Everything

Everything

Description

Link: www.newyorker.com/everything

Episodes

What Neighbors’ “Beware of Dog” Signs Really Mean

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

Phoebe Helander illustrates a humorous series of intended meanings behind “beware of dog” signs.

Peter Dinklage Is Still Punk Rock

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman interviews the actor Peter Dinklage, who played Tyrion Lannister on the HBO show “Game of Thrones,” and who will star in an Off Broadway production of “Cyrano.”

Finding Truth and Fiction on Film Sets in the South

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea writes about the photographer Alex Harris’s recent project “Our Strange New Land,” which is on display at the High Museum of Art, in Atlanta.

Arrivederci, Little Italy

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

Mark Binelli writes about his time in the gentrifying New York City neighborhood Little Italy and on his Italian-American heritage.

The 2020 Democrats and the New Politics of Gun Violence

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

The movement for tighter gun legislation has been revitalized, and supporting gun control is not the risk it once was, Margaret Talbot writes.

Sunday Reading: Winter Adventures

Dec 8, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, stories of wintertime expeditions and seasonal globe-trotters by David Grann, Susan Orlean, Kathryn Schulz, Nick Paumgarten, Rebecca Solnit, and Alec Wilkinson.

What Does a Strong Jobs Report Mean for Trump’s Reëlection Chances in 2020?

Dec 7, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the strong jobs figures released by the Department of Labor, and how much the economy may factor into the 2020 Presidential election.

The Riddler Celebrates Champagne

Dec 7, 2019

Description:

Hannah Goldfield reviews a new West Village bar and restaurant that heralds female winemakers and aims to make the celebratory drink part of diners’ regular routine.

A Powerful Statement of Resistance from a College Student on Trial in Moscow

Dec 7, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about Yegor Zhukov, a university student in Moscow who was on trial for “extremism” and who received a relatively light sentence after delivering a speech about responsibility and love.

Comedy = Tragedy + Time, and Other Equations

Dec 7, 2019

Description:

Riane Konc imagines a humorous list of mathematical equations that prove inherent bias in the worlds of comedy and standup.

Jamie Lee Curtis, the Original Scream Queen

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, interviews with Jamie Lee Curtis, the journalist Rana Ayyub, and the chef Niki Nakayama.

Impeaching Donald Trump Is Already a Win for Democrats

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy on how Trump’s impeachment will factor into the 2020 Presidential election.

How Donald Trump Is Making It Harder to End the War in Ukraine

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Joshua Yaffa writes about talks between the Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to end the war in the Donbass, and the involvement of Donald Trump in these negotiations.

Let It Snow on Trump

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon depicts President Donald Trump being slowly buried under falling snow as he stands tapping on his smartphone.

Conversations with Ma: A Lot to Unpack

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Julia Wertz writes and illustrates a humorous comic about siblings sorting through old boxes from the attic with their mother over the holidays.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, December 6th

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

David Ostow’s Daily Cartoon depicts a collection of letters to Santa Claus.

Holiday Gift Guide: How to Channel Your Inner Maximalist

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme lists her fine-fashion 2019 holiday-gifting recommendations, which are meant to re-create the wardrobe of an elegant, oddball octogenarian.

The Impeachment Hearings and the Coming Storm

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Jill Lepore writes about the current impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump and reflects on the national mood.

Adam Schiff on Donald Trump, Impeachment, and What’s Next

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser interviews Representative Adam Schiff about the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

Found! A Lost TV Version of “Wuthering Heights”

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman writes about how Jane Klain, the research manager at the Paley Center for Media, tracked down a recording of a lost TV adaptation of “Wuthering Heights.”

Instagram’s Decision, Explained

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Dan Rosen and Jeff Ayars parody Instagram interns in this humorous video.

A New Report on Family Separations Shows the Depths of Trump’s Negligence

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Blitzer on an Inspector General’s report that reveals the Trump Administration’s willful negligence of immigrant lives in preparing for its zero-tolerance policy of family separations at the southern U.S. border.

The Neo-Cabaret Diva Meow Meow Brings Holiday Glamour to BAM

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

The chanteuse, born Melissa Madden Gray, delivers nostalgia for a bygone era—and sometimes crowd-surfs.

Could Iran’s Revolution Unravel Over a Four-Cent Price Hike?

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about the forty-year anniversary of Iran’s revolution this year and how recent protests over an increase in gas prices may put the country’s regime in jeopardy.

“Seberg” and “In Fabric,” Reviewed

Dec 6, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Benedict Andrews’s “Seberg,” starring Kristen Stewart, and Peter Strickland’s “In Fabric,” starring Marianne Jean-Baptiste. 

Ralph Lauren’s American Dreams

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes about the HBO documentary “Very Ralph,” which chronicles the rise of the fashion designer’s global brand and the role his family has had in popularizing his vision of Waspy, Western elegance.

Facts vs. Fiction in the Impeachment Proceedings Against Donald Trump

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what we now know with certainty about the Administration’s back-channel operations in Ukraine—and what is still left unanswered.

Zuzana Caputova, the President of Slovakia, Voices Her Country’s Hopes and Frustrations

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about Zuzana Caputova, the new President of Slovakia, and how she serves as a political ray of hope for a whole region of the world.

What the Law Professors Brought to the Trump Impeachment Hearings

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about the testimony of the law-school professors Noah Feldman, Pamela Karlan, Michael Gerhardt, and Jonathan Turley on Wednesday, the first day of the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

Can “The Crown” Make Us Crush on Prince Charles?

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe writes about recent developments involving Prince Charles, his public perception, and his depiction by Josh O’Connor in Season 3 of “The Crown,” on Netflix.

Horoscopes as Unintelligible Words

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Olivia de Recat illustrates a satirical list of horoscopes that take the form of unintelligible words.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, December 5th

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Tom Toro’s Daily Cartoon depicts a couple facing the mess after Thanksgiving and contemplating doing it all again for the holidays to come.

How to Know If Something’s Cool

Dec 5, 2019

Description:

Kathryn Kvas writes a humorous list of ways to tell if something is cool, with an emphasis on demons.

The Best Movies of 2019

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the state of cinema and streaming in 2019 and names his best films of the year, including Jordan Peele’s “Us,” Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman,” Marielle Heller’s “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” and others.

After Making Thirteen Thousand Calls for Kamala Harris, a Volunteer Reacts to the End of the Campaign

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach speaks to Brooke Black, who became one of the most dedicated volunteers in Kamala Harris’s Presidential campaign, about her chosen candidate’s decision to suspend her campaign.

Some Other Trees in the Garden of Eden

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Lily Feinn imagines, in illustrations by Marian Blair, a satirical list of little-known tree varieties in Eden, in addition to the Tree of Life and the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.

The Best TV Shows of 2019, Picked by Emily Nussbaum

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum writes about the best TV shows of the year 2019, including “Fleabag,” “Watchmen,” “Succession,” “Jane the Virgin,” and others.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, December 4th

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Paul Karasik’s Daily Cartoon depicts a man moving from raking leaves in the fall to shovelling snow in the winter.

Watch Live: The House Judiciary Committee’s Impeachment-Inquiry Hearing into Donald Trump

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Watch live testimony from the constitutional-law scholars Noah Feldman, Pamela Karlan, Michael Gerhardt, and Jonathan Turley during the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Ben Shapiro Would Like to Order a Pizza

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Will Stephen writes a satirical transcript of a call between the American conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro and a Pizza Hut from which he is trying to order a pizza.

The Best Jokes of 2019

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Ian Crouch writes about the best jokes of 2019, including sketches from “I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson” and “Alternatino with Arturo Castro,” along with elements of “Parasite,” “Watchmen,”“The Great Depresh,” David Berman’s “That’s Just the Way That I Feel,” and more.

Do We Have Minds of Our Own?

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Meghan O’Gieblyn reviews new books by the neuroscientists Michael Graziano and Christof Koch, the novelist Tim Parks, and the cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman, on the question of how to define consciousness.

The House Impeachment Report Highlights Trump’s Ongoing Abuse of Presidential Power

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the House Impeachment report, which highlights President Donald Trump’s actions in the Ukraine incident and his obstruction of Congress.

Trump Arrives at the NATO Summit—and Talks About Impeachment

Dec 4, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on President Donald Trump’s comments at the NATO summit, in London, where he seemed preoccupied with the domestic drama of his ongoing impeachment hearings.

Kamala Harris’s Early Exit from the Presidential Campaign

Dec 3, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about Kamala Harris’s announcement on Tuesday that she will be suspending her Presidential campaign.

The Squalid Politicization of London’s Latest Terrorist Attack

Dec 3, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes about last week’s knife attack near London Bridge, perpetrated by the convicted terrorist Usman Khan, and how Prime Minister Boris Johnson has politicized the event.

The Monkey’s Paw of Beauty Products

Dec 3, 2019

Description:

Erika Sjule illustrates a humorous tale of beauty products that bring unintended consequences.

The House Republicans’ Shameless Impeachment Report

Dec 3, 2019

Description:

In endorsing the White House’s blatant effort to delay and obstruct the impeachment process, the House Republicans are demonstrating that there are virtually no ends to which they won’t go to protect President Donald Trump, John Cassidy writes.

What Jacques Derrida Understood About Friendship

Dec 3, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu writes about the French philosopher Jacques Derrida’s book “The Politics of Friendship.”

Rana Ayyub on India’s Crackdown on Muslims

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

On a bonus episode of The New Yorker Radio Hour, Dexter Filkins talks with the jounalist Rana Ayyoub about Narendra Modi and India’s treatment of Muslims.

Watching “The Irishman” on Netflix Is the Best Way to See It

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman,” starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci, and makes a case for streaming the film at home on Netflix.

Trump Is Running Out of Time for a Meaningful Diplomatic Deal—Anywhere

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on Donald Trump’s failed attempts at diplomacy across the globe and his ever-weakening leverage, in advance of a NATO summit in London this week.

Republicans Defending Trump on Impeachment Should Fear the Judgment of History

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Michael Luo writes about the legacy of the Republican members of the House Judiciary Committee who voted against the impeachment of President Richard Nixon and the warning they pose to Republicans today, ahead of impeachment hearings for Donald Trump.

The Benefits of Being Between Jobs

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Nic Koller illustrates a humorous list of advantages that come with being unemployed.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, December 2nd

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Jon Adam’s Daily Cartoon depicts a person on a desert island furiously throwing Thanksgiving leftovers into the sea.

Ronny Chieng Defends Dangerous Comedy

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Sheila Marikar interviews the “Daily Show” correspondent about how to make horrific things funny.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

“Serotonin,” “Salt Slow,” “Home Now,” and “The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti.”

“Old Hope,” by Clare Sestanovich

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Clare Sestanovich: “When I was about halfway between twenty and thirty, I lived in a large, run-down house that other people thought was romantic.”

The Mail

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Isaac Chotiner’s piece about the U.K. and Europe, Alec MacGillis’s report on the Boeing 737 MAX, and Michael Chabon’s Personal History. 

Clare Sestanovich on Desire and the Dangers of Metaphor

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

The author Clare Sestanovich discusses “Old Hope,” her story from the December 9, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“American Sonnet for My Past and Future Assassin,” by Terrance Hayes

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Terrance Hayes: “A taste for meddling & mixed messaging, a taste for witches’ / Brews brewed by the motherfuckers who slew all the witches.”

The Best Books of 2019

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman picks the best books of 2019, including “Mostly Dead Things,” by Kristen Arnett, “How We Fight for Our Lives,” by Saeed Jones, “On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous,” by Ocean Vuong, and more.

David Hammons Follows His Own Rules

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

By eluding the art world, David Hammons has conquered it, Calvin Tomkins writes.

Tom Gauld’s “Rooftop Astronomy”

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Tom Gauld, a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, about his cover for the December 9, 2019, issue of the magazine.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons December 9, 2019

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Taking Virtual Reality for a Test Drive

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Patricia Marx on her experience test-driving virtual reality, which included walking with Jesus, shopping for a sofa, and flying like a bird over New York City. 

Ralph Ellison’s Slow-Burning Art

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Kevin Young on how sixty years of the writer Ralph Ellison’s letters chart his evolution from iconoclast to icon.

Focusmate, the Service That Makes Shame a Productivity Hack

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan writes about Focusmate, a new service designed to increase productivity, in which two users wishing to work at the same time are matched and paired via video conference.

The Intoxicating History of Gin

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

The current gin craze knows no bounds, but the British have been imbibing the stuff for hundreds of years, sometimes with disastrous results, Anthony Lane writes.

Blood and Soil in Narendra Modi’s India

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Dexter Filkins on how the Prime Minister’s Hindu-nationalist government has cast two hundred million Muslims as internal enemies.

“The Green Lake,” by Dorothea Lasky

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Dorothea Lasky: “Yesterday everything felt so hopeless / Now I have the energy to sit in the sun.”

Cryptocurrency 101 in the South Bronx

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Sheelah Kolhatkar on a public-school teacher in Morrisania, the poorest congressional district in the country, who went on a crusade to help “the unbanked.”

Burial’s Search for Fleeting Moments

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu on the London producer Burial, who seems to be conducting an exercise in listening on his new album, making a kind of dance music about dance music.

Who Brought the Jugglers to the Metropolitan Opera?

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Sean Gandini explains to Fergus McIntosh how a dozen acrobats keep fifty-nine balls in the air, in rhythm with Philip Glass’s music, in “Akhnaten.”

The Incendiary Aims of HBO’s “Watchmen”

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum reviews Damon Lindelof’s update to Alan Moore’s graphic novel, which reorders the fictional universe and writes buried racial trauma back into comic-book mythology.

How Hipcamp Became the Airbnb of the Outdoors

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Anna Wiener reports on the origin story of Hipcamp, which was founded by Alyssa Ravasio in 2016 to allow people to book campsites online in a style similar to that of Airbnb.

Deep State D.M.V.

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Cora Frazier: You will hear someone call out a number. It will be a high number, expressed in scientific notation, for security purposes. 

Book of the Month Club, London Edition

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Anna Russell on the subscription service offered by the Mayfair bookstore Heywood Hill, which relies on well-read employees, rather than on algorithms, to recommend titles. 

Cartoon Caption Contest

Dec 2, 2019

Description:

Submit your caption.

Anna Lim’s Vision of Nuclear Anxiety in South Korea

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

Brian Dillon writes about the South Korean photographer Anna Lim and her series “Rehearsal of Anxiety,” which will be shown this coming summer at the Rencontres d’Arles festival, in France.

New Pods to Get Hooked On Instead of Juul

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

Pia Mileaf-Patel illustrates a variety of alternative pods for a consumer to get hooked on instead of Juul.

Sunday Reading: Impeachment and Echoes of Watergate

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces on the Trump-Ukraine inquiry and the Nixon proceedings by Susan B. Glasser, Isaac Chotiner, Jill Lepore, Jonathan Schell, and others.

Jamie Lee Curtis Has Never Worked Hard a Day in Her Life

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme interviews the actress Jamie Lee Curtis on addiction, beauty standards, her famous parents, Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, and her relationship with her husband, Christopher Guest.

The Next Steps in the Impeachment Inquiry

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

The proceedings move to the House Judiciary Committee as Trump’s support within the Republican Party gets louder and weirder, Amy Davidson Sorkin writes.

Ann Beattie Reads Mavis Gallant

Dec 1, 2019

Description:

Ann Beattie joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Dédé,” by Mavis Gallant, from a 1987 issue of The New Yorker.

Clive James Got It Right

Nov 30, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopniks remembers the writer Clive James, who died this week, at the age of eighty.

Will I Get a Plus-One?

Nov 30, 2019

Description:

Sam Spero and Patrick Goodney write a humorous argument for one wedding guest’s receipt of a plus-one.

Billy Porter Talks with Rachel Syme, and Bon Iver Performs Live

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, live conversations from The New Yorker Festival, with Billy Porter and Rachel Syme, and Bon Iver and Amanda Petrusich.

America!: Paul Revere’s A.S.M.R. Channel

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Ali Fitzgerald illustrates a humorous comic depicting Paul Revere’s attempts at A.S.M.R.

Pardison Fontaine and the Plight of the Ghostwriter

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan writes about Pardison Fontaine, a rapper from New York balancing material released under his own name with the ghostwriting he does for artists such as Cardi B and Kanye West.

The Oral History of a 1999 Comedy Movie

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Keaton Patti writes a satirical oral history of a beloved comedy movie from 1999, with memories from the cast and crew.

The Vienna Boys’ Choir’s Holiday Tunes

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

The well-drilled ensemble, whose trebles hail from all over the world and entertain audiences on five continents, comes to Carnegie Hall for its annual holiday concert.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, November 29th

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Julia Suits’s Daily Cartoon depicts the White House as the perfect place for people to work on their memoirs in peace.

The Life Lessons of “Little Lulu”

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Margaret Atwood writes about the influence that the “Little Lulu” comics had on her as a young writer and storyteller.

“The Aeronauts” and “Portrait of a Lady on Fire,” Reviewed

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Tom Harper’s “The Aeronauts,” starring Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones, and Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire.” 

Angel Indian’s Impressive Array of Vegetarian Standards and Showstoppers

Nov 29, 2019

Description:

Hannah Goldfield reviews the meat-free, mostly Punjabi restaurant in Jackson Heights, whose menu highlights house-made paneer in dishes that inspire passionate allegiance.

Living with Art

Nov 28, 2019

Description:

Jenny Kroik illustrates a series about the ways in which people celebrate art in their lives.

Alison Roman’s “Nothing Fancy” and the Art of the Unpretentious Dinner Party

Nov 28, 2019

Description:

Michele Moses on Alison Roman’s recent cookbook, “Nothing Fancy,” and its advocacy of making both food and entertaining accessible and stress-free.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, November 28th

Nov 28, 2019

Description:

Pat Achilles’s Daily Cartoon depicts turkeys confronting the idea of a quid pro quo on Thanksgiving.

The Quiet Protests of Sassy Mom Merch

Nov 27, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino interviews so-called mommy bloggers about the cheerfully harried, Amazon Prime-referencing memes that decorate T-shirts, mugs, and other merchandise.

Can Jeremy Corbyn Lose the British Election and Still Win?

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes about how Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party could be well placed to lead an anti-Brexit coalition if Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party fails to take control of Parliament in the December 12th election.

Updates to the Trump Portrait Gallery

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon depicts President Donald Trump, Attorney General William Barr, and the White House adviser Stephen Miller in the respective Renaissance portrait styles of Leonardo da Vinci, El Greco, and Anthony van Dyck.

The Twenty-Seven Best Movies of the Decade

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reflects on the past decade in film, and names his twenty-seven best movies, including Martin Scorsese’s “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Josephine Decker’s “Madeline’s Madeline,” Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” and others.

Historical Figures Go Home for the Holidays

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Eugenia Viti and Irving Ruan illustrate a series of humorous comics featuring historical figures such as Albert Einstein, Amelia Earhart, and Julius Caesar going home for the holidays.

Friendsgiving Will Set You Free

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Bryan Washington writes about Friendsgiving, a friend-based alternative to Thanksgiving typically featuring nontraditional food, and shares a recipe for bánh mì sandwiches.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, November 26th

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Lila Ash’s Daily Cartoon depicts a customer and cashier being unable to muster a moment of Thanksgiving warmth.

Darryl Pinckney’s Intimate Study of Black History

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Zadie Smith on the writer and activist Darryl Pinckney, drawn from the introduction of Pinckney’s recent book, “Busted in New York and Other Essays.”

Ugh, What Next?!

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Felipe Torres writes a humorous narrative about what will come next after a series of cultural and environmental changes.

Inside Popcorn’s Multisensory Appeal

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Whitney Holmes writes about the history and technology of popcorn, one of the most versatile snacks.

“Good Eats,” the One Cooking Show to Rule Them All

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Maya Phillips writes about “Good Eats: The Return,” the resurrection, this year, of “Good Eats,” the cooking show hosted by Alton Brown.

Roddy Doyle Reads “The Curfew”

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Roddy Doyle, who reads his short story “The Curfew,” from the December 2, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Reintroducing The New Yorker’s Cryptic Crossword

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Our delightfully devious cryptic is back. Here’s how to solve it.

The Inside Story of Christopher Steele’s Trump Dossier

Nov 26, 2019

Description:

Jane Mayer on the new book “Crime in Progress: Inside the Steele Dossier and the Fusion GPS Investigation of Donald Trump,” which investigates Trump’s 2016 Presidential campaign.

Whose Soul Is Joe Biden Fighting For?

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach reports from Joe Biden’s Presidential campaign stops in Iowa, including Des Moines, Coyote Run Farm, and Knoxville.

A Quid-Pro-Quo Mystery

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Mary Norris on the Latin origins and meaning of “quid pro quo” and its associations with criminality in the impeachment hearings involving Donald Trump.

Samantha’s Journey Into the Alt-Right, and Back

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Andrew Marantz speaks with a woman who went from canvassing for Obama to joining the white-nationalist group Identity Evropa. She explains how she got in, and out, of the alt-right movement.

Fras/Off: Crane vs. Crane

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Leslie Stein illustrates a humorous revision of the film “Face/Off,” starring two characters from the show “Frasier.”

Daily Cartoon: Monday, November 25th

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon depicts a business meeting in which a worker discusses productivity during a shortened Thanksgiving workweek.

Giuliani Claims He Has Evidence Linking Biden to Obama

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz presents a satirical conspiracy theory about Joe Biden and Barack Obama put forward by Rudy Giuliani that echoes allegations about links between supporters of Donald Trump and foreign actors, and between Biden and Burisma.

“I’ve Never Seen Evidence So Clear”: Inside the House Effort to Draft Articles of Impeachment

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Robert P. Baird on the state of the congressional impeachment proceedings against President Trump, following two weeks of hearings in front of the House Intelligence Committee.

My Favorite Gahan Wilson Story

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Roz Chast illustrates an anecdote that the New Yorker cartoonist Gahan Wilson, who died last week, at age eighty-nine, shared with her about a childhood trip to a meat-processing plant.

The Perfect Thanksgiving Cocktail Is the Boulevardier

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner on the Boulevardier, a classic cocktail dating back to the nineteen-twenties, made with whiskey, Campari, and vermouth.

Speed Walking with the Sculptor Charles Ray

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

On a visit to the Met, the artist visits a favorite Greek marble relief and muses on space, breath, and heart surgery, Naomi Fry writes.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons December 2, 2019

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

“Baron Wenckheim’s Homecoming,” “What Is Missing,” “Maoism,” and “A Month in Siena.”

Big Tech’s Big Defector

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Roger McNamee made a fortune as one of Silicon Valley’s earliest champions. Now he’s one of its most fervent critics, Brian Barth writes.

Hurricane Season, by David Sedaris

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Personal History by David Sedaris: On storms, repairs, and family.

Kadir Nelson’s “Art Connoisseurs”

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Kadir Nelson, a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, about his cover for the December 2, 2019, issue of the magazine.

Beck Is Home

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich on Beck, who, twenty-six years into his career, spends time visiting the Los Angeles of his youth and saying goodbye to the past.

It’s Still Margaret Thatcher’s Britain

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

James Wood on Margaret Thatcher’s gospel of success and self-reliance, which earned her many admirers and enemies. 

“The Inheritance” Is a Tribute to E. M. Forster and an Audacious Work of Its Own

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz reviews “The Inheritance,” for which the playwright Matthew Lopez used “Howards End” as a template to tell a tale about gay men in New York.

The Perfect Engagement Photo Session

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Susanna Wolff: Try to turn that look of terror into one of whimsy. Or maybe affectation? It’ll all look the same on Instagram.

Joan Didion’s Early Novels of American Womanhood

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Hilton Als on Joan Didion’s early fiction, in which the standard narratives of women’s lives are mangled, altered, and rewritten all the time.

The Art of War in “Theater of Operations”

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl on whether an exhibition about the Gulf wars can provide new ways of seeing such dismal subject matter.

Prepping for Parole

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Gonnerman on a group of volunteers who are helping incarcerated people negotiate a system that is all but broken. 

Roddy Doyle on Ex-Hurricane Ophelia and the Wild Atlantic Way

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

The author Roddy Doyle discusses “The Curfew,” his story from the December 2, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Lagerfeld Economy

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

He may have been a monster boss, but the late Chanel designer was a one-man stimulus package for a handful of Paris shops, Lauren Collins writes.

An Actresses’ Table for Four, Honoring Mike Nichols

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

To mark the publication of “Life Isn’t Everything,” an oral history about Nichols, Cynthia Nixon, Christine Baranski, Glenn Close, and Whoopi Goldberg re-created their final birthday lunch with the beloved director, Michael Schulman writes.

The Pristine Empire of ECM Records

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on the revered jazz and classical label’s launch of a major Beethoven cycle with the Danish String Quartet.

“Sixty,” by Fabián Severo

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Fabián Severo: “We are from the border / like the sun that is born there.”

The Mail

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Nick Paumgarten’s Personal History on concussions and Adam Hochschild’s piece about the Palmer Raids.

Introducing New Yorker Cartoons in Augmented Reality

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Experience the interior lives of inanimate objects—as interpreted by cartoonist Liana Finck—via The New Yorker Today app.

“The Curfew,” by Roddy Doyle

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Roddy Doyle: “He listened, for whistling wind, falling branches, roof slates decapitating pensioners.”

Now and Forever with a Giant Baseball for a Head

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Mrs. Met hosts a wedding expo for die-hard fans and their betrotheds, Betsy Morais writes.

“To Burn Through Where You Are Not Yet,” by Sophie Cabot Black

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Sophie Cabot Black: “Those who take on risk are not those / Who bear it.”

Cartoon Caption Contest

Nov 25, 2019

Description:

Submit your caption.

The Immigrant Witnesses of the Impeachment Hearings

Nov 24, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on what it means that four key witnesses in the House’s impeachment hearings against Donald Trump—Marie Yovanovitch, Alexander Vindman, Gordon Sondland, and Fiona Hill—are immigrants.

Getting Ready for a Funeral

Nov 24, 2019

Description:

Grace Helmer illustrates a humorous comic about the obstacles a family must overcome to get ready for a funeral.

Trump Impeachment Inquiry: Watch the Live Stream of Testimony by Fiona Hill and David Holmes

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Fiona Hill, the N.S.C. senior director in charge of Ukraine policy, and David Holmes, a career Foreign Service officer, testify in Day 5 of the impeachment-inquiry hearings.

My Two-Year-Old Requests Just One More Song Before Bed

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Jesse Eisenberg imagines a humorous exchange between a dad and his toddler before bedtime.

David Attenborough on the Variety and Resiliency of Nature

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Carolyn Kormann writes about Sir David Attenborough, the ninety-three-year-old British naturalist and the host of “Life on Earth,” “Blue Planet,” and other nature-focussed programming.

The Art of the Impeachment Podcast

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson reviews a spate of new podcasts devoted to the Donald Trump impeachment inquiry, including the New York Times’ “The Latest,” BuzzFeed News’s “Impeachment Today,” and NBC News’s “Article II.”

Joe Biden Stumbles Again on Race at the Fifth Democratic Debate

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach on the discussion of race at the fifth Democratic primary debate, including interesting exchanges among Kamala Harris, Pete Buttigieg, Joe Biden, and Cory Booker.

House Impeachment Inquiry: What Will the Republicans Do for Trump After Gordon Sondland’s Testimony?

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about how the revealing testimony of Gordon Sondland in the House impeachment hearings against Donald Trump will affect the Republicans’ defense strategy.

The Search for Pizzazz at the Impeachment Reality Show

Nov 21, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum on the spectacle of the televised House impeachment hearings and how narrative and storytelling could impact them.

The 2020 Democratic Debates Come to Atlanta, Signalling Georgia’s New Political Importance

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb writes on the upcoming Democratic Presidential debate at Tyler Perry Studios, in Atlanta, Georgia, and on the recent responses to Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Julián Castro, and other 2020 hopefuls in the state.

Ambassador Sondland’s Revenge in the Trump Impeachment Inquiry

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes about Gordon Sondland, the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, and his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, in which he affirmed a “quid pro quo” for aid to Ukraine and implicated Vice-President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, and the former national-security adviser John Bolton in the scheme.

Modern Moral Compasses

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Annelise Capossela and Julia Edelman illustrate humorous modern scenarios in which it would be helpful to have a moral compass.

Bolivia’s Evo Morales Wants to Stay in the Game

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

John Lee Anderson writes about Evo Morales, who recently resigned as President of Bolivia during what some call a coup and others call a democratic uprising.

How “Gogglebox” Became a Chronicle of Brexit Fatigue

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Anna Russell on the British reality show “Gogglebox,” in which the cast watches British TV programming live, including ongoing Brexit coverage.

“We Followed the President’s Orders”: Gordon Sondland’s Testimony Likely Assures Trump’s Impeachment

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

David Rohde writes about the explosive opening statement made by Gordon Sondland, the Ambassador to the European Union, in the Trump impeachment inquiry.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, November 20th

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Lila Ash’s Daily Cartoon depicts a woman speaking honestly to her baby about how he compares to Baby Yoda.

Trump Accuses Vindman of Becoming a War Hero Just to Make Him Look Bad

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump has accused Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman of becoming a military hero in order to make the President look bad.

Washington’s Other Drama: The Unbearable Departure of Its Last Panda Cub

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on Bei Bei, a four-year-old panda who was born at Washington’s National Zoo and who has been sent to China to help diversify the panda gene pool.

Trump Impeachment Inquiry: Watch the Live Stream of Testimony by Gordon Sondland, Laura Cooper, and David Hale

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Watch live testimony from the House impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump from Gordon Sondland, the Ambassador to the E.U.; Laura Cooper, of the Department of Defense; and David Hale, of the State Department.

Troubleshooting Your Bra

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Hannah Wolansky writes a humorous list of advice for achieving a proper fit with a brassiere.

The Plight of the Urban Planner

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Nikil Saval on the evolution of urban planning and how an affordable-housing crisis could lead to a resurgence in the role of city planner, as reported in “Capital City,” a book by the geographer Samuel Stein.

How Democratic Candidates Win the African-American Vote

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Frederick Harris, a professor of political science at Columbia University who has written extensively about African-American politics, about the role of black voters in the Democratic Party.

The Spectacular Failure of the Trump Wranglers

Nov 20, 2019

Description:

Susan Glasser on the testimony of Alexander Vindman and Kurt Volker in the House impeachment hearings, and how no one can manage, contain, steer, or constrain Donald Trump.

