

Eat, Fast, Feast: Why Intermittent Fasting is Good for the Mind, Body, and Soul—Jay W. Richards—New York Times Bestselling Author and Assistant Research Professor

Nov 18, 2019 31:36

Description:

Assistant research professor at the Catholic University of America and New York Times bestselling author Jay W. Richards joins the podcast to discuss the intersection between intermittent fasting, wellness, and spirituality. He shares his experience with intermittent fasting and how it has improved various aspects of his life. In this podcast, you will learn:

How intermittent fasting can improve your physical, mental, and spiritual wellnessThe physiology behind your body’s utilization of different fuel sources in the fed and fasted stateHow to create your own intermittent fasting schedule, and what foods you should eat during your fast-breaking

Jay W. Richards adds to his bestselling books collection, which includes The Privileged Plan, The Hobbit Party, and Money, Greed and God, with his upcoming release, Eat, Fast, Feast. You can pre-order the book now on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

An Exploration of Epigenetic Inheritance—Dr. Qi Chen, PhD—Assistant Professor, Biomedical Sciences at UC Riverside

Nov 18, 2019 47:05

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An Exploration of Epigenetic Inheritance—Dr. Qi Chen, PhD—Assistant Professor, Biomedical Sciences at UC Riverside

Nov 18, 2019 47:04

Description:

Inheritance is a fundamental feature of life, allowing organisms to pass traits onto their offspring. It’s well known that DNA is the carrier for this hereditary information, but for a long time it was believed to be the only carrier. Over the past several decades, new and evolving research on epigenetics—the method by which the environment has the ability to change genetic expression—has emerged, and most recently, this research has focused on epigenetic inheritance in humans. Dr. Qi Chen, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California, Riverside is studying sperm RNA and how its function may be related to environmental exposure and epigenetics in humans. Dr. Chen shares a number of fascinating insights from his lab and recent experiments, while pulling from decades’ worth of knowledge on the topics at issue.

On today’s episode, you will learn:

What happens when the RNA of a mouse exposed to a high-fat diet is extracted and implanted into a healthy zygoteHow the discovery of a subset of tRNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNA) in the mature sperm of mice might have important implications for epigenetic inheritance in humansHow sperm RNA changes in response to environmental stimuli

Tune in for all the details and check out http://qichen-lab.info/people.html to learn more.

You Are What You Eat – Matty Lansdown, Health Authority, Scientist and Nutrition Consultant – Improving Health Through Nutrition and Smart Science

Nov 15, 2019 32:26

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You Are What You Eat – Matty Lansdown, Health Authority, Scientist and Nutrition Consultant – Improving Health Through Nutrition and Smart Science

Nov 15, 2019 32:26

Description:

Matty Lansdown, noted health authority, scientist and nutrition consultant, discusses his passion for helping people improve their health through good nutrition.

Lansdown is passionate about food and nutrition. After getting his start on Facebook Live where Lansdown delivered powerful rants about food, medicine, and nutrition, his popularity grew and he soon moved into seminars, conferences, and retreats, bringing his message to thousands at a time. Lansdown’s podcast, “How To NOT Get Sick And Die” continues to be a popular one, and he regularly provides insightful information there.

Lansdown discusses his background and how he got into podcasting. As he explains, it was his desire to connect with audiences that brought him to podcasting, and his passion for health and nutrition helped him focus his energies into health podcasting. He’s into the concept of helping people enhance their biology, in order to live longer and be healthier. As a professional who works out of a cancer research hospital, he developed his own thoughts and epiphanies about disease and medical issues. As he explains, much of the work in health research is expensive and being done by high-dollar groups that have a stake in big profits, but hawking the preventive measures such as nutrition, eating cabbage, etc. he muses, is not exactly profitable, therefore there isn’t a big corporate interest in promoting the most basic path to better health—which is nutrition.

Lansdown talks about the so-called ‘alternative’ medicines and practices that are unfortunately often overlooked, but have been useful for thousands of years in many cultures, much longer than western medicine. Lansdown discusses some of the problems people experience, and the importance of nutrition, especially when a body is already under stress from an ongoing medical condition.

Lansdown’s mission: to bring people control of their own health, to empower them to take the needed action to make improvements. To this goal, Lansdown empowers individuals to live their absolute best lives by delivering impactful scientific training.

I Hear You! – Chris Ellis, CEO and Co-Founder of AudioCardio – Using Technology to Improve Hearing

Nov 15, 2019 27:20

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I Hear You! – Chris Ellis, CEO and Co-Founder of AudioCardio – Using Technology to Improve Hearing

Nov 15, 2019 27:19

Description:

Chris Ellis, CEO and co-founder of AudioCardio, talks about his company’s mission to improve and then maintain hearing with a new hearing test app designed for hearing loss treatment.

AudioCardio’s patented product, a mobile app, is a clinically proven Threshold Sound Conditioning™ technology that generates unique, personalized audio therapy designed to stimulate and strengthen cells. How does it work? AudioCardio™ can analyze an individual’s hearing and deliver valuable hearing therapy for their ears. The goal: to protect, maintain, and strengthen hearing ability.

Ellis discusses the different types of hearing loss, with special consideration given to sensory and neural hearing loss problems, which are the specific types of hearing loss that his company targets. These types of hearing loss problems can be due to age, medications, loud noise environments, disease, etc. Ellis discusses the ways that their technology can improve hearing. In the most basic terms, our hearing works by processing sound waves that travel through the air, and frequencies are sent as unique nerve signals, directly to the brain, which the brain then recognizes as sounds. Ellis’ company’s tech—the Threshold Sound Conditioning—can detect the important frequencies that have somehow lost much of their sensitivity and then exercise them with tailored sound signals, personalized for the individual.

Ellis talks about the many case studies of individuals with hearing loss who have seen improvement through the use of this innovative technology. And the hearing entrepreneur discusses dementia treatment, hearing loss treatment, and the types of people who have sought out the AudioCardio solutions. As Ellis explains, hearing loss is gradual, and that we continually recreate a ‘new normal’ which unfortunately can slide us deeper into reduced hearing.

The Hard to Swallow Truth of Esophageal Cancer and Disease States—Kelly Whelan, PhD—Temple University, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Nov 14, 2019 30:41

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The Hard to Swallow Truth of Esophageal Cancer and Disease States—Kelly Whelan, PhD—Temple University, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Nov 14, 2019 30:41

Description:

Millions of Americans experience symptoms of acid reflux or “heartburn” on a daily basis—that burning sensation in the chest that can be accompanied by a number of other unpleasant and sometimes seemingly unrelated symptoms. It’s a problem many people might brush off by popping a Tums, but there’s a darker side to acid reflux, which is that it can be a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma, a type of cancer that develops in the context of Barrett's esophagus, a condition in which the epithelial cells in the esophagus are displaced by tissue that more resembles intestinal tissue.

As a researcher with a background in cancer biology, Kelly Whelan, PhD, from Temple University is interested in further understanding the biology of the esophagus, how certain pathways help it to remain normal under homeostatic conditions, and what goes awry in states of disease, such as cancer and eosinophilic esophagitis, an allergic reaction to food.

She’s also interested in investigating the male and racial bias found in all esophageal diseases, how the type and quantity of a person’s mitochondria could be related to their esophageal disease state, whether or not there are non-invasive ways to determine a patient’s disease state, how to improve therapies for esophageal diseases, how the oral microbiome or even the lower GI tract microbiome could be influencing disease progression, and so much more.

Tune in for all the details.

Otter Alternatives to Conventional Wetsuits—Jacopo Buongiorno—MIT Department of Engineering

Nov 14, 2019 28:35

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Otter Alternatives to Conventional Wetsuits—Jacopo Buongiorno—MIT Department of Engineering

Nov 14, 2019 28:35

Description:

How do seals, orcas, otters, and other animals manage to survive in such cold waters? Simply put, they do so by virtue of one of the following: blubber (which is essentially just a thick layer of insulating fat), thick coats of fur which trap tiny gas bubbles that in turn insulate the body, and higher rates of internal heat generation.

Drawing inspiration from these approaches, Professor Jacopo Buongiorno from the department of engineering at MIT has helped develop a wetsuit that allows people—such as Navy Seals—to remain in very cold waters for longer periods of time than conventional wetsuits made from neoprene clothing.

On today’s episode, Professor Buongiorno explains how traditional wetsuits work and why the one they’ve created outperforms them, the science and technology behind thermal conductivity, the feedback they’ve already received on this new product, and what's on the horizon. Tune in for all the details

Getting Smart About Smartphone Usage—Paige Mayer—OurPact

Nov 14, 2019 18:52

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Getting Smart About Smartphone Usage—Paige Mayer—OurPact

Nov 14, 2019 18:52

Description:

With the ever-increasing prevalence of mobile devices these days, they’re finding their way into the hands of kids, where they seem to be staying for a growing number of hours each day. There’s no doubt that these connected lives we’re living provide us with some benefits, such as the ability to have maps, educational info, and health-related content at our fingertips, but this level of access can also be a significant source of distraction that negatively impacts the way we interact with others and the environment around us. And of course, the accessibility provided by cell phones also means potential exposure to content we don’t want to see, and particularly don’t want our kids seeing.

The team at OurPact has developed a solution to deal with the drawbacks of connected mobile devices: a digital parental control app that gives people the ability to limit app use, filter what is seen on the web, monitor the location of the device, and take automated screenshots to search for keywords that fall into certain categories, such as violent, drug-related, or sexual content. But OurPact isn’t just being used to monitor kids; it’s being used by professionals and students who recognize their own need to put away their phones and focus on their daily goals.

On today’s episode, Director of Communications at OurPact, Paige Mayer, explains all the ins and outs of what just might be the best screen time app for Android, as well as what’s to come in the near future. Tune in.

A Faster, Cheaper, Mouse-Free Model for Studying the Effects of Environmental Toxins on the Human Brain—David Pamies, PhD—University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Nov 13, 2019 36:01

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A Faster, Cheaper, Mouse-Free Model for Studying the Effects of Environmental Toxins on the Human Brain—David Pamies, PhD—University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Nov 13, 2019 36:00

Description:

It used to be a thing of science fiction…growing human organs in test tubes and observing their behavior as we manipulate their environment. For David Pamies, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, this is daily life, although it may not always be ordinary.

On today’s episode, he discusses how he’s using a brain organoid—an organ grown from human-induced pluripotent stem cells—to learn more about the toxins we come into contact with on a daily basis. He explains why and how this model is superior to far more commonly-used mouse models, and how it’s also fueling research on drug treatment for an aggressive type of brain cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Such research includes testing the effectiveness of temozolomide, a commonly used chemotherapy drug.

Dr. Pamies dives into the science behind it all and provides a compelling glimpse into the exciting and growing world of organoid-based research. Press play for all the details.

 

Biotech Detect – Kevin Hrusovsky, President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Quanterix – How Innovative Biotechnology is Helping Researchers Study the Blood More Effectively for Disease Treatment and Preventive Medicine

Nov 12, 2019 33:17

Description:

Biotech Detect – Kevin Hrusovsky

Nov 12, 2019 33:17

Description:

Kevin Hrusovsky, President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Quanterix (quanterix.com), discusses the innovative work his company is engaged in, and the future of biotech.

Hrusovsky is a seasoned biotech entrepreneur and engineer who has been passionately pursuing the transformation of medicine from reactive care to preventative medicine over his extensive 30-year career. For Hrusovsky, healthy living and peer-reviewed science that addresses health and disease issues on a molecular structure level in the body is what motivates his work. Hrusovsky launched the Global Health Summit Series to specifically promote innovation in disease eradication processes and practices, in his ongoing mission to promote global health.

Hrusovsky talks about his company and their mission, a company he states is “at the crossroads of technology and healthcare.” He discusses their technology, and how they have developed a means to look into the blood and see proteins in a way that was never before possible, to differentiate a single protein in a field of grass, with that field of grass being the size of Alaska. That’s some deep detail, indeed. It’s “rocket science on the blood” as he describes. He explains the important biochemistries that their technology allows researchers to discover and study, to develop new insights on health and disease.

Hrusovsky explains how they can utilize AI and algorithms to help researchers see proteins, which allows scientists to see things in the blood that were once impossible, which can lead to prediction of disease years before it occurs, etc. By seeing disease at the earliest stages possible, pharmaceutical research can bring these people in and work towards solutions. As he states, it’s much easier to beat a disease early on, than later after it has taken a firm hold in the body.