Trump Impeachment Hearings: Alexander Vindman Testifies to the Power of Truth

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy on the Republican attacks against Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman and the decorated military officer’s testimony in the House impeachment hearings against Donald Trump.

Small Wins at the Grocery Store

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Jeremy Nguyen illustrates a humorous comic about small wins at the grocery store.

The Violent Insights of Bohumil Hrabal

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Becca Rothfeld reviews two new translations of work by the Czech author Bohumil Hrabal: “All My Cats,” translated by Paul Wilson, and “Why I Write,” translated by David Short.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, November 19th

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Sara Lautman’s Daily Cartoon shows a dog named Boomer enjoying the best week of his life during a viral Internet craze.

What Does “A Warning,” by Anonymous, Really Tell Us?

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin reviews the new book “A Warning,” by Anonymous, which serves as a compendium of alarming information about President Donald Trump’s Administration and actions in the Oval Office.

Trump Impeachment Inquiry: Watch a Live Stream of Testimony by Alexander Vindman, Kurt Volker, and More

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Watch live testimony from the House impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump from Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, Jennifer Williams, Kurt Volker, and Tim Morrison.

Spice Up Your D. & D. Game

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Mike Drucker devises a satirical list of new character types to freshen up the old tropes that play into the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons.

The Pope and Catholic Radicals Come Together Against Nuclear Weapons

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Paul Elie on civil disobedience and sentencing of the Catholic radicals known as the Kings Bay Plowshares Seven, and on Pope Francis’s anticipated denunciation of nuclear weapons.

Dirt-Road America

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

M. R. O’Connor writes about Sam Correro, the creator of the TransAmerica Trail, and the pleasures of navigating what the writer William Least Heat-Moon called “blue highways,” the dirt roads of America.

The Airbrushed Racing History of “Ford v Ferrari”

Nov 19, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews James Mangold’s “Ford v Ferrari,” starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon, which, though rooted in history, is empty and hollow.

Prince Andrew’s Noxious Interview About Jeffrey Epstein

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes about Prince Andrew’s interview on the BBC’s “Newsnight,” with Emily Maitlis, about his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein.

Teodor Currentzis Brings His Intense Verdi to New York

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross writes about the work of the conductor Teodor Currentzis and his orchestra, musicAeterna, which will make its North American début performing Verdi’s Requiem for three nights at the Shed.

Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb speaks with the screenwriter Lena Waith, whose new film, “Queen & Slim,” is about a first date that goes terribly wrong when a police officer is accidentally shot.

The Public Stage of the House Impeachment Inquiry

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Robert P. Baird writes on the House impeachment inquiry into the conduct of Donald Trump, and on the significance of recent and upcoming testimonies by Marie Yovanovitch, Gordon Sondland, William B. Taylor, Jr., George Kent, and others.

Dating Material: Stalking Your Ex Throughout History

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Olivia de Recat and Julia Edelman illustrate a humorous comic about how people stalked their exes throughout history,

Daily Cartoon: Monday, November 18th

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Robert Leighton’s Daily Cartoon depicts a dog rethinking its view of government employees.

The Ordinary Brilliance of Big Thief

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino on Big Thief, a Brooklyn-formed folk-and-indie-rock band that, after releasing four albums in the past three years, is gaining a greater following.

Trump Warns Republicans That If They Vote to Impeach He Will Campaign for Them Like He Did in Louisiana

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump threatened to campaign enthusiastically for the reëlection of Republicans who vote to impeach him.

The Laws of Forgiveness

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the lawyer and academic Martha Minow, the author of “When Should Law Forgive?,” about what child soldiers teach us about forgiveness, the lessons of the #MeToo movement, and just how forgiving Americans should be about the misdeeds of the Trump era.

Wayne Thiebaud’s “Stuffed”

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the nonagenarian artist Wayne Thiebaud, about his cover for the November 25, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Bryan Washington Makes Soondubu Jiggae

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

A video of Bryan Washington making the Korean dish soondubu jjigae, a soft-tofu stew with dried anchovies and gochugaru.

“A Baker Swept By,” by Edward Hirsch

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Edward Hirsch: “You weren’t sure why / morning halted / up and down the street.”

Mixed Débuts on Apple TV+ in “The Morning Show” and “Dickinson”

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell’s depiction of a #MeToo crisis is a pricey, glum misfire, while Emily Dickinson’s makeover is a sweet and original surprise, Emily Nussbaum writes.

How Natural Wine Became a Symbol of Virtuous Consumption

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

The mainstreaming of natural wines has brought niche winemakers capital and celebrity, as well as questions about their personalities and politics, Rachel Monroe writes.

The Legacy of a Radical Black Newspaperman

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Casey Cep on William Monroe Trotter, who rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages.

My Life as a Child Chef

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Personal History by Adam Shatz: For a bullied kid with weight issues, haute cuisine provided an escape.

The Invention of Thanksgiving

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

Philip Deloria on massacres, myths, and the making of the great November holiday.

Kano’s Second Act

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

In a piece by Rebecca Mead, the London-based grime rapper, who also stars in the Netflix drama “Top Boy,” reflects on British slang, his sixth album, and how to get into the mind of a criminal.

SAT Prep for the Über-Rich

Nov 18, 2019

Description:

At the two-Tesla homes of the Los Angeles suburbs, Mighty Prep offers tutoring, pep talks, and something called “brain balm,” Charles Bethea writes.

Trump Impeachment Hearings: The President’s Attempt to Intimidate Marie Yovanovitch Backfires

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

David Rohde writes about the opening statement by the former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, during her testimony in the Trump impeachment inquiry.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, November 15th

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Kim Warps’s Daily Cartoon shows a gym session powered by bad political takes.

How a Trump Administration Proposal Could Worsen Public Health

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Douglas Dockery, a professor of environmental epidemiology at Harvard’s T. H. Chan School of Public Health, about a Trump Administration proposal that would limit the research that the E.P.A. can use when regulating public health.

Watch Live: Marie Yovanovitch Testifies in the Trump Impeachment Hearings

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Rachel Riederer on the second day of testimony in the Trump impeachment hearings, which features the former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch.

Hello, I’d Like to Network at You

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Johnathan Appel and Lillian Stone imagine a humorously awkward and overbearing networking interaction.

The Sober Clarity of the Impeachment Witnesses

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

In the Trump impeachment hearings, William Taylor and George Kent were direct about their sense of dismay, and essential questions emerged from the stories they told, David Remnick writes.

The Enjoyable Discomfort of Noah Baumbach’s “Greenberg”

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes about Noah Baumbach’s film “Greenberg,” starring Ben Stiller and Greta Gerwig, a savage portrait of one man’s noxious narcissism.

Paulie Gee’s, F&F Pizzeria, and New York City’s Slice Renaissance

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Hannah Goldfield reviews the new pizza joints that are cropping up around the city, combining nostalgic atmospheres with modern additions such as vegan options and fermented-dough wizardry.

The Art of Crafts at the Whitney

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

The new exhibition “Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950-2019” includes works by Robert Rauschenberg, Simone Leigh, and other artists who have experimented with materials not usually associated with fine art.

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” and “The Report,” Reviewed

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Marielle Heller’s “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” starring Tom Hanks as Mr. Rogers, and Scott Z. Burns’s “The Report,” starring Annette Bening and Adam Driver.

Seasonal Celebrations with the Rockettes, Ebenezer Scrooge, and More

Nov 15, 2019

Description:

Amid a season of Handel’s “Messiah” and a jazzy version of “The Nutcracker,” perhaps the most authentically New York City holiday tradition is a boom-box carolling event. 

Tricky Dick and Dirty Don: How a Compelling Narrative Can Change the Fate of a Presidency

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Thomas Mallon joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how public testimony helped bring down the Nixon Presidency and the challenges facing the Democrats in the House.

WeWork’s Downfall and a Reckoning for SoftBank

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Sheelah Kolhatkar writes about the downfall of WeWork and about the struggles of SoftBank under the leadership of the founder Masayoshi Son.

Dear Pepper: Single for the Holidays and a Media Misfit

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Liana Finck illustrates a comic advice column from the perspective of her dog, Pepper, on how to find companionship for the holidays.

What’s Missing from the Brilliant “Marriage Story”

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story,” starring Adam Driver, Scarlett Johansson, and Laura Dern, and reflects on how the film falls short of greatness.

After Six Decades, Turkey Is Now a U.S. Ally in Name Only

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about the meeting at the White House between President Donald Trump and the Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, November 14th

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Emily Flake’s Daily Cartoon shows the skeletons in Elizabeth Warren’s closet.

The Two Irreconcilable Realities of the Trump Impeachment Hearings

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the two competing political realties that surround the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.

New Plant-Based Alternatives

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Sam Corbin imagines a humorous list of options to help environment-conscious individuals incorporate veganism into their life style beyond their diet.

Can Film Save Indigenous Languages?

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Julian Brave NoiseCat on the Haida film “SG̲aawaay Ḵ’uuna” (“Edge of the Knife”) and the possibilities that film presents for indigenous language preservation.

A Young Girl’s Immigration Journey in “A Line Birds Cannot See”

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about the story of a young girl’s immigration journey, as told in “A Line Birds Cannot See,” an animated short directed by Amy Bench.

Janelle Monáe on Privilege and Survival

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Briana Younger writes about Janelle Monáe, who discusses her identity and the responsibility that comes with celebrity in a new short film.

What Jim Jordan Claims Trump Really Wanted from Ukraine’s President

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about Representative Jim Jordan, an Ohio Republican who recently joined the House Intelligence Committee and who questioned William Taylor and George Kent at the public hearing in the Trump impeachment inquiry on Wednesday.

Crazy for Trump: On the G.O.P. Plan to Keep Impeachment Partisan

Nov 14, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes about the first day of televised impeachment hearings against Donald Trump, featuring testimony by the career diplomats George Kent and William Taylor.

A Candid Look at the Drivers of Los Angeles

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Peter C. Baker on the photographer Jonathan Castillo and his images of cars in L.A., which evoke Philip-Lorca diCorcia’s famous photographs of pedestrians in Times Square.

Sleeping Positions You Can No Longer Maintain in Your Old Age

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton illustrates a humorous list of sleeping positions no longer maintainable in old age, including spooning, seated in front of the television, and in the orgy tent at Burning Man.

Trump Impeachment Hearings: William Taylor’s Unspinnable Testimony

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about William Taylor’s testimony against Donald Trump in the impeachment-inquiry hearings and how Taylor aimed to present a truthful, nonpartisan account of the facts.

Trump Impeachment Hearings: Adam Schiff Emphasizes the Constitutional Stakes

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

David Rohde on Adam Schiff’s statements at Donald Trump’s impeachment hearing about the constitutional stakes and the need for Congress to hold the President accountable for his actions.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, November 13th

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Ellis Rosen’s Daily Cartoon shows the return of a dreaded villain: the winter coat.

An Overlooked Novel from 1935 by the Godmother of Feminist Detective Fiction

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Nora Caplan Bricker writes about Dorothy L. Sayers’s “Gaudy Night,” which was a forerunner of works by Gillian Flynn and Tana French.

Trump Impeachment Inquiry: Watch the Live Stream of the House Intelligence Committee’s Open Hearings

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach introduces a video of the House Intelligence Committee’s first public hearing of the impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump, in which William Taylor and George Kent will answer questions about the Trump Administration’s dealings with Ukraine.

The House Republicans’ Impeachment Defense of Trump Is Full of Holes

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about a memo sent to Republicans in Congress which outlines how they should defend President Trump during the impeachment inquiry.

Course Syllabus for Making New Friends as an Adult

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

A humorous piece by Irving Ruan and Alex Watt imagining a class syllabus for students studying how to make new friends as an adult.

What Do Lula’s Release and Morales’s Ouster Signal for Latin America?

Nov 13, 2019

Description:

Jon Lee Anderson writes about the ouster of Bolivia’s long-serving President Evo Morales, the release from prison of Brazil’s former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, and the possibility of a leftist resurgence at a time of deepening political polarization across Latin America.

The Firing of Don Cherry, Hockey’s Self-Appointed Gatekeeper

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Ben McGrath writes about the firing of Don Cherry, the “Hockey Night in Canada” broadcaster and a gatekeeper of the sport, and how he was a pioneer of identity politics in sports.

How High Can High-Waisted Pants Go?

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme writes about the renewed popularity of high-waisted pants and discusses garments offered by the brands Levi’s, the Gap, Rolla’s, American Eagle Outfitters, Madewell, Eloquii, Everlast, Jesse Kamm, Rachel Comey, Loup, Target, and Elizabeth Suzann.

I Love Everything About You

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Nathan Gelgud illustrates two lovers who demonstrate that their affection for each other knows no bounds.

Kamala Harris’s Last Stand in Iowa

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the Presidential campaign of Kamala Harris, and its decision to pin all its remaining hopes on the Iowa caucuses.

“Mobituaries,” Mo Rocca’s Curious, Offbeat Collection of Lives Forgotten

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman writes about “Mobituaries,” by Mo Rocca, a new book that memorializes overlooked lives.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, November 12th

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Elisabeth McNair’s Daily Cartoon shows how an office prepares for the coming season of colds.

Emily Dickinson, Freelancer

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Emma Brewer humorously imagines how famous Emily Dickinson poems would be written if the poet were a freelancer today.

Amos Oz and the Politics of the Hebrew Language

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Gal Koplewitz writes about the writer Amos Oz’s love of the Hebrew language and his reflections on how language can evolve but also be abused.

Border-Town Life Defies the Wall in “Borderlands”

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

“Borderlands,” a short documentary, shows how commuters, city planners, and kids deal with the wall that divides their cities.

Reframing Modernism at the New MOMA

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Andrea Scott writes about how a gallery in the renovated Museum of Modern Art in New York City challenges the hierarchies of Modernism.

Weike Wang Reads “The Trip”

Nov 12, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Weike Wang, who reads her short story “The Trip,” from the November 18, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Nikki Haley Embodies What’s Wrong with the Republican Party

Nov 11, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy on the former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and other Republicans who have adopted a see-no-evil posture regarding the impeachment of Donald Trump.

The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

Nov 11, 2019

Description:

A lawyer who has been living under the policy’s protection from deportation will argue in its favor at the Supreme Court.

Fall Hair Styles for Introverts

Nov 11, 2019

Description:

Cerise Zelenetz and Thatcher Jensen illustrate a humorous list of autumnal hair styles for people who prefer to keep human interactions to a minimum.

Waking Up from the California Dream in the Age of Wildfires

Nov 11, 2019

Description:

Dana Goodyear on the California Dream in the midst of recent wildfires, and on the destruction of an “architecturally-controlled community” called Crestwood Hills.

A Bloomberg Presidential Campaign Would Likely Be a Costly Folly

Nov 9, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes that the former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is unlikely to succeed if he decides to enter the race for the 2020 Democratic Presidential nomination.

Postmodernist Pirate Jokes

Nov 9, 2019

Description:

Alex Baia writes a humorous collection of postmodernist pirate jokes.

What to Stream This Weekend: “Burning Cane”

Nov 9, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody on Phillip Youmans’s “Burning Cane,” starring Karen Kaia Livers.

DACA Goes to the Supreme Court

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, Dana Goodyear on the California wildfires, Jonathan Blitzer on DACA, Eliza Griswold in conversation with a progressive evangelical, and Natalie Meade interviewing Charlamagne Tha God.

The Homophobic Activist Who Won an Audience with Two Supreme Court Justices

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on Brian Brown, the head of the National Organization for Marriage, and his meeting with the Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Brett Kavanaugh that came three weeks after the Supreme Court hear arguments in the cases R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc., v. E.E.O.C.; Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia; and Altitude Express, Inc., v. Zarda, which take up L.G.B.T. rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.

The Passion of Newt Gingrich

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the former House Speaker Newt Gingrich about Donald Trump’s views on China, whether there was a quid pro quo in the President’s dealings with Ukraine, and conservative support for Trump.

Fall Blowout

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon shows a hair stylist cleverly using a leaf blower to style a salon patron’s long hair.

This Season’s Must-Have Face Masks

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Grace Miceli illustrates a satirical comic about new kinds of face masks, including a wrinkle enhancer and a frown remover.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, November 8th

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Jon Adams’s Daily Cartoon shows President Donald Trump paying a big fine.

Trump Is Poison for Suburban Republicans—So Why Won’t They Turn on Him?

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about President Donald Trump’s negative ratings among suburban Republican voters and the burden he places on the campaigns of Republican candidates in suburban districts.

Daniel Sloss’s “X,” a Laddish Comic’s Reckoning with #MeToo

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes about the comedian Daniel Sloss, whose latest special, “X,” premièred on Saturday, on HBO.

Bloomberg Offers Trump Ten Billion Dollars to Leave White House by End of Day

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that, a day after Michael Bloomberg indicated he would enter the 2020 Presidential race, the former New York City mayor offered to pay Donald Trump ten billion dollars to leave the White House.

New Careers for Carmelo Anthony If He Never Plays in the N.B.A. Again

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Talib Babb imagines a satirical list of new careers for the ten-time N.B.A. All-Star Carmelo Anthony.

Man and Things

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

In a speech drawn from the book “Think, Write, Speak,” Vladimir Nabokov discusses the relationship between humans and things.

“Ford v Ferrari” and “Doctor Sleep,” Reviewed

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews James Mangold’s “Ford v Ferrari,” starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon, and Mike Flanagan’s “Doctor Sleep,” starring Ewan McGregor.

The High-Drama Flamenco of Soledad Barrio

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

At the Joyce, the dancer and her company, Noche Flamenca, perform with deep focus and raw energy—and without dry ice or multiple costume changes.

Nami Nori’s Hand Rolls Are Worth the Wait

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

At a new West Village restaurant from former Masa chefs, patience is rewarded with toro, calamari, and exceptionally efficient service, Hannah Goldfield writes. 

Is Trump Already Winning on Impeachment?

Nov 8, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser on how the developments and revelations of the impeachment inquiry, involving President Donald Trump’s quid pro quo with Ukraine, are interpreted along partisan lines by Democrats and Republicans.

Why Is Trump Obsessed with Outing the Whistle-Blower?

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik on Donald Trump’s obsession with outing the whistle-blower who brought the President’s phone call with Ukraine to attention.

How Facebook Continues to Spread Fake News

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Evan Osnos joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the ways in which Facebook and Twitter have failed to reckon with the dangers of social media as political tools.

Watch Until the End!

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

David Ostow illustrates a comical video about how a woman’s kindness toward stray animals prompted a tremendous act of philanthropy—with a twist at the end.

What House Republicans Can Learn from the Bipartisan Effort to Impeach Nixon

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Michael Luo writes about the bipartisan coalition in the House Judiciary Committee that eventually forced Richard Nixon from office and about Donald Trump’s strong support among House Republicans today.

The Myth and Magic of Generating New Ideas

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Dan Rockmore on mathematical epiphanies and the mind-enhancing strategies that help them to occur.

Emmet Gowin’s Intimate Photography of Nuclear Destruction

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Max Norman writes about Emmet Gowin’s new book, “The Nevada Test Site,” which reflects on beauty in the aftermath of nuclear destruction.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, November 7th

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Ward Sutton’s Daily Cartoon shows President Donald Trump’s impeachment bingo card.

I Have No Idea What I’m Doing

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Jonny Auping writes a humorous list of things that he doesn’t understand or know how to do.

How Dreams Change Under Authoritarianism: Charlotte Beradt’s “The Third Reich of Dreams”

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Mireille Juchau on Charlotte Beradt’s “The Third Reich of Dreams,” which uncovers the effects of authoritarian regimes on the collective unconscious.

Leonard Cohen and the Divine Voice

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

David Remnick on a video that depicts Leonard Cohen’s reflections on creativity and spirituality at the end of his life.

Martin Scorsese’s Radical Attack on Marvel Movies

Nov 7, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes on the director Martin Scorsese’s criticisms of movies from the Marvel Cinematic Universe and of systems of film production that submerge the authority of directors.

The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe on a half-dozen WeWork employees reflecting on their time at the company, whose C.E.O., Adam Neumann, was recently pushed out, following its failed I.P.O.

People You See on the Subway

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Juliet Goodman illustrates humorous comics depicting the people you see on the subway, including girls with houseplants, screaming children, dudes with fanny packs, and others.

The New Yorker Documentary

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Innovative short films, produced by emerging and renowned filmmakers, that premi`ère across The New Yorker’s digital platforms.

High Turnout of Smart Voters in Kentucky Terrifies Rand Paul

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that the defeat of Matt Bevin, the Republican governor of Kentucky, has made Senator Rand Paul fearful about his own prospects for reëlection in that state.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, November 6th

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Ali Solomon’s Daily Cartoon shows Cinderella’s fairy godmother choosing the wrong form of midnight transportation.

The Slowness of Literature and the Shadow of Knowledge

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

The author Karl Ove Knausgaard writes on the slowness of literature, adapted from a speech delivered at the Frankfurt Book Fair in October.

Office Housework: A History

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Ali Ruth writes humorous letters in which self-satisfied men patronizingly request office-housekeeping help from great women in history whom they’ve wronged, like Joan of Arc, Sacagawea, and Rosalind Franklin.

The Promise of Mr. Trash Wheel

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Carolyn Kormann writes about Mr. Trash Wheel and the Interceptor, two waterway-trash-collection machines, and the promise that such technology could have in combatting pollution globally.

How “The Memory Police” Makes You See

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino reviews “The Memory Police,” a novel by Yoko Ogawa, from 1994, which was published in an English translation by Stephen Snyder earlier this year.

What W. E. B. Du Bois Conveyed in His Captivating Infographics

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu writes about the striking statistical graphics that W. E. B. Du Bois and his curators commissioned for the World’s Fair, reprinted in the book “Black Lives 1900: W.E.B. Du Bois at the Paris Exposition.”

“Love and Capital,” an Ode to the Relationship That Saved Karl Marx

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

Sheelah Kolhatkar reviews Mary Gabriel’s book “Love and Capital,” about Karl Marx’s relationship with his wife, Jenny, and how she helped Marx to write his famous works.

Trump’s Own Donor Diplomat Blows Up His Impeachment Defense

Nov 6, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about how the revised testimony of Gordon Sondland, the Seattle hotelier and Donald Trump donor who serves as the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, sheds new light on Ukrainegate and challenges the President’s impeachment defense.

The Japanese Fried-Rice Omelette That Rewired My Brain

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Bryan Washington presents a recipe for omurice, a cross between an omelette and Japanese fried rice.

Guy Fawkes and the New Pronoun in Town

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Mary Norris writes about the history of the word “guys” and its burgeoning use as a pronoun, as traced by Allan Metcalf in “The Life of Guy: Guy Fawkes, the Gunpowder Plot, and the Unlikely History of an Indispensable Word.”

The Terrorization of Katie Hill

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes on the fear expressed by Katie Hill, the California congresswoman who resigned from the House last week, amid allegations of improper sexual relationships.

The Art of Letting Go

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Hyesu Lee illustrates a comic about the art of letting go, which is hard to do.

Rudy Giuliani and the Butt-Dialler Within All of Us

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Jody Rosen writes on Rudy Giuliani pocket-dialling an NBC reporter and inadvertently leaving a voice-mail recording of a business-deal discussion, and on privacy in the digital age.

The Democrats Need a Dual Strategy to Beat Trump in Battleground States

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about a new poll from the New York Times that shows Donald Trump running close to the Democratic front-runners in a variety of swing states.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, November 5th

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon shows a ruler looking for the bright side of an angry mob at his door.

Hello, Earthlings, We Are Here to Destroy You

Nov 5, 2019

Description:

Bob Vulfov writes a humorous letter from a conquering alien species to the citizens of Planet Earth about the ways in which human civilization could be destroyed.

The Ham-Handed, Money-Driven Mangling of Sports Illustrated and Deadspin

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas writes about the massive layoffs at Sports Illustrated, the mass exodus of employees from Deadspin, and the future of sportswriting.

Runners Who Get on Your Nerves

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst illustrates a humorous list of runner archetypes that annoy their fellow-joggers.

Editing Donald Trump’s “The Art of the Deal”

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Peter Osnos, the editor of “The Art of the Deal,” recalls working on the the book that made Donald Trump a national figure.

Daily Cartoon: Sunday, November 3rd

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Ellis Rosen’s Daily Cartoon shows a bedroom taken over by marathoners.

Shirley Baker’s Half Century of Street Photography

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Lou Stoppard writes about the English street photographer’s archive, which contains unheralded images that capture “the great madness and oddness of this life.”

Sunday Reading: American Playwrights

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Hilton Als, Rebecca Mead, John Lahr, Michael Schulman, and Larissa MacFarquhar on the cultural impact of several of the country’s notable dramatists, including Lin-Manuel Miranda and Arthur Miller.

What New York City Misses by Not Doing Hearing Tests on Students

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

David Owen writes about the justifications that New York City schools gave for discontinuing hearing tests, and the effects the screening can have on students.

Impeachment Goes Public

Nov 3, 2019

Description:

Steve Coll on what is at stake, and what will sway voters more: the Trump machine’s populist propaganda or a sober presentation of damning facts.

Impeachment Proceedings Go Public, and Republicans Go on the Attack

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how President Donald Trump and the Republican Party are preparing for public hearings on whether the President abused his office for political gain.

Elizabeth Warren Doubles Down on Medicare for All

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the Democratic Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s proposed financing plan for Medicare for All.

The Disastrous Arrival of Video Replay in English Soccer

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes about the English Premier League’s recent adoption of the virtual-assistant referee program, which is soccer’s first serious attempt to incorporate technology into the umpiring of the game, like Hawk-Eye, in tennis, or the replay system, in the N.F.L.

Trump Gets Note from Podiatrist Exempting Him from Impeachment

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump has secured a note from his podiatrist that would get him out of the impeachment process.

The Reluctant Partygoer’s Schedule

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

Shannon Reed comically outlines the schedule of a reluctant partygoer’s exploits and awkward conversations at a social event.

The Legacy of Robert Evans, a Vexing Hollywood Legend

Nov 2, 2019

Description:

Noami Fry on Robert Evans, the producer of the films “The Godfather” and “Chinatown,” who has died, at the age of eighty-nine.

A Yale Student’s Urgent Fight to Save His Mother from Deportation

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Rachel Nolan interviews Cristian Padilla Romero, a Ph.D. student at Yale who has been fielding calls, running campaigns, and managing petitions on behalf of his mother, who is recovering from cancer and is at an ICE detention center in Atlanta.

Pete Buttigieg Live, and the History Behind the Irish Backstop

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, David Remnick asks Pete Buttigieg about his lack of support among black voters. And Patrick Radden Keefe examines why the Northern Ireland border keeps derailing Brexit.

Mark Zuckerberg Monkeys Around

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon imagines Mark Zuckerberg, the Facebook co-founder, chairman, and C.E.O., mimicking the three wise monkeys that embody the maxim “See no evil; hear no evil; speak no evil.”

Will Hurd and the Crisis of the Moderate Republicans

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes on Will Hurd, of Texas, the lone African-American in the House Republican caucus, and on the position of moderate Republicans in the impeachment inquiry of Donald Trump.

Making Comics: The Face-Jam Exercise

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Lynda Barry presents a humorous group exercise for drawing comic characters and then discovering what they’re thinking.

Virtue and Vanity at Reformation

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino writes about Yael Aflalo’s eco-friendly clothing line Reformation, and how its mission of sustainability is at odds with fast fashion.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, November 1st

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Ali Solomon’s Daily Cartoon shows a woman trying to find the perfect pair of sneakers to wear while watching the marathon.

Meghan Daum to Millennials: Get Off My Lawn

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt reviews “The Problem With Everything: My Journey Through the New Culture Wars,” by the author Meghan Daum.

Four Shows at the Center of a Golden Age of Hip-Hop Television

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews the television shows “Untold Stories of Hip Hop,” on WE tv, “Hip Hop: The Songs That Shook America,” on AMC, “Rhythm + Flow,” on Netflix, and “Wu-Tang: An American Saga,” on Hulu.

Running Is My Therapy and My Nutritionist Is Kale

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Turkewitz writes a humorous piece on simple, everyday alternatives to modern luxuries and conveniences.

Abigail Heyman’s Groundbreaking Images of Women’s Lives

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry on the American photographer Abigail Heyman and her famous feminist-photography book, “Growing up Female.”

In His Dealings with Ukraine, Did Donald Trump Commit a Crime?

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin writes on the Hobbs Act and its possible relevance to Donald Trump’s conduct in the Ukraine affair and the impeachment inquiry.

Garth Greenwell Reads Jean Stafford

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Garth Greenwell joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Shorn Lamb,” by Jean Stafford, from a 1953 issue of the magazine.

Winter Classical-Music Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Oussama Zahr on a celebration of the Nineteenth Amendment at the Philharmonic, a bounty of world-class recitalists at Carnegie Hall, and more.

Winter Night-Life Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Briana Younger on a roster of young R. & B. rule-breakers, an assemblage of genre-spanning big-ticket shows, and more.

The Auspicious Treats of Pilar Cuban Bakery and Win Son Bakery

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Each is an offshoot of a restaurant, and each brings to Brooklyn relatively hard-to-find delicacies from an island nation, Hannah Goldfield writes.

“Terminator: Dark Fate” and “Marriage Story,” Reviewed

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Tim Miller’s “Terminator: Dark Fate,” with Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story,” starring Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson.

Channel Tres’s Stylish Blend of Hip-House and G-Funk

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

The producer and rapper performs from his concise but enthralling catalogue in a pair of shows at Brooklyn Steel, Nov. 8-9.

Winter Dance Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Marina Harss on new choreography from Colin Dunne, Dormeshia, Alexei Ratmansky, and others.

Winter Theatre Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on Ivo van Hove’s “West Side Story,” a gender-swapped “Company” revival, and more.

Winter Art Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Andrea K. Scott on Kehinde Wiley, Donald Judd, and more.

Winter Movies Preview

Nov 1, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody on a series of ambitious remakes, tales of political resistance, and other Oscar hopefuls.

“He’s No Mr. Nice Guy”: Impeachment Comes for Trump

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes on a vote in the House of Representatives to move ahead with public impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump and the response from the President and congressional Republicans.

Facebook and the “Free Speech” Excuse

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Andrew Marantz explains why Mark Zuckerberg’s claims that Facebook is a neutral platform on which free speech should be protected ignores the role profit plays for the company.

“Dickinson,” from Apple TV+, Is Deeply Weird and Dazzles Gradually

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews the Apple TV+ show “Dickinson,” starring Hailee Steinfeld, which is an anachronistic retelling of the young Emily Dickinson’s coming of age in antebellum Massachusetts.

Upcycled Autumn Craft Showcase

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Sara Lautman illustrates a humorous list of upcycled autumn-themed crafts, including a pumpkin-lid hat, a bolo tie and belt buckle made with corncobs, and more.

“In the Dream House,” Reviewed: Carmen Maria Machado’s Many Haunted Stories of a Toxic Relationship

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews Carmen Maria Machado’s ”In the Dream House,“ a formally inventive memoir that recounts the author’s experience with an abusive relationship.

A Civil-Rights Challenge to Testing Joins the College-Admissions Battle

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Nicholas Lemann writes about a threatened lawsuit against the University of California for racial discrimination unless the school system bans the use of pre-college test scores in admissions, including from the SAT and ACT.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, October 31st

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Karen Sneider’s Daily Cartoon shows witches planning their Halloween party to accommodate some dietary restrictions.

Trick or Treat: Something to Eat

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Lisa Hanawalt illustrates a humorous comic in which people prone to irritable-bowel syndrome search for Halloween sweets to give to trick-or-treaters.

The Harrowing, Two-Year Detention of a Transgender Asylum Seeker

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Murat Oztaskin writes on Alejandra Barrera, an asylum seeker from El Salvador, who was detained in Cibola County Correctional Center, the only ICE facility in the country with a unit for transgender women, where she was denied humanitarian parole five times.

When Patti LuPone Haunted a Laundromat

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman writes about the musical series “Hip Pocket Musicals,” which was pitched to PBS but never aired, starring Patti LuPone, Priscilla Lopez, Lonny Price, Walter Bobbie, and Ellen Foley.

Vijay Seshadri Reads Sylvia Plath

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker’s Poetry podcast, Vijay Seshadri joins Kevin Young to discuss “The Moon and the Yew Tree,” by Sylvia Plath, and his own poem “Cliffhanging.”

How Live Accompaniments Make Silent Films Interactive

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

S. Whitney Holmes writes about a video documentary on the silent-film accompanist Ben Model, who counts himself among a dwindling number of people practicing the craft.

After ICE Came to Morton, Mississippi

Oct 31, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea writes about the aftermath of an Immigration and Customs Enforcement a raid of chicken-processing plants in Morton, Mississippi, where one in ten of the city’s residents was jailed or fired.

Donald Trump Makes the Raid That Killed Baghdadi All About Him

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Donald Trump’s briefing on the raid that killed the ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: America’s Pastime

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Kim Warp’s bonus Daily Cartoon depicts bar patrons reacting to a World Series audience’s message for President Trump.

Sophia Takal’s “Black Christmas” and the Producer Jason Blum on Horror with a Message

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Rhiannon Corby speaks with the director Sophia Takal about her first feature film, a remake of the early slasher movie “Black Christmas,” and David Remnick speaks with the film producer Jason Blum, of Blumhouse Productions.

“The World Is, of Course, Insane”: An Interview with Errol Morris

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Daniel A. Gross interviews the documentary filmmaker Errol Morris about his new movie, “American Dharma,” Steve Bannon, Elizabeth Holmes, filmmaking, and the truth.

Haunted Objects Found by an Amateur Paranormal Investigator

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Ashley Franklin humorously illustrates haunted objects found by an amateur paranormal investigator.

The Sun Rises on Wegmans in Brooklyn

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner writes on the opening of a Wegmans, a grocery chain founded in Rochester, New York, in the Brooklyn Navy Yard on Sunday.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, October 28th

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Ellis Rosen’s Daily Cartoon shows a dog’s nascent understanding of feline philosophy after encountering a Halloween costume.

How a Busker Became an International Advocate for People with Albinism

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about the short documentary “Lazarus,” directed by David Darg and produced by Bryn Mooser, which follows the Malawian musician Lazarus Chigwandali, who was born with albinism.

Trump Claims World Series Fans Want to Lock Him Up in White House for Doing Excellent Job

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Trump lied or deluded himself into claiming that the baseball fans who booed him at Game 5 of the World Series did so because they support him.

A Biblical Rough Draft, by Bob Odenkirk

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Bob Odenkirk: In an early version of the Book of Matthew, our narrator toils over finding the right metaphor.

Tiphanie Yanique on the Necessity of the Spirit

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

The author Tiffanie Yanique discusses “God’s Caravan,” her story from the November 4, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“Louisiana,” by T. R. Hummer

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Poetry by T. R. Hummer: “I foresaw my own undoing in the slow, clumsy flight / of pelicans over Lake Maurepas.”

Waiting for Kanye West in Wyoming

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Corey Morris on a couple who had planned to get married at the Monster Lake Ranch before Kanye West bought the property.

The Mail

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Joan Acocella’s article on reading “Gilgamesh” and Dana Goodyear’s Profile of Thomas Joshua Cooper.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons November 4, 2019

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Why We Can’t Tell the Truth About Aging

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Arthur Krystal on the gift of a long life and whether we are really grateful for it.

Thomas Middleditch’s Chat-Room Childhood

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Playing Richard Hendricks, the angsty, low-E.Q. coder and star of “Silicon Valley,” required no research for the Internet-native Middleditch, Dana Goodyear writes.

Richard McGuire’s “Noise New York”

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Richard McGuire about his cover for the November 4, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“God’s Caravan,” by Tiphanie Yanique

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Tiphanie Yanique: “ ‘Ride or die,’ the electric mouths shouted. ‘Amen,’ the mouths of the boys shouted back.”

A Cybersecurity Firm’s Sharp Rise and Stunning Collapse

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Raffi Khatchadourian on Tiversa, which dominated an emerging online market before it was accused of fraud, extortion, and manipulating the federal government. 

How to Make a Diamond Disappear

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Tyler Foggatt on Diemut Strebe, an M.I.T. artist-in-residence who tells visitors at the New York Stock Exchange how she turned a two-million-dollar gem into a black hole. 

“Failed Essay on Privilege,” by Elisa Gonzalez

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Elisa Gonzalez: “I came from something popularly known as ‘nothing’ / and in the coming I got a lot.”

Suzy Batiz’s Empire of Odor

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

After making a fortune off Poo-Pourri, the serial entrepreneur is spreading her gospel of corporate mysticism, Carina Chocano writes.

An Ecstatic Revival of Ntozake Shange’s “for colored girls”

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

The choreopoem is a bittersweet cabaret that shows how the tradition of the monologue can remain freshly vital, Vinson Cunningham writes.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

“Artificial Intelligence,” “The Accusation,” “Frankissstein,” and “Red at the Bone.”

The Women Who Helped Build Hollywood

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Women played essential behind-the-scenes roles as the American movie industry was taking off, Margaret Talbot writes. What happened? 

Who’s Afraid of the Lesbian Haunted House?

Oct 28, 2019

Description:

Ariel Levy on Killjoy’s Kastle, which mines the culture’s worst fears about feminists with a cast of “Polyamorous Vampiric Grannies,” “Ball Bustas,” and “demented women’s-studies professors.”

Kanye West’s True Salvation on “Jesus Is King”

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan writes on Kanye West’s new album, “Jesus Is King,” his Sunday Service sessions, and his melding of soul, house, gospel, and hip-hop.

The Trump Administration’s War on the Government Is an “Autocratic Attempt”

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the difficulty in properly describing President Donald Trump’s assault on the norms and institutions of American government.

ISIS’s Leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi—the World’s Most Wanted Man—Is Dead

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes on the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, who was killed by U.S. Special Forces during a raid in Syria, on Saturday, October 26th.

A Hundred Years of T. S. Eliot’s “Tradition and the Individual Talent”

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Kevin Dettmar revisits the poet T. S. Eliot’s seminal essay on literary criticism and reflects on its broad influence in the field.

A Pep Talk for My Wardrobe

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Sarah Kempa humorously writes and illustrates a pep talk for a person’s wardrobe of jumpsuits.

The Mysterious Relationship Between Pets and Their Owners

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Brian Dillon writes about Sage Sohier’s photography book “Animals,” which depicts people with their animals.

Sunday Reading: Culinary Journeys

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by M. F. K. Fisher, A. J. Liebling, Anthony Bourdain, John McPhee, Calvin Trillin, Nora Ephron, Burkhard Bilger, Helen Rosner, Alex Prud’Homme, and Dana Goodyear on food and the culinary arts.

A Clarifying, Upending Week in the Impeachment Inquiry

Oct 27, 2019

Description:

Republicans can protest all they want, but the facts increasingly indicate that the President committed impeachable violations, Jelani Cobb writes.

Franco’s Body Is Exhumed, as Spain Struggles to Confront the Past

Oct 26, 2019

Description:

Stephania Taladrid writes about the controversy surrounding the Valley of the Fallen, the mausoleum that housed Franco’s remains.

Chicago’s Striking Teachers Test a Progressive New Mayor

Oct 26, 2019

Description:

Peter Slevin writes about a teachers’ strike in Chicago, where the central sticking point between educators and Mayor Lori Lightfoot has not been salaries but the teachers’ demands for expanded support services and enforceable limits on class size.

Cult-Activities Coördinator Seeking New Gig

Oct 26, 2019

Description:

Elliott G-B writes a satirical C.V. by a cult-activities coördinator who is seeking employment.

Ukraine’s Unlikely President, Promising a New Style of Politics, Gets a Taste of Trump’s Swamp

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Volodymyr Zelensky swept to power pledging to end corruption. Then the White House called, Joshua Yaffa writes.

Trump’s New Rank

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon imagines President Donald Trump wearing the military dress of an autocrat.

“Frankie” and the Performance of Life in the Face of Death

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Ira Sachs’s new film “Frankie,” in which Isabelle Huppert plays an actress, dying of cancer, who summons her family and friends to bid her goodbye.

Horror with a Real-Life Message

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, Sophia Takal and Jason Blum talk about horror movies, Simon Parkin reports on a story about deepfakes, and Paul Karasik honors Charles Addams.

The Worst Meeting: A Cast of Characters

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Dana Maier illustrates a humorous list of people (and their behaviors) at the worst work meeting ever.

How Brexit Will End

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Until recently, it was possible to believe that there was a middle way, or to be in denial that a decisive moment would come. That’s no longer the case, Sam Knight writes.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, October 25th

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Lila Ash shows the transformation of a Dean & Deluca shop into a Halloween store in Manhattan.

The Importance of Cigarette Receipts in a Thirty-Two-Year-Old Murder Case

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Gonnerman writes about David Warren and Eric Smokes, two Brooklyn men who have asked a court to vacate their convictions for the murder of a tourist near Times Square in 1987, and the seemingly insignificant piece of evidence that could help corroborate a witness’s testimony in their favor.

The Top Ten Hottest Coffee Roasts

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Zeller writes a humorous list of the ten hottest coffee roasts.

“The Irishman,” Reviewed

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman,” which stars Robert De Niro and Al Pacino and slows the passage of time.

Rachel Feinstein’s Fairy-Tale Fanciful Sculptures

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

On Nov. 1, the Jewish Museum opens “Maiden, Mother, Crone,” Feinstein’s first museum exhibition in the U.S.

The Cross-Cultural Cuisine of Llama San

Oct 25, 2019

Description:

Hannah Goldfield reviews the chef Erik Ramirez’s third restaurant, in the West Village, which zeros in on Nikkei, or Peruvian-Japanese, food. 

Justin Trudeau’s Victory Was Narrow, but Still Significant

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes on the results of the 2019 Canadian elections, in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party retained a slight majority and Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives came in second.

The New Economics: Data, Inequality, and Politics

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes on “Unbound,” a new book by the economist Heather Boushey which illustrates how some in the profession are returning to the roots of economics by studying politics and economic outcomes.

Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Know What the First Amendment Is For

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the Facebook C.E.O., Mark Zuckerberg, his recent lecture on free speech, and how he’s symptomatic of our collective refusal to think about speech and the media in complicated ways.

Life’s Greatest Hits on Vinyl

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Andy Babbitz illustrates a humorous series of fake album covers for a playlist of sounds from everyday life.

Springtime for Nazis: How the Satire of “Jojo Rabbit” Backfires

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews the new satirical film “Jojo Rabbit,” about Nazi Germany, directed by Taika Waititi and featuring Scarlett Johansson.

The N.B.A. and China and the Myths of Sports Diplomacy

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas writes, in advance of the N.B.A.’s opening night, about the league’s current conflict with China after the Houston Rockets’ Daryl Morey tweeted about human rights in China.

Life After Prison for Women Who Are Convicted of Murder

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes about “The Bedroom Project,” by the photographer Sara Bennett, a series that takes a look at the aftermath of incarceration, depicting the the homes of women who have finished long sentences.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, October 22nd

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Peter Kuper images other locations where President Donald Trump might consider hosting the G-7 summit.

Summer Walker’s Sex-Positive R. & B.

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Briana Younger writes about Summer Walker’s début album, “Over It,” sex-positive R. & B. music, and ratchet culture.

Tessa Hadley on the Bonds of Childhood

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

The author Tessa Hadley discusses “The Bunty Club,” her story from this week’s issue of The New Yorker.

Are You Experiencing Symptoms of Writer’s Block or N.B.A. Block?

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Ian Goldstein writes a humorous list designed to help figure out if you’re suffering from writer’s block or a block by someone who has played for the N.B.A.

Tessa Hadley Reads “The Bunty Club”

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Tessa Hadley, who reads her short story “The Bunty Club,” from the October 28, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Uncertain Fate of Amsterdam’s Red-Light District

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Anna Russell writes about Amsterdam’s De Wallen neighborhood, the popular party destination, and about mayor Femke Halsema’s proposal to cover brothel windows and move sex workers out of the area.

When the Government Seizes Your Embryos

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Anna Sussman on a law in Poland that bans single women who have undergone IVF from accessing their frozen embryos.

A Documentary of Funeral Care for Abandoned AIDS Patients

Oct 22, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on the short documentary film “Departing Gesture,” by Jonathan Napolitano and Brian Bolster, which focusses on the Sebrell Funeral Home, in Ridgeland, Mississippi, and its funeral services for AIDS patients abandoned by their families.

Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Ronan Farrow talks with David Remnick about efforts by men like Harvey Weinstein to censor accusers and intimidate journalists.

“Find Me” Is a Shallow Sequel to “Call Me By Your Name”

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews “Find Me,” André Aciman’s sequel to “Call Me by Your Name,” which lacks the charm and artfulness of its predecessor.

How to Choose a Writing Instrument and What It Says About You

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Dana Schwartz writes and Jason Katzenstein illustrates a a humorous list of writing instruments and how they correspond to different personality types.

When the Beatles Walked Offstage: Fifty Years of “Abbey Road”

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Gould on the history and back story of the Beatles’ tenth studio album, “Abbey Road,” which Giles Martin, George Martin’s son and protégé, has expertly remixed and reissued in a super-deluxe edition on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, October 21st

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon shows people navigating through a beet maze.

“The Bunty Club,” by Tessa Hadley

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Tessa Hadley: “The textures of the past rose around the sisters like an uneasy dream, alien and stale and intensely familiar.”

The Real Nature of Thomas Edison’s Genius

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

The inventor did not look for problems in need of solutions, Casey Cep writes; he looked for solutions in need of modification.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons October 28, 2019

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

What Can We Learn from the Germans About Confronting Our History?

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe on the philosopher Susan Neiman’s recent book, “Learning from the Germans,” and her case for an American version of Germany’s “working off the past,” referring to the process through which the country has come to terms with Nazism and the Holocaust.

“The Poets Are Dying,” by Brenda Shaughnessy

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Brenda Shaughnessy: “Where are they going / if not to their next poems?”

Astrology in the Age of Uncertainty

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Millennials who see no contradiction between using astrology and believing in science are fuelling a resurgence of the practice, Christine Smallwood writes.

Adam Driver, the Original Man

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on why so many directors want to work with Hollywood’s most unconventional lead.

The Ghosts of Yaddo Act Up

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on a fund-raiser for Yaddo, which featured Willem Dafoe, Kathryn Hahn, Rufus Collins, and Lucy Liu, who described Yaddo as “like a Tinder for artists.” 

Can Brain Science Help Us Break Bad Habits?

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Jerome Groopman on studies that suggest that relying on will power is hopeless. Instead, he writes, we must find strategies that don’t require us to be strong. 

“On the Fly,” by James Richardson

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Poetry by James Richardson: “Some things in a life / happen once, but then again, / some happen twice.”

The Invention—and Reinvention—of Impeachment

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Impeachment is the ultimate political weapon, but we’ve never agreed on what it’s for, Jill Lepore writes.

The Mail

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to D. T. Max’s report on robotic surgery, Louis Menand’s piece on meritocracy, and Andrew Marantz’s analysis of techno-utopianism.

Psst! Wanna Buy an Avocado?

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Rachel Felder on Miguel Gonzalez, who hand-delivers perfectly ripe specimens to restaurants and private citizens and may have solved the rock-hard-avocado problem. 

Liniers’s “Leaf Peepers”

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the Argentine cartoonist Liniers about his Halloween-themed cover for the October 28, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Shattered Afghan Dream of Peace

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Trump upended peace talks, civilian casualties keep climbing, and Afghans are suffering more than ever, Luke Mogelson reports.

American Dreams in “The Rose Tattoo” and “Soft Power”

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz reviews Tennessee Williams’s mid-century drama, starring Marisa Tomei, and David Henry Hwang’s fever dream of theatrical redemption. 

Your Immortality Application

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Cora Frazier: Your story about meditating for thirty minutes raised some questions among our panel about your ability to handle an eternity of the mind.

Broadway’s New Emily Post Is a Fifth Grader

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Patricia Marx on why Donna Murphy and Bebe Neuwirth are talking about Sadie Markowitz and her guide on how to behave at the theatre.  

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

“Crisis of Conscience,” “The Collector of Leftover Souls,” “The Shadow King,” and “Gun Island.”

Edward Norton Conjures Robert Moses’s New York

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Nick Paumgarten on how the director of “Motherless Brooklyn” re-created the nineteen-fifties for Alec Baldwin and a building under the Triborough Bridge.

Why They Bulldozed Your Block

Oct 21, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik on what we can learn from Ed Logue, the long-reviled master of “urban renewal.”

Rob Delaney on Writing While Grieving and the Real Work of Comedy

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

The actor and comedian Rob Delaney spoke with the television critic Emily Nussbaum onstage at The New Yorker Festival.

America’s Ally in Syria Warns of Ethnic Cleansing by Turkey

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright interviews General Mazloum Kobani Abdi about the pullout of U.S. troops from Syria, its impact on the Kurdish forces, the ceasefire brokered by Mike Pence last week with Turkey, and the coming meeting between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

The Latest in Mid-Century-Modern Furniture

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Tracey K. Berglund comically depicts the latest in mid-century-modern furniture, including Alvar Aalto’s classic three-legged stool reimagined as an eight-legged stool.

“Talking of Dead Jack”

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Allen Ginsberg’s journal entries in the days immediately following Jack Kerouac’s death, fifty years ago.

Turkey, Syria, the Kurds, and Trump’s Abandonment of Foreign Policy

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on President Donald Trump’s ignorance of the world, which has never been so blatant or produced such bipartisan opposition. 

Sunday Reading: Spooky Stories

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, stories of scary and supernatural occurrences by David Gilbert, Karen Russell, Shirley Jackson, Jorge Luis Borges, Lionel Shriver, and Robert Coover.

How to Mourn a Glacier

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Lacy M. Johnson on how a memorial ceremony for Okjökull, a glacier in Iceland, suggests new ways to think about climate change.

Reviving Venezuelan Punk, the Music of Revolution

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Camila Osorio on Venezuelan punk music, which rose amid the country’s political and economic crisis in the eighties and is now experiencing a revival.

Boris Johnson’s Bad Saturday and the Contradictions of Brexit

Oct 20, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about the refusal by British Parliament to vote on Boris Johnson’s plan for Brexit.

China Forces the N.B.A. to Weigh Value Against Values

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Evan Osnos writes about the backlash from China after the Houston Rockets’ general manager, Daryl Morey, tweeted in support of protesters in Hong Kong.

The Precarious Position of Benjamin Netanyahu

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Ruth Margalit writes about the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s pre-trial hearing, the changes to his defense team, and the debate in Israel over whether Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit is likely to indict him.

The Mystery Bruise

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Ashley Franklin illustrates a humorous cartoon comic about a mysterious injury that results in a bruise.

Highlights from the Third Week of the New York Film Festival

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews highlights from the third week of the New York Film Festival, including Agnès Varda’s illuminatingly introspective “Varda by Agnès,” Mati Diop’s drama “Atlantics,” and Theo Anthony’s short documentary “Subject to Review.”

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, October 8th

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

David Sipress’s Daily Cartoon imagines a head of state with an army of apologists.

What a Pediatrician Can Do for a Child Seeking Asylum—and What She Can’t

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

The pediatrician and author Rachel Pearson writes about caring for an asylum-seeking child in government custody.

Trump’s Muddled Syria Policy Opens the Way for More War in the Middle East

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on President Donald Trump’s policy shift on U.S. relations with Turkey, and how it will affect the Syrian Democratic Forces and the dregs of ISIS.

Welcome to Instagram Club!

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Lauren Bans writes a humorous piece about an imagined club for discussing Instagram accounts.

Joyce Carol Oates Reads “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Joyce Carol Oates, who reads her short story “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” from the October 14, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Ciaran Carson’s Urgent, Hopeful, Final Lines

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Kevin Young writes about the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who died on Sunday at the age of seventy.

The Unseen Student Victims of the “Varsity Blues” College-Admissions Scandal

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Daniel Golden and Doris Burke, of ProPublica, on the students affected by a college-admissions scandal involving Sage Hill School, in Newport Coast, California.

Three Podcasts to Listen to in October

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson presents three podcasts to listen to in October: a new series, “Dolly Parton’s America,” by Jad Abumrad; the fourth season of Jonathan Goldstein’s “Heavyweight”; and the Michigan Radio and NPR podcast series “Believed,” about the abuse of Larry Nassar.

Ronan Farrow’s Black Cube Chronicles, Part II: The Undercover Operative

Oct 8, 2019

Description:

In an excerpt drawn from his new book, “Catch and Kill,” Farrow describes how a private spy who manipulated Rose McGowan in service of Harvey Weinstein was unmasked.

The Many Sins of College Admissions

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Jeannie Suk Gersen writes about the conclusion to the court ruling on Harvard University’s use of race in admissions, which alleged that the school discriminated against Asian-American applicants, from the federal judge Allison Burroughs.

A Judge Rules That Trump Isn’t Above the Law—and Neither Are His Tax Returns

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes on the federal judge Victor Marrero’s ruling that Donald Trump must give his tax returns to Cyrus Vance, the Manhattan District Attorney, who subpoenaed them as part of the investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels.

The New Yorker on Impeachment

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

David Remnick speaks with Susan B. Glasser, Joshua Yaffa, Jane Mayer, Jelani Cobb, and Jill Lepore about impeachment and responses to “Ukrainegate.”

The Eurohug, Is It a Thing?: A Global Guide to Embrace

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

In this humorous excerpt from Emily Flake’s forthcoming book, “That Was Awkward: The Art and Etiquette of the Awkward Hug,” the author presents guidelines for greeting people throughout the world.

How We Came to Live in “Cursed” Times

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino writes on the uptick in uncanny or unpleasant things being described on Twitter, Reddit, and other social-media platforms as having “cursed energy,” a phrase that has come to signify anxiety and malaise.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, October 7th

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon predicts Donald Trump’s struggle to get another job if he is impeached.

Edward Steed’s “Inside Baseball”

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Edward Steed about his cover for the October 14, 2019, issue of the magazine.

“Presidents’ Day,” by Louise Glück

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Louise Glück: “Some / principle is at work, I thought.”

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons October 14, 2019

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Reginald Dwayne Betts’s Poetry After Prison

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Dan Chiasson reviews “Felon,” Betts’s third collection, which upsets the narrative of incarceration and redemption.

The new OkCupid? O.K., Comrade!

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Red Yenta, a matchmaking site for lovelorn leftists, helps socialists, communists, and the anarchist-curious find the special modern Bolshevik of their dreams, Danyoung Kim writes.

Gossipeuse to Press Agent: Drop Dead!

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the feud between the Post’s Cindy Adams and Sy Presten, the oldest P.R. man in town. Only in New York, kids.

Nietzsche’s Eternal Return

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on why thinkers of every political persuasion keep finding inspiration in the philosopher Nietzsche.

Ronan Farrow’s Black Cube Chronicles, Part I: The Private Investigators

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

In an excerpt drawn from from his new book, “Catch and Kill,” Farrow describes being surveilled by two detectives embroiled in an international plot to suppress sexual-assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

“Princess of the Hither Isles,” “This Land Is Our Land,” “Out of Darkness, Shining Light,” and “Machine.”

Can Smart Wood Help You Log Off? 

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

The designers of a block of wood with a touch screen and an Internet connection want to help cure digital overload, Andrew Marantz writes.

Star-Crossed Pairings in “Porgy and Bess” and “Denis & Katya”

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on new productions at the Met and Opera Philadelphia, respectively, that are driven not by celebrity allure but by strong artistic purpose.

Branson Ditches Downton for Manhattan

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Allen Leech, who plays the Irish republican firebrand Tom Branson on “Downton Abbey,” communes with his cultural past and talks Brexit on upper Fifth Avenue, Sarah Larson writes.

“Freestyle Love Supreme” Raps Its Way to Broadway

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham reviews the improvised Broadway production “Freestyle Love Supreme,” from Thomas Kail, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and Anthony Veneziale.

Meanwhile, in Kiev

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Yoni Brenner: What happened after Trump hung up. 

Joyce Carol Oates on Catastrophizing and Environmental Collapse

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews Joyce Carol Oates about “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” her short story from the October 14, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Fighting for Abortion Access in the South

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Alexis Okeowo reports on an abortion fund in Georgia that is responding to restrictive legislation with a familial kind of care.

An Omani Novel Exposes Marriage and Its Miseries

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

James Wood reviews “Celestial Bodies,” in which a multigenerational narrative of women is sliced by the patriarchy’s violent edge.  

“Poem of Names,” by Robert Pinsky

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Robert Pinsky: “The chains of begats and births, the chains of names / Are meaning itself.”

The Mail

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Michael Schulman’s piece on fandom, Shauna Lyon’s review of Jajaja Plantas Mexicana, Ben Taub’s reporting on Jonathan Ledgard, and Peter Schjeldahl’s column on Amy Sherald.

Edna O’Brien Is Still Writing About Women on the Run

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Ian Parker on the regal Irish novelist Edna O’Brien, who, at eighty-eight, is publishing new fiction and recalling her early rise to fame.

“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” by Joyce Carol Oates

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Joyce Carol Oates: “Is it the earth, the water, the air? Contaminates? Something is poisoning them.”

How to Read “Gilgamesh”

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

The heart of the world’s oldest long poem is found in its gaps and mysteries, Joan Acocella writes.

Can a Machine Learn to Write for The New Yorker?

Oct 7, 2019

Description:

John Seabrook on how predictive-text technology could transform the future of the written word.

Trump Sees New Polls and Orders Ukraine to Investigate Elizabeth Warren

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump ordered the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate Elizabeth Warren, similar to how he asked the Ukrainian government to look into Joe Biden, after Warren’s rise in the Democratic polls.

Ezra Stoller Turned Buildings Into Monuments

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

Thomas de Monchaux writes on “Ezra Stoller: A Photographic History of Modern American Architecture,” a new monograph, published by Phaidon, of the architectural photographer’s work.

Cartoons That Were Rejected for Being “Too 1999”

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

Johnny DiNapoli illustrates a series of humorous cartoons that could conceivably have been rejected from publication for being “too 1999.”

Amartya Sen’s Hopes and Fears for Indian Democracy

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the economist, philosopher, and public intellectual Amartya Sen about his boyhood in pre-independence India, his fears and hopes for Indian democracy, and why contemporary politics hasn’t led him toward fatalism.

Donald Trump’s Ukraine Scandal Has Its Roots in Russia

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

Both situations stem from the President’s apparent willingness to accept political favors from foreign leaders, and his eagerness to do Putin’s bidding, Jeffrey Toobin writes.

Sunday Reading: The World of Calvin Tomkins

Oct 6, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Calvin Tomkins on artists, including Cindy Sherman, Chris Ofili, Georgia O’Keefe, Philippe Petit, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and David Adjaye.

Why Trump, Facing Impeachment, Warns of Civil War

Oct 5, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb compares the Civil War era with our current one and interrogates Donald Trump’s comments about how a potential impeachment inquiry could lead to another civil war.

The Secret to Success Is Failure, or I Guess Not Failing Would Also Work

Oct 5, 2019

Description:

Jeremiah Budin writes a humorous consideration of the value of failure.

The “Getting Real” Moment on Instagram

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan writes about the trend among social-media influencers, including Tavi Gevinson and Hiyat Rida, of posting candid photographs and captions that admit to the messier, less aspirational, elements of their lives.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, October 1st

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Brendan Loper’s Daily Cartoon shows the burdens of a busy news day.

How Isaac Hayes Changed Soul Music

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Emily Lordi on the legacy of Isaac Hayes’s album “Hot Buttered Soul” and how the artist revolutionized the genre of soul music.

Come Visit Me in New York!

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Sam Spero and Patrick Goodney writes a humorous invitation to New York.

Mark Meadows and the Dinosaur Property

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea writes about an allosaur skeleton found on a piece of property in Dinosaur, Colorado, that the congressman Mark Meadows sold to the creationist organization Answers in Genesis but failed to report, in a possible ethics violation.

Jhumpa Lahiri Reads Primo Levi

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Jhumpa Lahiri joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Quaestio De Centauris,” by Primo Levi, from a 2015 issue of The New Yorker.

Rion Amilcar Scott Reads “Shape-ups at Delilah’s”

Oct 1, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Rion Amilcar Scott, who reads his short story “Shape-ups at Delilah’s,” from the October 7, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Floodgates Open on Trump

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

David Remnick on how Donald Trump’s incitements to violence against Representative Adam Schiff and others, in the wake of the whistle-blower report about his call with the Ukrainian President, may urge other insiders to come forward.

What Paul Badura-Skoda Did for Classical Piano

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody on the Austrian pianist Did for Classical Piano, who helped reconceive the very nature of classical-music performance.