Hrusovsky talks about empowering individuals to manage their own destinies by observing their own biomarkers and staying aware. Quanterix’s digital health product, Simoa® provides researchers a unique opportunity to examine critical biomarkers for cardiology, oncology, neurology, infectious diseases, and more.

Hrusovsky has been a featured guest on a multitude of media, from ABC’s Good Morning America, and all the other major networks, such as NBC, CNN, CNBC, CBS, and NPR, as well as in top publications and online sites: Scientific American, USA Today, Forbes, Fortune, Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, Fast Company HuffPost, The Guardian, Boston Globe, and many more.

Audio Pharma – Dr. Tony Guerra, Instructor and Pre-Pharmacy Advisor, Des Moines Area Community College – Audio Books for the Pharmacy and Pharmacology Fields, Education & Outreach

Nov 12, 2019 22:09

Description:

Audio Pharma – Dr. Tony Guerra, Instructor and Pre-Pharmacy Advisor, Des Moines Area Community College – Audio Books for the Pharmacy and Pharmacology Fields, Education & Outreach

Nov 12, 2019 22:08

Description:

Dr. Tony Guerra, Instructor and Pre-Pharmacy Advisor, Ankeny Campus, Des Moines Area Community College, delivers an interesting overview of his work in pharmacy education and the writing and production of audio books.

Dr. Guerra is passionate about educating young minds and he teaches multiple courses in chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacology. And Dr. Guerra earned an AS degree from DMACC himself, back in 2010.

Dr. Guerra talks about his background and his interest in creating audio books for educational purposes. To date, he has close to 20 audio books out, on various topics within his areas of expertise. His books cover a range of issues, from pharmacology to pharmacotherapy, to pharmacy careers and pharmacy schools/education. Dr. Guerra writes and co-writes his books and he continues to reach many people through books and educational outreach.

The Pre-Pharmacy Advisor talks extensively about the business of creating, producing, and delivering audio books for the public. He discusses his views on audio book presentation, and the value of reading your own books/recording your own books, if you are in consulting. First time authors, for sure, should definitely record their own books, he states. Dr. Guerra explains the differences between print books, e-books, and audio books, and how each should be different in terms of audience and structure, etc.

Wrapping up, he talks about the audiences for his books, and for medical-oriented books in general. He explains that audio books can help solve problems or allay fears, and often the best-selling books deal with these issues/worries—books that help people overcome.

Microbial Mission – Peter Christey, PhD, CEO and Co-Founder of GALT – Greater Access to Microbes, Transforming Microbiome Research & Product Development

Nov 11, 2019 42:46

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Microbial Mission – Peter Christey, PhD, CEO and Co-Founder of GALT – Greater Access to Microbes, Transforming Microbiome Research & Product Development

Nov 11, 2019 42:46

Description:

Peter Christey, PhD, CEO and Co-Founder of GALT (General Automation Lab Technologies), on the web at (galt-inc.com), discusses his work in microbial cultivation.

Christey has over 20-years experience commercializing research instruments for a number of complex applications. Prior to his launch of GALT, Christey helmed the DNA Sequencing Business Unit and DNA forensic product line for Life Technologies.

Christey discusses his background and how his focus in microbial cultivation in a laboratory setting drove him to develop microbes for use in multiple areas. He explains proteomics applications, microbial diversity, and his company’s platform—detailing how they work to get a pure isolate (a culture of living microorganisms) into culture in the lab in order to study biochemistry and physiology. They strive, primarily, to deliver pure, living isolates to researchers and product developers. Utilizing the GALT technology, entire populations of microbes can be screened efficiently and quickly for low-abundance species or perhaps strains that demonstrate selected characteristics.

Estimations have surmised that there are approximately one-trillion microbial species on our planet, but remarkably, less than one percent of the known species have actually been cultured. So many species remain unexplored and we just don’t have any information on them. Christey discusses how isolates are understood, and how scientists can test them. He discusses the microbiome, and the growth media that they use in their research. And he provides extensive information on how bacteria grow, and the requirements that are necessary, including a discussion of symbiotic relationships.

Hey Look, No Hands! – Michael Schwarz, Director of the PBS Documentary, Look Who’s Driving – The Push to Get Self-Driving Cars on the Roads and Highways, But Is the Technology Really Ready?

Nov 11, 2019 29:39

Description:

Hey Look, No Hands! – Michael Schwarz, Director of the PBS Documentary, Look Who’s Driving – The Push to Get Self-Driving Cars on the Roads and Highways, But Is the Technology Really Ready?

Nov 11, 2019 29:38

Description:

Michael Schwarz, director of the popular PBS / NOVA documentary, “Look Who’s Driving,” provides some interesting information on artificial intelligence (AI) and the current state of autonomous vehicles.

How do self-driving cars (autonomous vehicles) work and is society ready to trust them? In this interesting podcast, director Michael Schwarz discusses the expanding technology that is pushing its way into the transportation industry.

Schwarz talks about his interests, and the lead up to making his current documentary, “Look Who’s Driving.” He recounts how he learned about some of the early companies that were seeking to develop autonomous vehicles, and how General Motors was very interested in grabbing the new technology quickly. After many years of waiting and anticipating what they might be like, autonomous vehicles are finally sharing the roads with us at least in testing mode, but experts caution that there are massive challenges to overcome still, and some caution that the tech is just not there yet to provide safety for everyone.

Schwarz discusses the safety issues in detail. As he states, there are nearly 40,000 deaths per year on the roads in America, and the idea that developers of autonomous vehicles boast is that their self-driving cars don’t drive drunk, drowsy, or distracted, making them, potentially, a safer alternative. Schwarz goes on to discuss the challenges ahead for autonomous vehicles, talking about the high bar that the technology must meet because there are millions and millions of miles driven by human drivers before even one fatality occurs. Schwarz talks about some of the leading companies that are developing these self-driving cars, and how they are focused on pushing the technology to handle the entire driving experience. As he states, although passengers can ‘take over’ in a potential accident situation, it is perhaps unrealistic to expect a relaxed passenger to suddenly take action effectively. Thus, some say that the technology must be developed until it is good enough to no longer need any human input, or intervention, while driving.

Conservation Crisis! – Dr. Gerardo Ceballos, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Ecology of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México – The Conservation Efforts that Must Happen Now to Curb Climate

Nov 11, 2019 45:18

Description:

Conservation Crisis! – Dr. Gerardo Ceballos, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Ecology of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México – The Conservation Efforts that Must Happen Now to Curb Climate

Nov 11, 2019 45:17

Description:

Dr. Gerardo Ceballos, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Ecology of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), discusses his work in conservation efforts worldwide, and the quest for solutions to environmental problems.

Dr. Ceballos holds a degree in Biology from the Metropolitan Autonomous University Campus Izatalapa, Mexico. He received his master's degree in Ecology from the University of Wales, working under the close supervision of the well known ecologist, John. L. Harper. And Dr. Ceballos earned a PhD in Ecology from the University of Arizona, working with Dr. James H. Brown. Additionally, Dr. Ceballos has been on sabbatical at the prestigious, Stanford University working in close collaboration with Professor Paul R. Ehrlich, one of the preeminent ecologists of our time.

Dr. Ceballos's extensive, important research program addresses the conservation of species and ecosystems, and the connection between conservation and development. Dr. Ceballos discusses his current projects dealing with conservation and extinction crises. He talks about habitat requirements of endangered species and their work to set aside protected areas. As he explains, he and his contemporaries are working to push public policy to do more for conservation. Dr. Ceballos outlines the importance of the Amazon forests due to their incredible diversity of species, many of which are endangered or about to become endangered. He explains how they look at the problems and challenges to develop solutions to maximize their conservation efforts. As species become extinct, human activity is certainly a factor, he states.

The type C conservation researcher talks in detail about the general consensus between various governments regarding what needs to be done to preserve species, and to make global actions to curb the extinction crises and climate change. Unfortunately, many governments are not doing what they need to do; they do not seem to understand the severity of these global crises. Wrapping up, Dr. Ceballos discusses ocean conservation, and some of the recent reports that talk about the toxification of water, soil, and air, and what he and his colleagues are trying to do to persuade nations to do more, and now.

Biologically Speaking – Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, Renowned British Biologist – The Complex Biology of Cells and Extracellular Vesicles

Nov 11, 2019 56:09

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Biologically Speaking – Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, Renowned British Biologist – The Complex Biology of Cells and Extracellular Vesicles

Nov 11, 2019 56:08

Description:

Denis Noble, CBE, PhD, FRS, the famed British biologist, delivers an interesting overview of his life’s work studying the intricate details of biology and what new developments can mean for the treatment of disease.

As a celebrated British biologist, Noble held the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology at the University of Oxford for two decades and was later bestowed the honor of Professor Emeritus and appointed Co-Director of Computational Physiology. Noble’s work has been groundbreaking and he is one of the earliest pioneers of systems biology who developed the very first useful mathematical model of the heart, back in 1960.

Noble talks in detail about extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are lipid bilayer-delimited particles—naturally released from a cell but, unlike a cell, they cannot replicate. He discusses the interior of cells, and explains how extracellular vesicles occur, touching on DNA and RNA, and the processes utilized by cells. As he explains, we “used to think that the cells were more or less cut off from each other,” but Noble states that this is just not true. Cells are actually exchanging information all the time, and the extracellular vesicles are little packets that contain information for exchange.

The celebrated biology expert goes on to discuss how Darwin saw the potential significance of transgenerational information being passed on. Noble explains that we can use the expanding information to develop tools to diagnose and treat diseases earlier on, which will be incredibly beneficial of course to patients. Noble continues, and talks about how digital intelligence and AI can help to organize information and opportunities. He explains how intelligence is created, and discusses his theories on the topic.

As one of the world’s preeminent biologists and evolution scientists, Noble continues to lead some of the most pertinent discussions in the scientific community regarding life, genetics, and cellular processes.

Harness the Authority of an Author, In Just a Few Hours—Secrets of Attorney Marketing—Richard Jacobs and Tracy Merda

Nov 8, 2019 32:40

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Harness the Authority of an Author, In Just a Few Hours—Secrets of Attorney Marketing—Richard Jacobs and Tracy Merda

Nov 8, 2019 32:39

Description:

Most attorneys aspire to one day author a book…to put all of the knowledge and expertise they’ve compiled over the years into a concise, informative, and easy-to-read guide for prospective clients and the public at large. Attorneys want this because they know the benefits are numerous, but nevertheless, they simply don’t have the time to actually sit down and put pen to paper.

On today’s episode, Richard Jacobs of Speakeasy Marketing, Inc. is joined by Tracy Merda to discuss how you can author a book by putting in a couple hours’ worth of your time and simply speaking it. The Speak-a-Book™ method has helped hundreds of attorneys harness the authority that comes with being an author, and the returns are proving to be lucrative. In addition to differentiating you from the others, having your own book to reference will significantly influence the way others perceive your authority and expertise, demonstrate to clients your worth (and one more reason why they should retain your services), allow you to command higher fees, elevate your status as an attorney in your area of practice, bring in many new referrals, increase your chances of being featured in the media, and allow you to hand out copies to hundreds of colleagues and prospective clients almost anywhere you go, for free.

This isn’t a long process; within 30-60 days, you could have a published book that translates to profit for years to come. Tune in for more information, and visit https://www.jacobsandwhitehall.com/

Disconnection in an Entirely Connected Society—Stever Robbins—Author, Serial Entrepreneur, Co-Host of the Get-It-Done Guy Podcast

Nov 8, 2019 52:15

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Disconnection in an Entirely Connected Society—Stever Robbins—Author, Serial Entrepreneur, Co-Host of the Get-It-Done Guy Podcast

Nov 8, 2019 52:14

Description:

In addition to being an author, serial entrepreneur, time management expert, and co-host of the Get-It-Done Guy podcast, Stever Robbins played a critical role in the development and implementation of the internet. Robbins joins the podcast today to share his insight and knowledge on several issues centering on the internet—how it came about, what it’s become, and where it’s going.