Killer Mike Still Believes Bernie Sanders Can Start a Revolution

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea reports from Bernie Sanders campaign events in Georgia and North Carolina and interviews the rapper Michael Render, who is better known as Killer Mike, about the senator’s candidacy for the Democratic Presidential nomination.

A Visit to the Pro-Brexit Coastal Town of Hartlepool

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes on the English town of Hartlepool, where, earlier this month, ten of its local council members defected to the Brexit Party, including Shane Moore, who offered his views on UKIP, Boris Johnson, and the necessity of a no-deal Brexit.

Cory Booker on How to Defeat Donald Trump

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

The New Jersey senator and Presidential candidate Cory Booker on when to compromise, when to empathize, and when to impeach.

A Hypnotic but Contextless Portrait of Stalin’s Death and Its Aftermath

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes on “State Funeral,” Sergei Loznitsa’s second found-footage documentary on the Stalinist period, which had its U.S. première, at the New York Film Festival, this past weekend.

Evaluations from Every Doctor I Visited Before My Insurance Ran Out

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Julia Edelman and Ginny Hogan write a humorous list of evaluations from an allergist, psychiatrist, dentist, primary-care physician, and other doctors before the patient’s insurance ran out.

Rosmarie Waldrop’s Novel of the In-Between

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Ben Lerner writes on “The Hanky of Pippin’s Daughter,” a novel by Waldrop that was first published in 1986 and is being republished by Dolphin.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, September 30th

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Pat Byrnes’s Daily Cartoon tries to stop thinking about climate change.

Trump Says If There Is Another Civil War He Will Get a New Note from Podiatrist

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that, after his tweet threatening a civil war over the Ukraine scandal, President Donald Trump clarified that he would try to get a medical exemption from fighting, as he did during the Vietnam War.

How Donald Trump Could Further Erode Democracy During Impeachment

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Michael Luo writes on the dangers of a Democratic-led impeachment inquiry of Donald Trump, given the partisan animus that defines contemporary American politics.

Mitch McConnell Announces Senate Will Close Until 2021 for Repainting

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Mitch McConnell has announced that the Senate will close until 2021 for repainting.

The Norwegian Novel That Divided a Family and Captivated a Country

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Lauren Collins on Vigdis Hjorth, who insists that her novel “Will and Testament” is not autobiography and whose work has ignited debate over the ethics of “reality literature.” 

Fanny Howe Makes Sense of Beginnings and Endings

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

After sixty years of writing, the poet’s latest collection has fresh urgency—the necessity of reimagining time even as time runs out, Dan Chiasson writes.

A Photographer at the Ends of the Earth

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Thomas Joshua Cooper risks his life to document the world’s remotest places, Dana Goodyear writes.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

“The Dutch House,” “A Pure Heart,” “Year of the Monkey,” and “Growth.”

The Unstable, Flickering “The Height of the Storm”

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz reviews Jonathan Kent’s restrained staging of Florian Zeller’s play, which plunges the audience into a fearful place where reality, memory, and imagination mingle indiscriminately.

William Forsythe’s Self-Portrait in Absentia

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Homans on “A Quiet Evening of Dance,” in which the choreographer William Forsythe pulls ballet’s original elements through his own imagination.

What if Your Abusive Husband Is a Cop?

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Police departments have become more attentive to officers’ use of excessive force on the job, but that concern rarely extends to the home, Rachel Aviv writes.

Rion Amilcar Scott on Haircutting and Intimacy

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Willing Davidson interviews Rion Amilcar Scott about “Shape-Ups at Delilah’s,” his short story from the October 7, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Are You on the Apps? 

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Hallie Cantor: What’s the name of that dating app—the one where if someone doesn’t respond to your message a freelance contract killer goes to his house and kills him for you?

The Mail

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Zuzana Justman’s Personal History about the Terezín concentration camp, Dexter Filkins’s review of Samantha Power’s memoir, and Hua Hsu’s piece on student debt.

“Ode on Words for Parties (American Edition),” by Barbara Hamby

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Barbara Hamby: “Shindig, bash, / meet-and-greets, raves, blowouts, barbecues, / and more tepid functions, receptions, luncheons.”

“Shape-ups at Delilah’s,” by Rion Amilcar Scott

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Rion Amilcar Scott: “The Great Hair Crisis was raging on with no visible end.”

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons October 7, 2019

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

How Derren Brown Remade Mind Reading for Skeptics

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

The mentalist’s manipulation techniques give people too sophisticated to believe in the paranormal something quasi-scientific to hang on to.

Haruki Murakami Remembers His Father

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Personal History by Haruki Murakami: “This heavy weight my father carried—a trauma, in today’s terminology—was handed down, in part, to me.”

Michael Bloomberg’s Answer to the U.N. General Assembly

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Evan Osnos on the Bloomberg Global Business Forum, an oasis for corporate executives that is free of speeches denouncing millionaires and billionaires. 

A Taxonomy of Hugs, by Emily Flake

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Sketchpad by Emily Flake: The Mother-Son Hug—like “Psycho,” but make it fashion.

Richard Serra Will Jolt You Awake

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl on how the minimalist sculptor, with current shows at three branches of the Gagosian gallery, keeps the dynamic of the sublime in splendid tension.

“Angela Hackett, ‘Lemons on a Moorish Plate,’ 2013,” by Ciaran Carson

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Ciaran Carson: “How long does it take, we wondered, for a lemon / To completely rot?”

In Ukraine, a TV President to Rival Trump

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum on Volodymyr Zelensky’s performance in “Servant of the People,” a genre-bending series that blends Ryan Murphy wackiness with Sorkinian uplift (minus the hubris).

Trump’s Close-Call Diplomacy with Iran’s President

Sep 30, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes on recent diplomatic developments during the United Nations General Assembly between Donald Trump, Hassan Rouhani, and Emmanuel Macron, and on goals to reaffirm the 2015 nuclear deal and lift sanctions against Iran.

Life in Alaska in the Round-the-Clock Darkness of Polar Night

Sep 29, 2019

Description:

Coralie Kraft writes on the photo series “Polar Night,” by the photographer Mark Mahaney, which chronicles a two-month winter period of uninterrupted darkness in Utqiagvik, Alaska.

The Dangerous Position of William Barr

Sep 29, 2019

Description:

David Rohde writes on the decisions facing the Attorney General, William Barr, who has been implicated in the scandal resulting from Donald Trump’s call with the Ukrainian President, Volodymyr Zelensky.

Sunday Reading: Personal Histories

Sep 29, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, personal histories by John Bayley, Ariel Levy, Daryl Pinckney, Nora Ephron, Stephen King, Colson Whitehead, Jo Ann Beard, Salman Rushdie, Oliver Sacks, and Jia Tolentino.

America!: The Statue of Liberty Goes to Therapy

Sep 29, 2019

Description:

Ali Fitzgerald imagines what the Statue of Liberty might say during a therapy session in this humorous comic.

The Fallen Worlds of Philip Pullman

Sep 29, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz interviews Philip Pullman, the author of the His Dark Materials series, about the forthcoming HBO adaptation of “The Golden Compass,” his new book “The Secret Commonwealth,” and more of his past work.

The Democrats Are Looking to Strike Quickly in the Impeachment Inquiry

Sep 28, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the plan by the Democratic leaders in the House of Representatives to move quickly on their impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

Cory Booker Assesses His Presidential Prospects

Sep 28, 2019

Description:

David Remnick interviews Cory Booker for The New Yorker Radio Hour, asking the New Jersey senator about Donald Trump, impeachment, Jared Kushner, Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, and Medicare for All.

A Ukrainian Push for a White House Visit Gave Trump Leverage Over Volodymyr Zelensky

Sep 28, 2019

Description:

Joshua Yaffa and Adam Entous write about how Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s need for a strong rapport with the United States left him vulnerable to coercion from President Donald Trump and his desire to see the actions of former Vice-President Joe Biden and his son Hunter investigated by Ukrainian authorities.

The Age of Bathfluence

Sep 28, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme writes about how social-media influencers have made the self-care ritual of taking a bath increasingly popular and expensive.

Highlights from the New York Film Festival: Martin Scorsese’s Colossal, Mournful “The Irishman”

Sep 28, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman,” a gangster drama starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci, and Harvey Keitel.

The Seven Emojis of Grief

Sep 25, 2019

Description:

Emily Winter writes a satirical guide to the seven emojis that will both reflect the stages of and help get you through a period of grief.

At the U.N., Jair Bolsonaro Presents a Surreal Defense of His Amazon Policies

Sep 25, 2019

Description:

Jon Lee Anderson writes on the Brazilian President, Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right populist who in an address to the United Nations General Assembly defiantly defended his administration’s response to fires in the Amazon rain forest.

Nancy Pelosi Finally Goes All In on Impeachment

Sep 25, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes on Nancy Pelosi’s announcement that the House of Representatives will proceed with a formal impeachment inquiry, following a whistle-blower scandal involving President Trump, Joe Biden, and Ukraine.

Trump Faces Impeachment

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on President Donald Trump’s appearance at the United Nations General Assembly and the opening of an official impeachment inquiry following a scandal in which Trump reportedly asked Ukraine’s President to investigate Joe Biden’s son Hunter.

Panicky Trump Orders Dozen New Sharpies Before Releasing Ukraine Phone Transcript

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Trump wants to redact the transcript of his phone conversation with the Ukrainian President, Volodymyr Zelensky, with a Sharpie like the one he used to alter maps showing the path of Hurricane Dorian.

The Colorful Pageantry and Mob Mentality of the Iowa Caucuses

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes about the Polk County, Iowa, Steak Fry, where potential caucusgoers judged the Democratic-primary candidates on who had the largest crowds, the snappiest chants, the best signs, the longest march lines, and the loudest applause.

Greta Thunberg Is the Anti-Trump

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg and how her message of logic and that humanity is capable of moral action is the antithesis of President Donald Trump’s apparent belief that the world is doomed to corruption.

The Times Columnist Roger Cohen on the Future of India

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the New York Times columnist Roger Cohen about his column and his views of the Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, Indian politics, and the current situation in Kashmir.

Ryan Murphy’s “The Politician” Is a Funhouse-Mirror Reflection of the So-Called Meritocracy

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes about Ryan Murphy’s new Netflix series, “The Politician,” starring Ben Platt and Gwyneth Paltrow, which satirizes privilege and ambition.

Pink Blots: A Chromatic Experiment

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Kaye Blegvad jokes about how to interpret an array of images one might see in a set of pink, Rorschach-like ink blots.

Boris Johnson’s Supreme Court Calamity

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight reports on Britain’s Supreme Court ruling that Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament in the lead-up to Brexit was against the law.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, September 24th

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Evan Lian’s Daily Cartoon shows Greta Thunberg’s global mission.

What Is a Hit?: “Downton” vs. “Rambo”

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane humorously imagines a meeting in which Rambo, the character made popular by Sylvester Stallone, visits Downton Abbey to discuss the Crawley family’s recent box-office success.

The Debt That All Cartoonists Owe to “Peanuts”

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Chris Ware writes about the comic strip “Peanuts,” by Charles Schulz, and how it affected him and other cartoonists.

Joy Williams Reads “The Fellow”

Sep 24, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Joy Williams, who reads her short story “The Fellow,” from the September 30, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“How Has This Bastard Not Been Impeached Yet?” Nixon Asks in Hell

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that the former President Richard Nixon asked, from Hell, why Donald Trump had not yet been impeached, and drew comparisons between the Watergate scandal and recent developments with Ukraine.

In Communities of Color, Fighting for a Stake in the Legal-Cannabis Market

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

The war on drugs put millions in prison for marijuana use—people of color disproportionately. Will those harmed by prohibition share the benefits of legalization? Jelani Cobb reports on the burgeoning marijuana industry.

Trump’s Ukraine Defense Is the Same One He’s Used for Years: I Did It. So What?

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Donald Trump’s response to criticism of the phone call he had with Volodymyr Zelensky, the President of Ukraine, and how Trump’s remarks echo those he made about Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Poland’s Ruling Party Puts an Extraordinary Museum of Polish-Jewish History Into Limbo

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about Polin, a museum of Polish-Jewish history, and the government’s efforts to legislate memory.

“The Divers’ Game,” Jesse Ball’s Unnerving Parable of a Country That Feigns Innocence

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews “The Divers’ Game,” by Jesse Ball, which imagines a dystopian society that’s split into two classes, pats and quads.

Mitch Epstein’s Urgent Look at Communities Vying for American Land

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Andrea K. Scott writes about Mitch Epstein’s new photography series, “Property Rights,” which is being displayed at the Sikkema Jenkins gallery, in New York City, through October 5, 2019.

Ways of Planning: A Personality Guide

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Liana Finck offers humorous illustrations that detail many approaches to balancing one’s social calendar.

The Joyous, Fragmented, and Slightly Anxious 2019 Emmy Awards

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson recaps the 2019 Emmy Awards, which went without a host and awarded performers and creators from the series “Game of Thrones,” “Fleabag,” “Ozark,” “Killing Eve,” and others.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, September 23rd

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon reimagines the story of David and Goliath with Nancy Pelosi.

The Hottest Looks from the N.R.A.’s Concealed Carry Fashion Show 

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

In Texas during New York Fashion Week, brands such as Tactica Defense and American Rebel ruled the runway, Charles Bethea writes.

Alan Bigelow’s Solar-Cooking Revolution 

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Ian Frazier on the physicist and inventor who wants to bring solar stoves to parts of the world where open fires harm humans and the environment.

The Desperate Plight Behind “Darkness at Noon”

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Adam Kirsch on Arthur Koestler’s novel of the Moscow Trials, which laid bare the gulf between Communist ideals and the reality they produced. 

Paging Dr. Robot

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

D. T. Max on a pathbreaking surgeon who prefers to do his cutting by remote control.

Can a Burger Help Solve Climate Change?

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Eating meat creates huge environmental costs. Impossible Foods thinks it has a solution, Tad Friend writes.

The 2020 Presidential Race, As Told Through Cameos

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Tyler Foggatt on Bernie Sanders playing a curmudgeon in an eighties dramedy, Cory Booker reaching across the aisle in “Parks and Rec,” and Bill de Blasio on “The Good Wife.” 

The Mail

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Jonathan Franzen’s Cultural Comment about climate change.

“The Climate,” by Annelyse Gelman

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Annelyse Gelman: “It was like watching a wave approach / from a great distance.”

Christoph Niemann’s “Evolution”

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Christoph Niemann about his cover for this year’s Technology Issue of The New Yorker.

Is Meritocracy Making Everyone Miserable? 

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

In a renewed debate over élite higher education, the question is whether the system is broken or the whole idea was a terrible mistake, Louis Menand writes.

How TikTok Holds Our Attention

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino on the popular short-video app, which young people are using to churn through images and sounds at warp speed, repurposing reality into ironic, bite-size content.

“The Fellow,” by Joy Williams

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Joy Williams: “The dog looked at me. If I were to attempt to describe that look I would say that it was one that deeply questioned what it was looking at, my very existence, even.”

Running with Scissors

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Colin Stokes: They say that bad things will happen if you do this, but that hasn’t been my experience. You see, job interviews go much faster when you’re running around an office holding scissors. 

“Hudson Yards”

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Sketchbook by Joel Kuntz.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons September 30, 2019

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Four Years in Startups

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Anna Wiener writes about her life in Silicon Valley during the dawn of the unicorns.

“On Friendship,” by Henri Cole

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Henri Cole: “In loneliness, I fear me, but in society I’m like a soldier / kneeling on soft mats.”

How Trump’s Presidency Looks from Rural Wisconsin

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Peter Slevin reports from Wisconsin, where Democrats and Republicans are gearing up earlier than ever to contest counties that voted for Barack Obama, in 2008 and 2012, before lurching to Donald Trump, in 2016.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

“A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves,” “The Outlaw Ocean,” “The Ten Loves of Nishino,” and “Marilou Is Everywhere.” 

Jenny Lewis’s Wasted Youth

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Nick Paumgarten on the singer’s origin story: her father was a harmonica virtuoso, her grandmother was a Busby Berkeley dancer, and her grandfather was a Golden Gloves boxer. 

The Dark Side of Techno-Utopianism

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Big technological shifts have always empowered reformers. They have also empowered bigots, hucksters, and propagandists, Andrew Marantz writes.

Cartoon Caption Contest

Sep 23, 2019

Description:

Submit your caption.

The Mounting Scandal Over What Trump Said to Ukraine’s President

Sep 22, 2019

Description:

Joshua Yaffa and Adam Entous write about a whistle-blower complaint against Donald Trump involving a phone call with Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian President.

Weird Animals That I’m Upset I Didn’t Know About Sooner

Sep 22, 2019

Description:

Mariah-Rose Marie writes a humorous illustrated guide to exotic animals with which the artist has recently become acquainted.

Sunday Reading: The Remarkable Journeys of Explorers

Sep 22, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by David Grann, Claudia Roth Pierpont, Judith Thurman, Alec Wilkinson, Christopher Rand, and Elizabeth Kolbert on history-making explorers, including Henry Worsley in Antarctica, Amelia Earhart, the first Sherpa to reach Mt. Everest’s summit, and Christopher Columbus.

An Extraordinary Performance at Metrograph: Zia Anger’s “My First Film”

Sep 21, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about Zia Anger’s show “My First Film,” at the Metrograph, and its criticisms of the world of independent filmmaking.

The Right Wing’s War on the L.G.B.T.Q. Community

Sep 19, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on a recent Arizona Supreme Court decision affirming the right of the Brush & Nib Studio to reject a gay couple as customers and on the use of religious freedom as a tool to enable discrimination by the modern conservative movement and the Trump Administration.

Israel Has Voted—and Netanyahu’s Future Is in Doubt

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Bernard Avishai writes about Israel’s inconclusive election results and the Prime Minister’s competition with Benny Gantz and his center-left allies for a majority in the Knesset.

Review: The Wan Faithfulness That Made “The Goldfinch” Movie a Flop

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the film adaptation of Donna Tartt’s book “The Goldfinch,” starring Oakes Fegley, Ansel Elgort, and Nicole Kidman and directed by John Crowley.

The Brexit Agonies of David Cameron

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes about the former Prime Minister David Cameron’s account of the role that he played in Brexit and recent British history in his memoir “For the Record.”

In New Mexico, Trump Tries to Explain What He Thinks “the Hispanics” Want

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about Donald Trump’s campaign rally in New Mexico, and what he seems to think it means to be Hispanic in the United States.

The Workplace Pathos of “Party Down”

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes about the dark comedy “Party Down,” which is streaming on Hulu, starring Jane Lynch, Adam Scott, and Lizzy Caplan as struggling actors working in the catering business in L.A.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, September 18th

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Maddie Dai’s Daily Cartoon considers what is and isn’t cancel culture.

The 2019 National Book Awards Longlist: Poetry

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker announces the contenders in the 2019 National Book Awards category of Poetry.

The Meaning of Tracksuits

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Amos Barshad on the history of the tracksuit, which was originally made for athletes but migrated to the worlds of rap culture, street culture, and high fashion.

Travel Adventures Through Other People’s Instagram Stories

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Farah Brook writes a humorous article detailing the travel adventures taken via other people’s Instagram stories.

The Trumpian Origins of New York’s Floating Billboard Problem

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Thomas J. Campanella writes about the advertising scheme behind a recently banned billboard boat, which took a page from Fred Trump’s playbook.

A Memorial for the Remarkable Martha Gellhorn

Sep 18, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes on the unveiling of a memorial plaque, in London, in honor of Martha Gellhorn, the noted twentieth-century war correspondent and writer, and on the reminiscences by her friends and colleagues.

Elizabeth Warren’s Crusade Against Corruption

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Sheelah Kolhatkar writes about the Democratic Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s campaign rally in New York City’s Washington Square Park and her endorsement by the Working Families Party.

Kim Deitch Spins His Yarns

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly on an excerpt from the comics artist Kim Deitch’s new book, “Reincarnation Stories.”

Trump’s Awful Middle East Policies Are Coming Back to Haunt Him

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about how Donald Trump is feeling the repercussions of his policies in the Middle East, in the aftershocks of attacks on oil installations in Saudi Arabia.

A Monstera’s Memoir

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Connie Sun illustrates a humorous monologue from a monstera plant.

Money Is the Oxygen on Which the Fire of Global Warming Burns

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Bill McKibben on what would happen if the banking, asset-management, and insurance industries decided to move away from fossil fuels, and on how the financial sector affects climate change.

An A.C.L.U. Immigration Attorney on Fighting Trump’s Asylum Ban

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Blitzer talks with Lee Gelernt, an immigration attorney with the A.C.L.U., who says that the number of family separations under the Trump Administration has been underestimated, and that the Administration’s mix of policies is creating a legal chaos.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, September 17th

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Robert Leighton’s Daily Cartoon compares the morning news to the evening news.

The 2019 National Book Awards Longlist: Translated Literature

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker announces the ten contenders in the National Book Awards category of Translated Literature.

Literal Writing Exercises

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Irving Ruan and Mia Mercado provide a humorous list of exercises for writers, including special bicep curls and yoga poses.

Thomas McGuane Reads “Wide Spot”

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Thomas McGuane, who reads his short story “Wide Spot,” from the September 23, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“Midnight Traveler” Expands the Narrative of the Refugee Documentary

Sep 17, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix writes on “Midnight Traveler,” by Hassan Fazili, which documents his family’s flight from the Taliban, in the course of three years, from Afghanistan to Germany.

Ric Ocasek’s Eternal Cool

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about the life and work of Ric Ocasek, who died on Sunday, at seventy-five, and was a singer for the Cars and a producer for other artists.

Where Does All the Plastic Go?

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Carolyn Kormann reports on efforts to remove macroplastic from the earth’s oceans and research on how plastic poses a danger to marine ecosystems.

A Texas Republican Exits the House

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Representative Will Hurd, of Texas, tells The New Yorker’s Washington correspondent. Susan B. Glasser, about his decision not to run for reëlection in 2020 and his view of President Trump’s border policy.

Tender Buttons, a One-of-a-Kind New York Institution, Closes Shop

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes about the closing of Tender Buttons, a shop on the Upper East Side that was founded by Diana Epstein and Millicent Safro and began as a kind of performance art.

In Saudi Arabia, World Oil Supplies Are in Flames

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about a strike on Saudi Arabia’s largest oil-processing center and the lasting repercussions for the kingdom, the global economy, and diplomacy with Iran.

A Haphazard Recovery in the Bahamas

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt reports on recovery efforts after Hurricane Dorian made landfall in the Bahamas, visiting evacuees from Nassau, Freeport, Marsh Harbour, and other areas on the islands.

Lou Sullivan’s Diaries Are a Radical Testament to Trans Happiness

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Jeremy Lybarger writes about the diaries of the trans activist Lou Sullivan, which document a personal awakening and a cultural transformation.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, September 16th

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon considers the perception of the 2020 candidates.

The 2019 National Book Awards Longlist: Young People’s Literature

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker announces the ten contenders in the National Book Awards category of Young People’s Literature.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons September 16, 2019

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Rick and Pete Yorn Revisit the Mix-Tape Era

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Rick, a Hollywood manager whose clients include Leonardo DiCaprio, and Pete, who just released a new album, “Caretakers,” chat about the Van Halen, R.E.M., and Madonna singles of their youth, John Seabrook writes.

Review: Edward Snowden and the Rise of Whistle-Blower Culture in “Permanent Record”

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

In his memoir, he chronicles his life game by game, from Nintendo to the N.S.A., Jill Lepore writes.

“Wide Spot”

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Thomas McGuane: “You never know what’s next, and that is why I can say with all honesty that I am not a depressed person.”

The Amy Sherald Effect

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

In the painter’s realism, race applies as a condition and a cause for resetting the mainstream of Western art, Peter Schjeldahl writes.

The Mail

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Nick Paumgarten’s reporting on the measles outbreak and the anti-vaccine movement and Alex Ross’s piece on Erich Wolfgang Korngold.

No, James Murdoch Doesn’t Watch “Succession”

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

After leaving the family empire, Rupert Murdoch’s son is investing in comics, championing Pete Buttigieg, and fighting threats to democracy that sound an awful lot like Fox News, Jane Mayer writes.

Going to the Restaurant, by Jenny Slate

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Jenny Slate: Tonight I will eat a burned-up bird and drink liquefied old grapes. I’m so excited that I put skin-colored paint on my face and pasty red pigment on my lips.

“Before Winter,” by Kwame Dawes

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Kwame Dawes: “You must know that this is a preamble to an epiphany I will record.”

Roy DeCarava’s Poetics of Blackness

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Hilton Als on how the artist Roy DeCarava explored the ways in which race can define a person’s style and essence.

J. J. Sempé’s “Our Sunday-Morning Outings”

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist J. J. Sempé about his cover for the September 23, 2019, issue of the magazine.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

“Last Witnesses,” “Fashionopolis,” “Night Boat to Tangier,” and “Dominicana.”

Cartoons from the September 23, 2019, Issue

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Constance Wu’s Hollywood Destiny 

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Coming late to celebrity, the star has felt the burden of representing all Asian-Americans, Jiayang Fan writes.

Who Speaks for Crazy Horse?

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

The world’s largest monument is decades in the making and more than a little controversial, Brooke Jarvis writes.

How Crosswords Put Your Brain Into Hyperdrive

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Adrienne Raphel writes about crossword puzzles and the the happy accidents that happen when unlikely words get juxtaposed, according to Liz Maynes-Aminzade and the puzzle constructor Kameron Austin Collins.

Will American Readers Ever Catch on to Marie-Claire Blais?

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Pasha Malla reviews the newly published English translation of Marie-Claire Blais’s “A Twilight Celebration,” the eighth book in her “Soifs” series, and discusses the literary merits of Blais’s work, which has gone mostly unnoticed in America.

“Our Boys” and the Economics of Empathy 

Sep 16, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum reviews the galvanic new series, set in Israel, which emphasizes how easily dehumanizing rhetoric can sway vulnerable minds, and which should feel uncomfortably relevant to American viewers.

Where Was Mayor Pete Buttigieg at the Democratic Debate?

Sep 13, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, Pete Buttigieg, and his performance at the Democratic Presidential primary debate.

Did Beto O’Rourke Just Change the Democratic Conversation on Guns at the Debate?

Sep 13, 2019

Description:

Michael Luo writes about Beto O’Rourke’s assertion during Thursday night’s Democratic Presidential debate that, if elected President, he would push for mandatory buybacks on assault-style weapons like the AR-15.

Democratic Debate

Sep 13, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes about whether the Democratic Presidential candidates, who on Thursday participated in a primary debate in Houston, are effectively reaching potential voters through the debate format.

A Blue Note Founder’s View of Jazz Music’s Private Side

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the photographs of Francis Wolff, a co-founder of the record label Blue Note.

Trumpism and Conservatives’ Identity Crisis

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Dorothy Wickenden talks with Benjamin Wallace-Wells about what a debate between David French of the National Review and the New York Post’s Sohrab Ahmari reveals about the battle for the future of the Republican Party.

America’s First Taco Editor Says That Burritos Are Actually Tacos

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner interviews José R. Ralat, who will assume the newly created role of taco editor at Texas Monthly, next week, about burritos, breakfast tacos, and Mexican food.

A Top Leader of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Political Opposition Returns

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Nicholas Niarchos writes on the opposition leader and former governor Moïse Katumbi Chapwe’s return to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, after three years of exile, and after the contested election of Félix Tshisekedi Tshilombo, who succeeded the former President Joseph Kabila.

Something for the Democrats to Try at the Debates: a Little Togetherness

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

James Lardner on the upcoming Democratic Presidential-primary debate, between Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and others, and on why the moment calls for a show of unity against Trump.

The Death of Uyinene Mrwetyana and the Rise of South Africa’s #AmINext Movement

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Rosa Lyster writes about protests of violence against women in South Africa in the wake of the murder of Uyinene Mrwetyana.

The Growing Debate Over Elizabeth Warren’s Wealth Tax

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Elizabeth Warren’s plan for a wealth tax and its potential impact on rising inequality, according to the economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman.

Can Joe Biden Remind Democrats What They Saw in Him?

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells assesses Joe Biden’s campaign for the Democratic Presidential nomination so far, and foreshadows how the candidate might perform in the Democratic debates in Houston, which will pit him against Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders.

A New California Bill Takes Aim at Worker Misclassification at Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, and other Gig-Economy Companies

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Nathan Heller writes about California’s Assembly Bill 5, which would require gig-economy companies to reclassify their workers as employees and could change the American labor market.

Hurricane Dorian Was a Climate Injustice

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Ferguson Bernard discusses the effects of Hurricane Dorian on the Bahamas and how it exemplifies the unfairness of Small Island Developing States bearing the brunt of the damage caused by climate-change-related disasters.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, September 12th

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton’s Daily Cartoon shows two readers attempting to make their way through memoirs by John Bolton, Jim Mattis, James Comey, and other former officials in the Trump Administration.

Did You Lock the Door?

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Julia Edelman writes a humorous inner monologue about trying to remember if the house door is locked.

Koffee, the Nineteen-Year-Old Artist Modernizing Reggae

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix recommends listening to “Toast,” the explosive début single by the nineteen-year-old Jamaican reggae artist Koffee.

David French, Sohrab Ahmari, and the Battle for the Future of Conservatism

Sep 12, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes on two competing conservative figures, David French and Sohrab Ahmari, and how their voices could shape the Republican Party after Donald Trump.

Bernie Sanders’s Enduring Appeal to the Youth Vote in Iowa

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey reports from Iowa on Bernie Sanders’s enduring appeal to young people, particularly college students, in the early-voting state of Iowa.

How Robert Frank’s Photographs Helped Define America

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb writes on the photographs of Robert Frank, the Swiss photographer who died on September 9, 2019, and how Frank’s book “The Americans” captured the idea of America.

The Misplaced Feminism of Ms. Monopoly

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Mary Pilon writes about Ms. Monopoly, a supposedly feminist new version of the classic board game, and Hasbro’s failure to acknowledge that the original creator of the Monopoly concept was a woman named Lizzie Magie.

How Social Media Is Helping Survivors of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Natalie Meade writes about how residents of the Bahamas have used Twitter and Facebook to coördinate rescues and raise money in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian.

My Friend Dorothea Benton Frank

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Mary Norris writes about Dorothea Benton Frank, the best-selling South Carolina mystery writer, who died earlier this month.