He discusses the good and the bad and the strengths and weaknesses of the internet, but expounds on the way it’s affecting society as well as people on an individual level. “The internet acts as a tremendous amplifier…if something makes it onto the top 10 list…once it’s on the top 10 list…you have audiences in the sizes of millions or billions…the problem is, just because something’s on that list doesn’t mean it’s worth focusing on…” says Robbins. He continues to explain how this can lead to irresponsible social behavior, an emphasis on emotional reactivity, a decrease in our ability to focus, an increase in the prevalence of censorship, the manipulation of our biases, and a disconnection from our own creativity and ability to focus on our goals. 

Robbins provides an in-depth and eye-opening examination of something that’s so commonplace in the modern world that many of us don’t even see it anymore. Press play to hear the full conversation. Learn more about Robbins’ work at http://www.steverrobbins.com/.

Probiotic Problem Solving – Zack Abbott, PhD, Co-Founder and CEO of ZBiotics – Engineering Probiotic Solutions for Health Problems and Health Protections

Nov 6, 2019 31:18

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Probiotic Problem Solving – Zack Abbott, PhD, Co-Founder and CEO of ZBiotics – Engineering Probiotic Solutions for Health Problems and Health Protections

Nov 6, 2019 31:18

Description:

Zack Abbott, PhD, Co-Founder and CEO of ZBiotics (zbiotics.com), discusses his company’s mission, acetaldehyde toxicity, and the future of probiotics for health protection.

Abbott is the creative scientific mind behind the proprietary technology and foundation for ZBiotics. Abbott holds a PhD in microbiology &amp; immunology from the University of Michigan, where he worked on bacterial gene regulation. He earned his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley, in immunology as well as classical art and archaeology. In his earlier years, Abbott was a researcher, studying HIV vaccines and pursuing novel antibiotics.

Abbott’s company has developed ZBiotics™—the planet’s first genetically engineered/modified probiotics designed to break down a toxic byproduct of alcohol known as acetaldehyde. He explains how the product works to combat the negative effects of alcohol, discussing the live bacteria aspects and the way they have engineered it to fight those negative effects. As he explains, by mimicking what our livers do to metabolize alcohol, ZBiotics takes its inspiration from nature.

Instead of manufacturing the enzyme separately, ZBiotics has engineered some probiotic bacteria to produce this enzyme anew, inside your gut, thereby transferring the trait for acetaldehyde breakdown out of the liver to probiotic bacteria. Abbott talks about the future of ZBiotics, as they look to build new products that can help our bodies handle many potentially problematic issues, from everyday chemicals in alcohol and dairy, to severe contaminants and problems, such as radiation and lead in water health effects.

Global Glue – Joan Diamond, Deputy Director and Senior Scenarist, Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability – Bringing Together Great Minds and Educating the Public to Help Advance Solutions to Solve Our Planet’s Major Problems

Nov 6, 2019 20:27

Description:

Global Glue – Joan Diamond, Deputy Director and Senior Scenarist, Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability – Bringing Together Great Minds and Educating the Public to Help Advance Solutions to Solve Our Planet’s Major Problems

Nov 6, 2019 20:27

Description:

Joan Diamond, Deputy Director and Senior Scenarist, Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability delivers an overview of her important work educating the public and assisting with the development of solutions for global crises.

Diamond is Executive Director of the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and Biosphere, an advanced Stanford University initiative that addresses the chasm between current knowledge of global problems and societies’ failure to respond. Diamond is also a visiting scholar at the Center for the Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, where she actively oversees the Institute of Foresight Intelligence there.

Diamond talks about her experience and background. As she states, there is a vast amount of knowledge about the world’s major problems, and that many systems are simply not working, from environmental issues such as water/drought to soil degradation, to fragile financial systems (credit/debt issues), etc. Many people are working to shift the trajectory from collapse to sustainability. In her role at the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability, Diamond works to bring minds, public intellectuals, together to meet the world’s challenges and assist with overpopulation solutions as well as economic growth and overconsumption solutions.

The Deputy Director explains many of the current inequities in the world, such as health care and education quality in developed nations like the United States. Educating the public through library materials, blogs, etc. are some of the ways that the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and Biosphere can make a difference. Diamond talks about their focus—the human predicament, civilization collapse. And as she states, unless societies engage then we are on a somewhat dire path, but individuals can be empowered and come together to find solutions.

Toxicity & Disease – Thomas Hartung, MD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health – New Technology Advances to Improve Toxicity Testing and Disease Modeling

Nov 6, 2019 37:34

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Toxicity & Disease – Thomas Hartung, MD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health – New Technology Advances to Improve Toxicity Testing and Disease Modeling

Nov 6, 2019 37:33

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Thomas Hartung, MD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, delivers an insightful overview of his work studying toxicity testing improvements, organoids, and advancing technologies.

Dr. Hartung has departmental affiliations with the Environmental Health and Engineering and Molecular Microbiology and Immunology departments at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Hartung’s work is heavily focused on creating a paradigm shift in toxicity testing to improve overall public health. Dr. Hartung has been an integral part of the implementation of the 2007 NRC vision document known as, “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century – a vision and a strategy.”

Dr. Hartung discusses his background, and the road he has taken to arrive at his current place as a leading voice in the discussions concerning toxicity and animal testing. He explains that the technological opportunities have advanced significantly in the last few years. Dr. Hartung discusses ‘organ on a chip’ technologies and other advanced tissue, etc. work. As he explains, this field is permanently moving. The advancement of organoids, which are small, self-organized 3D tissue cultures that are actually derived from stem cells, is changing the way research is done.

The research doctor talks about the importance of toxicity testing, cellular communication and tissue technology, as well as genomics and metabolomics, discussing nutrients, types of cells, and the coming research that will certainly advance the field. Learning from current experiences, he explains that the ‘human on a chip’ technologies will continue to change as more research is done. Organoids are being used to test various compounds to observe the relative toxicity, but they are utilized for other reasons as well, such as modeling diseases. As Dr. Hartung states, the future will likely bring these types of

systems into all kinds of toxicity testing, and replace animal testing altogether if possible.

The Gene Game – Katie Hasson, PhD, Writer, Researcher, Educator – The Political and Social Issues of Human Biotechnologies

Nov 6, 2019 28:01

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The Gene Game – Katie Hasson, PhD, Writer, Researcher, Educator – The Political and Social Issues of Human Biotechnologies

Nov 6, 2019 28:00

Description:

Katie Hasson, PhD, writer, speaker, researcher, educator, talks about the political and social aspects of human genetic technologies.

Hasson has an active role with the Center for Genetics and Society (geneticsandsociety.org) as their Program Director on Genetic Justice. The Center for Genetics and Society is a public interest nonprofit social justice organization that seeks to ensure a fair and impartial future in which human genetic and reproductive technologies will benefit the collective good.

Hasson explains the social justice perspective they seek to cultivate through important public discourse regarding human biotechnologies. She discusses her role and her goal of bringing more important and diverse voices into the conversation regarding human gene editing. Hasson explains the current thoughts on human gene editing, and the uses of CRISPR (clustered regular interspaced short palindromic repeats). Hasson outlines the differences in the types of gene editing, discussing treatments for actual patients versus gene editing that could perhaps affect the traits of future generations, the latter of which tends to be the most controversial. She talks about some of the more surprising uses of gene editing that pushed the conversation forward rapidly, talking about some of the ethical and safety issues, as well as social concerns.

The science educator talks about the current technologies, and the risks, ethics, and benefits. Hasson explains the concept of normal, in regard to gene editing and the idea that some ‘problems’ may be edited out. In regard to correcting disease, she discusses the policy that could be implemented pertaining to gene editing uses. Continuing, she talks about some of the international commissions that have pulled together various voices from countries around the world to discuss and think about frameworks for utilizing some forms of gene editing.

Hasson holds a PhD in Sociology with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality from the prestigious University of California at Berkeley. She is a former Assistant Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California.

Also, there is this link for a session about CRISPR Consensus: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29W0b7TmEDzaW1VsLHndZtBpoOlB5CmI

 

Foiling Fraud – Kevin Lee, Digital Trust and Safety Architect at Sift – Using Technology to Combat Various Types of Digital Fraud

Nov 4, 2019 22:47

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Foiling Fraud – Kevin Lee, Digital Trust and Safety Architect at Sift – Using Technology to Combat Various Types of Digital Fraud

Nov 4, 2019 22:47

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Kevin Lee, Digital Trust and Safety Architect at Sift (sift.com), talks about his company and their mission.

As the Trust and Safety Architect at Sift Science, Lee is very involved in Sift’s core mission—securing trust and safety for the digital age. Lee is skilled in building high-performing teams and systems that will combat suspicious and malicious behaviors. Before bringing his expertise to Sift, Lee was a manager at Facebook, Square, and Google in roles pertaining to risk, and spam, as well as trust and safety.

Lee discusses how Sift started out in the payment fraud area, using machine learning and other technologies to outsmart fraudsters. Today, they are focused heavily on digital trust and safety issues. Lee explains the mechanics of their solutions, and he cites specific examples of client work, from Airbnb, Twitter, and others, helping to stop data breaches and fraud. He explains how ‘bad actors’ take over accounts and the kinds of malicious acts they try to implement.

Lee discusses some of the e-commerce sites that they offer protections for, and how attacks against them are designed. Continuing, Lee explains some of the signs they look for that could indicate fraud is potentially happening. He talks about iPhone fraud attempts, and the telltale signs of fraud that they see in that platform/family versus android. From account take over to trolling and financial fraud, Lee explains some of the most current problems businesses are combatting. As he states, in account take over scenarios, often trust is destroyed, which could result in the loss of customers and clients.

Wrapping up, Lee explains how easy it is to get started with Sift and the protections that companies can take advantage of right away. As digital disrupters, Sift is innovating daily, taking its position as a leader in the digital security space.

Prosthetic Improvements – Luke Osborn, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory – Using Technology to Improve Amputees’ Experiences with Their Prosthetics

Nov 4, 2019 34:01

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Prosthetic Improvements – Luke Osborn, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory – Using Technology to Improve Amputees’ Experiences with Their Prosthetics

Nov 4, 2019 34:00

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Luke Osborn, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, discusses the lab’s exciting work in modern prosthetics and biomedical engineering.

Osborn is a postdoctoral researcher in the Intelligent Systems Group in the Research and Exploratory Development Department at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Osborn’s expertise lies in multiple scientific areas, specifically concentrated on neuroengineering and applied neuroscience. His intensive work explores the groundbreaking new areas of advancement in tactile sensing and feedback for sensory augmentation.

Osborn often works with upper limb amputees. He discusses the problem known as phantom limb, which is the sensation that an amputated limb is still actually attached. Statistically speaking, 80 to 100% of people who have had an amputation report experiencing ‘phantom’ sensations/feelings in their amputated limb, and unfortunately, most of these types of sensations are painful. He explains how the muscles that still exist in partial limbs can cause amputees to feel sensations. He talks about their work in the improvement of prosthetics, utilizing sensory feedback. The big issue: embodiment, and as Osborn explains embodiment is the integration of an artificial limb (prosthetic) into someone&#39;s own body identity so to speak, essentially the fusion of body and perception. The goal is to get people to feel that their prosthetic is a part of them.

The prosthetics researcher talks about the ways they work with amputees, and the methods they use to get them to feel sensations, such as pressure, etc. Restoring sensation is a key element of their work, and Osborn explains how they target functionality. Osborn’s questions lead to more research and advancement. Ultimately, the goal is to figure out what types of sensations and perceptions can be improved, and how to improve them via new technologies.

Genetic Pathways – Dr. Theodore Piliszek, Founder and Medical Director of the Advanced Health and Wellness Center in Houston, Texas – Genetics, Health, and Disease

Nov 4, 2019 33:33

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Genetic Pathways – Dr. Theodore Piliszek, Founder and Medical Director of the Advanced Health and Wellness Center in Houston, Texas – Genetics, Health, and Disease

Nov 4, 2019 33:33

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Dr. Theodore S. Piliszek, founder and medical director of the Advanced Health and Wellness Center in Houston, Texas, delivers an interesting overview of his life’s work in health, wellness, and genetics research.

Dr. Piliszek has over 30 years of experience in preventive medicine that has taken him to multiple continents. Dr. Piliszek is a nutritional specialist who has dedicated his life to the study and advancement of Functional Longevity Medicine and Clinical Nutrition for the prevention and reversal of vascular, metabolic, and degenerative diseases.

Dr. Piliszek has extensive experience in Hematopathology research and has studied with some of the world’s greatest geneticists, including the celebrated geneticist, Sir David Weatherall at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. Dr. Piliszek has been certified by the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine, and today he continues to

share his vast knowledge with the medical community and public.

Dr. Piliszek talks about his interest in anti-aging, the medtech impact, and nutrigenomics, which is the science that analyzes the relationship between the human genome, nutrition, and health. By evaluating one’s genomic expressions, Dr. Piliszek states that we can learn a lot about possible future outcomes, and risks, and potentially provide information that could help individuals delay or avoid possible medical maladies. Dr. Piliszek continues his discussion and dives into a detailed analysis of foods and exercise and the impact each has on health. Citing examples of how genetics plays a role in the trajectory of long term health, Dr. Piliszek lays out the many genetic abnormalities that could be factored in to bring about a medical problem, such as Alzheimer’s and other debilitating diseases.

The genetics, health, and medical technology expert discusses some of the puzzling questions that he is most curious about, discussing nutrition and micronutrients—including vitamins and minerals. To counteract modern stressors, micronutrient supplementation often produces a good outcome. Dr. Piliszek goes on to discuss disease treatment and some of the changes that are coming that may be beneficial.

Relationship Repair – Nicola Beer, Internationally-Recognized Expert in Relationship Psychology and Transformation – Improving Relationships, Healing Trauma, and Living Your Best Life

Nov 4, 2019 24:29

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Relationship Repair – Nicola Beer, Internationally-Recognized Expert in Relationship Psychology and Transformation – Improving Relationships, Healing Trauma, and Living Your Best Life

Nov 4, 2019 24:29

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Nicola Beer, internationally-recognized and award-winning expert in relationship psychology and transformation, provides an interesting overview of her work with individuals—helping people improve relationships, heal trauma, and live fuller lives. She is a leading authority on save your marriage techniques.


Beer has dedicated her life to helping people repair, renew, and reinvigorate their relationships. For more than ten years, Beer has assisted thousands of men and women from many corners of the world to live more vibrant lives by healing their damaged relationships and traumas. Her popular empowered love program has helped countless people and she is dedicated to helping bring positivity into lives. 


Beer discusses her background and her path toward her current career and focus. She talks about the difference between her male and female clients, and the areas that are of most importance to each, on average. From separations to divorces, emotional issues and distance between partners, Beer works with many and various issues and the couples that struggle with them. She cites specific examples of the challenges couples face, discussing emotions, guilt, communication, and more. And Beer delves into some of the areas and times in a relationship that are most challenging, when problems tend to develop, often because of unmet expectations from one or both partners. From financial struggles and beyond, Beer talks about the many ways that we can take action to seek improvement. 


Beer co-authored four international best-sellers and she has been featured on ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox News, HuffPost, and Wall Street Select.

Conservation Connections – Peter H. Raven, Celebrated Botanist and Conservationist – Conservation Can’t Wait—A Serious Look at Climate Change, Population, and Future Scenarios

Oct 30, 2019 24:14

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Conservation Connections – Peter H. Raven, Celebrated Botanist and Conservationist – Conservation Can’t Wait—A Serious Look at Climate Change, Population, and Future Scenarios

Oct 30, 2019 24:14

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Peter H. Raven, internationally celebrated Botanist, and Conservationist provides an interesting overview of his life’s work in the life sciences.


Raven has spent the better part of his life advocating for conservation, educating the public about the grave threats to Earth’s biodiversity. His work and research are so significant that Time magazine hailed him as a “Hero for the Planet.” For four decades, Raven headed the Missouri Botanical Garden, a distinguished institution and world-class center for the advancement of conservation, botanical research, and education, and known worldwide for its horticulture display. Raven is currently President Emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden.


Raven discusses his long background and current work promoting major scientific projects, from plant observation and study to conservation efforts. Raven discusses his decades of work and interest in the tropical rainforests, which house more species than anywhere else on Earth. He states that there are incredibly important implications for climate and that we need to preserve the trees and their interactions, and the storage of carbon within them to prevent global warming. He discusses the potential problems in detail, and that we effectively have about two generations to correct the problems.


The Missouri Botanical Garden conservationist discusses consumption and population growth, and how it all affects preserved areas. Clearly, not enough is being done as our actions have demonstrated that preserved areas are not a high priority, unfortunately. Raven talks about the increasing population globally, and how it is important to empower women worldwide. As women are often ignored, Raven states, their true talents—that could be incredibly significant in the search for global crisis solutions—are wasted. He underscores the stupidity of ignoring women and the potentially massive contribution they could bring to global problems and issues. 


Raven continues by discussing how we can empower smaller nations to help themselves, and form alliances to think globally regarding solutions to the world’s problems. By helping to strengthen their infrastructure they can get more benefits from their own productivity. Additionally, Raven talks about the progress they are making globally, in agriculture and other areas. And he talks about the importance of social justice initiatives, helping some of the poorest countries in the world to rise up out of poverty and stabilize themselves. 


As he states, there are ways we can help, by consuming less, recycling, living closer to our jobs, etc. But ultimately, the moral argument is what could really change things… essentially we all need to acknowledge that these are the right things to do, to make a difference, to help solve the poverty problem, and work toward conservation on a global scale. 

Finding Calm – Charlotte Reznick, PhD, Author, The Power of Your Child’s Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success – Meditation and Mindfulness for a Healthier Life

Oct 30, 2019 36:06

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Holistic Health – Samantha Gladish, Author & Holistic Wellness Coach – Making Strides Toward a Healthier Way of Living and Healing

Oct 30, 2019 26:45

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Holistic Health – Samantha Gladish, Author & Holistic Wellness Coach – Making Strides Toward a Healthier Way of Living and Healing

Oct 30, 2019 26:44

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Samantha Gladish, author and holistic wellness coach (holisticwellness.ca) delivers a wealth of information about holistic health and holistic wellness.

As a longtime sufferer of various health issues, Gladish battled blood sugar levels, mood swings, poor digestion, and troublesome gut health, as well as tremendous PMS cramping and bloating. She endured numerous bouts with devastating migraines and day to day headaches, and she set out on a path to heal herself. Currently, Gladish is healing from autoimmune Hashimoto’s, and sharing her success path with others so they can also find healing solutions.

Gladish discusses her background and her early love for nutritious foods, exercise, and healthy living. But in spite of her early knowledge, she found her health was suffering. By taking things into her own hands, she studied nutrition in detail, and ditched unnatural pills in an effort to find a path back to great health. She discusses the problems with birth control pills, and the health issues and side effects that are not often talked about. And she talks about various studies that have linked the birth control pill to estrogen dominant cancers. She explains in detail how the taking of synthetic hormones changes the way a woman’s body produces estrogen and progesterone. As she explains, maintaining the proper fertility is important, regardless of whether a woman wants to become pregnant or not. Gladish’s programs incorporate many facets of healthy living, including healthy recipes and food choices which can assist with weight loss and health improvements.

Gladish continues by discussing various health conditions that have incredible alternative solutions for healing, but how the mainstream medical community may not always consider these healthy alternatives. She discusses vitamins and medications, and the importance of studying root cause medicine, and how we need to look deeper for the origins of medical problems in order to truly eradicate them or relieve them.

Gladish has over fifteen years in the health and wellness field and she has worked with women in more than 30 countries worldwide. She is a sought-after consultant and coach.

Finding Calm–Charlotte Reznick, PhD, Author, The Power of Your Child’s Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success – Meditation and Mindfulness for a Healthier Life

Oct 30, 2019 36:08

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Charlotte Reznick, Ph.D., child educational psychologist, and author of the Los Angeles Times bestselling book, The Power of Your Child’s Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success, provides an overview of her work in meditation and mindfulness practices.


For three decades, Dr. Reznick has had a meditation practice, and she is the creator of positive coping skills, mindful program, Imagery For Kids: Breakthrough for Learning, Creativity, and Empowerment. Dr. Reznick is a noted authority on mindfulness, imagination creation, and meditation, and is a leader in her field.


Dr. Reznick talks about her background and education, and what pushed her to develop her programs and write about her work. As a specialist in child and teen mindfulness and meditation, she talks about how she combined imagination and mediation to help those she worked with. A primary goal is to help kids access their inner wisdom through their own imagination. She talks about some specific case studies and the progress she made. 


Continuing, Dr. Reznick provides further examples of brain/body meditation and imagination that transformed some of the kids she worked with. As Dr. Reznick states, fear is sometimes known, but sometimes we don’t know where it is coming from, and the imagination work helps young people find comfort, to relax, and sleep better. Talking about stress, Dr. Reznick states that today we have more complications in life with technology, etc., and that it is all combining to potentially accelerate stress and anxiety. 


Dr. Reznick discusses texting and social media, and the emotions that are communicated, and not communicated in exchanges between people. Wrapping up, Dr. Reznick discusses her travels and the teaching she provides, giving people tools to help them find healthier paths, better solutions, and to promote joy and success through change and growth.

Finding Calm–Charlotte Reznick, PhD, Author, The Power of Your Child’s Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success – Meditation and Mindfulness for a Healthier Life

Oct 30, 2019

Description:

Charlotte Reznick, Ph.D., child educational psychologist, and author of the Los Angeles Times bestselling book, The Power of Your Child’s Imagination: How to Transform Stress and Anxiety into Joy and Success, provides an overview of her work in meditation and mindfulness practices. For three decades, Dr. Reznick has had a meditation practice, and she is the creator of positive coping skills, mindful program, Imagery For Kids: Breakthrough for Learning, Creativity, and Empowerment. Dr. Reznick is a noted authority on mindfulness, imagination creation, and meditation, and is a leader in her field. Dr. Reznick talks about her background and education, and what pushed her to develop her programs and write about her work. As a specialist in child and teen mindfulness and meditation, she talks about how she combined imagination and mediation to help those she worked with. A primary goal is to help kids access their inner wisdom through their own imagination. She talks about some specific case studies and the progress she made.  Continuing, Dr. Reznick provides further examples of brain/body meditation and imagination that transformed some of the kids she worked with. As Dr. Reznick states, fear is sometimes known, but sometimes we don’t know where it is coming from, and the imagination work helps young people find comfort, to relax, and sleep better. Talking about stress, Dr. Reznick states that today we have more complications in life with technology, etc., and that it is all combining to potentially accelerate stress and anxiety.  Dr. Reznick discusses texting and social media, and the emotions that are communicated, and not communicated in exchanges between people. Wrapping up, Dr. Reznick discusses her travels and the teaching she provides, giving people tools to help them find healthier paths, better solutions, and to promote joy and success through change and growth.

Hemp Hemp Hooray – Ryan Lewis, Chief Business Developer of Global Cannabinoids – The Incredible Potential of Hemp-Derived Products

Oct 29, 2019 29:03

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Hemp Hemp Hooray – Ryan Lewis, Chief Business Developer of Global Cannabinoids – The Incredible Potential of Hemp-Derived Products

Oct 29, 2019 29:02

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Ryan Lewis, Chief Business Developer of Global Cannabinoids, talks about the emerging markets for CBD and hemp-derived products.

Global Cannabinoids is a high volume producer and distributor of bulk and wholesale phytocannabinoid-rich (PCR) industrial hemp—naturally high in CBD, CBG, CBC, CBN, CBDA, and terpenes. Additionally, Global Cannabinoids is a large manufacturer of private- label CBD products, one of the biggest in the US. They are a serious CBD oil distributor that is changing the marketplace.

Lewis talks about his background, starting with the building of the very first bulk and wholesale B2B distribution platform for American-grown hemp and cannabinoids derived from hemp. He discusses some of the challenges, and some of the advances that were enabled after the passing of the US Farm Bill.

Lewis explains that hemp is excellent with phytoremediation, a form of bioremediation that applies to all the chemical or physical processes that involve plants for immobilizing or degrading contaminants within the soil and/or groundwater. He recounts some remarkable stories of how hemp has shown it can literally absorb all kinds of contaminants and survive, which makes testing incredibly important. Lewis explains their testing processes in detail. And he provides details about upcoming federal regulation and the marketplace, as well as his expectation for the near future in regard to the hemp-derived phytocannabinoids market.

Working Out, For Yourself and the Planet—Ruben Mejia—SportsArt

Oct 28, 2019 20:38

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Working Out, For Yourself and the Planet—Rubin Mejia—SportsArt

Oct 28, 2019 20:37

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Most of us value our health, and we know that exercise can help us achieve and maintain it, but it can still be a challenge to get to the gym on a regular basis. The team at SportsArt is trying to change that by giving us one more reason to work out: we can help improve the planet by doing so. The fitness equipment manufacturer has created a product that's like nothing else on the market: a line of cardio equipment that actually generates electricity when it’s used.