Thank-You Battle

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Erica Sjule illustrates a humorous never-ending thank-you battle between two people.

Trump Finally Fired John Bolton, but Does It Really Matter?

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes about the tenure of Donald Trump’s national-security adviser John Bolton, Bolton’s relationship with Mike Pompeo, and what the President’s latest firing by tweet says about the state of his Administration.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, September 11th

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

David Sipress’s Daily Cartoon shows a revolt at the king’s castle.

Instagram, Facebook, and the Perils of “Sharenting”

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu on “Sharenthood: Why We Should Think Before We Talk About Our Kids Online,” a new book by Leah Plunkett, and the practice of parents sharing private details about their childrens’ lives publicly on social media, sometimes without their knowledge or consent.

How to Properly Load a Dishwasher

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Emma Soren writes a humorous set of instructions for loading a dishwasher properly.

The Continuing Legacy of 9/11

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Caroline Lester discusses the lasting effects of 9/11 on not just first responders but also others in the community.

Behrouz Boochani Is One of Australia’s Most Celebrated Writers, But He Can’t Step Onshore

Sep 11, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on the Australian writer Behrouz Boochani, who won the country’s prestigious Victorian Prize, for the novel “No Friend but the Mountains,” which he wrote while in prison on the remote Manus Island.

Wanting to See Like Robert Frank

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes on the legacy of the photographer Robert Frank, who died on Monday, including his book “The Americans,” his work in the Museum of Modern Art’s famed exhibition “The Family of Man,” and his approach to ambiguity.

How John Bolton Got the Better of President Trump

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Dexter Filkins writes about John Bolton, whom President Donald Trump dismissed as his national-security adviser on Monday.

The Shock of Robert Frank’s “The Americans”

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl writes about the photographer Robert Frank, who died on Monday, at the age of ninety-four.

Cycling for Climate Justice

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Anna Russell writes about a protest organized by the activist groups Stop Killing Cyclists and Extinction Rebellion, designed to draw attention to cycling- and climate-related deaths.

Three Podcasts to Listen to in September

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson reviews three podcasts: “1619,” part of the 1619 Project from the New York Times; “Broken: Jeffrey Epstein”; and the long-running Seattle-based podcast “BirdNote.”

Unprecedented Alliances Are Moving Against Netanyahu Ahead of the Israeli Election

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Bernard Avishai writes on Benjamin Netanyahu’s prospects in the Israeli do-over election, on September 17th, and on opposition alliances that include the parties of Avigdor Lieberman, Ayelet Shaked, and Benny Gantz.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, September 10th

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon shows an amusement-park attraction that takes riders through the daily news cycle.

The Chicago Band Whitney and the Fear of Being “Too Indie”

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Peter C. Baker interviews Julien Ehrlich and Max Kakacek, of the Chicago band Whitney, about what it means to be an “indie” band, and writes about the influence of streaming services like Spotify on today’s listening habits.

Trump Signs Executive Order Giving Him Control of Weather

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump has signed an order putting him in charge of the world’s weather.

The Release of Oleg Sentsov and the Plight of Those Left Behind

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on the release of the Crimean journalist Oleg Sentsov and on the members of the Crimean Tatar ethnic group who remain in prison on trumped-up charges.

Highlights from Twenty Years of The New Yorker Festival

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

We compile some of our favorite moments of previous New Yorker Festivals, when we’ve hosted Janet Mock, Zadie Smith, Jeffrey Eugenides, Patti Smith, Toni Morrison, Stephen Sondheim, and more.

My Typical New York Day

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Eddie Small writes a humorous diary about a typical day in New York City.

Garth Greenwell Reads “Harbor”

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Garth Greenwell, who reads his short story “Harbor,” from the September 16, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Clarence Thomas’s Radical Vision of Race

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Corey Robin on Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’s views on race, black nationalism, and affirmative action.

Trump’s Stunt with the Taliban Was Not About Negotiating Peace

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on Donald Trump’s recent announcement that he had planned and cancelled a summit with the Taliban, which was to have taken place at historic Camp David, near the anniversary of 9/11.

A Message of Useful Beauty from New York Fashion Week

Sep 10, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews designer collections shown during New York Fashion Week, including shows from Thom Browne, Pyer Moss, and students at the Parsons School of Design.

Revisiting “Moment by Moment,” Lily Tomlin and John Travolta’s Wrongly Despised 1978 Melodrama

Sep 9, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Moment by Moment,” a 1978 melodrama starring Lily Tomlin and John Travolta, directed by Jane Wagner, who is the subject, along with Tomlin, of an upcoming series at Lincoln Center.

Salman Rushdie’s Fantastical American Quest Novel

Sep 9, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman, The New Yorker’s fiction editor, talks with Salman Rushdie about “Quichotte,” his new novel, which sends its hero through an America ravaged by opioids, white supremacy, and mastodons.

The Horror of Such a Love

Sep 9, 2019

Description:

An essay by Marguerite Duras about a baby dying an hour after childbirth.

The Buried Promise of the Reconstruction Amendments

Sep 9, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks to the historian Eric Foner about the Reconstruction amendments, the ways in which we misunderstand the legacy of slavery, and whether Trump’s Presidency demands a rethinking of our racial history.

How An Élite University Research Center Concealed Its Relationship with Jeffrey Epstein

Sep 7, 2019

Description:

Ronan Farrow on new documents that show that the M.I.T. Media lab was aware of Epstein’s status as a convicted sex offender, and that Epstein directed contributions to the lab far exceeding the amounts to which M.I.T. has publicly admitted.

“Mr. Klein,” a Political Mystery of Mistaken Identity in Occupied Paris

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about “Mr. Klein,” a film set during the Second World War, about a man who is mistaken for a Jew with his name.

Jeremy Renner’s Strange Summer

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes about the Oscar-nominated actor Jeremy Renner, who has recently starred in commercials for Jeep, pursued a music career, and launched an app.

Boris Johnson vs. Parliament on Brexit

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

On the Politics and More podcast, Sam Knight and Dorothy Wickenden discuss Boris Johnson and one of the most tumultuous weeks in the history of Parliament.

Salman Rushdie’s Fantastical American Quest Novel

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, Salman Rushdie’s “Quichotte,” inspired by “Don Quixote,” sends its hero through an America ravaged by opioids, white supremacy, and mastodons. It is, by turns, fantastical and all too realistic.

The Secret Files of the Master of Modern Republican Gerrymandering

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

David Daley writes about newly obtained records and e-mails that raise new questions about the role of race in Thomas Hofeller’s gerrymandering and in the Republican Party’s mapmaking nationwide.

Revisiting “Open,” Andre Agassi’s Classic Memoir About the Loneliness of Tennis

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan on Andre Agassi’s memoir, “Open,” which sheds light on star tennis players and the celebrity-industrial complex.

Photo Shoots I Want to Be In

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Siobhán Gallagher writes and illustrates a humorous list of photo shoots she yearns to be a part of.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: Trump and His Sharpie

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

John Cuneo’s bonus Daily Cartoon depicts Donald Trump and his Sharpie pen.

James Mattis Doesn’t Want to Talk About the President

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Susan Glasser on the former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’s new book, “Call Sign Chaos,” and his book-tour appearances, at which he has refused to discuss his time in the Trump Administration.

Let’s Talk About the Clothes on “Succession”

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme talks to the costume designer for the HBO show “Succession” about the bland luxury of the Logan family.

“Sharpiegate” and Donald Trump’s Perpetual Cone of Uncertainty

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Donald Trump’s battle with the media about what he did or did not say about the path of Hurricane Dorian.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, September 6th

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Ali Solomon’s Daily Cartoon shows the summer winding down.

A Few of My Greatest Fears, in No Particular Order

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

The comedian and TV writer/producer Josh Gondelman writes a list of his greatest fears in this excerpt from his new book, “Nice Try: Stories of Best Intentions and Mixed Results.”

Jajaja Plantas Mexicana’s Millennial-Tinged Vegan Trickery

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Shauna Lyon reviews Jajaja Plantas Mexicana, which front-loads every seemingly familiar item with a vegan innovation.

A Summer of Unprecedented Brutality in Moscow

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the Russian government’s cruel response to protests in Moscow surrounding an upcoming rigged election for the city legislature on September 8th.

Can One Sentence Capture All of Life? Lucy Ellmann’s “Ducks, Newburyport,” Reviewed

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews “Ducks, Newburyport,” the new novel by Lucy Ellmann, which takes the form of a single, nearly thousand-page sentence, with no paragraph breaks.

Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner’s Personal and Professional Partnership

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

A retrospective film series at Lincoln Center celebrates the two women, with screenings of “The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe,” “Nashville,” “9 to 5,” and more.

Boris Johnson’s Brexit Carnage

Sep 6, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes on the chaotic week in Parliament, as the Prime Minister Boris Johnson kicked opponents to his Brexit plan out of the Conservative Party and threatened to call an election.

The Growing Impatience for Action at CNN’s Climate-Change Town Halls

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes on a succession of town halls on climate change hosted by CNN and featuring the ten leading candidates for the Democratic Presidential nomination.

In Latest Humiliation, Boris Johnson’s Dog Resigns As His Pet

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that the United Kingdom’s situation it faces Brexit under Boris Johnson is so embarrassing that even Johnson’s dog is distancing himself from the Tory Prime Minister.

Trump’s Plan to Host the G-7 Revives the Issue of Emoluments

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin writes about how Congress and the courts have failed to hold President Trump accountable for the financial gain he has sought while in office.

The Best Weather Map

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon imagines President Donald Trump as a meteorologist who is tracking the route of Hurricane Dorian.

Da Vinci’s First-Draft Doodles

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Jessica Olien writes and illustrates a humorous list of Leonardo Da Vinci’s first-draft doodles, including a portrait of Mona Lisa’s sister Vicky.

“Travel Man,” Richard Ayoade’s Travel Show for People Who Hate Travel

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes on “Travel Man,” a British travel series starring the comedian, writer, actor, and director Richard Ayoade.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, September 4th

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton’s Daily Cartoon offers creative guidance for painting upcoming extreme-weather-event predictions.

Walmart’s Announcement and Other Signs of Hope in the Gun Crisis

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes on Walmart’s announcement that it will end the sale of some kinds of ammunition, and the sale of handguns in Alaska; on other hopeful signs of action on gun violence in America; and on the book “Bleeding Out,” by Thomas Abt.

Other Brands Launching Hard Seltzers

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Sara K. Runnels writes a humorous roundup of product descriptions for imaginary brands of spiked seltzers launched by Home Depot, Nike, Amazon, Girl Scouts of America, Dove, and IKEA.

Have You Ever Met One?

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Rivka Galchen writes a flash-fiction short story, “Have You Ever Met One?,” about seeing ghosts.

Margaret Atwood Expands the World of “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Sep 5, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino reviews “The Testaments,” in which the novelist examines the kinds of complicity that are required for constructing such a frightening future.

A Bot That Captures the Ambivalence of Human Emotion

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Michele Moses writes about the Emoji Mashup Bot, a Twitter bot, created by Louan Bengmah, that combines features from two Unicode emojis to create new, nuanced expressions.

Existential Dread in the Animal Kingdom

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Irving Ruan and Avi Steinberg humorously illustrate the existential ruminations of members of the animal kingdom.

A Fresh, Well-Funded Start for Pete Buttigieg in Iowa

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey reports on the moves of the Pete Buttigieg campaign for the 2020 Democratic Presidential nomination so far, comparisons to Obama’s campaign, and Buttigieg’s strategy in Iowa going forward.

Remembering Isabel Toledo, a Designer with Few Peers

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Judith Thurman on the life and legacy of the designer Isabel Toledo, who died last week, at the age of fifty-nine.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, September 4th

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon provides expert analysis of yesterday’s events in Parliament.

Will Trump Back Down As His Trade War with China Bites The U.S. Economy?

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the latest round of tariffs and duties in Trump’s trade war with China, and how it’s affecting American factory output.

Americans Shocked by Spectacle of Legislative Body Taking Action

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes about Americans being surprised by the action taken by the British Parliament against Boris Johnson.

A Photographer’s Intimate Self-Portrait of Womanhood in Middle Age

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Kristen Roupenian writes about the photographer Elinor Carucci’s series “Midlife,” full of disconcerting closeups of the body that represent the themes of aging and womanhood.

Witnessing a Federal Execution

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Peter Slevin reflects on his experience watching the federal execution of Juan Raul Garza, and, in response to William Barr’s announcement of plans to put five prisoners to death, questions the point of further executions.

Urban Foraging 101

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Katie Barsotti writes a humorous syllabus on how to forage for food and other freebies in urban environments.

The Rivalry Between Georgia O’Keeffe and Her Sister Ida

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Roxana Robinson writes about the relationships between Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Ida O’Keeffe, who said that she could have been famous like her sister.

Consider the Forehand

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas on a New Yorker video that considers the forehand’s role in tennis, and how the sport’s stars, like Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, and Madison Keys, make the move their own.

Boris Johnson Takes on Parliament over a No-Deal Brexit—and Loses

Sep 4, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on events in the British Parliament, where twenty-one Conservative M.P.s voted against Prime Minister Boris Johnson to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

Review: Jonas Mekas’s Illuminating Documentary of Martin Scorsese on the Set of “The Departed”

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Jonas Mekas’s documentary film “Notes on an American Film Director at Work,” which centers on Scorsese’s work on “The Departed,” in 2005.

School Supplies for Post-School Adults

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Annah Feinberg writes and illustrates a humorous list of school supplies for post-school adults.

A Century of “Shrill”: How Bias in Technology Has Hurt Women’s Voices

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Tina Tallon writes about how gendered technological bias and failures in the design of audio technology have affected how women’s voices are perceived in society.

The Brexit Warnings to Be Found in Sheep Grazing in a London Park

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes on Boadicea’s Grave, a mound in London’s Hampstead Heath once thought to contain the remains of an ancient Briton queen.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, September 3rd

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Jon Adams’s Daily Cartoon wonders why North Korea keeps launching missiles.

Americans Envious That Tiffany Trump Never Hears from Dad

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump’s daughter Tiffany rarely hears from her father, a circumstance which many Americans envy.

Trump’s Wacky, Angry, and Extreme August

Sep 3, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes about President Donald Trump’s incendiary Twitter feed during the month of August.

Bravery and Nihilism Amid the Protests in Hong Kong

Aug 31, 2019

Description:

Megan K. Stack writes from Hong Kong on the protests, unrest, and street battles that have shaken the city as it grapples with its standing as a special administrative region and its relationship with China.

Sexual Fantasies of Everyday New Yorkers

Aug 31, 2019

Description:

Mark Cognata writes humorously about the sexual fantasies of New Yorkers, involving umbrellas, oat milk, improv shows, and washing machines.

Boris Johnson’s Brexit-Driven Parliamentary Runaround

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about Boris Johnson maneuver to prorogue the House of Commons, which will reduce the amount of time that the British Parliament has to plan for the Brexit deadline.

What to Stream: “Afterglow,” a Melodramatic Spotlight for Julie Christie

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends the film “Afterglow,” available to stream on Amazon Prime, which was directed by Alan Rudolph and stars Julie Christie and Lara Flynn Boyle.

A Virtual Threat to Iowa’s First-in-the-Nation Caucuses

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey reports on the Democratic National Committee’s rejection of a proposal from the Iowa Democratic Party, which would have introduced “virtual” caucuses in the state.

Marianne Williamson Would Like to Clarify

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, the self-help author Marianne Williamson talks with David Remnick about her unorthodox campaign for the Democratic Presidential nomination. Plus, a discussion on what “affirmative consent” means.

In Season 3, “GLOW” Raises the Stakes

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on Season 3 of Netflix’s “GLOW,” in which the show, which focusses on women wrestlers in the nineteen-eighties, hits its stride.

Dear Pepper: Three’s Company, or a Crowd?

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Liana Finck illustrates her monthly advice-column comic ,“Dear Pepper,” with suggestions for dealing with a friend who would prefer to see her two best buddies ditch their romantic partners.

Boris Johnson’s Busy Week

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon imagines British Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a Beatles-like dash from Buckingham Palace, after he humbly asks the Queen to suspend Parliament so he can put a No-Deal Brexit plan into action.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, August 30th

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Trevor Spaulding’s Daily Cartoon gets ready for Labor Day weekend.

The Site of an Environmentalist’s Deadly Act of Protest

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Chris Wiley writes about the photographer Joel Sternfeld’s book “Our Loss,” which documents the site where the environmentalist and former L.G.B.T.Q.-rights lawyer David Buckel set himself on fire to protest environmental devastation.

Why “Styling Hollywood” Is One of the Best Celebrity-Stylist Reality Shows

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes about “Styling Hollywood,” starring the stylist Jason Bolden and his husband, Adair Curtis.

Prayers of the Summer Traveller

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Claire Friedman writes a series of humorous prayers for travellers.

Greta Thunberg’s Slow Boat to New York 

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

A crowd of young eco-warriors and international media greeted the teen-age climate activist as she sailed into town on a carbon-neutral boat to attend a summit at the U.N., Emily Witt writes.

Wangechi Mutu’s Female Figures Grace the Met’s Façade

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Art will adorn the museum’s exterior for the first time courtesy of the Kenyan-born artist, whose quartet of seven-foot-high bronzes are reminiscent of caryatids.

The Unapologetic Decadence of Hutong

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan reviews Hutong, in the former Le Cirque space, where playing chopsticks hockey for the last morsel of David Yeo’s Szechuanese classics is inevitable.

Can You Write a Novel as a Group?

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Ceridwen Dovey on three groups who write novels collectively: the Alices, who write romance novels under the name Alice Campion; the Helenas, who write choose-your-own-adventure erotic novels under the name Helena S. Paige; and Wu Ming, who write historical novels.

The Hour of Reckoning Descends in “Mr. Klein”

Aug 30, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Joseph Losey’s 1976 film, which, restored to its clammy glory and starring Alain Delon, shows the director as a connoisseur of dread as he dissects the anti-Semitism of Occupied France.

Filling the Empty Seats at the F.E.C. Won’t Fix America’s Corrupt Elections

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Sue Halpern writes about the Federal Elections Commission’s inability to instate meaningful reform to the election process, and the undermining of democracy through voter disenfranchisement.

Review: “Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool” and the Problem of the Archive

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool,” a documentary film directed by Stanley Nelson for the PBS series “American Masters.”

The Politics Behind the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Nick Paumgarten joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how the fear about vaccines acts likes a virus, and why public-health officials see the phenomenon as part of “an all-out war on science.”

America!: Prehistoric Political Ads

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Ali Fitzgerald humorously writes and illustrates a series of political ads from prehistoric times.

A Smaller Debate Lineup Ushers In the Next Stage of the 2020 Democratic Primary

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the winnowing of the field of candidates running in the Democratic Presidential primary, ahead of the September debate event on ABC.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, August 29th

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon shows an empty-nest replacement cat.

Literally the Only Workout for Your Wedding-Dress Silhouette

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Alex Beggs writes a satirical list of exercises for a bride to practice before putting on a wedding dress.

The Weight

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Anne Enright writes a flash-fiction short story, “The Weight,” about a trip on an airplane.

The New Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo, and American Memory

Aug 29, 2019

Description:

Maya Phillips writes on the work of Joy Harpo, the recently named U.S. Poet Laureate, and her latest collection, “An American Sunrise.”

Another Look at Impeaching Trump, at the End of a Long Summer

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes about renewed calls for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, arguing that it is more important for the Democratic Party to compel Trump’s Republican allies to defend their support than it is to protect the incumbency of Democratic House members.

How the Anthony Levandowski Indictment Helps Big Tech Stifle Innovation in Silicon

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Charles Duhigg writes about Anthony Levandowski, who was indicted on allegations of stealing trade secrets, relating to self-driving-car technologies, from Google and sharing them with Uber.

Jair Bolsonaro, the Trump Ally Who Is Allowing the Fires in the Amazon in Brazil to Burn

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Carol Pires writes about the fires surging in the Amazon, and the hostile environmental policies of Brazil’s President, Jair Bolsonaro.

Dating Material: Everything You’ll Need for Class This Year

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

In this first installment of a new monthly comic, Olivia de Recat and Julia Edelman offer a humorous checklist of necessary items for this continuing-education course on love and relationships.

“Kim’s Convenience,” the Genial Canadian Sitcom That Feels Like Watching Another Time Line

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu reviews the Canadian sitcom “Kim’s Convenience,” starring Paul Sun-Hyung Lee and Jean Yoon, based on a play by Ins Choi, who writes and directs the show.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, August 28th

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Emily Flake’s Daily Cartoon shows some swag from the G7 summit.

Honest iPhone Updates

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Blythe Roberson imagines a humorous list of iPhone updates that merely serve to exacerbate the condition and battery life of an old phone that its user has been putting off an upgrade for.

Caleb Crain’s “Overthrow” and the Power of Literary Form

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Garth Greenwell reviews “Overthrow,” the second novel by Caleb Crain.

Argentina Considers a Return to Peronism

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Stephania Taladrid writes on the August 11th primaries in Argentina, in which the incumbent President, Mauricio Macri, fell behind the Peronists Alberto Fernández and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, and the economic consequences of the Macri administration.

A Palestinian Lawyer on Netanyahu’s Strategic Errors

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Raja Shehadeh, the Palestinian lawyer, writer, and activist who co-founded the human-rights organization Al-Haq, about the decline of the Israeli left and how changes in American politics affect the fate of Palestinians.

Ariel Francisco Reads James Wright

Aug 28, 2019

Description:

Ariel Francisco joins Kevin Young to discuss “By a Lake in Minnesota,” by James Wright, and his own poem “Along the East River and in the Bronx Young Men Were Singing.”

“Jawline,” Reviewed: A Chilling Look at the Making of a Teen Influencer

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix writes about the Hulu documentary “Jawline,” directed by Liza Mandelup, about the teen-age social-media influencer Austyn Tester and his quest for Internet fame.

Trump’s Weird Whoppers at the G-7 Summit

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on Donald Trump at the G-7 summit, at which he spouted fabulist views on China, Russia, North Korea, and the environment.

Circumstances in Which I Will Not Pet Your Dog

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

The writers Lucy Huber and Lillian Stone provide a humorous list of circumstances in which they would not pet a dog, with illustrations by Andrew Haener.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, August 27th

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

David Sipress’s Daily Cartoon gets the latest news about President Trump.

A Day in the Life of a Tree

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

M. R. O’Connor writes about new technology that allows researchers to watch as trees grow, shrink, drink, and breathe.

Marianne Williamson Has a Plan for That

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

Jill Gutowitz writes a humorous outline of the Presidential platform of the Democratic candidate Marianne Williamson, addressing issues of foreign policy, gun control, immigration, and more.

In “One Child Nation,” Nanfu Wang Confronts China’s History, and Her Own

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

Han Zhang writes about how Nanfu Wang, the director of the documentary “One Child Nation,” confronts China’s infamous one-child policy and her own history and upbringing in China.

Kate Walbert Reads “To Do”

Aug 27, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Kate Walbert, who reads her short story “To Do,” from the September 2, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” Reviewed: Richard Linklater’s Narrow View of a Creator in Crisis

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Richard Linklater’s adaptation of Maria Semple’s novel “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” starring Cate Blanchett and Billy Crudup.

HBO’s “Our Boys,” a Brutally Truthful Depiction of the Effects of Hate Crimes

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

David Remnick speaks with two of the creators of the HBO show “Our Boys”—Hagai Levi, an Israeli Jew, and Tawfiq Abu Wael, a Palestinian living in Israel—about the human costs of the conflict in their homeland.

New York: En Español

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Jenny Kroik illustrates a series of panels that narrate her attempts at learning Spanish in New York City.

Nell Zink’s Satire Raises the Stakes

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Madeleine Schwartz on whether the novelist Nell Zink, who has spent her career critiquing both activism and cynicism, can take on the age of Donald Trump in her fiction.

The Mail

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Brooke Jarvis’s review of “The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator” and Nathan Heller’s piece about the automobile era.

The Survival of Iggy Pop

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich and Iggy Pop, an inventor of punk rock, discuss his long career, the future, and swimming in Miami.

The Message of Measles

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

As public-health officials confront the largest outbreak in the U.S. in decades, they’ve been fighting as much against dangerous ideas as they have against the disease, Nick Paumgarten writes.

Some Relationship Models, by Liana Finck

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Sketchbook by Liana Finck: How to Netflix and chill forever.

Love Poems for People with Children

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by John Kenney: I look at my darling / who spits up on me again / and appears to mouth “dickhead.” / I am sure of it. 

“To Do,” by Kate Walbert

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Kate Walbert: “Are we the sum of what we’ve crossed off? Or are we only what we still have left to do?”

The Subway Valley Floor

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Sketchpad by Maggie Larson: Stray too far from the Lost Earbud Basin, and you might find yourself in the Air-Conditioner Drip Zone. 

Everything You’re Afraid to Ask About Human Composting

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Henry Alford on a new form of eco-burial that was just legalized in Washington State and the psychological hurdle that it may pose to consumers.

Vija Celmins’s Surface Matters

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Calvin Tomkins on the artist Vija Celmins, who produces relatively little work and vigorously resists all forms of self-promotion but, as she enters her eighties, may be changing her attitudes. 

Baz Luhrmann’s “Moulin Rouge!” Mega Mashup

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on the cast album for the stage adaptation of the film director’s 2001 movie musical, which features songs from Elton John, Madonna, Beyoncé, and Sia. 

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons August 26, 2019

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Reader, I Googled It

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Dan Chiasson on finding new ways to bring books to life amid fears about their death.

Lights, Curtain, Action: Backstage with the Man Who Illuminates “Hamilton”

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about a video that follows Brian (Rizzo) Frankel, a Broadway lighting technician, behind the scenes at the Richard Rodgers Theatre and the musical “Hamilton.”

Marianne Williamson’s Esprit de Orb Corps

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Antonia Hitchens on the Democratic Presidential candidate’s visit to Manny’s, in the Mission, where she reunited with her “larger philosophical tribe.”

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

“In Montparnasse,” “A Primer for Forgetting,” “In West Mills,” and “The Chain.”

“Among the Intellectuals,” by Tony Hoagland

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Tony Hoagland: “They were a restless tribe.”

Kadir Nelson’s “Heat Wave”

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Kadir Nelson about his cover for the September 2, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Are Spies More Trouble Than They’re Worth?

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik on the history of espionage, which is a lesson in paradox: the better your intelligence, the dumber your conduct; the more you know, the less you anticipate.

The Rich Can’t Get Richer Forever, Can They?

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Inequality comes in waves. The question is when this one will break, Liaquat Ahamed writes.

“Lust Must Have Struck for the First Time,” by Jessica Lee

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Jessica Lee: “It’s not that I wanted / to kiss them so much as I wanted to be them.”

Kate Walbert on Characters Acting Out of Character

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Cressida Leyshon interviews Kate Walbert about “To Do,” her short story from the September 2, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Cartoon Caption Contest

Aug 26, 2019

Description:

Submit your caption.

A Park Slope Stoop Horror Story

Aug 25, 2019

Description:

Rachel Lindsay illustrates a story about a Brooklyn brownstone-dwelling couple’s worst nightmare: having lowbrow books, like “Fifty Shades of Grey” and “The Notebook,” left in front of their stoop.

China’s Hong Kong Dilemma

Aug 25, 2019

Description:

The mass demonstrations are in bold defiance of Chinese authority, but a crackdown could be incalculably costly, Evan Osnos writes.

Sunday Reading: The Power of The New Yorker’s Investigative Reporting

Aug 25, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, highlights from the magazine’s long history of investigative journalism, including reporting by Philip Gourevitch, Rachel Carson, Seymour Hersh, Jane Mayer, Paul Wilkes, Ronan Farrow, Susan Sheehan, Ed Caesar, David Lang, and Lawrence Wright.

My Life in Smoke

Aug 25, 2019

Description:

Garnett Kilberg Cohen writes a personal history about smoking cigarettes, through the lens of her family and relationships.

“Ready or Not,” a Screwball Take on the Hide-and-Seek Slasher Film

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey reviews the horror movie “Ready or Not,” directed by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, about a bride who becomes involved in her in-laws’ deadly game of hide-and-seek.

Donald Trump Dreams of Golf in Greenland

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon imagines President Trump playing a frigid round of golf in Greenland.

A Rediscovered Archive from California in the Seventies

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu writes about the photographer Michael Jang and his work in the nineteen-seventies, in which he captured L.A. glitz, San Francisco streets, and his Chinese-American family.

Who’s Laughing Now?

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Casey Rand writes a humorous list of rhetorical questions for the end of the world.

How the Trump Administration Is Stigmatizing Abortion

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Margaret Talbot writes about a new rule governing Title X, the federal program that funds reproductive-health services for low-income women, which interferes with providers’ ability to refer patients to abortion providers.

Félix Auger-Aliassime Is Trying to Stay Calm

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas writes on Félix Auger-Aliassime, a nineteen-year-old Canadian tennis phenom who is currently ranked the No. 21 men’s player in the world.

“The Quick and the Dead,” by Joy Williams, a Prescient Ode to Political Hopelessness

Aug 24, 2019

Description:

Jeanie Riess reviews “The Quick and the Dead,” by Joy Williams, which presents a prescient ode to political hopelessness.

Roger Federer Opens Up

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, on the eve of his nineteenth U.S. Open, Roger Federer sits down with David Remnick. Plus, Jia Tolentino on the corrosiveness of the Internet.

Stephen Cheng Released One Single That Sounded Like Nothing Else. But Who Was He?

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu writes about the Chinese-American singer Stephen Cheng, who recorded the song “Always Together (A Chinese Love Song)” for the Jamaican record label Sunshine.

Avant-Garde Wedding Concepts for Your Totally Original Nuptials

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Max Wittert offers a humorous illustrated list of ideas for an out-of-the-ordinary wedding celebration.

Trump Clarification Syndrome

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

David Remnick on Donald Trump’s deranged behavior as he has repeated an anti-Semitic slur, reneged on promises to enact gun control, and retweeted conspiracy theories, and on the importance of not falling into despair.

How the Religious Right Transformed Israeli Education

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Ruth Margalit on the “religionization” that supposedly secular public schools in Israel have undergone in the past decade, under the leadership of Benjamin Netanyahu, Naftali Bennett, and Rafi Peretz.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, August 23rd

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

In Farley Katz’s Daily Cartoon, the Burning Man people took all the ketamine.