On today’s episode, CTO of SportsArt, Rubin Mejia, explains the technology behind the product, the reduction in electricity use (and bills) resulting from it, and how the product has been received in general. The equipment can be found in nearly every large city in the world, but it’s just starting to gain traction in the U.S.

Tune in and check out gosportsart.com for more info.

 

Game Changer – Robin Arnott, CEO of Andromeda Entertainment – New Immersive Video Games that Seek to Provide Transformative Content in an Exciting Platform

Oct 28, 2019 37:00

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Game Changer – Robin Arnott, CEO of Andromeda Entertainment – New Immersive Video Games that Seek to Provide Transformative Content in an Exciting Platform

Oct 28, 2019 37:00

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Robin Arnott, CEO of Andromeda Entertainment (enterandromeda.com), discusses his work with the next wave of gaming and the ever-expanding world of entertainment technologies.

Andromeda Entertainment is the first publisher to serve the advancing interest in mindfulness and wellness with truly transformative content and amazing virtual entertainment experiences for users.

Arnott talks about his background as an audio engineer and game designer. Through working in games in the entertainment technologies space, he came to truly understand how games capture our minds perhaps better than anything else. It’s about practicing and being, and can really bring people into a specific environment. He talks about how games can play an important role in people’s introspective journeys, hitting deep states of consciousness. With video games, we can package practices that are good for us, in a fun, engaging, deeply involved game environment. Arnott explains that video games can become addictive, but most games can actually exercise parts of your mind, thus the benefits are there.

Arnott discusses how their games engage people on a somatic level, to move out of deeply held trauma, to approach self-actualization. As we learn, he states, we can really take advantage of this form in a positive way, elevating the gaming experience. Arnott talks about some of the games that are coming out soon, and their mental and physical benefits. Continuing, Arnott says they, as a company, are looking for original genius ideas; he is looking for creators who are engaged on a higher level. As a publisher, Arnott states that they often take on games that may be somewhat unusual, but offer transformative experiences. And Arnott discusses how game designers might draw from the mind/body connection to inspire their designs, to make a new kind of game for self-actualization and beyond.

Diabetes Discoveries – Professor Jeffrey M. Karp, Principal Investigator, Karp Lab – Reversing Diabetes? An Amazing New Breakthrough

Oct 28, 2019 29:45

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Diabetes Discoveries – Professor Jeffrey M. Karp, Principal Investigator, Karp Lab – Reversing Diabetes? An Amazing New Breakthrough

Oct 28, 2019 29:45

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Professor Jeffrey M Karp, Principal Investigator, Karp Lab (karplab.net), provides an overview of the current state of diabetes treatment.

Dr. Karp is a celebrated Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Additionally, Dr. Karp is a principal faculty member at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, as well as an affiliate faculty member at the Broad Institute and with the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. Dr. Karp specializes in the fields pertaining to drug delivery, stem cell therapeutics, medical devices, and tissue adhesives.

Dr. Karp discusses his background, from his early undergrad training as a chemical engineer at McGill University, a public research university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, to his PhD work at the University of Toronto, continuing with a postdoc at MIT. The research doctor discusses diabetes in detail, and the incredible resources that are needed for this one medical condition. He talks about some amazing discoveries made through gastric bypass surgeries, and how doctors quickly acknowledged that many of their gastric bypass surgery patients no longer needed medication for their type 2 diabetes after the procedure.

Dr. Karp talks about the medical community’s mission thereafter, to achieve the same response in a more minimally-invasive way.

The solution—a pill. Dr. Karp discusses the immense work that got the medical community through the research and to the solution. As he states, the pill they’ve created, which is taken before a meal, forms a transient coating that can limit nutrient absorption, effectively limiting the nutrient contact with the GI tract and thus mimicking the effects achieved earlier through the gastric bypass surgery.

Dr. Karp continues by explaining some of the treatments for weight loss and diabetes, and he expounds upon their progress getting their research into the clinical trial stage. Dr. Karp has published more than 125 peer-reviewed papers, with greater than 18,500 citations, and he has given over 300 lectures on topics within his areas of expertise. And Dr. Karp has 100+ already issued or pending patents (national and international).

Managing Chronic Pain with the Oska Pulse – Dr. Jeff Marksberry, Chief Medical Officer – Oska Wellness

Oct 28, 2019 19:48

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Managing Chronic Pain with the Oska Pulse - Dr. Jeff Marksberry, Chief Medical Officer – Oska Wellness

Oct 28, 2019 19:48

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If you’ve ever experienced chronic pain, odds are that you’ve tried various solutions to mitigate that pain. Maybe you’ve found something that works. Great! If not, you may be looking for an alternative to your current therapy. One of the latest technologies in pain management utilizes painless electromagnetic pulse therapy to provide long-term pain relief. Dr. Jeff Marksberry, Chief Medical Officer of medical technology company Oska Wellness, discusses the Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Technology that is utilized in the Oska Pulse. This device emits precise frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields to provide pain relief on virtually any area of the body that may be painful.

Dr. Marksberry discusses the many benefits of using the Oska Pulse (of note – there are no known side effects), and how patients have achieved significant pain reduction – some patients have been able to manage their pain exclusively with the Oska Pulse.

For more information, visit https://www.oskawellness.com and find the device on Amazon.

Meditation for the Busy Millennial—Andrew Feinstein—Founder and CEO of Find Your Mind Meditation

Oct 28, 2019 42:17

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Meditation for the Busy Millennial—Andrew Feinstein—Founder and CEO of Find Your Mind Meditation

Oct 28, 2019 42:16

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Many of us have heard of the numerous benefits of meditation, yet many of us have also faced numerous challenges in adopting this practice into our daily lives. Maybe we are too busy. Maybe we don’t know what we’re doing. Maybe it’s a combination of the two. Without judgment, Andrew Feinstein, founder and CEO of Find Your Mind Meditation joins us today to discuss his meditation journey as a busy young professional.

He discusses how he overcame the barriers that many of us face while learning how to meditate and how and why how he incorporates meditation into his daily life. Andrew advocates that we can find the time in our day to practice meditation­­—no matter how busy we are­­­­­­—and explains why and how it will benefit us in the long run.

For more information, visit https://www.fymmeditation.com/.

On the Latest in AI Research and Development—Alexey Potapov—SingularityNET

Oct 25, 2019 28:05

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On the Latest in AI Research and Development—Alexey Potapov—SingularityNET

Oct 25, 2019 28:05

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Smart cities, personal assistants, and human longevity; what do each of these things have in common? They’re all—in one technical way or another—possible only by virtue of the fact that neural networks and other models for AI processing exist. Alexey Potapov, PhD, is a researcher in the area of AI at SingularityNET, and he joins the podcast to talk about a number of topics, including the limitations of neural networks and how natural symbolic networks can compensate for them, areas of research in AI that are continuing to grow, the demand for improved AI presented by the rise of smart cities, and the current popularity of natural language processing models.

Tune in for the details and learn more at https://singularitynet.io/.

Generating Genius – Robin Eric Weiner, Author of The Geography of Genius – Examining the Ways that Genius Develops, from How, to Where, and Why

Oct 25, 2019 40:43

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Generating Genius – Robin Eric Weiner, Author

Oct 25, 2019 40:42

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Robin Eric Weiner, author, The Geography of Genius, talks about his book, his interests, and why geniuses are the way they are.

In The Geography of Genius, the New York Times bestselling author, Weiner, author of The Geography of Bliss, journeys from Athens to Silicon Valley—and takes a look back at history to show how truly creative geniuses flourished in very specific places at very specific times.

Weiner explains how we have been looking at geniuses all wrong. He talks about the myths of geniuses. Weiner states that myth number one is that geniuses are ‘born.’ He provides the example of Mozart, who was certainly born with amazing talent, but Weiner states that we must also consider that he was born into a very musical family in area that was musically-oriented, in an extremely musical period in history. Myth number two, he states, is that genius is made through hard work. Weiner states that hard work does play a role, but that’s not enough. Thus, Weiner proposes that geniuses are actually grown, cultivated. Weiner’s point: geniuses are not random, but there are groupings—certain places produce more geniuses, and he talks about the many factors that are involved. Weiner provides detailed information about some of the places in the world, and their companion times, that produced the world’s greatest geniuses.

Continuing, Weiner talks about the tyranny of expertise, and how there is a now common problem in academia in which individuals are not allowed to freely expound upon their ideas unless those ideas are specifically in their exact area of expertise. And Weiner talks about how we romanticize geniuses, but as the times change so do our perceptions.

In Tune to Autoimmune – Josep Bassaganya-Riera, DVM, PhD, Founder, Chairman and CEO of Landos Biopharma – Safer Therapeutics for Autoimmune Disease

Oct 25, 2019 33:26

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In Tune to Autoimmune – Josep Bassaganya-Riera, DVM, PhD, Founder, Chairman and CEO of Landos Biopharma – Safer Therapeutics for Autoimmune Disease

Oct 25, 2019 33:25

Description:

Josep Bassaganya-Riera, DVM, PhD, founder, Chairman and CEO of Landos Biopharma, delivers a fact-filled overview of his company’s work, developing safer therapeutics for autoimmune disease.

Dr. Bassaganya-Riera has received numerous research grants from a wide variety of science and health institutions, including the National Institutes of Health, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), as well as many industrial corporations. Dr. Bassaganya-Riera holds the title of Principal Investigator and Director for the Modeling Immunity to Enteric Pathogens (MIEP) project, which investigates the various immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying infections with certain gut pathogens by introducing mathematical systems to current mucosal immunology.

Dr. Bassaganya-Riera discusses his work with Landos Biopharma, an emerging biotech company that is already an integral player in the development of groundbreaking oral treatments for patients who suffer from autoimmune diseases. He discusses the unmet needs in Crohn&#39;s disease treatment in detail, as well as colitis—a chronic digestive disease recognized by inflammation of the colon’s inner lining. Dr. Bassaganya-Riera discusses their successful completion of phase one clinical trials, and he talks about his enthusiasm for further advancement of their therapeutics.

The research doctor discusses other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. He outlines their progress thus far and explains their lead clinical asset, BT-11, which is a unique, oral, locally-acting tiny molecule that targets the Lanthionine Synthetase C-Like 2 (LANCL2) pathway in the gastrointestinal tract for the treatment of IBD (inflammatory bowel

disease).

Dr. Bassaganya-Riera has a prolific track record of publishing and securing his important work and has published over 100 scientific papers, and secured 9 patents. He was awarded the 2018 Research Excellence Award from the prestigious Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech.

Medical Gamer – Samantha Bond, Certified Medical Illustrator & Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago – Exciting and Educational Medical Games for Learning and Training

Oct 25, 2019 28:06

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Medical Gamer – Samantha Bond, Certified Medical Illustrator & Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago – Exciting and Educational Medical Games for Learning and Training

Oct 25, 2019 28:05

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Samantha “Sam” Bond is a Certified Medical Illustrator and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago. In this podcast, Bond discusses her work, and her excitement about illustration, medical game development, and much more.

Sam Bond wears many diverse hats in the business world. She is a successful medical illustrator, Unity developer, and innovative interactive designer. In 2016, Bond graduated from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a Master&#39;s of Science in Biomedical Visualization (BVIS). She is an Atlanta, Georgia native and proudly attended the University of Georgia where she received a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Scientific Illustration.

Bond talks about her background and journey. She enthusiastically explains the emerging medical game field, and how these beneficial games can educate people about medicine and healthcare. She discusses the wide audience for select games, from technical games designed for neurosurgery residents, and more general games for the average person who wants to learn more about health. From general anatomy to vaccines, the topics are wide and varied, for a seemingly unending receptive audience of diverse inquisitive minds. By using the power, and fun, of games, Bond explains that gaming can be a great tool to educate and inform.

The medical gaming technology guru talks about some of the institutions that are interested in utilizing this groundbreaking platform. From companies that focus on surgical training and beyond, the need is clearly real. Bond talks about the success of the immunity and vaccination games and how they are changing the way we learn.

Why Healthcare Should Come Naturally – Dr. Joseph Mercola – Mercola.com

Oct 24, 2019 42:15

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Why Healthcare Should Come Naturally – Dr. Joseph Mercola – Mercola.com

Oct 24, 2019 42:14

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After obtaining his medical degree, Dr. Joseph Mercola practiced conventional medicine for about five or six years before discovering more natural approaches that were actually more effective for improving his patients’ health, allowing him to heal people that other healthcare professionals couldn’t. When people began coming from around the world seeking his help, he decided to create a website that would allow him to educate a greater number of people. Dr. Mercola is passionate about improving people’s health without the use of drugs or surgery. 

Click play to hear practical tips that you can incorporate into your lifestyle, learn about why life expectancy in the U.S. is declining, and get specific advice on how you can take hold of your own health to change this trajectory.

For more information, visit Mercola.com. Keep an eye out for his book on the dangers of electric and magnetic fields, EMF’d.

Ketone Kaleidoscope – Steve Zarpas, President and CEO of PHK Inc. – The Amazing Benefits of Ketone Supplementation

Oct 23, 2019 34:48

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Ketone Kaleidoscope – Steve Zarpas, President and CEO of PHK Inc. – The Amazing Benefits of Ketone Supplementation

Oct 23, 2019 34:48

Description:

Steve Zarpas, President and CEO at PHK Inc. (phketo.com) discusses ketones, and his company’s mission. Zarpas’ company, PowerHouse Ketones is a beverage company that features 100% bioavailable, all-natural ketones that mimic ketones that our livers naturally produce.

Steve attended George Washington University where he majored in the scientific areas of chemistry and biology. Zarpas talks about his early interest in ketones, and the exciting new field of exogenous ketone supplementation that has created a buzz in the health community. Zarpas discusses the many and varied, immense benefit of ketones and ketone supplementation. And as ketones produce more energy per each breath of air than carbohydrates do, they are an excellent way to not only improve health but make our bodies more efficient in processing. Unfortunately, to date, many people do not experience the incredible physical and cognitive energy benefits that come with a ketone-fueled body and mind, because the American diet is largely carbohydrate based.

Zarpas discusses bioactivity, and how ketones work. He explains the differences—ketone esters versus salts, but makes the distinction that his particular focus is on ketone acid, which is exactly what the liver makes when the body converts fat into ketones. The ketone and good health enthusiast talks about some of the best ways to utilize ketone acid. Zarpas talks about their upcoming products, such as their functional beverage that some early testers have said tastes great. Effects can be seen quickly, and it promotes the production of endogenous ketones. He talks about the benefits to athletes as well as sedentary people. The cognitive effects are obvious and the improvements in energy level and sharpness are demonstrable. And Zarpas explains how he uses the product to increase his endurance, increase recovery, and energy.

Transforming the Way We Look at Disaster Response – Tony Cowan – Clinics on Wheels

Oct 23, 2019 30:26

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Transforming the Way We Look at Disaster Response – Tony Cowan – Clinics on Wheels

Oct 23, 2019 30:26

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During the Ebola outbreak in Africa in 2014, a response camp was designed in order to create a clinical environment that included observation bays, recovery bays, and areas for isolation. When the project didn’t go through at the last minute, the assets in place had to be burned due to an inability to disinfect the canvas structures that made up the camp. Not only is this an unsustainable use of resources, but the lack of pre-existing medical public health infrastructure created conditions conducive to an outbreak in the first place.

Clinics On Wheels wants to develop medical public health infrastructure in austere environments in order to provide general public healthcare on a regular basis, while also being ready to respond immediately should an outbreak occur. In this episode, Tony Cowan, Director of Emergency Response Technology for Clinics on Wheels explains the varied uses and economic benefits of quality care that has mobile capabilities.

For more information, visit www.clinicsonwheels.com, or their parent company, World Housing Solution, at www.worldhousingsolution.com. You can also email Cowan directly at tonyc@worldhousingsolution.com.

Deep Thoughts About Nutrition – Dr. Cate Shanahan – drcate.com

Oct 22, 2019 38:02

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Deep Thoughts About Nutrition - Dr. Cate Shanahan – drcate.com

Oct 22, 2019 38:01

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Around 2001, Dr. Cate Shanahan acquired a mysterious pain and inflammation in her knee, which her medical providers could not explain and even surgery could not fix. The pain sometimes made her febrile and even unable to walk. When she finally learned that it was caused by a virus in her knee resulting from a diet she had once believed to be healthy, she became inspired to learn more. 


A medical professional herself, Dr. Cate is familiar with the nutritional science training, or lack thereof, provided in medical school. She has turned her pursuit of knowledge of nutrition into a book, Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food, with a new edition recently out. She joins us today to share her insights on nutrition. Press play to hear more.


Find her book on most online retailers, including Amazon and Audible. You can find out more about Dr. Cate and what she does at <a href="http://drcate.com">drcate.com</a>

This Company Has Our Hearts – Steven Morris – BIOLIFE4D

Oct 22, 2019 31:01

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This Company Has Our Hearts – Steven Morris – BIOLIFE4D

Oct 22, 2019 31:01

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BIOLIFE4D is back to tell us more about the technology they are using to create a bioengineered heart! In the United States, there are about 200,000 people who could use a heart transplant to save their lives, but only about 3,500 heart transplants take place each year.  


This discrepancy is due to a lack of viable donor hearts. BIOLIFE4D is addressing this problem by developing the technology to create a heart out of the cells of the very patient who will receive the heart for transplantation. Listen in to hear Steven Morris, CEO, and president of BIOLIFE4D, explain how such a heart can be made, why such a method reduces rejection risk, and how it can improve accuracy and ethics in drug testing.


 Learn more at <a href="http://www.BIOLIFE4D.com">www.BIOLIFE4D.com</a>.

Autofocals: A New Way of Looking at the World—Nitish Padmanaban—PhD Candidate, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University

Oct 22, 2019 19:50

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Autofocals: A New Way of Looking at the World—Nitish Padmanaban—PhD Candidate, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University

Oct 22, 2019 19:50

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According to Nitish Padmanaban, the problem in vision is deceivingly simple: as a person ages, the lenses in their eyes stiffen and become unable to change shape enough to focus on different objects in their environment. As a result, a person might get reading or bifocal lenses to help them see what they need to. As a fifth-year Ph.D. student at Stanford University, Padmanaban is working on a unique solution to this problem, which is a focused, tunable lens that replaces the functionality that’s lost by the eyes over time. 


These autofocus function as a combination of two types of eye-tracking software and a depth camera, and are able to determine exactly which object a person is looking at, how far from the person the object is located, and change shape accordingly so that the person can seamlessly focus on anything in their line of vision. 


In today’s episode, Padmanaban discusses the technical details of how the product works, how the technology of the lenses is based upon the technology behind virtual reality headsets, what they’re aiming to improve about the product in the future, and more. Tune in to hear the full conversation and check out <a href="https://www.computationalimaging.org/">https://www.computationalimaging.org/</a> to learn more.

AI Advancing – Gary Marcus, Scientist, Entrepreneur, and Author – Discussing the Current State, and Future, of AI and Learning

Oct 21, 2019 26:43

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AI Advancing – Gary Marcus, Scientist, Entrepreneur, and Author – Discussing the Current State, and Future, of AI and Learning

Oct 21, 2019 26:42

Description:

Gary Marcus, the scientist, entrepreneur, and author of the buzz-worthy book, Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust, talks about the current state of AI and learning.


Marcus is a scientist, first and foremost, and his extensive research has often focused on natural and artificial intelligence. Marcus was Founder and CEO of Geometric Intelligence, a successful machine learning company that was acquired by Uber. Marcus talks about his background, and his early interest in AI, and the possibilities to, as he states, “make machines do smart things.”


Marcus discusses his path from studying human cognition to AI. He states that much ‘intelligence’ is narrow, meaning the intelligence can only accomplish one or a few tasks. With general intelligence, the goal is to build machines that can figure things out for themselves, to analyze and adapt. The scientist and educator talk about human intelligence and our abilities. 


Continuing, Marcus discusses early chatbots and their relative intelligence levels. Additionally, he talks about self-driving software and some of the accidents that have caused injuries and even death. He states that none of this software has been properly debugged, but many people feel comfortable already. Marcus expounds upon the concept of deep comprehension, discussing data representations, and the ability to analyze things like space, time, causality, and individual objects. He explains his thoughts on how some things will be ‘learned’ but others will be built in. He talks about how AI needs to have a ‘rough draft’ of the psychology built-in, information and knowledge it needs to possess in order to function in the world around it, and that will ultimately make the learning process easier.


Marcus discusses some of the problems and challenges that arise in the quest to advance AI and neuroscience. He explains his theories and expands on some of the themes in his new book. He discusses which aspects of problems can be readily solved and how machines often fail in analytical thinking unless proper programming is implemented. 


Gary Marcus, the scientist, entrepreneur, and author of the buzz-worthy book, Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust, talks about the current state of AI and learning.


Marcus is a scientist, first and foremost, and his extensive research has often focused on natural and artificial intelligence. Marcus was Founder and CEO of Geometric Intelligence, a successful machine learning company that was acquired by Uber. Marcus talks about his background, and his early interest in AI, and the possibilities to, as he states, “make machines do smart things.”


Marcus discusses his path from studying human cognition to AI. He states that much ‘intelligence’ is narrow, meaning the intelligence can only accomplish one or a few tasks. With general intelligence, the goal is to build machines that can figure things out for themselves, to analyze and adapt. The scientist and educator talk about human intelligence and our abilities. 


Continuing, Marcus discusses early chatbots and their relative intelligence levels. Additionally, he talks about self-driving software and some of the accidents that have caused injuries and even death. He states that none of this software has been properly debugged, but many people feel comfortable already. Marcus expounds upon the concept of deep comprehension, discussing data representations, and the ability to analyze things like space, time, causality, and individual objects. He explains his thoughts on how some things will be ‘learned’ but others will be built in. He talks about how AI needs to have a ‘rough draft’ of the psychology built-in, information and knowledge it needs to possess in order to function in the world around it, and that will ultimately make the learning process easier.


Marcus discusses some of the problems and challenges that arise in the quest to advance AI and neuroscience. He explains his theories and expands on some of the themes in his new book. He discusses which aspects of problems can be readily solved and how machines often fail in analytical thinking unless proper programming is implemented.

A Chiropractor Conversation – Dr. Amelia Mazgaloff, Principal, Chiro-Health, Inc. – Discussing Modern Chiropractic and Soft Tissue Techniques

Oct 21, 2019 20:11

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A Chiropractor Conversation – Dr. Amelia Mazgaloff, Principal, Chiro-Health, Inc.

Oct 21, 2019 20:11

Description:

Dr. Amelia Mazgaloff, principal, Chiro-Health, Inc. (chirohealthsf.com), provides an overview of her work as a chiropractor, helping people heal their nervous system.


Dr. Mazgaloff holds a master’s degree in physical education and kinesiology (the study of human movement). She completed her education in X-ray technology and began her tenure at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan, a top-rated spine orthopedic hospital.


Dr. Mazgaloff discusses joint pain and inflammation, and how chiropractic techniques can be utilized. She expounds upon the various treatments for misalignments of the joints, all of which can affect our nerves and muscles. She discusses the many ways that body problems can occur, from slip and fall injuries to accidents, and more, and how trauma can impact our joints. As she states, when there are alignment problems that cannot realign on their own, that’s when chiropractors get involved, to manually realign and return the body to its normal state. 


The doctor discusses some of the issues she deals with, and how some patients respond. She explains that her goal is to fix problems permanently if possible, not just relieve pain and problems. She outlines their techniques and processes and explains how they adjust joints, with a discussion on maintenance adjustment and how they schedule patients for follow-ups. Typically, maintenance schedules are four to six weeks, but it depends on a particular person’s activities and activity level. 

Combatting Cancer – Charles J. Meakin, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Care Oncology Clinic USA – Finding New Ways to Fight Cancer, Combinations of Drugs, and Rethinking Treatment

Oct 21, 2019 40:40

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Combatting Cancer – Charles J. Meakin, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Care Oncology Clinic USA – Finding New Ways to Fight Cancer, Combinations of Drugs, and Rethinking Treatment

Oct 21, 2019 40:40

Description:

Charles J. Meakin, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Care Oncology Clinic USA, provides an overview of his life’s work in oncology and research.