Billie Eilish and Her Ambient Hopelessness Go to No. 1 with “Bad Guy”

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes about the singer and songwriter Billie Eilish, whose song “Bad Guy” has toppled Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” from the top of the Billboard chart.

The VOID Is Where Virtual Reality Enters the Dying Meatspace of the Mall

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire, a virtual-reality immersive video game now playing at the Oculus, in lower Manhattan.

Even Keith Richards Gets the Blues

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook cartoon shows the legendary Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards nostalgic for his glory days and for former bandmates.

New Budget Airlines

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Jiji Lee writes a humorous roundup of budget airlines and the ways that they cut corners.

A Penn Law Professor Wants to Make America White Again

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks to Amy Wax, a professor at University of Pennsylvania Law who promotes the idea that the U.S. should limit immigration because of the superiority of Western culture.

Kabab Café’s “Snout to Tail” Delicacies

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

David Kortava on Ali El Sayed, the restaurant’s chef and sole employee, who refuses to be confined to a menu and is committed to exotic meats and flamboyant improvisation. 

A New Revival of Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal”

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

The play, which traces the life of an extramarital affair in reverse chronology, features Charlie Cox, Zawe Ashton, and the “Avengers” star Tom Hiddleston.

Tanya Tucker’s New Album Might Be the Best of Her Long, Underrated Career

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

David Cantwell writes about the sixty-one-year-old country singer Tanya Tucker and her new album, “While I’m Livin’,” and also her reputation and career throughout the years.

“Tigers Are Not Afraid” and “Give Me Liberty,” Reviewed

Aug 23, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Issa López’s “Tigers Are Not Afraid,” starring Paola Lara, and Kirill Mikhanovsky’s “Give Me Liberty,” featuring Lauren (Lolo) Spencer.

What to Stream: A Rediscovered Short by—and Starring—Chantal Akerman

Aug 22, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews the Belgian director Chantal Akerman’s seventeen-minute film “Family Business,” from 1984, a comedy about the variety of indignities that the movie business inflicts on its eager and earnest participants.

The Second Season of “Succession” Digs Into the Characters’ Self-Loathing

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes on the second season of HBO’s “Succession,” starring Jeremy Strong, Brian Cox, and Kieran Culkin.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, August 14th

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Peter Kuper’s Daily Cartoon shows a revised Emma Lazarus poem on the Statue of Liberty.

Why Binge-Watching Is Good for You

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Talib Babb offers a humorous list of the many ways that binge-watching contributes to a person’s well-being.

The Royal Family Gets Drawn Deeper Into the Brexit Maelstrom

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes on the relationship between national and royal news, including reportage on Prince William and Duchess Kate, Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan Markle, Prince Andrew, and the Queen, amid reports of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s and others’ comments on Brexit.

Charles Manson’s Musical Ambitions

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Jim DeRogatis writes about Charles Manson’s music career, which included links to Dennis Wilson, of the Beach Boys, and the music producer Terry Melcher, and how it’s regarded or ignored in recent takes on the Manson murders, including the films “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood“ and ”Charlie Says.“

Julius: The Story of a Premature Birth

Aug 14, 2019

Description:

Jon Michaud writes a personal essay about the premature birth of his second child.

George Saunders Reads “Elliott Spencer”

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author George Saunders, who reads his short story “Elliott Spencer,” from the August 19, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Why Joe Biden’s Gaffes Matter

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the gaffes of the Democratic Presidential candidate and former Vice-President Joe Biden, who misspoke several times during a recent trip to Iowa, and what his verbal mistakes will mean if he wins the Party’s nomination.

Respect for Fredo, a Character Who Is So Much More Than a Political Insult

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman writes on the character Fredo Corleone, played by John Cazale in “The Godfather” and “The Godfather: Part II,” as Chris Cuomo, Donald Trump, and others weigh in on the use of “Fredo” as a taunt.

“Kochland” Examines the Koch Brothers’ Early, Crucial Role in Climate-Change Denial

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Jane Mayer writes about the new book “Kochland,” by Christopher Leonard, which is about how Charles and David Koch crippled government action on climate change.

Dear Pepper: Cohabitation and Long-Distance Friendship

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Liana Finck’s comic advice column, which she writes in the voice of her dog, Pepper, addresses someone whose partner isn't ready to move in together and someone with a friend who has distanced himself.

The Battle Over the Soul of El Museo del Barrio

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Camila Osorio on controversies over the mission and future of El Museo del Barrio, in East Harlem.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, August 13th

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton’s Daily Cartoon shows the food on offer at the Iowa State Fair.

Endangered Polar Bear Demands Face-to-Face Meeting with Trump

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that a polar bear has asked to speak with Donald Trump after the Administration made changes to the Endangered Species Act.

Your Period-Tracking App: F.A.Q.

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Sarah Hutto imagines a humorous list of frequently asked questions for a fake app that tracks users’ menstrual cycles and takes some of the work out of having a period.

“Is There Still Sex in the City?” and the Decline of a Particular Fantasy Life

Aug 13, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews Candace Bushnell’s “Is There Still Sex in the City?,” which serves as a follow-up to the author’s “Sex and the City” and the HBO TV series it inspired.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: Conspiracy Theories

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Daily Cartoon depicts Jeffrey Epstein among conspiratorial figures.

Jeffrey Epstein Conspiracies and the Mysterious Deaths of the Rich and Ruined

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes on Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide and the conspiracy theories, circulated by members of the Trump Administration and others, about his death.

Review: The Mild Horror of “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark”

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark,” directed by André Øvredal, adapted from the eponymous three-book series of classic macabre and gory tales by Alvin Schwartz.

The Rippling Effects of China’s One-Child Policy

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Nanfu Wang joins Jiayang Fan and Dorothy Wickenden to discuss “One Child Nation,” her documentary film about China’s one-child policy.

Who Stays Gone, and Who Can Afford to Return

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Sarah M. Broom writes on a year living in the French Quarter of New Orleans, six years after Hurricane Katrina, on growing up in New Orleans East, and on the identity that the neighborhood represents.

Mysterious Summer Abrasions: An Investigation

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Sara Lautman illustrates a humorous series of possible origins for some super-localized red scratches.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, August 12th

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon shows what is going on inside Cuomo’s fish tube.

Toni Morrison and Nina Simone, United in Soul

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Emily Lordi writes on the commonalities between the music of Nina Simone and the literature of Toni Morrison; Morrison died, at the age of eighty-eight, on August 5, 2019.

The Radical Transformations of a Battered Women’s Shelter

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Larissa MacFarquhar on Transition House, which had to be true to its principles until it had to leave them behind.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

“The MVP Machine,” “A History of the Bible,” “EEG,” and “The Organs of Sense.”

George Saunders on the Induced Bafflement of Fiction

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews George Saunders about “Elliott Spencer,” his short story from the August 19, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“Sherman’s Showcase” Celebrates a Lost TV Genre

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum reviews “Sherman’s Showcase,” a loving homage to a fake “Soul Train”-like show and its iconic host. 

The Mail

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Lizzie Presser’s article on black land loss, Hilton Als’s review of Hannah Gadsby’s “Douglas,” and Dana Goodyear’s Profile of Kamala Harris.

“Claude Monet, ‘The Artist’s Garden at Vétheuil,’ 1880,” by Ciaran Carson

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Ciaran Carson: “So we wander down the road of what it is we think / We want to say.”

“Sea Wall/A Life” and “Coriolanus,” Reviewed

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham reviews “Sea Wall/A Life,” starring Tom Sturridge and Jake Gyllenhaal, on Broadway, and the Public’s new rendition of Shakespeare’s “Coriolanus.”

The Fight to Redefine Racism

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Kelefa Sanneh on “How to Be an Antiracist,” in which Ibram X. Kendi argues that we should think of “racist” not as a pejorative but as a simple, widely encompassing term of description.

Joey Salads Gets Out the Vote

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Andrew Marantz on the Staten Island YouTube star and congressional candidate who thinks he’s better at social-media marketing than A.O.C. 

“Scylla and Charybdis,” by Megan Fernandes

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Megan Fernandes: “I like when the choices are both ugly— / the rock and the hard place.”

Téa Obreht Reimagines the Western

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Francisco Cantú on Téa Obreht’s second novel, “Inland,” which brings unexpected disturbances to the American landscape Obreht grew up romanticizing from afar. 

Cyrus Grace Dunham on a Year Without a Name

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Personal History about transitioning by Cyrus Grace Dunham: Was the problem gender—or me?

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons August 19, 2019

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Winston Churchill’s Granddaughter’s MTV Connection 

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry on a visit with the octogenarian Edwina Sandys in the SoHo loft that launched “The Real World”—and American reality TV.

The Worst of the 1919 White Sox

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Sketchbook by Barry Blitt: “Happy” Felsch: Tore pages out of library books. Enjoyed a good shunning. Frightened the batboy.

Clairo and the Fuzzy, D.I.Y. Sounds of Bedroom Pop

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Carrie Battan reviews Clairo’s new album, “Immunity,” on which the singer evinces a newfound maturity.

Recent Articles of Mine 

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Jack Handey: “Why Rubbing Sand Into a Drag Burn Is Not as Crazy as It Sounds” —Men’s Health.

Johnny Carson’s Favorite Singer

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on the cabaret star Marilyn Maye, who has a packed schedule and a batch of new fans who may have missed the first eight decades of her career. 

Making Music from the Met’s Forgotten Treasures

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik on Oliver Beer’s Vessel Orchestra, which was assembled by rummaging around in the basement storerooms of the Metropolitan Museum.

Stacey Abrams’s Fight for a Fair Vote

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

As the 2020 elections approach, Abrams is leading the battle against voter suppression, Jelani Cobb writes.

“Elliott Spencer,” by George Saunders

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Fiction by George Saunders: “Never have I felt being me to be so worth it so far.”

Erich Wolfgang Korngold, the Opera Composer Who Went Hollywood

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on Erich Wolfgang Korngold, whose melodic gift rivalled Puccini’s and whose reputation suffered when he began writing movie scores. 

Revisiting Sutton Hoo, Britain’s Mythical Ship Burial

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes about Sutton Hoo, an estate in Suffolk that is grounds to Europe’s largest ship burial, which ended Britain’s Dark Ages, and which, when reconsidered, points to the fluidity of the country‘s history.

What Dayton’s Mayor, Nan Whaley, Wants America to Learn from Her City

Aug 12, 2019

Description:

Paige Williams writes on Nan Whaley, the mayor of Dayton, Ohio, and the aftermath of the mass shooting by Connor Betts that left the killer and nine others dead.

Why John Delaney Won’t Drop Out of the Presidential Race

Aug 11, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes on the 2020 Presidential hopeful John Delaney, who trails behind Democratic front-runners such as Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders but is the only candidate to have visited all of Iowa’s counties.

Professions of Men I’ve Gone Out with and the T-Shirts I Borrowed from Them

Aug 11, 2019

Description:

Pia Mileaf-Patel humorously illustrates a closet full of T-shirts that a person has borrowed from past lovers.

India and Pakistan Clash in Kashmir, the Most Dangerous Place in the World

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Dexter Filkins joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how Narendra Modi’s virulent Hindu nationalism is destabilizing the region.

A Young Artist Charts the Journey from “Haiti to Hood”

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix writes on Daveed Baptiste, a twenty-two-year-old artist, who explores the complicated birth of the Haitian-American in his photographic series “Haiti to Hood.”

How Long Have I Had That?

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Amy Kurzweil illustrates a humorous comic about how long she’s had clothing and other items.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, August 8th

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Felipe Galindo’s Daily Cartoon shows a day at the beach.

David Berman Made Us Feel Less Alone

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on the artist, poet, and musician David Berman, of the bands Silver Jews and Purple Mountains, who died on Wednesday, and the work Berman left behind for his fans.

Cory Booker Tries to Meet the Moral Moment

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the state of Cory Booker’s 2020 Presidential-election campaign after his performance during the Democratic debates, and his speech at the Mother Emanuel church in the wake of mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton.

How to Motivate Me During an Exercise Class

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Ellie Shechet writes a humorous list of ways to motivate a participant in an exercise class.

How Social Media Shapes Our Identity

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Nausicaa Renner writes on how the Internet—especially social-media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat—makes it difficult for people to escape their previous identities.

Kara Walker’s Toni Morrison

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

The artist Kara Walker talks about the inspiration behind her cover for the August 19, 2019, issue of the magazine.

The Lonely Work of Moderating Hacker News

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Anna Wiener writes on Daniel Gackle and Scott Bell, the content moderators of Hacker News, a popular online tech-focussed forum owned by the startup accelerator Y Combinator.

How Many

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Bryan Washington writes a flash-fiction short story, “How Many,” about a romantic relationship.

“There’s Blood On Your Little Hands”: Trump’s Visit to El Paso Energizes His Opponents

Aug 8, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea writes about the protesters in El Paso who organized against Donald Trump’s visit to the city, following the recent mass shooting.

The Indelible Substance of a Semester with Toni Morrison

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson recalls a Princeton University course that he took with the novelist Toni Morrison, the author of “Beloved,“ ”Sula,“ ”The Bluest Eye,“ and more, and who died this week, at the age of eighty-eight.

“Letterkenny,” a Surreal Canadian Comedy to Rival “Schitt’s Creek”

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner writes on the Canadian TV show “Letterkenny,” based on a Web series, whose first six seasons are available to American viewers on Hulu.

Toni Morrison and What Our Mothers Couldn’t Say

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix remembers Toni Morrison, the author of the novels “The Bluest Eye,” “Beloved,” “Jazz,” and “Sula,” who died on Monday, at the age of eighty-eight.

My Netflix Family Tree

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Laura Mishkin humorously illustrates a network of people who all use the same Netflix account.

Going to the Movies with Toni Morrison

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Kevin Young remembers going to the movies with Toni Morrison, who died on Monday, and Angela Davis.

Donald Trump and Lax Gun Laws Are Tearing America Apart

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the ways in which President Trump and the mass-shooting crisis is tearing apart the social and political fabric of the United States.

Why Do Americans Feel That There’s No One to Help Us?

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about the corrosion of public faith in leadership and institutions that now consumes Americans of both the Democratic and Republican Parties in the Trump era.

Toni Morrison on Her Last Novel and the Voices of Her Characters

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Hilton Als interviews Toni Morrison in 2015 at The New Yorker Festival, about writing her novels, including “Beloved,” “Sula,” “Jazz,” and others, and how her relationship with her father shaped her understanding of the world.

How Beto O’Rourke and Julián Castro Respond to Trump’s War on Immigrants

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells compares the responses of the Democratic candidates Beto O’Rourke and Julián Castro to the border-control policies of the Trump Administration.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, August 7th

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Amy Hwang’s Daily Cartoon shows the search for central air-conditioning.

Trump Demands Facebook Investigate Why Obama’s Post Got So Many Likes

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump has demanded an inquiry into why former President Barack Obama’s post about gun violence was so popular.

Even More Historical Events as Reimagined by Quentin Tarantino

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Harris Mayersohn humorously imagines historical events as interpreted by Quentin Tarantino, the director of “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” including Election Night 2016 and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

The Last Presidential Salmon

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Caroline Lester writes on the tradition of delivering the first wild-caught Atlantic salmon to the President and on the future of the endangered species.

Is Ebola Evolving Into a Deadlier Virus?

Aug 7, 2019

Description:

Richard Preston on the Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the process of mutation through which the virus evolves, possibly becoming more infectious and deadly.

“He Won’t Be Welcome Until He Repents”: El Paso Residents Ask Trump to Stay Away

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea reports from a gathering of El Paso residents who were brainstorming what sort of welcome—and what level of hostility—should meet President Donald Trump on Wednesday, when he visits the Texan city in the wake of this past weekend’s deadly mass shooting.

Toni Morrison, the Teacher

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham remembers the author and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, who died on Monday.

How the Trail of American White Supremacy Led to El Paso

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb writes on how American white supremacy can be traced from the Chicago race riot of 1919 through to the racially motivated mass shootings in Charleston, South Carolina, and El Paso, Texas.

Toni Morrison in The New Yorker

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Erin Overbey writes on the death of the author Toni Morrison, and looks back on the Nobel Prize laureate’s written contributions to The New Yorker.

Just Your Luck: A Smattering of Common Blessings and Curses

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Maritsa Patrinos writes and illustrates a humorous list of everyday blessings and curses.

An Unexpected Letter from John Paul Stevens, Shakespeare Skeptic

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

James Shapiro writes about his six-month correspondence with Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who died last month, about the authorship of William Shakespeare’s plays.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, August 6th

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Emily Flake’s Daily Cartoon shows the fallout from a meme about feral hogs.

Donald Trump’s Trade War with China Is Spiralling Out of Control

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Donald Trump writes about the escalating trade war between Donald Trump and the Chinese government.

The Brutal Logic of Stardom in “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood”

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry reviews Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” a fantastical retelling of the Manson murders, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, and Margot Robbie.

Link Found Between Gun Violence and Cowardly Politicians

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz writes about a new study that connects gun violence to the prevalence of cowardly politicians in a country.

How “Peanuts” Created a Space for Thinking

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Nicole Rudick writes about how Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts,” a beloved comic strip about the everyday adventures of Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, Lucy, and a gang of other kids, invited readers to contemplate the big picture on a small scale.

All the Define-the-Relationship (D.T.R.) Moments in a Modern Romance

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Ginny Hogan makes a funny list of relationship milestones for modern couples.

Three Podcasts To Listen to In August: A Study of an Averted Mass Shooting, A New True-Crime Classic, and the Familiar Pleasures of “Reply All”

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson recommends three podcasts to listen to in August: “Jolted,” about an averted mass shooting; “The Clearing,” which examines the complexities of true crime; and the old favorite “Reply All.”

Was E-mail a Mistake?

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Cal Newport writes about the invention of e-mail and recent studies in the field of distributed systems which suggest that synchronous forms of communication, such as meetings, are more efficient.

After El Paso and Dayton, Three Ways to Think About Violence

Aug 6, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes about the recent mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, and alternate ways to think about both sides of the gun-control issue.

“Trump the Accomplice”: El Paso Residents Blame the President for a Hate-Fuelled Mass Shooting

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea reports from a march in El Paso, Texas, on Sunday, protesting gun policy and Donald Trump’s rhetoric and featuring a speech by Beto O’Rourke, after a mass shooting there and in Dayton, Ohio.

Politics Changed the Reading of the Second Amendment—and Can Change It Again

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on the history of the Second Amendment, the National Rifle Association’s efforts to shift the interpretation of the right to bear arms, and the parallels between the gun-rights and same-sex-marriage-rights movements, in light of the El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, mass shootings.

Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker’s Politics and More podcast, Ben Taub discusses his reporting on Mohamedou Salahi, who was held by the U.S. at Guantánamo Bay for fifteen years for a dubious link to Al Qaeda.

Possible Explanations for Exhuming John Dillinger

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Kim Warp illustrates some humorous, conspiracy-provoking theories as to why the corpse of John Dillinger is being exhumed.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, August 5th

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton’s Daily Cartoon imagines President Trump’s response to another act of violence.

Representative Veronica Escobar Speaks Out About Gun Violence and El Paso

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Representative Veronica Escobar, a Democrat of Texas representing El Paso, about the shooting at a Walmart in that town.

People Boris Johnson Resembles

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes a humorous list of characters whom Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister of the U.K., resembles.

Why Doctors Should Organize

Aug 5, 2019

Description:

Eric Topol writes to advocate for the organization of medical caregivers that eschews the business of medicine and instead places its focus on promoting the health concerns of patients and confronting the transformational challenges that lie ahead for the medical profession.

What to Stream: “Tucker: The Man and His Dream,” a Slyly Personal Francis Ford Coppola Film

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends streaming Francis Ford Coppola’s film “Tucker: The Man and His Dream,” starring Jeff Bridges, based on the life of the automotive visionary Preston Tucker.

Mississippi’s Race for Governor Tests the Limits of Conservatism

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Bob Moser writes on the Mississippi gubernatorial race, which pits the fiscally conservative Republican lieutenant governor Tate Reeves against the Republican Bill Waller, Jr., and possibly the Democratic attorney general, Jim Hood.

Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

On The New Yorker Radio Hour, the U.S. tortured Mohamedou Salahi and kept him at Guantánamo Bay for fifteen years. He’s no Al Qaeda mastermind, but, even today, he’s virtually a prisoner. Why won’t we let him go?

Bonus Daily Cartoon: Product Placements

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Daily Cartoon identifies the products mentioned during the Democratic debate.

Top Nine Hot and Unavoidable Summer Vibes

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Ashley Franklin illustrates a humorous list of the top unavoidable summer vibes.

How a Historian Uncovered Ronald Reagan’s Racist Remarks to Richard Nixon

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks with the historian Tim Naftali, who published the text and audio of a taped call, from 1971, in which Reagan described the African delegates to the U.N. in luridly racist terms.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, August 2nd

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Mike Twohy’s Daily Cartoon throws lightning bolts.

A Green Light on the Border Wall as Trump’s Supreme Court Victories Mount

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Cristian Farias writes on the Supreme Court’s decision to allow the construction of the border wall as the case advances in the Ninth Circuit, and on Donald Trump’s travel ban, the National Emergency Act, and the separation of powers.

The Best Beach Reads for When You Left Your Book at Home

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Alex Watt offers a humorous list of reading recommendations for the beach when you’ve forgotten to bring along a book.

The Stunning Grounds, and Tragic History, of the Lost Gardens of Heligan

Aug 2, 2019

Description:

Charlotte Mendelson writes about the Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall, England, a living memorial to those who died in the First World War and an antidote to garden envy.

“Honeyland,” Reviewed: A Gripping, Frustrating Documentary About a Beekeeper’s Fragile Isolation

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Honeyland,” a documentary about beekeeping, by the filmmakers Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov.

Senator Michael Bennet on His Long-Shot Bid for the Presidency

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Senator Michael Bennet, of Colorado, one of more than twenty Democrats vying for the Party’s Presidential nomination, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the race, the Party, and the President.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: Once Upon a Time . . . In Detroit

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

In Barry Blitt’s Daily Cartoon, Joe Biden emerges relatively unscathed from the Democratic debate.

Unsung Heroes of the Internet

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Matthew C. Kramer humorously illustrates the unsung heroes of the Internet, including people who post video tutorials, free yoga classes, and useful reviews.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, August 1st

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Al Solomon’s Daily Cartoon stages the board-game version of the Democratic primary.

The Battle Over Barack Obama’s Legacy at the Democratic Debates

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the July 31st Democratic-primary debates, in which Joe Biden defended the Obama Administration while other candidates, including Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Julián Castro, argued for more progressive approaches to immigration, health care, and criminal-justice reform.

The Last Robot-Proof Job in America?

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe writes about the seafood-delivery startup FultonFishMarket.com and its reliance on a mix of technology and human expertise.

Frequently Asked Questions: My Engagement

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Danielle Kraese writes humorous answers to frequently asked questions about a woman’s recent engagement and the wedding-planning process.

Margaret Atwood Reads Alice Munro

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Margaret Atwood joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss the short story “Corrie,” by Alice Munro, from a 2010 issue of the magazine.

Sara Stridsberg’s “Valerie,” Reviewed: An Extraordinary Love Letter to the Radical Feminist Valerie Solanas

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews Sara Stridsberg’s novel “Valerie,” based on the life of the radical feminist and the author of “SCUM Manifesto,” Valerie Solanas, who is best known for shooting Andy Warhol.

An Evening with Joseph Conrad

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Anne Carson writes a flash-fiction short story, “An Evening with Joseph Conrad,” about Joseph Conrad and a woman who knew him in the Congo.

During Night 2 of the Democratic Debate, Cory Booker Tests the Power of His Best Performance

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes on Senator Cory Booker’s impressive performance during the Democratic primary debate in Detroit, where he held his own alongside Joe Biden and Kamal Harris.

On Night 2 of the Democratic Debate, Joe Biden Defends the Party’s Past

Aug 1, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes on how, in the Democratic primary debate, in Detroit, Joe Biden was made to answer for the policies of the Democratic Party’s past.

What to Expect on the Second Night of the Democratic Debate

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about what to expect on the second night of the Democratic debate in Detroit, which will feature the front-runners Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.

How the Cover Song Conquered Movie Trailers

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Alex Pappademas on the evolution of cover songs in movie trailers, beginning with the trailer for David Fincher’s film “The Social Network,” from 2010, by the company Mark Woollen & Associates, and in those for the blockbuster sequels and remakes of Hollywood today.

The Whitney Biennial Protests and the Changing Standards of Accountability in Art

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Andrea K. Scott writes about the resignation of Warren B. Kanders from the board of the Whitney Museum of American Art, after a group of artists announced that they would remove their work from the Whitney Biennial to protest Kanders’s ownership of the Safariland Group, a manufacturer of tear gas whose use has been documented against migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: Candidate Angst

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Ward Sutton’s Daily Cartoon brings the Democrats to therapy.

A Revelatory Performance by the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends a classical-music performance at Lincoln Center, of works by Mozart and Brahms, by the pianist Martin Helmchen and the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, conducted by Louis Langrée.

The Rhetoric and Reality of Donald Trump’s Racism

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about Donald Trump’s appearance in Jamestown, Virginia, which is marking four hundred years since the beginning of both slavery and democracy in America.

Eternal Damnations for the Twenty-first Century

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Evan Lian humorously illustrates eternal damnations for the modern era.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, July 31st

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Lila Ash’s Daily Cartoon can’t beat the exposure.

The Fiery Pleasures of “Blown Away,” a Reality-TV Competition for Glassblowing

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme writes about the Netflix series “Blown Away,” where experienced glassblowers labor to create works of stunning, breakable art.

The Decline of Yelling

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes about how yelling is no longer seen as a sign of power or authority but as a display of toxic masculinity, hubris, and privilege.

At the Democratic Debate, Pete Buttigieg Addresses the Age Issue

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about the Democratic Presidential-primary debate and how Pete Buttigieg used his youth as a rhetorical tool to talk about gun control, foreign policy, and climate change.

Things to Do During Your Karaoke Song’s Too-Long Instrumental Interlude

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Claire Friedman writes a humorous list of things to do when you mistakenly choose a song with a lengthy musical interlude during karaoke with your co-workers.

CNN’s Non-Stop Hunt for Drama at the Democratic Debate

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach on how CNN handled the first night of the Democratic debate, pitting the long-shot candidates against the front-runners Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders.

On Night 1 of the Democratic Debate, Marianne Williamson Battles the “Dark Psychic Force”

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes on Marianne Williamson’s performance at the Democratic primary debate in Detroit, which added a level of rigor to her campaign.

In Night 1 of the Democratic Debate, It Was Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders Versus the Moderates

Jul 31, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes on how the progressives Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders were the best communicators during the first night of the Democratic primary debates, in Detroit.

The Gilroy Shooting and What the Democratic Candidates Should Remember About Justice John Paul Stevens

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes about the recent shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival and about Justice John Paul Stevens’s compelling dissent in District of Columbia v. Heller, in which he argued that gun-control laws are constitutional.

New Documents Raise Ethical and Billing Concerns About the N.R.A.’s Outside Counsel

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Mike Spies on allegations, including a written statement from a former senior employee, that the N.R.A.’s outside counsel obstructed the work of N.R.A. accountants and exacerbated the organization’s financial woes as he charged it hefty legal fees.

“Screen Directors Playhouse” Let Directors Run Free

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the series “Screen Directors Playhouse,” featuring episodes by John Ford, Ida Lupino, Allan Dwan, and others, is a reproach to the bureaucratic jumble of modern television.

The Democratic Debates Are an Opportunity to Speak Frankly About Trump and Race

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes about the the second round of Democratic Presidential-primary debates, whose atmosphere has been intensified by President Trump’s bluntly racist attacks on Democratic politicians.

A Decline in Capital Investment Reveals the False Promise of Trump’s Tax Bill

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the Commerce Department’s report on the gross domestic product, released last week, which showed a sharp slowdown in capital spending by American businesses during the second quarter of this year, contrary to the Trump Administration’s predictions.

Facebook’s Audacious Pitch for a Global Cryptocurrency

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Sue Halpern on Facebook’s proposal, in the face of recent data-privacy scrutiny, for a new global cryptocurrency, Libra, which will operate on the investment of large corporations like Visa, Uber, and Spotify, and is designed to be used with Facebook’s digital wallet, Calibra.

The Questions Constituents Want to Ask 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Nic Koller illustrates a humorous list of questions that Americans might want to ask Democratic Presidential candidates, including “How is this happening?“

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, July 30th

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon gets a gift for its pet.

Putin Denies Mitch McConnell Is Russian Asset: “He Has Never Been an Asset to Any Country”

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Vladimir Putin criticized pundits who called the Kentucky senator Mitch McConnell a Russian asset, on the basis of McConnell’s lack of use or value.

New Slogans for Athleisure Brands

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Sam Saulsbury makes a humorous list of possible branding slogans for companies who make athleisure clothing.

Elizabeth Strout Reads “Motherless Child”

Jul 30, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Elizabeth Strout, who reads her short story “Motherless Child,” from the August 5 & 12, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Jacqueline Novak Chews Over the Blow Job in Her One-Woman Show “Get on Your Knees”

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz reviews the comedian Jacqueline Novak’s one-woman show “Get on Your Knees,” about blow jobs.

Review: Quentin Tarantino’s Obscenely Regressive Vision of the Sixties in “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood”

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” the latest film by the director Quentin Tarantino.

After the Brexit Vote, Mark Neville Looks at Life in “Little Britain”

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Brian Dillon reviews “Parade,” a book by the British photographer Mark Neville that looks at life in the French region of Brittany.

So, It Looks Like Sarah Has a Boyfriend Now: A Eulogy

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Julia Edelman writes a humorous eulogy for a friend who just got a new boyfriend.

Ritchie Torres, Another Young Bronx Progressive, Launches a Run for Congress

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Gonnerman writes about Ritchie Torres, a member of the New York City Council who, at the age of thirty-one, is campaigning to represent the Bronx in the U.S. House of Representatives.

A Louisiana Republican Reckons with Climate Change

Jul 27, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes on the Republican congressman Garret Graves, from Louisiana, who wants to help the Gulf Coast adapt to sea-level rise, and on the responses by Democrats skeptical of how far he will go to address climate change.