Dr. Meakin amassed 30 years of radiation oncology practice before joining Care Oncology in the summer of 2019. Dr. Meakin is interested in health optimization strategies and uses his extensive oncology background to develop and implement ‘whole patient’ care. Dr. Meakin completed his premed education at Notre Dame University, Medical School at the University of Cincinnati, and his oncology training at the prestigious Stanford University Hospital.


Dr. Meakin talks about his early thoughts on diet, yoga, and other alternative elements to standard of care, in his pursuit of metabolic solutions to disease. He discusses the concept of reappropriating drugs that were designed for some other malady that can also be effective in cancer treatment. Dr. Meakin discusses tumors and drug/treatment options that impact disease on the cellular level.


Dr. Meakin provides an overview of the Care Oncology Clinic’s mission and some of its methods. Scientists have spent many years working to find safe and viable combinations of medicines to target the metabolic pathways of cancer. They are seeking combinations that will benefit a large section of people suffering from cancer as well as preventative cancer combinations. And Dr. Meakin discusses their protocol and some of their promising work and successes. 

Radiation Reaper – Trisha Pritikin, Lawyer and Radiation Exposure Survivor – Radiation Danger: The Health Calamity of Dangerous Radiation-Dispersing Plants and Facilities

Oct 17, 2019 39:52

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Radiation Reaper – Trisha Pritikin, Lawyer and Radiation Exposure Survivor – Radiation Danger: The Health Calamity of Dangerous Radiation-Dispersing Plants and Facilities

Oct 17, 2019 39:52

Description:

Trisha Pritikin, lawyer, and radiation exposure survivor talks in-depth about her past health problems, causes, and her efforts to educate the public about the dangers of radiation exposure.


Trisha Pritikin was born and raised in Richland, Washington, just a couple miles from the Hanford Site, a decommissioned nuclear production complex that was operated by the United States government, on the Columbia River in Benton County, Washington. Her father worked around the reactors, overseeing operations. Eventually, the family moved away, but at the age of 18, Pritikin began to develop health problems she believes were caused by childhood exposure to radioactive iodine and other toxic radionuclides that were released from chemical separations at Hanford. 


Pritikin tells her story and explains her background. As she explains, the Hanford Site as part of the government’s early plutonium production. She outlines the process they used and how toxins were released into the air and water. Pritikin’s health deteriorated over time due to an undiagnosed autoimmune thyroid disorder known as Hashimoto’s disease, and other related health issues. 


Pritikin explains the depth at which residents of the area were exposed to harmful radiation, and how, surprisingly, the public was never really informed for years and years. She talks about the many cancers that people of the area experienced, and how it is easy to see the connection. Pritikin talks about her efforts to make an impact, and the 24-year litigation that went on and on in an effort to gain settlements for plaintiffs. She talks about her book of stories, stories of people who suffered, and the release of her book. Continuing, she discusses her efforts to spread the word about dangerous exposures and provides information on some of their websites and info for the public. 

Rethinking Dentistry – Dr. Hanan Elsaie, Voted One of ‘America’s Top Dentists’ – Modern Dentistry Practices and Procedures with a Holistic Approach

Oct 16, 2019 37:28

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Rethinking Dentistry – Dr. Hanan Elsaie, Voted One of ‘America's Top Dentists’ – Modern Dentistry Practices and Procedures with a Holistic Approach

Oct 16, 2019 37:28

Description:

Dr. Hanan Elsaie voted one of ‘America's Top Dentists’ discusses her background, goals, and extensive work in dentistry.


Dr. Elsaie is a graduate of the University of Texas Health Science Center - Dental Branch, in Houston. Dr. Elsaie is skilled in all areas of general dentistry, and she specializes in general and cosmetic dentistry. Dr. Elsaie received the honorific—‘one of America’s Top Dentists’— Consumers’ Research Council of America, Guide to America’s Top Dentists.


Dr. Elsaie discusses her background and her holistic method of modern dentistry. She believes in taking a whole-body approach when caring for her patients. She promotes more natural medicines and supplements in her overall care plan. The doctor goes on to talk about gum disease and how it can affect the health of the entire body. Dr. Elsaie explains some of the problems that can develop, from gingivitis to periodontitis. 


The recognized dental doctor discusses her thoughts on fluoride and mouthwashes with preservatives (or alcohol), explaining that she is not an advocate whatsoever as they can do damage to the body. She delves into a discussion of saliva and things to watch for in regard to that. Continuing, Dr. Elsaie provides information on a few of the many natural foods, supplements, and more that can combat inflammation, and are excellent for gum health, etc. She discusses, in great detail, various sweeteners—the good versus the bad, discussing ingredients and effects. And she continues, discussing some of the potentially harmful chemicals that we could be exposed to. 


Wrapping up, she discusses new technologies and advances in the dental field. Dr. Elsaie’s work has been recognized by her peers, and she is passionate about providing outstanding dental care to everyone. Dr. Elsaie is skilled in general and cosmetic dentistry, as well as oral surgery, including implant placement and surgical extractions, endodontics, periodontics, and prosthonotics.


The Big Science Question – Perry Marshall, Marketing Expert, Engineer, Entrepreneur, and General Scientific Enthusiast – The Quest for Scientific Explanations—Origin of Life

Oct 16, 2019 38:02

Description:

The Big Science Question – Perry Marshall, Marketing Expert, Engineer, Entrepreneur, and General Scientific Enthusiast – The Quest for Scientific Explanations—Origin of Life

Oct 16, 2019 38:01

Description:

Perry Marshall, a marketing expert, engineer, entrepreneur, and general scientific enthusiast, talks about the current state of scientific development, approaches, and practices.


Marshall’s sought-after consulting service provides independent entrepreneurs an opportunity to take part in high-level mentoring groups, to solve problems, and find exciting pathways to incredible success. Though Marshall’s lifetime of marketing and business knowledge, he has developed a system that delivers state-of-the-art marketing methods to company owners and executives, managers and marketers, as well as hungry salespeople—all who want to find new ways to thrive. And Marshall’s 80/20 Sales and Marketing concept is a foundation in the business world.


Marshall discusses his Evolution 2.0 Prize, the largest “origin of life” prize thus far, that seeks to bridge the divide between the scientific fields of chemistry, genomics, and modern computing. Marshall discusses the difficulty level of attaining funding for research. He discusses some of the hurdles that scientists face in their attempt to get work published. He explains the peer review process and how ‘good science’ is evaluated.


Continuing, the electrical engineer and general scientific enthusiast discuss his process to find judges for his Evolution 2.0 Prize. As he explains, many scientists wanted no part in it, but the ones who chose to be involved tended to be outspoken ‘rock stars’ so to speak in the world of science. He states, to take controversial positions, it requires some maneuvering that many ranks and file scientists are not able to do, due to lack of time/schedules, etc. 


Marshall explains why most scientists don’t typically share their information with the general public from the outset. Going further, Marshall talks about how some scientists break out and become ‘popular scientists,’ such as Neil deGrasse Tyson, Stephen Hawking, and others. 

Wild Ride – Joshua Perry, Keto Consultant, Former Professional Athlete, Coach – Sage Advice and Consulting from a Former BMX Champ Who, Today, Rides for Team Health

Oct 16, 2019 28:27

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Wild Ride – Joshua Perry, Keto Consultant, Former Professional Athlete, Coach – Sage Advice and Consulting from a Former BMX Champ Who, Today, Rides for Team Health

Oct 16, 2019 28:27

Description:

Joshua Perry, keto consultant, former professional athlete, coach, and brain tumor survivor, (<a href="http://joshperrybmx.com">joshperrybmx.com</a>) talks about his life and work as a keto consultant and public speaker.


Perry provides some background on his life and interests, starting out with his high school years, and how he found a love for BMX (bike motocross). He talks in-depth about his competition years, and how regular pain, nausea, and vision loss caused him to look deeper into his health issues. He explains the difficult process and path that led to the discovery he had a brain problem that had to be dealt with. He explains the process, from diagnosis to surgery, and how he coped along the way. 


Moving forward, he sought a way to improve his life, after the brain tumor surgery, and he found keto. He discusses physicians and his feelings about medicine in general, discussing his aversion to taking regular pain meds, etc. As he explains, diet and nutrition are the key elements he focuses on to maximize his health. As a keto consultant, Perry has clients all over the globe. 


Perry utilizes communication and a results-oriented program to help clients increase cognitive function, enhance their quality of life, and bring their overall performance and health to the highest level possible. Wrapping up, Perry talks about how to prioritize, and focus the brain, and he discusses the many types of people he interacts with and coaches. 

Healing Your Home – Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA, Architect, EcoNest Architecture Inc. Healthy Home Design and Consulting – Taking Control of Your Environment Via Healthy, Green Architecture, and the Simple Changes We Can All Make to Improve Health

Oct 14, 2019 24:23

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Healing Your Home – Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA, Architect, EcoNest Architecture Inc. Healthy Home Design and Consulting – Taking Control of Your Environment Via Healthy, Green Architecture, and the Simple Changes We Can All Make to Improve Health

Oct 14, 2019 24:23

Description:

Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA, Architect, EcoNest Architecture Inc. Healthy Home Design and Consulting, discusses her important work in the emerging arena of healthy, green architecture.

Baker-Laporte holds degrees from the School of Architecture at the University of Toronto, and The International Institute of Bau-Biologie and Ecology. Baker-Laporte’s firm is dedicated to environmentally sound and health-enhancing architecture. She is a noted advocate for environmentally-sound architecture and was recognized as a United States ‘Top 10’ green architect by Natural Home magazine.

Baker-Laporte discusses her interest in ‘healthy’ architecture. She talks about her personal background and her incredible sensitivity to various chemicals that negatively impacted her health. As she states, after battling pneumonia literally every year, and her regular bouts with dizziness and her general loss of focus, she began to dig deeper into how our environments, specifically architecture, can greatly impact our health and wellness.

The recognized architect discusses the many problems that homes can have, from mold to chemicals to electromagnetic radiation. She talks about the ways we can improve our living environments, and begin to rid our homes of the negatively impacting agents. From standalone filtration systems, to reorganizing how you use your space (considering where you are sleeping), to vacuuming and cleaning practices and solutions, to simply opening windows, she discusses it all.

Baker-Laporte was elected into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects, recognized for her groundbreaking architectural and educational work in the emerging area of Natural Healthy Building.

Helping Healing – Cass Nelson-Dooley, M.S., Owner and CEO of Health First Consulting, LLC – The Microbiome, Plant Diversity, and Natural Pathways to Healing

Oct 14, 2019 46:33

Description:

Helping Healing – Cass Nelson-Dooley, M.S., Owner and CEO of Health First Consulting, LLC – The Microbiome, Plant Diversity, and Natural Pathways to Healing

Oct 14, 2019 46:32

Description:

Cass Nelson-Dooley, M.S., owner and CEO of Health First Consulting, LLC, discusses her work and research into the microbiome and beyond.

Nelson-Dooley has conducted extensive research into the pharmacology of medicinal plants at the University of Georgia and AptoTec, Inc, and she was an innovator at Metametrix Clinical Laboratory as well as Genova Diagnostics.

Nelson-Dooley is passionate about human health, passionate about improving it through a comprehensive approach that addresses the many and various underlying causes of disease. She is a student of ethnobotany, ethnopharmacology, and natural product chemistry and has experience in integrative and functional medicine, and the integrative medicine laboratory industry, as well as nutraceutical research and development, osteoporosis, and obesity.

Nelson-Dooley discusses her background and her desire to learn all she could about medicinal plants. Natural medicine, as she explains, has long been something she and her family were interested in. She discusses her work and time in Panama, studying indigenous people and the plants that they used for common illnesses.

Nelson-Dooley’s book, Heal Your Oral Microbiome: Balance and Repair your Mouth Microbes to Improve Gut Health, Reduce Inflammation and Fight Disease, is a good read for anyone who wants to seriously work on improving their health. Nelson-Dooley explains how plants need vitamins and minerals, and she discusses the many similarities of living organisms. She outlines the nutrients that plants have within them that we as humans could harness and take advantage of. Continuing, she explains some of the problems that occur with modern drugs on the market.

Nelson-Dooley discusses her evolutionary perspective on why certain plants do what they do, and how they continually work to advance their lineage. She cites the example of the fruit tree, and how it is perfectly designed to promote its survival, as fruits are eaten and then the fruit seed is carried and deposited through feces, which creates a perfect environment for the growth of a new tree.

Continuing, Nelson-Dooley discusses her book and microbiome testing, including her work in diagnostic testing. She talks about the gut microbiome in detail and explains her research into the oral microbiome. She explains the similarities between the two. And she talks about the many functions of the microbiome, from making vitamins to calming

inflammation.

Psilocybin Salvation – Alan K. Davis, PhD, of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University – Unlocking the Power of Magic Mushrooms in a Clinical Setting that Could Offer New Hope for Depression Sufferers

Oct 14, 2019 26:45

Description:

Psilocybin Salvation – Alan K. Davis, PhD, of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University – Unlocking the Power of Magic Mushrooms in a Clinical Setting that Could Offer New Hope for Depression Sufferers

Oct 14, 2019 26:45

Description:

Alan K. Davis, PhD, of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University, discusses his important work researching the powerful and positive effects of psilocybin on depression sufferers.

Dr. Davis has vast clinical experience in multiple areas and he regularly works with people who are dealing with trauma-based psychological problems, including addiction, PTSD, depression, and anxiety.

Dr. Davis discusses his research, and his work as a guide for psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for people suffering from depression. The doctor’s work focuses on psychedelic research that includes clinical trials with psilocybin (the active psychedelic ingredient in “magic mushrooms”) for people with depression. His research explores the many psychological mechanisms through which the psilocybin can potentially ameliorate mental health and functioning. Remarkably, approximately 50% of the people who participated in their study stated that their depression was completely eradicated after about one month of treatment. And following up, at the three and six month marks, Dr. Davis states that a good number of those people are still free of depression entirely. Dr. Davis explains their treatment process and how actual psychotherapy is an integral part. As he states, it’s important to build a rapport with study participants and create a level of trust, so they are comfortable with the environment and the process.

Dr. Davis talks about some of the upcoming trials and the data that the FDA will need to approve the psilocybin as a specialty drug that can be prescribed by psychiatrists or general practice doctors and then administered by psychologists, social workers, and counselors. Dr. Davis discusses some of the states that are working to push legislative changes, and how the DEA is involved with the scheduling of the drug.

Continuing, Dr. Davis discusses in detail the mechanisms that allow psilocybin to work. As he states, the psilocybin takes action on serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain. Dr. Davis explains that serotonin is the chemical in the brain that regulates many things such as mood, appetite, and sleep. And as depression sufferers often experience negative mood, decreased or increased appetite, and sleep disruption, psilocybin is potentially a great alternative for depression, especially for those people who have found no relief through other meds that are typically prescribed for depression.

Putting You (And Your Baby) To Sleep—Dr. Lynelle Schneeberg, Sleep Psychologist

Oct 11, 2019 48:01

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Putting You (And Your Baby) To Sleep—Dr. Lynelle Schneeberg, Sleep Psychologist

Oct 11, 2019 48:00

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In this episode, we hear from Dr. Lynelle Schneeberg, sleep psychologist and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Schneeberg works with adults who suffer from sleeping disorders and helps educate and coach guardians of children who struggle with sleep. 


Today’s conversation is focused on helping babies and children to have better sleep health. Dr. Schneeberg tells us that the most common sleep challenge for children is behavioral insomnia, which may be caused by learned methods of falling asleep—methods that aren’t necessarily ideal. 


Click play to hear her discuss her new book, Become Your Child’s Sleep Coach: The Bedtime Doctor’s 5 Step Guide, Ages 3-10, and learn her general tips for raising healthy sleepers.

Saving the Planet – Louise Charles, Communications Manager at Climeworks – CO2 Removal Technology to Help Combat Global Warming

Oct 10, 2019 25:01

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Saving the Planet – Louise Charles, Communications Manager at Climeworks – CO2 Removal Technology to Help Combat Global Warming

Oct 10, 2019 25:01

Description:

Louise Charles, Communications Manager at Climeworks (climeworks.com), provides an overview of how Climeworks’ technology is helping with CO2 removal from the atmosphere.

Louise is a multilingual, expert communications specialist with vast experience working cross-culturally in communications, project management, as well as translation. Louise discusses the history and founding of Climeworks and how it has grown to a company of seventy employees to date.

Louise discusses their innovative CO2 collectors, and how their system’s fans draw in the air and filter it. As climate change is driven by the activities of humans, through the burning of fossil fuels that release dangerous levels of carbon dioxide into the air that are directly causing global warming, Climeworks’ technology seeks to help with CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Climate change desperately needs advanced carbon removal technologies and this is where Climeworks is stepping up to meet the challenge, because climate scenarios have demonstrated that negative emissions will be necessary in order to keep global warming below critical levels.

The Communications Manager talks about the many ways that they can utilize the collected CO2 in various other uses for multiple industries. She explains their storage options and the economic options for countries who are utilizing the CO2 collection technology. Continuing, Louise expounds upon the rewards systems that parties can take advantage of when they provide information on their offset emissions. She talks about the costs of CO2 capture, as well their goals for decreasing costs in the future as they streamline and expand.

Wrapping up, the technology expert and Communications Manager talks about their larger projects that capture even greater amounts of CO2, possibly even millions of tons. And she discusses the Climeworks timeline and their goals for CO2 capture as they expand their operations.

Climeworks’ expansion of the world’s first commercial carbon removal technology will hopefully lead us to a negative emissions future that will be better for the planet and the living organisms, including us, who reside upon it.

Cannabis Concepts – Edward Sawicki Jr., MBA, Chief Executive Officer at Think20 Labs, LLC – Unlocking the Many and Various Medical Uses for Cannabis

Oct 10, 2019 26:21

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Cannabis Concepts – Edward Sawicki Jr., MBA, Chief Executive Officer at Think20 Labs, LLC – Unlocking the Many and Various Medical Uses for Cannabis

Oct 10, 2019 26:20

Description:

Edward Sawicki Jr., MBA, Chief Executive Officer at Think20 Labs, LLC (think20labs.com), discusses his vision for the future of cannabis.

Sawicki’s mission is to help expand personalized medicine and ensure safety for consumers in the cannabis market. He is a cannabis advocate and is heavily involved in the education of consumers about the many benefits of cannabis. Sawicki has a rich background in the biotech space assisting with lab design for DNA-sequencing and molecular biology labs.

Sawicki talks about the premise of Think20 Labs and his background. He explains that Think20 Labs is much more than a testing company, that his company wants to encompass everything they know about molecular development and beyond. Think20 Labs is heavily involved in not only compliance testing, but the sequencing of DNA, epigenetic work, and so much more in research, and the design of projects as well. Sawicki explains that Think20 Labs seeks to get to the core of what cannabis can truly do to move medicine forward and help individuals who suffer from a wide variety of maladies. As he explains, full legalization is needed in order to expand the research.

The cannabis research expert talks about the individualized work they do with local growers, and the massive data that they are collecting about plants and soil conditions, etc. As he states, the most important issue right now is ensuring safety for consumers, and compliance. He discusses the dangers of products that come from the black market, and how full legalization with standards will help to improve safety.

Wrapping up, he talks about how research into epigenomic and RNA profiles will help them to figure out where the important correlations lie, in regard to understanding what they need to learn, and how to approach that in an ordered fashion. Sawicki states that by starting with genetic profiles of patients and of plants, their research can begin to find important correlations that will guide further research, ongoing.

The Future of Surgery – Sean Buchanan, Co-Founder of Visom Technology, Inc. – How Innovative Technology Will Change Modern Surgery for the Better

Oct 9, 2019 25:56

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The Future of Surgery – Sean Buchanan, Co-Founder of Visom Technology, Inc. – How Innovative Technology Will Change Modern Surgery for the Better

Oct 9, 2019 25:55

Description:

Sean Buchanan, co-founder of Visom Technology, Inc. (visomtech.com), talks in detail about the incredible AR + AI software-enabled technology that his company offers.

Visom’s mission is to enable surgery without any compromise whatsoever. By bringing together AR + AI software, Visom is innovating how surgeons can see and operate, by overlaying important images directly over patients which places crucial information surgeons need right in their easy view.

Buchanan talks about Visom’s mission in detail, discussing Augmented Reality (AR). As he explains, Visom’s technology offers a way to simplify surgery and potentially help decrease errors, 75% of which occur during the surgery. Buchanan delivers an overview of how their system works, providing information on the technology. Transitioning imagery to 3D, while challenging, will provide more thorough information than the standard 2D. He explains how pre-surgical planning can be augmented by the Visom system. By utilizing 3D holograms, surgeons can really get a better grasp of what they will be doing in surgery, before the surgery begins.

The technology guru talks about some of the partnerships and business relationships that they have engaged in, to expand and accelerate the use of their amazing technology. Buchanan provides information on how they are taking their technology to institutions that want to use it for training purposes. The technologist speaks in depth about the healthcare industry in general, discussing innovation.

The critical data that is generated and subsequently interpreted by Visom can truly provide surgeons the insight they require and assist them in making better, more informed decisions, allowing surgeons to focus on the patient. The Visom mission is to simplify healthcare through innovative technology that is easy to use, and provide mobile surgical navigation software that can be utilized anywhere.

Buchanan wraps up by talking about the future of Visom and when he expects their tech will be commercialized and opened up to the wide market in the healthcare industry.

Mood Tracking Made Easy—Dan Seidler—Misu.app

Oct 9, 2019 30:30

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Mood Tracking Made Easy—Dan Seidler—Misu.app

Oct 9, 2019 30:30

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After being diagnosed with a serious mental health condition eight years ago, Dan Seidler began to track his mood at the recommendation of his psychiatrist. The idea was that the more he could understand aspects of his experience, such as what triggers his anxiety or depression, the better he could deal with managing it, the better he could work with his mental health providers, and the better he could regulate his own behaviors in a way that could reduce his symptoms. 

This mood tracking practice has brought him improved self-awareness, increased happiness, and reduced stress levels. Though continuing to deal with life’s struggles is unavoidable, he now has a better sense of control and knows how to implement more effective coping strategies. Seidler wants you to have access to these tools as well. He joins the podcast today to talk about his experience and his app, Misu, an automated mood tracking tool. Listen in to learn more.

Misu is still in closed beta, which you can obtain access to by going to www.misu.app. If you are too excited to wait, email Seidler at dan@misu.app and he will bump you to the front of the line!

The Heart of the Matter: Improving Transplantation Standards Through the Development of a Bioartificial Heart—Dr. Jeffrey Morgan—BIOLIFE4D

Oct 9, 2019 29:38

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The Heart of the Matter:—Dr. Jeffrey Morgan—BIOLIFE4D

Oct 9, 2019 29:38

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Right now, there are thousands of people who need a heart transplant, yet there are not nearly enough organs available to meet that need. Additionally, those who do receive a donor heart run the risk of rejection and must on lifelong immunosuppressants, which consequently makes them more susceptible to infection. As Dr. Jeffrey Morgan, M.D., says, with the methods we have in place today, heart transplant recipients are essentially trading one disease for another.

Dr. Morgan is the Chief Medical Officer at BIOLIFE4D, a biotech company that is developing a bioartificial heart, which would increase availability of hearts for transplantation and eliminate the risk of rejection, as the heart would be generated from the patient’s own cells. 

Press play to hear more. Be sure to visit the BIOLIFE4D website at https://biolife4d.com.

The Heart of the Matter:—Dr. Jeffrey Morgan—BIOLIFE4D

Oct 9, 2019

Description:

Right now, there are thousands of people who need a heart transplant, yet there are not nearly enough organs available to meet that need. Additionally, those who do receive a donor heart run the risk of rejection and must on lifelong immunosuppressants, which consequently makes them more susceptible to infection. As Dr. Jeffrey Morgan, M.D., says, with the methods we have in place today, heart transplant recipients are essentially trading one disease for another. Dr. Morgan is the Chief Medical Officer at BIOLIFE4D, a biotech company that is developing a bioartificial heart, which would increase availability of hearts for transplantation and eliminate the risk of rejection, as the heart would be generated from the patient’s own cells.  Press play to hear more. Be sure to visit the BIOLIFE4D website at https://biolife4d.com.

Clearing the Mind – Adele Anderson, Life Coach, Destiny Coach, and Neuro-Linguistic Programmer – How Coaching and Neuro-Linguistic Programming Can Help to Open New Pathways for Healing and Success

Oct 8, 2019 31:22