Donald Trump and the G.O.P. Confirm Their Fiscal Conservatism Was a Sham

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the House Republicans’ passage of the so-called Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019, which serves to undermine the Party’s professed devotion to the principle of fiscal conservatism.

The Paradox at the Heart of Abbas Kiarostami’s Early Films

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the films of Abbas Kiarostami, currently featured in an IFC retrospective, whose career was shaped by Iran’s Islamic Revolution.

The Latest Dreams of Barbara Hillary, the First African-American Woman to Travel to the North Pole

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Lauren Collins catches up with Barbara Hillary, an eighty-eight-year-old explorer who has travelled to Antarctica and Outer Mongolia.

Summer, by the Book

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker Radio Hour talks to Tana French about how she got started, her latest book, and the impact of Ireland’s economic boom and collapse. Plus, Jia Tolentino and Rivka Galchen on children’s books that shaped their lives.

Cut and Paste: Be Glad You’re Neurotic

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Roz Chast humorously transforms found images and text into comic collages. This month’s source material is an early self-help book about embracing neuroses.

Puerto Rico’s Joyful and Committed Days of Protest of Governor Ricardo Rosselló

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt writes about the protests leading to the resignation of the Puerto Rican governor, Ricardo Rosselló, whose leaked text messages insulting L.G.B.T.Q. people, women, and victims of Hurricane Maria sparked outrage.

My Name Is Robert Mueller, and I Will Be Your Waiter

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

John Kenney writes a humorous dialogue in which Robert Mueller is a waiter who repeatedly refers diners to the menu, as he did with his report in congressional testimony.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, July 26th

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon introduces a new app.

Is the Internet Making Writing Better?

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews the linguist Gretchen McCulloch’s book “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language,” about how the Internet and social media has changed discourse.

Surviving a Conversation at a WeWork

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Jonny Auping writes a humorous guide to getting through a conversation at the co-working startup WeWork.

Powerful Expressions of Indian Dance at the Drive East Festival

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

At A.R.T./New York Theatres, accomplished performers present the classical Indian ideal of storytelling through movement.

The Extreme Highs and Lows of Cuco’s Début Album, “Para Mí”

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu reviews the teen-age musician Cuco’s début album, “Para Mí.”

The Incredible Life and Tragic Death of Lyra McKee

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Susan McKay writes about her friendship with the young journalist and L.G.B.T.Q. activist Lyra McKee, who was killed in a riot in Creggan, Ireland, led by the New I.R.A.

“Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood,” Reviewed

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” which features Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, and Margot Robbie.

The Frustration Behind Puerto Rico’s Popular Movement

Jul 26, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Yarimar Bonilla, a professor of Puerto Rican studies and anthropology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, on the background to and context of the widespread protests in Puerto Rico that led to the resignation of its governor, Ricardo A. Rosselló, this week.

The Democrats’ Immigration Problem Is Bigger than Trump

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Blitzer writes about the immigration debate, and why the Democrats’ popular positions have not connected with voters.

Tensions with Mainland China Explode into Violence on the Streets of Hong Kong

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the recent protests in Hong Kong.

Republicans Defend Trump’s Decision to Give Putin Office Space at White House

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump gave the Russian President Vladimir Putin office space at the White House, while Republicans such as Lindsey Graham defend the decision.

The Exciting Real-Life Diary of Merrill Markoe: Squirrel Nurse

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Merrill Markoe writes and illustrates a humorous diary of her schedule taking care of squirrels at a wildlife rescue center.

Inside a Vanished Hub of Beijing’s Experimental-Art Scene

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Andrea K. Scott writes on a new book, “RongRong’s Diary: Beijing East Village,” and a related show at the Walther Collection gallery, in Manhattan, that showcase the work of the photographer RongRong, which documented performance artists such as Zhang Huan and was distributed by Ai Weiwei.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, July 25th

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

David Sipress’s Daily Cartoon wishes Mueller would solve all its problems.

A World Without Mad Magazine

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Jordan Orlando writes on the legacy and history of Mad magazine, published by William M. Gaines and launched by Harvey Kurtzman, which, after sixty-seven years, announced that it would cease publication of new material.

Some Additional Things Alanis Morissette’s Other Hand Could Be Doing While She’s Got Her One Hand in Her Pocket

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

AJ DiCosimo humorously imagines various scenarios for things Alanis Morisette’s other hand could be doing, based on the lyrics to her popular song “Hand in My Pocket.”

I Like Your Shoes

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Kevin Brockmeier writes a flash-fiction short story, “I Like Your Shoes,” about a haunting series of notes.

ESPN, Dan Le Batard, and the Refusal to Ignore Politics

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas writes about the ESPN Radio host Dan Le Batard’s on-air rebuke of President Donald Trump’s public demonization of Representative Ilhan Omar and Le Batard’s defiance of the sports network’s policy that its hosts should steer clear of political discussions.

Why the Mueller Hearings Were So Alarming

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony to the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees about his report on Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential election, and Donald Trump’s conquest of the Republican Party.

Neal Katyal Has One More Question for Robert Mueller After His Testimony

Jul 25, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Neal Katyal about the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony to the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees about his report on Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential election and President Donald Trump’s possible involvement.

In Search of a Viral Moment at the Robert Mueller Hearings

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes about Robert Mueller’s testimony before the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, regarding the special counsel’s report on Russian interference and Presidential obstruction.

Bonus Daily Cartoon: One More Question

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Daily Cartoon illustrates the former special counsel Robert Mueller taking one more question.

“Accountability”? The Mueller Hearing Is How Trump Escapes

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser on the congressional testimony of the former special counsel Robert Mueller about his investigation of Trump and Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential election.

Just How Crazy Is Boris Johnson?

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes about Boris Johnson’s remarks on Wednesday upon succeeding Theresa May as Prime Minister, and what Johnson’s tenure will look like.

Mueller Revealed the Conspiracy-Theory-Driven State of American Politics

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

David Rohde on the three competing narratives of the Russia investigation the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony before the House emerged throughout the day.

The Unsurprising Recalcitrance of Robert Mueller During His Testimony

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes about the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s congressional testimony, and his reluctance to directly recommend the impeachment of President Donald Trump to the Democrats.

The Cooking Cartoonist: The Greatest Summer Foods

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Farley Katz humorously weighs the pros and cons of various summer foods, like corn, avocado, tomatoes, and figs, in the running for the title of culinary champion of the season.

Mueller’s Testimony Walks Back the Suggestion That Trump Would Be Indicted If He Weren’t the President

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s congressional testimony after questioning from the congressmen Ted Lieu and Ken Buck, which initially appeared to suggest that Donald Trump would have been indicted if he weren’t President.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, July 24th

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Farley Katz’s Daily Cartoon chronicles the rise in hamburglaries during today’s Mueller hearing.

Mueller Testimony: “The President Was Not Exculpated”

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

David Rohde writes about Robert Mueller’s congressional testimony, and his statement that President Trump “was not exculpated” by his report.

“The Black Clown” Beautifully Reconfigures a Langston Hughes Poem

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Maya Phillips reviews a new theatrical production of Langston Hughes’s poem “The Black Clown,” staged by the singer Davóne Tines and the composer Michael Schachter, which premières at Lincoln Center.

Live Stream: Robert Mueller’s Testimony on Donald Trump and the Russia Investigation

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the former special counsel Robert Mueller’s appearance before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, which you can watch online here.

Reasons You, My Roommate, Should Adopt a Dog

Jul 24, 2019

Description:

Amy Collier writes a humorous plea to a roommate to convince her to adopt a dog.

“Big Little Lies” Season 2 Was a Metaphor for Power in Hollywood in the #MeToo Era

Jul 23, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman writes about the parallels between Season 2 of the show “Big Little Lies” and Hollywood’s post-#MeToo reckoning with the sexual-assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

The Friend Weekend

Jul 23, 2019

Description:

Niccolo Aeed and Marina Tempelsman offer a humorous video about a weekend with friends, some of whom may have a country estate.

What Happens When a Group of Strangers Spends a Day Debating Immigration?

Jul 23, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen reports from a deliberative-polling event in Houston, during which hundreds of people from across the political spectrum debated issues surrounding immigration.

Conservative Nationalism Is Trumpism for Intellectuals

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes on the National Conservatism Conference, in Washington, D.C., where guests including Tucker Carlson, Amy Wax, Josh Hawley, and David Brooks opined on immigration, religion, Donald Trump, big business, and élite cosmopolitanism.

Does Extinction Rebellion Have the Solution to the Climate Crisis?

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Sam Knight writes on Extinction Rebellion, a British campaign of civil disobedience aimed at addressing the worldwide climate crisis.

Jack Davison’s Throwback to a Golden Age of Editorial Portraiture

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Chris Wiley writes on the British photographer Jack Davison, whose first monograph, “Photographs,” was released in May.

The Weaponization of National Belonging, from Nazi Germany to Trump

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes on how Donald Trump has initiated a radical renegotiation of what it means to belong in the United States.

Cognitive Dissonances I’m Comfortable With

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Irving Ruan and Katie Zhu humorously depict a series of contradictions in a person’s life.

The Audio App That’s Transforming Erotica

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on Dispea, a subscription-based audio erotica app that was founded in 2018, by Gina Gutierrez and Faye Keegan, and designed with women in mind.

Sunday Reading: The Women Reshaping Professional Sports

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Alexis Okeowo, Louisa Thomas, Ariel Levy, Nick Paumgarten, Ben McGrath, and Alec Wilkinson on female athletes, like the members of the U.S. women's soccer team, fighting for equality in professional sports.

Donald Trump’s Idea of Selective Citizenship

Jul 21, 2019

Description:

Last week, the President wasn’t just attacking four congresswomen of color; he was reanimating ideas whose prevalence wreaked havoc in the nation’s past, Jelani Cobb writes.

Between the Moon and Woodstock

Jul 20, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik considers the relationship between Woodstock and the moon landing, and how each event displayed the new technology of the era.

Archaeologists Discover Long-Sought-After Racist Bone

Jul 20, 2019

Description:

Sarah Hutto writes a satirical article noting the discovery of a racist bone, and efforts by the Trump Administration to stymie the search.

Witnessing the Moon Landing in Ireland, at the Start of the Troubles

Jul 20, 2019

Description:

Kevin Dettmar writes about visiting Northern Ireland during the summer of 1969, at the beginning of the Troubles, and watching the moon landing during a moment of political turbulence.

Lyndon Johnson’s Unsung Role in Sending Americans to the Moon

Jul 20, 2019

Description:

Jeff Shesol writes about the outsized role that Lyndon B. Johnson, first as the Senate Majority Leader and then as John F. Kennedy’s Vice-President, played in marshalling the U.S. government’s resources toward the goal of putting an American man on the moon.

There Is Nothing Strategic About Trump’s Racism

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Donald Trump’s race-baiting statements at a reëlection rally in North Carolina on Wednesday, and how members of the Republican Party, including Vice-President Mike Pence, are worried about their implications in the 2020 election.

“Cassandro, the Exotico!,” Reviewed: An Intimate Portrait of a Lucha-Libre Star

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Marie Losier’s documentary “Cassandro, the Exotico!” which follows the titular lucha-libre fighter through his personal life and professional struggles.

Updated Museum Etiquette for 2019

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Jiji Lee humorously imagines a new etiquette for visiting museums in the social-media age, with illustrations by Jeremy Nguyen.

What Would an Effective, Humane Border Policy Look Like?

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Dorothy Wickenden talks with Robin Wright about the Iranian perspective on the crisis in the Persian Gulf.

Watching the Moon Landing

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker Radio Hour explores why so many people believe the footage of the moon landing was fake, and visits the artist Fahamu Pecou in Atlanta.

Why Mark Sanford Might Challenge Donald Trump

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Mark Sanford, the former governor of South Carolina,

Trump Denies Being at North Carolina Rally

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump lied about the racist chants of “Send her back” that he encouraged at a campaign rally in North Carolina, claiming that he was not present.

Iran’s Eye-for-an-Eye Strategy in the Gulf

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright on how the latest escalation between the United States and Iran is of a pattern with many of the Islamic Republic’s confrontations with regional and international adversaries since the 1979 revolution.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, July 19th

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Lars Kenseth’s Daily Cartoon shows a violation of a frog’s sovereign airspace.

Fifty Years Since the Lunar Invasion

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Eli Grober humorously imagines a missive from one resident of the moon to the rest, recalling the first moon landing as a peculiar invasion.

A Music-Theatre Adaptation of Langston Hughes’s “The Black Clown”

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

In Michael Schachter and Davóne Tines’s version of the dramatic monologue, the speaker exorcises the degradations of minstrelsy through song and dance.

Jean-Georges’s Revisionist Tweaks at the Fulton

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan reviews the Fulton, Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s new restaurant at the South Street Seaport, which is the chef’s first to focus on seafood.

“The Lion King” and “Honeyland,” Reviewed

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Jon Favreau’s C.G.I. remake of “The Lion King” and Ljubomir Stefanov and Tamara Kotevska’s documentary “Honeyland.”

The Strange Appeal of Perverse Actions

Jul 19, 2019

Description:

Paul Bloom writes about the psychology and philosophy of perversity and why we enjoy doing things that are unruly, mischievous, bad, or peculiar for no good reason.

The Pelosi-Versus-Squad Paradigm

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Rick Perlstein about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s strategy of compromise in the Democratic Party versus Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Squad, who represent a new left-wing influence.

What to Stream: Five Directors’ Outstanding First Features

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends the best features from first-time directors that are available on streaming, including Terence Nance’s “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty,” Josephine Decker’s “Butter on the Latch,” and others.

The Movement to Impeach Donald Trump Is Far from Over

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy on a vote in Congress about whether to table Representative Al Green’s resolution to impeach President Donald Trump, and what it shows about support for impeachment among Democrats.

“I’m Winning”: Donald Trump’s Calculated Racism

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Donald Trump is unwavering in his belief that racism against Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and other minority Americans will win him the Presidency again in 2020, Susan B. Glasser writes.

From “Lock Her Up” to “Send Her Back”: Trump in North Carolina

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin reports on President Donald Trump’s rally in Greenville, North Carolina, in which he inflamed the crowd by invoking the racist argument that citizens like Democratic Representatives Ilhan Omar and Ayanna Pressley should be “sent back.”

A Photographer’s Elaborate Transformations in His Childhood Bedroom

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes about the self-portraits of Christopher Smith, who kept his photography private until 2016, when he created an Instagram account to share his snapshots in real time.

Magical Mystery Move

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

P. C. Vey humorously illustrates the difficulties of hiring movers and how apartment insurance can help when all your possessions get lost or broken.

How Cyber Weapons Are Changing the Landscape of Modern Warfare

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Sue Halpern on the U.S. military’s Cyber Command unit and its response to recent attacks, attributed to Iran, on oil tankers and a U.S. military drone.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, July 18th

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Avi Steinberg’s Daily Cartoon shows the perils of using Presidential language.

“The Raft” Chronicles an Extreme Experiment with Human Nature

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Nathan Pemberton writes on “The Raft,” a new documentary by Marcus Lindeen, who interviews the surviving volunteers of a nineteen-seventies experiment investigating the nature of violence, devised by the Mexican anthropologist Santiago Genovés.

Three Ukrainian Reformers Pay an Unexpected Price for Their Success

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Joshua Yaffa reports from Ukraine on the political futures of three political reformers, who find themselves isolated during the administration of President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Classic Female-Authored Novels Rebranded as Chick Lit

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Mary Cella humorously writes synopses of classic novels, including Edith Wharton’s “House of Mirth,” Charlotte Brontë’s “Jane Eyre,” and Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein,” for a chick-lit audience.

“Lanny” Is a Dark, Wonderfully Tactile Reimagining of the Folktale

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Maya Phillips writes about the book “Lanny,” by Max Porter, a hybrid morality tale about environmental awareness, parenthood, and growing up that is enriched by its textures and stylized approach.

Citizen Punch

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Robert Coover’s flash-fiction short story “Citizen Punch.”

Goodnight Moon Landing

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Bruce Handy on children’s books about the Apollo 11 moon landing, including “My Little Golden Book About the First Moon Landing,” written by Chip Lovitt with illustrations by Bryan Sims, and “The Man Who Went to the Far Side of the Moon” by Bea Uusma Schyffert.

How Andrew Yang’s Robot Apocalypse Can Heal a Divided Nation

Jul 18, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt writes on Andrew Yang, the Democratic Presidential hopeful and the founder of Venture for America, who is attracting some of the white male voters who had supported Donald Trump in 2016.

Two Comedy Writers Take “Face/Off” to a New Level of Weirdness

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes on “Face/Off,” a Shakespearean reënactment of the 1997 action film of the same name, written by two staffers at “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” and performed in Prospect Park.

Facial Expressions for Reacting to the New York Times Crossword

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Colin Stokes and Ellis Rosen joke about the facial expressions that accompany the emotional journey of finishing the New York *Times* crossword puzzle.

Campbell McGrath Reads Czeslaw Milosz

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Campbell McGrath joins Kevin Young to discuss “Realism,” by Czeslaw Milosz, and his own poem “The Human Heart.”

“The Hills: New Beginnings” and Our Warped American Reality

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews “The Hills: New Beginnings,” a new MTV reality sequel to “The Hills,” starring Spencer Pratt, Heidi Montag, Audrina Patridge, Mischa Barton, Justin Bobby, Brody Jenner, and Brandon Thomas Lee.

The Trump Campaign Pitches Its Crypto-Majority Argument to Women

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach reports from the launch event of the Trump campaign’s Women for Trump group, in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

The Stories We Tell, and Don’t Tell, About Asian-American Lives

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu reviews “Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation: On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans,” a new book by David Eng and Shinhee Han, about Asian-American lives.

Barney Frank Defends Nancy Pelosi from Her Critics

Jul 17, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the retired representative Barney Frank about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the state of the Democratic Party.

The Health-Care Defense

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes on how the latest Republican effort to destroy the Affordable Care Act appears likely to reach the Supreme Court in the heat of the 2020 Presidential race.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, July 15th

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Peter Kuper’s Daily Cartoon traces the five stages of White House unemployment.

The Mail

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Nick Paumgarten’s article on the Masters golf tournament and Valeria Luiselli’s piece about frontier towns near the U.S.-Mexico border.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

“The Impeachers,” “Leaving the Witness,” “Patsy,” and “Life of David Hockney.”

On the Fiftieth anniversary of the Moon Landing, Revisit What It Was Like to Watch the Event from New York City

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

On July 20, 1969, the world watched in anticipation as Apollo 11 approached the surface of the moon. Journey back to the viewing parties taking place that night in the apartments, parks, streets, and bars of Manhattan.

A Millennial Countertenor’s Pop-Star Appeal

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead on Jakub Józef Orliński, who brings a swooning sultriness and a bunch of break-dancing moves to the Baroque-music revival.

The Promise and Price of Cellular Therapies

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

New “living drugs”—made from a patient’s own cells—can cure once incurable cancers, Siddhartha Mukherjee writes. But can we afford them? 

Dancing a Memoir at Alvin Ailey

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

The choreographer Troy Powell tells his life story—with pint-sized doppelgängers—in “Testimony,” Elizabeth Barber writes.

Harald Szeemann’s Revolutionary Curating

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl on a re-creation of the auteur’s most personal show which essentializes a strange glamour that has leaked from the art world into culture at large.

Christoph Niemann’s “The Commute”

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks with the artist Christoph Niemann about his cover for the July 22, 2019, issue, which depicts an overcrowded M.T.A. subway platform.

“Sentence,” by Tadeusz Dąbrowski

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Tadeusz Dąbrowski: “You’d be sure this sentence was the key to your / life. Also to this cell.”

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons July 22, 2019

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

This Password Is Invalid

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Claire Friedman: Mydogismybestfriend1? Yeesh. Password must be less sad.

What’s in a Woke McRib?

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

The chefs Roy Choi and Jose Mejia sample the Vegan Hooligans’ plant-based junk food at an L.A. pop-up, Sheila Marikar writes. 

The Art of Aphorism 

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik writes about why these fragments of wisdom—empirical or mystical, funny or profound—are such an enduring form.

Hanif Kureishi on How We Talk About Love and Sex

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews Hanif Kureishi, about “She Said He Said,” his short story from the July 22, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“These Are the Pearls,” by Myra Shapiro

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Myra Shapiro: “It’s 2018, the future / far from songs we danced to / left inside me.”

Stitch ’n’ Bitch for the Trump Era

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

The Tiny Pricks Project collects the President’s priceless utterances and embroiders them on doilies and dish towels, Anna Russell writes.

Marc Maron Chooses His Weapon

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

The podcasting star of “Sword of Trust” joins the director Lynn Shelton to check out the arms and armor—and some guitars—at the Met, Sarah Larson writes.

Kamala Harris Makes Her Case

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Dana Goodyear on Kamala Harris, who has been criticized as a defender of the status quo but is trying to prove that she can be a force for change as a Presidential candidate.

Over the Moon

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Fifty years after the Apollo 11 landing, a look back at some of The New Yorker’s space-exploration cover art.

How Picasso’s Muse Became a Master 

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz on Françoise Gilot, the artist’s lover and pupil, and Gilot’s 1964 memoir, “Life with Picasso.”

Kicked Off the Land

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Presser on why so many black families are losing their property.

“She Said He Said,” by Hanif Kureishi

Jul 15, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Hanif Kureishi: “Women liked variety, he said, and he was offering some.”

Escaping Manhattan During the Blackout of 2019

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham writes on the power outage that darkened most of Manhattan’s West Side on the evening of Saturday, July 13th, and residents’ efforts to get back to Brooklyn.

Look Who’s Suddenly Into Tarot Cards Now That He’s Possessed by the Devil

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Ronald Metellus jokes about discovering that an old friend is suddenly into tarot cards because he’s been possessed by the devil.

The Best Cookbooks of the Century So Far

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner writes about her favorite cookbooks of the past twenty years, including Samin Nosrat’s “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,” David Chang’s “Momofuku,” Judy Rodgers’s “The Zuni Cafe Cookbook,” and others.

The Battle for Health Care

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on the latest Republican effort to destroy the Affordable Care Act, which appears likely to reach the Supreme Court in the heat of the 2020 Presidential race.

Tom Steyer, the Democrats’ Billionaire for the People?

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes about Tom Steyer, a billionaire Democratic Party candidate in the 2020 Presidential race, and his attempt to convey a populist message about income inequality.

Sunday Reading: American Singers, Songwriters, and Storytellers

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by David Hajdu, Doreen St. Félix, Alex Ross, Claudia Roth Pierpont, Hua Hsu, and Kelefa Sanneh, on the American musicians Woody Guthrie, Childish Gambino, Bob Dylan, Nina Simone, Dr. Dre, and Paul Simon.

Going Home with Wendell Berry

Jul 14, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich visits the writer and farmer at his home in Kentucky to discuss the importance of local knowledge, embracing limits, and the exploitation of rural America.

Trump Furious That Mar-a-Lago Is Left with No Employees After ICE Raid

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort, in Palm Beach, Florida, is suddenly understaffed after Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents conducted a raid there as part of a nationwide crackdown on undocumented immigrants.

How the Stress of Separation and Detention Changes the Lives of Children

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner speaks with Jack P. Shonkoff—a professor of pediatrics and also child health and development at Harvard—about the health consequences of the Trump Administration’s child-separation and -detention policies at the border.

Martina Navratilova on Megan Rapinoe and the Trajectory of Gay Women in Sports

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the tennis legend who was the first American professional athlete to come out, and her perspective on what has changed for lesbian sports stars over the past thirty years.

Focus-Group-Testing Takeaways for the Next Social-Media Platform

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Zoe Pearl writes a humorous list of takeaways from focus-group testing for a new social-media platform, including privacy and community standards.

Aziz Ansari’s “Right Now,” Reviewed: The Productive Ambivalence of Ansari’s Comeback Netflix Special

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix reviews Aziz Ansari’s new Netflix standup special, “Right Now,” which is positioned as a comeback for the comedian after questions about his sexual behavior arose, at the peak of the #MeToo movement.

An Absurd Case of Mistaken Identity Draws to a Close for an Eritrean Migrant in Italy

Jul 13, 2019

Description:

Ben Taub on Italy’s highest-profile migration case, against the smuggler Medhanie Yehdego Mered, which for three years was a matter of mistaken identity.

The New Indictments Against R. Kelly Are an Indictment of the Music Industry

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Jim DeRogatis writes about the new indictments brought against the singer R. Kelly, which were unsealed on Friday night, are the result of investigations by the F.B.I. and the Department of Homeland Security.

Trump Is Poised to Sign a Radical Agreement to Send Future Asylum Seekers to Guatemala

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Blitzer writes about a major immigration deal, known as a safe-third-country agreement, which is expected to be signed next week and which raises questions about how Guatemala will cope with an influx of migrants seeking asylum.

“Sword of Trust,” Reviewed: A Mumblecore Comedy That Takes on the Pro-Confederate Right

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Sword of Trust,” Lynn Shelton’s mumblecore comedy that stars Marc Maron and takes on the pro-Confederate right.

Why Lebanon’s People Are Turning on Their Politicians

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Jane Ferguson writes about the economic dysfunction in Lebanon, which is reaching crisis stage as the country’s political leaders seek to impose austerity measures without attempting to reform a political system renowned for its graft and corruption.

Alex Acosta Had to Go, But the Jeffrey Epstein Scandal Is Really About Money and Privilege

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Alex Acosta’s resignation as Labor Secretary in the wake of the Jeffrey Epstein scandal, and Donald Trump’s attempts to distance himself from Acosta.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Breaking up Homeland Security

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tells David Remnick what she saw at the border and her view of the 2020 Presidential race. Plus, Carly Rae Jepsen performs live.

A Rosé by Any Other Name: Welcome to Duty Free

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Tracey K. Berglund humorously illustrates a woman’s shopping experiences at the duty-free store in an airport.

A Father, a Daughter, and the Attempt to Change the Census

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea on Stephanie Hofeller, whose estrangement from her late father, Thomas Hofeller, the onetime R.N.C. data-operations manager and a master of modern gerrymandering, might have altered American political history.

Joe Biden’s Attempt to Get Serious on Foreign Policy

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about Joe Biden’s speech, at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center, about his foreign-policy plans, as part of his Presidential run in the 2020 election.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, July 12th

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Mort Gerberg’s Daily Cartoon brings a delivery to the President.

Look, Son, Maybe Men Just Aren’t Built to Play Soccer

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Lane Moore humorously imagines a conversation between a father and son about how soccer is really more of a game for girls than boys.

“The Farewell” and “The Art of Self-Defense,” Reviewed

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Lulu Wang’s “The Farewell,”  starring Awkwafina, and Riley Stearns’s “The Art of Self-Defense,” starring Jesse Eisenberg.

A Brazilian Polymath’s Tropical Oasis at the New York Botanical Garden

Jul 12, 2019

Description:

Roberto Burle Marx designed a swirling garden path at Copacabana Beach, and his American protégé has created a fragrant homage to the landscape architect in the Bronx.

“Midsommar,” Reviewed: Ari Aster’s Backwards Horror Story of an American Couple in Sweden

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Ari Aster’s “Midsommar,” starring Florence Pugh, and highlights its similarities to the director’s prior cult film, “Hereditary.”

An Eight-Second Film of 1915 New Orleans and the Mystery of Louis Armstrong’s Happiness

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Gwen Thompkins writes about a silent eight-second film, recently discovered by the journalist James Karst, believed to show a smiling Louis Armstrong as a young teen-ager in New Orleans.

The Battle Over the Census Citizenship Question Is Now About Civil Rights

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Cristian Farias writes that President Trump’s insistence that a citizenship question be included in the census has sown chaos and uncertainty for the courts, the public, and members of his own Administration.

Margin Call

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about how, in the first Democratic primary debates, radical ideas were as much at the center of the action as at the fringes.

The End of the Gay-Panic Legal Defense

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Jeannie Suk Gersen on New York joining other state legislatures in banning defendants from blaming their actions on a sudden emotional response to an unwanted advance.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, July 8th

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Ali Solomon’s Daily Cartoon contemplates the future of women’s soccer.

British Ambassador Concealed Insults from Trump by Writing Messages in English

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that the British Ambassador to the United States, Kim Darroch, tried to hide his insulting analyses of Donald Trump from the President by writing cables in English.

Conversations with Ma: Mad About Mars and Movies

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Julia Wertz humorously illustrates a comic about her mother, who hates both Mars, Martin Scorsese, and Quentin Tarantino.

What If Life Did Not Originate on Earth?

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner speaks with Gary Ruvkun, a molecular biologist and professor of genetics at Harvard, who wants to search for DNA on Mars.

“This Is Pleasure,” by Mary Gaitskill

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Mary Gaitskill: “At first, the suit was not against me but against the publishing house, and all she wanted was a payment, which the company was prepared to make—as long as she kept quiet about her complaints.”

The Fight for the Future of YouTube

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Neima Jahromi writes on TK TK TK

What Do People in Solitary Confinement Want to See?

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix writes on the efforts of the activist group Tamms Year Ten, and a project that sends custom images to inmates being held in solitary confinement.

Mary Gaitskill on the Power of Fiction for Examining #MeToo

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Mary Gaitskill, the author of the novella “This is Pleasure,” discusses workplace harassment, the impact of #MeToo, and how she expects readers to respond to her story.

Boris Johnson’s “Looking Glass” Brexit

Jul 8, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes on how Boris Johnson’s attitude toward Brexit recalls the political folly in the author John le Carré’s novel “The Looking Glass War,” from 1965.

But What About

Jul 7, 2019

Description:

River Clegg and Evan Waite humorously posit outlandish excuses for bad behavior.

Sunday Reading: Summer Travel

Jul 7, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Calvin Trillin, Jill Lepore, David Sedaris, Alice Gregory, Daniel Mendelsohn, and T. Coraghessan on unique summer experiences.

Kamala Harris Takes Her Post-Debate Momentum to Iowa

Jul 6, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey writes about Kamala Harris’s campaign trip through Iowa, and how her performance compares with those of Beto O’Rourke, Joe Biden, and other candidates running in the Democratic Presidential primary.

Cutouts of J.F.K., Jr., Tanks, and Adulation at Trump’s “Salute to America”

Jul 6, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevnu on the enthusiastic and sometimes bizarre crowd at Donald Trump’s “Salute to America” event at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Little Lending Libraries

Jul 6, 2019

Description:

Dana Maier humorously illustrates the contents of tiny lending libraries that various types of people construct.

O. J. Simpson Has a Little Bit of Getting Even to Do on Twitter

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry writes about O. J. Simpson, who has recently joined Twitter and started posting curious videos.

Aaron Sorkin Kills a Mockingbird, and Tracy K. Smith Takes a Journey

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, the director on adapting a 1960 classic to the 2019 Broadway stage. And the former Poet Laureate on bringing poems to the public.

Donald Trump’s “Inoffensive” War on Reality

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on Donald Trump’s Fourth of July address, and the President’s war against immigrants.

Wimbledon 2019: Kyrgios vs. Nadal and the Difference Between an Entertainer and a Champion

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Gerald Marzorati on the Nick Kyrgios vs. Rafael Nadal Wimbledon match, and on Kyrgios‘s empty rebellion as a tennis star.

The Underworld of Online Content Moderation

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Sarah T. Roberts, a professor of information studies at U.C.L.A. and the author of “Behind the Screen,” describes how the work of content moderation takes a psychological toll.

Peter Parker: A Superhero, But Also a Teen, Just Like You!

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Graham Techler writes a humorous take on Spider-Man, a superhero by night and a regular teen-ager by day.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, July 5th

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Christopher Weyant’s Daily Cartoon sells sunblock at the beach.

“Drop Dead Gorgeous,” Which Is Finally Streaming, Is Possibly My Favorite Movie of All Time

Jul 5, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino writes on the movie “Drop Dead Gorgeous,” from 1999, which stars Kirsten Dunst, Denise Richards, Kirstie Alley, Ellen Barkin, Amy Adams, and Allison Janney, and which is available to stream, on Hulu, for the first time.

My Review of the Big Parade After Being Locked in the Trunk of My Car

Jul 4, 2019

Description:

James Folta writes a satirical review of a small-town parade from the perspective of a local reporter who gets locked, on Main Street, in the trunk of his car.

The Declaration Heard Around the World

Jul 4, 2019

Description:

Louis Menand on the Declaration of Independence and the liberation movements it has inspired around the world.

“Everyone Cried”

Jul 4, 2019

Description:

Lydia Davis’s flash-fiction story “Everyone Cried,” about sadness and living in the world.

Donald Trump: Little Rocket Man

Jul 4, 2019

Description:

David Remnick writes on President Donald Trump’s military-heavy plans for his Independence Day celebrations, in Washington, D.C.

What the Democrats’ Turn Leftward Means for the Party’s Chances in 2020

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks to Dave Wasserman, of the Cook Political Report, about whether having candidates run on a more explicitly progressive platform will energize the Democratic base or cost the Party the election.

The Disillusion and Frustration of a New Generation is Fuelling Hong Kong’s Protests

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan writes about the recent protests in Hong Kong, the storming of a legislative building, and how the current unrest resonates with other generations of pro-democracy protesters in China.

The Supreme Court Just Legitimized a Cornerstone Element of Voter Suppression

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Jelani Cobb writes on the Supreme Court’s decision in Rucho v. Common Cause, in which it ruled that the federal government could not impede partisan gerrymandering on the state level.

The Supreme Court Is One Vote Away from Changing How the U.S. Is Governed

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Jeannie Suk Gersen on Gundy v. United States, which put the nation on notice that the Court will likely abandon its longstanding tolerance of Congress delegating technically detailed regulations to federal agencies.

Trump’s Fourth of July Parade to Include Flyover by Russian Air Force

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes about President Donald Trump including Russian fighter jets in a Fourth of July celebration.

You’re Invited to My Early-Two-Thousands-Themed Party!

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Evan Williams humorously imagines an invitation to a party themed around reliving the carefree days and popular culture of the early two-thousands.

What Does It Mean to Be a “Real” Writer?

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Hermione Hoby writes about Lucy Ives’s “Loudermilk: Or, the Real Poet; Or, the Origin of the World” and Mona Awad’s “Bunny,” two novels about creative-writing M.F.A. programs.

Daily Cartoon: Wednesday, July 3rd

Jul 3, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon celebrates the Fourth of July.

Will California’s New Bot Law Strengthen Democracy?

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Noam Cohen writes about California’s law requiring that users of commercial and political bots disclose that they are code, not people, and the controversy it has stirred up among Silicon Valley libertarians and advocates of free speech online.

Stormzy at Glastonbury: King Michael Wears His Crown

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Zadie Smith writes about the grime artist Stormzy’s performance at Glastonbury.

For Better and Worse, We Live in Jony Ive’s World

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Nikil Saval writes on the work and legacy of the industrial designer Jony Ive, who recently left his longtime post as the lead designer at Apple.

The “Star-Spangled Banner” Hysteria of 1917

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross reviews the historian E. Douglas Bomberger’s book “Making Music American: 1917 and the Transformation of Culture.”

Signatures in Danny Zuko’s Yearbook

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Johnny DiNapoli humorously illustrates the signatures in the yearbook of Danny Zuko, John Travolta’s character from the movie “Grease.”

David Rabe Reads “Uncle Jim Called”

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author David Rabe, who reads his short story “Uncle Jim Called,” from the July 8 & 15, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

A Word of Thanks for My Compression Socks

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Andrea DenHoed writes an ode to her compression socks, which have helped prevent her feet from swelling on long plane rides.

The Best Year of My New York City Moviegoing

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Nathan Gelgud humorously illustrates this comic about seeing movies at the Gramercy Theatre, in New York City, while the MOMA was closed for renovations, in 2003.

Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, July 2nd

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Drew Panckeri’s Daily Cartoon buys an ice cream.

A Short Film of Dreamy Imagery and Mysterious Language

Jul 2, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on Benjamin Cleary’s “Wave,” in which the narrator wakes up from a coma speaking a language that only he can understand.

Andre Iguodala on the Business of Basketball

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks to the basketball star Andre Iguodala about his career at the Golden State Warriors, the evolution of the sport, and the clash between religious beliefs and gay acceptance in the N.B.A.

Review: “Spider-Man: Far from Home” Presents the Illusion of a Good Movie

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Spider-Man: Far from Home,” the latest film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, starring Tom Holland, Jake Gyllenhaal, Samuel L. Jackson, and Zendaya.

Ivanka Comes Out Against Busing: “I Have Never Taken a Bus In My Life—They’re Gross”

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Ivanka Trump opposes busing, but not for the reasons Joe Biden cited in the second Democratic debate after being confronted by Kamala Harris.

Emily Nussbaum Likes to Watch

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

David Remnick talks with Emily Nussbaum, The New Yorker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic and the author of “I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way through the TV Revolution,” about television as a medium that deserves respect.

Trump Praises Kim on Immigration: “No One Is Trying to Get Into Your Country”

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that, during his rendezvous with Kim Jong Un at the Demilitarized Zone, on Sunday, President Trump praised Kim’s control of the border between North Korea and South Korea.

I'm a Garden Person Now!

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Julie Sharbutt writes a humorous announcement by a person who has newly taken up gardening.

Kirstin Valdez Quade Reads John L’Heureux

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Kirstin Valdez Quade joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Long Black Line,” by John L’Heureux, from a 2018 issue of The New Yorker.

On the Road with Mitski

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Margaret Talbot on the musician Mitski, who writes achingly intense songs about private yearnings and has spent the past year in performance venues packed with fellow-loners.

In Praise of “Dark,” Subtitles, and Mind-Bending Time-Travel Plots

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Ian Crouch reviews German series “Dark,” whose second season recently premièred on Netflix.

Will Hunter Biden Jeopardize His Father’s Campaign?

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Joe Biden’s son is under scrutiny for his business dealings and tumultuous personal life, Adam Entous writes.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

“Ghosts of Gold Mountain,” “Don’t Read Poetry,” “Beyond Babylon,” and “Harbart.”

How Posters Became Art

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

It’s a story of the collective dreams that circulate in society, connecting the Lamborghini Countach to Paris in 1968, Hua Hsu writes.

Peter de Sève’s “Dog Days of Summer”

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Peter de Sève about his cover for the July 8 & 16, 2019, cover of The New Yorker.

My Evolving Affection for Ackee and Salt Fish, Jamaica’s National Dish

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Bryan Washington writes on and provides a recipe for ackee and salt fish, the national dish of Jamaica—ackee fruit and salted cod sautéed lightly together, with peppers, onions, and spices.

“Uncle Jim Called,” by David Rabe

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Fiction by David Rabe: “I held my breath, trying to hear. But I couldn’t understand a word. Or, rather, a word here and there was all I could understand. The sense eluded me.”

The Mail

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Lizzie Widdicombe’s article about Emily Oster and data-driven parenting techniques.

Off-Kilter Humor on “Los Espookys” and “Alternatino”

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum reviews the silly and satisfying new series “Los Espookys” and “Alternatino,” which can be loose and healthily illogical, with plenty of big laughs.

World Cup Challenge

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Sketchbook by Golden Cosmos.

Jim Jarmusch Is Afraid of Cherubs and Abe Lincoln

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson interviews the director of “The Dead Don’t Die,” who discusses headstone symbols, mycology, how ghouls should move, and why zombies are having a moment.

What Led Peru’s Former President to Take His Own Life?

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Once the bright young hope of the Latin-American left, Alan García was caught up in an epic corruption investigation, Daniel Alarcón writes.

Robert Caro Reflects on Robert Moses, L.B.J., and His Own Career in Nonfiction

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Robert Caro speaks to David Remnick about his biographies of Robert Moses and Lyndon Johnson, his career in newspapers, and his time as an undergraduate at Princeton.

David Rabe on the Netherworld of Fiction

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews David Rabe, about “Uncle Jim Called,” his short story from the July 8 & 15, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Lingering of Loss, by Jill Lepore

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Personal History by Jill Lepore: My best friend left her laptop to me in her will. Twenty years later, I turned it on and began my inquest.

“Leviathan,” by Timothy Donnelly

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Timothy Donnelly: “My citizenship is most acutely / felt at night.”

John Hickenlooper’s War on Socialism

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes about the Democratic Presidential candidate and former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper and his aversion to socialism, in which he sees an implied passivity that he feels is at odds with the tradition of American entrepreneurship.

“It’s the End of My Presidency”: Movie Stars Channel Mueller

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on John Lithgow, Annette Bening, Jason Alexander, Michael Shannon, and others who brought the special counsel’s report to life, funded by scions of the Disney clan.

Rudyard Kipling in America

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Charles McGrath on what happened to the great defender of Empire when he settled in the United States.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons July 8 & 15, 2019

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Waxing Poetic About Plastic

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Bruce Handy on a symposium held by MOMA’s Paola Antonelli that explored our complicated relationship with plastic.

The Last Poems of James Tate

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Dan Chiasson reviews the poetry of James Tate, who mastered the art of absurdist endings in the course of his career.

Oregon’s Tsunami Risk: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Kathryn Schulz writes about how Oregon Governor Kate Brown’s signing of HB 3309 into law, allowing for development in the state’s tsunami-inundation zone, will be disastrous once the tsunami strikes.

Basquiat’s Memorial to a Young Artist Killed by Police

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Distraught over the death of the graffiti artist Michael Stewart, he repeated, “It could have been me,” Peter Schjeldahl writes.

“Conflation,” by Andrea Cohen

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Andrea Cohen: “I took riflery in school, and Marriage 101.”

Daily Cartoon: Monday, July 1st

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Amy Kurzweil’s Daily Cartoon thinks about going out to hate Trump.

The Imperfect, Unfinished Work of Women’s Suffrage

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

A century after the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, it’s worth remembering why suffragists had to fight so hard, and who was fighting against them, Casey Cep writes.

An Archeological Space Oddity

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Nick Paumgarten on the Egyptologist Sarah Parcak, who is using satellites to recruit amateur Indiana Joneses to help locate ancient tombs before they’re lost forever.

I Am an Old Soul

Jul 1, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Cora Frazier: In the true era of my soul, Mary-Kate and Ashley played a single child, and Lindsay Lohan played twins.

Trump’s Curious Rendezvous with Kim Jong Un at the D.M.Z.

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes on the last-minute meeting between President Donald Trump and the leader of North Korea, Kim Jong Un, at the Demilitarized Zone separating North and South Korea, on Sunday.

“The Loudest Voice” Eviscerates Roger Ailes and Fox News

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson writes about “The Loudest Voice,” a television show about the Republican media consultant and television executive Roger Ailes and his creation of Fox News.

The Cooking Cartoonist: Guilt-Free Ways to Prepare Octopus

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

Farley Katz writes and illustrates a satirical list of innocent, humane ways of consuming octopus.

The Democrats’ Cautious Return to the War on Poverty

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes about the Reverend Dr. William Barber’s Poor People’s Campaign and its efforts to encourage the 2020 Democratic Presidential candidates speak more specifically and more unapologetically about the plight of the poor.

Sunday Reading: A Night at the Theatre

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Arthur Miller, Truman Capote, Wolcott Gibbs, Kenneth Tynan, Larissa MacFarquhar, Andy Logan, Hilton Als, John Lahr, Janet Malcolm, and Michael Schulman on renowned playwrights, including Tennessee Williams and Edward Albee, and plays, including “A Raisin in the Sun” and “Angels in America.”

The Democratic Primary’s Moving Margins

Jun 30, 2019

Description:

In the first debates, radical ideas were as much at the center of the action as at the fringes, Amy Davidson Sorkin writes.

“Yesterday,” Reviewed: Danny Boyle’s Comedic Fantasy About a World Without the Beatles

Jun 29, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Richard Curtis and Danny Boyle’s “Yesterday,” a comedic fantasy about a world without memory of the Beatles that stars Himesh Patel, Lily James, Ed Sheeran, and Kate McKinnon.

The Epic Tale of My Quest to Find a Plain Black Shirt, Part 17

Jun 29, 2019

Description:

Shannon Reed humorously describes the difficult journey of trying to find a plain black shirt at a mall.

Gioncarlo Valentine’s Searing Portrait of the Fears of Young Black Men

Jun 29, 2019

Description:

Kiese Laymon writes on the exhibit “The Soft Fence,” by the photographer Gioncarlo Valentine, and how the photos therein catalogue how black men can ritualize fear in their bodies.

Five Films to Stream on Kanopy While New Yorkers Still Can

Jun 28, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends movies to stream on Kanopy, which New York Public Library card holders can do until July 1st, including “Time Regained,” “Personal Problems,” and others.

The Enduring Urgency of Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing” at Thirty

Jun 28, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody on the rerelease of Spike Lee's “Do the Right Thing,” for the film’s thirtieth anniversary, and what hasn’t changed about the film’s resonance in the past three decades.

Emily Nussbaum on the TV Revolution, and Valeria Luiselli on the Border

Jun 28, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, The New Yorker’s television critic demands respect for her medium, and a Mexican writer goes to the Southwest to try to understand the vigilante mindset.

Thom Yorke’s “Anima” Is His Best Solo Album

Jun 28, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich reviews Thom Yorke’s third solo album, “Anima,” which was released alongside a short film by Paul Thomas Anderson.

Trump Sanctions Iran’s Supreme Leader, but to What End?

Jun 25, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about the new sanctions Donald Trump imposed on Iran, and what they say about the President’s Administration’s view of Ayatollah Khameini and his regime.

ICE Agents Are Losing Patience with Trump’s Chaotic Immigration Policy

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Jonathan Blitzer writes about how ICE agents and other groups within the Administration are responding to the immigration-enforcement raid that Trump announced and then postponed.

Belligerence

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright delves into Donald Trump's four options to rectify a crisis of his own making in Iran.

Lil Nas X Is the Sound of the Internet, Somehow

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes about how the music and popularity of Lil Nas X, who wrote the hit song “Old Town Road,” and who recently released the EP “7,” reflects our modern age of the Internet.

The Trump Administration’s Plan to Deport Victims of Human Trafficking

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Dorothy Wickenden speaks with the New Yorker contributor Jenna Krajeski about the Trump Administration’s policies toward T visas and how human-trafficking victims can now be deported if their visa applications are rejected.

The Hills Have Eyes: Nü Beginnings

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Heather Loase humorously illustrates a party-bus adventure.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, June 24th

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

David Sipress’s Daily Cartoon thinks about going out to hate Trump.

The Threat of War Brings New Fears to Wang Xiyue, an American Hostage in Iran

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Laura Dean writes about Wang Xiyue, a Princeton graduate student who had been imprisoned in Iran for three years on espionage charges, in the course of researching his dissertation.

Rent-Stabilized and Nervous in the East Village

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Tenants don’t mind Susan Schiffman seeing dust mops or sex toys when she photographs their spaces—just don’t ask what they pay in rent, Paige Williams writes.

Can Emmanuel Macron Stem the Populist Tide?

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

France’s young President is now Europe’s most forceful progressive, but violence at home and the success of right-wing parties throughout the Continent threaten his ambitions, Lauren Collins writes.

The Paternity Reveal 

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Margaret Talbot on the developments in science that have changed fatherhood from a matter of faith to a matter of fact.

Kadir Nelson’s “Wheel Life”

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Kadir Nelson about his cover for the July 1, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Hidden Cost of GoFundMe Health Care

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

When patients turn to crowdfunding for medical costs, whoever has the most heartrending story wins, Nathan Heller writes.

Sandra Bernhard on Leaving Bitchy Behind

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

The “Pose” actress and queer-TV trailblazer was embraced by the drag demimonde in her ferocious days but has a gentle vibe in person, Ariel Levy writes.

“Son of Friedman,” by Emma Cline

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Emma Cline: “George had been counting on a certain loose camaraderie, nostalgia tipping slightly toward sloppiness. William not drinking made things harder.”

What Is It with Millennials and Cactuses?

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

“They’re not just interior-design objects,” says one member of the Cactus Store crew. “They’re the ultimate survivors.”  Naomi Fry writes.

Singin’ in the Acid Rain

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Patricia Marx: A predicted hurricane of hail and fire doesn’t mean it has to be all gloomy and doomy for our class—except for Didi, who was swept away by a roving glacier.

What Pete Buttigieg Has and Hasn’t Done About Homelessness in South Bend

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea writes on varying efforts to combat rising homelessness, alongside growing prosperity, in South Bend, Indiana, by the Presidential candidate and South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons July 1, 2019

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

The Ecstatic Doubling of “A Strange Loop”

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham reviews Michael R. Jackson’s musical, which can be harsh but has a lyrical cleverness that helps it maintain an unlikely levity.

Meredith Monk’s “ATLAS” and the L.A. Phil’s Extraordinary Season

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

In staging Monk’s peerless and demanding opera, the orchestra again proved that it has no equal, Alex Ross writes.

Emma Cline on the Movie Business

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Willing Davidson interviews Emma Cline, the author of “The Girls,” about “Son of Friedman,” her short story from the July 1, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

“Spying on the South,” “Native Country of the Heart,” “China Dream,” and “America Was Hard to Find.”

“American Sonnet for My Past and Future Assassin,” by Terrance Hayes

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Terrance Hayes: “We lie to break the truth / apart.”

“Love Poem,” by Linda Gregerson

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Linda Gregerson: “Pity the part // we think we do on purpose.”

Why Weather Forecasting Keeps Getting Better

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Hannah Fry on how the stakes of weather forecasting can be so much higher than whether you’ll need an umbrella today.

Can Modern Dance Be Preserved?

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

In safeguarding the legacies of innovators like Merce Cunningham and Paul Taylor, we risk losing their spirit, Joan Acocella writes.

The Mail

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Mark Singer’s Profile of David Milch and Alex Ross’s article on Antonio Salieri.

What Would New York Be Without the Beatles?

Jun 24, 2019

Description:

Himesh Patel, the star of “Yesterday,” contemplates a city where the Dakota was just the setting of “Rosemary’s Baby” and no Fab Four ever set foot in Shea Stadium, Michael Schulman writes.

Will Boris Johnson’s “Late-Night Altercation” Sink His Bid to Become Prime Minister?

Jun 23, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes on the Conservative M.P. Boris Johnson and whether reports of a domestic altercation with his girlfriend can derail his candidacy for Prime Minister.

Tseng Kwong Chi, an “Ambiguous Ambassador” to Life in America

Jun 23, 2019

Description:

Brian Dillon writes on Tseng Kwong Chi, a photographer who documented monuments of American culture, figures such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, and the work of his friend Keith Haring, some of which is on view at the Grey Art Gallery, at N.Y.U.

Old-Timey Silhouette Portraits of Poor Choices

Jun 23, 2019

Description:

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell humorously illustrates portraits of people’s poor decisions.

Sunday Reading: The Challenge to Reproductive Rights in America

Jun 23, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Charles Bethea, Jill Lepore, Margaret Talbot, Kelefa Sanneh, Jeffrey Toobin, and Helena Huntington Smith on the historical legal battle over women's reproductive health and abortion in America.

Why the Polar Bear Is an Indisputable Image of Climate Change

Jun 23, 2019

Description:

Michele Moses writes about the response to an image of a starving polar bear in Norilsk, Siberia, and what it says about our moral reckoning with climate change and other forms of environmental damage.

Inside a Texas Building Where the Government Is Holding Immigrant Children

Jun 22, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Warren Binford, a lawyer who has been interviewing children held in the detention facilities and who was so disturbed by what she saw that she decided to talk to the media.

The Devil Critiques Expressions That Mention Him

Jun 22, 2019

Description:

Sarah Hutto offers a list of humorous rebuttals by the Devil of expressions that mention him.

What to Stream This Weekend: “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” Through the Eyes of Pauline Kael

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody on the film “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” by Paul Mazursky, and on the film critic Pauline Kael’s perspective of that movie and of the cinema in general.

Clarence Thomas’s Astonishing Opinion on a Racist Mississippi Prosecutor

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin writes about Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’s opinion about Doug Evans, the prosecutor of the Flowers v. Mississippi case, who was accused of racial discrimination.

What Will Follow Trump’s Cancelled Strike on Iran?

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

The worst option is the one that both countries say they don’t want: a full-on war, Robin Wright writes.

Trump Is Trapped by His Own Incoherent Iran Policy

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Trump’s decision to call off strikes on Iran and how his Administration’s incoherent policy toward the country caused the situation.

Elizabeth Warren vs. Wall Street

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Senator Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts, has a bold plan to save the middle class. So why does she scare many Democrats?

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Unimaginable Reality of American Concentration Camps

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the debate over Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s use of the term “concentration camp,” President Donald Trump’s blurring of political reality, and our perceptions of our place in history.

The Trials of Human-Trafficking Victims, and Dexter Filkins on Ominous Signs from Iran

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, victims of human trafficking are facing greater hurdles under the Trump Administration. Plus, a look at what’s happening in a very tense moment between Iran and the U.S.

How Gyo Fujikawa Drew Freedom in Children’s Books

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about the illustrator Gyo Fujikawa, whose children’s books celebrated the beauty and power of the natural world and the earthly pleasures of the people walking around in it.

Nineteenth-Century Novels, with Better Birth Control

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Glynnis Fawkes humorously imagines what nineteenth-century novels, such as “Jane Eyre,” “Madame Bovary,” and “Pride and Prejudice,” would have been like if the characters had access to birth control.

Zion Williamson and the N.B.A. Draftees Usher in a New Era of Basketball

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Photographed by Cait Oppermann shortly after their selection, the proud 2019 draft-night stars celebrated in style, David Remnick writes.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, June 21st

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Avi Steinberg’s Daily Cartoon blames itself for climate change.

Love, Death, and Begging for Celebrities to Kill You

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino writes about punch-me-in-the-face discourse on Twitter, celebrity stans, and the trend toward the half-ironic millennial death wish.

Pixar Movies for Grownups

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Wes Marfield offers a humorous list of digitally animated movies that would be produced with adults as the target audience.

The Newsstands of the Future Will Have No Newspapers

Jun 21, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe writes on New Stand, a modern newsstand that sells novelty items and snacks instead of newspapers.

Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Backs Down, but the Protests Continue

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan writes about Carrie Lam’s announcement of the indefinite suspension of a controversial extradition bill in Hong Kong and the continuing protests.

Donald Trump and the Telltale Cough

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on an off-camera cough from Donald Trump’s chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, in the middle of an interview the President did with George Stephanopoulos, for ABC’s “20/20.”

Remembering Maida Heatter, a Charmingly Shameless Self-Promoter Who Became a Legend of Desserts

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Helen Rosner on Maida Heatter, a Miami coffee-shop owner who wrote recipes for the New York Times and became a successful author of dessert cookbooks.

“The Dead Don’t Die,” Reviewed: Jim Jarmusch’s Fiercely Political Zombie Comedy

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Jim Jarmusch’s “The Dead Don’t Die,” a zombie film which stars Bill Murray, Adam Driver, and Selena Gomez and borrows a small but solid batch of horror-movie tropes for an exuberantly imaginative comedy.

The Don and Joe Show

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin delves into what a Joe Biden-Donald Trump Presidential race might look like.

Will the Government Get Tough on Big Tech?

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Sue Halpern on antitrust investigations, and why tech giants are now asking the government to regulate them.

What’s Hidden at the Bottom of Your CVS Receipt

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Johnathan Appel and Sarah Kempa imagine a humorous list of information that can be found at the bottom of your CVS receipt.

Bomani Jones on the N.B.A., Analytics, and Race

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the ESPN host Bomani Jones about the N.B.A., basketball analytics, and his experiences in sports media.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, June 17th

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon contemplates the notion of America starting a war.

Is Sarah Huckabee Sanders the Future of the Republican Party?

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Paige Williams writes about the political future of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the Trump Administration’s outgoing press secretary.

Olimpia Zagnoli’s “Heartfelt”

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Olimpia Zagnoli about her cover for the May 27, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Mail

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Jia Tolentino’s account of losing religion and taking Ecstasy in Houston and Ed Caesar’s article on a young Englishman who got mixed up with white supremacists.

A Twenty-Four-Thousand-Mile Walk Across Human History

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Paul Salopek on the Out of Eden Walk, a slow-journalism project for which he is walking across the world, from Africa’s Rift Valley to Tierra del Fuego, in Argentina.

How to Celebrate Walt Whitman’s Two-Hundredth Birthday

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Loaf at your ease, luxuriating in the poet’s unhurried, insinuated cadences, Peter Schjeldahl writes.

Yes, the Ladies of “Wine Country” Have a Group Text

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe on a tarot-card session with Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, and Paula Pell.

“Peony,” by C. L. O’Dell

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Poetry by C. L. O’Dell: “I am ready for the next / thing.”

“Back Then,” by Mary Grimm

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Mary Grimm: “I was thirteen, as I said, and something was going on with me, in my head or outside it.”

How “When They See Us” and “Chernobyl” Make Us Look

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum reviews the new true-story series, which manage to make depressing, traumatic material not merely watchable but mesmerizing.

Troye Sivan’s Coming of Age

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on the pop idol Troye Sivan, whose songs translate the gay teen experience into recognizable rites of passage.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

“Spring,” “Bangkok Wakes to Rain,” “The City-State of Boston,” and “Autumn Light.”

Mary Grimm on the Rituals and Stories of Summer

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews Mary Grimm about “Back Then,” her short story from the June 24, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons June 24, 2019

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Finding Refuge in “The Secret Life of Bees” and “Much Ado About Nothing”

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

In the South Carolina of the nineteen-sixties and in Messina, reimagined as an Atlanta suburb, equality is elusive, Alexandra Schwartz writes.

Shirley Jones Returns to “Oklahoma!” with Her Teen-Idol Son

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

The night before the Tony Awards, Shaun Cassidy and his mom, the star of the 1955 movie, took in the musical’s dark and sexy revival, Sarah Larson writes.

The Podcasts I’ll Be Relaxing to This Summer

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Nathan Heller: I want voices that sound like the voices of every Ritalin-addled Yale history major who now works at the Park Slope Food Co-op, and I want them deep in my ears all the time.

“Because,” by Ellen Bass

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Ellen Bass: “Because there’d been too many people / and then there was no one.”

Liu Cixin’s War of the Worlds

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

A leading sci-fi writer takes stock of China’s global rise, Jiayang Fan writes.

Karlheinz Stockhausen Composes the Cosmos

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

His seven-opera cycle, “Licht,” shows that he was not only a master of far-out spectacle but also a composer of impeccable craft, Alex Ross writes.

Feed the Birds—While You Still Can

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Lily Puckett on the New Yorkers who won’t give up tossing bread crumbs and junk food to critters, even if it kills them.

Manafort’s Monster House in the Hamptons

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

In Tyler Foggatt’s piece, Paul Manafort’s Water Mill neighbor recalls the man whose McMansion blocked out the sunset. 

Summertime Movie Screenings Around the City

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

Instead of drive-ins, New York, with its foot-traffic culture, offers cinematic sit-ins on rooftops and in parks, soccer fields, and other public spaces around town.

Where Are All the Books About Menopause? 

Jun 17, 2019

Description:

For women, aging is framed as a series of losses—of fertility, of sexuality, of beauty. But it can also be a liberation, Sarah Manguso writes. 

Liz Johnson Artur’s Vibrant Chronicle of the African Diaspora

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Anakwa Dwamena writes about Liz Johnson Artur’s photographs of the African diaspora, in her first solo museum show, “Dusha,” at the Brooklyn Museum.

Replacement for Sarah Sanders Disqualified After Telling Truth on Job Application

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that a candidate to replace the outgoing White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, was eliminated from contention for telling the truth.

Fantasy and Nightmare Dads I Could Become

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Jetti Allen humorously illustrates the fantasy and nightmare dads one might become.

Review: “Euphoria” and the Flawed Art of Gen Z Prophesying

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix writes about the HBO television show “Euphoria,” a teen drama about Generation Z, starring Zendaya and Hunter Schafer.

What a Biden-Trump Presidential Race Might Look Like

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on the similarities between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

My Father’s Things, and My Own

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Jane Brox writes on her father’s death, and the significance of the material things we leave behind.

Sunday Reading: The Electrifying Critical Mind of Pauline Kael

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Pauline Kael on cinematic masterpieces: Martin Scorsese's "Taxi Driver" and "GoodFellas," Arthur Penn's "Bonnie and Clyde," Orson Welles's "Citizen Kane," George Lucas's "Star Wars," and Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather."

The Strange Story of a Secret Literary Fellowship

Jun 16, 2019

Description:

Daniel A. Gross writes about what happened after he was offered ten thousand dollars as part of a new—and secretive—award for young writers.

The Stephanopoulos Interview Is Another Fine Mess for Trump

Jun 15, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the repercussions of President Donald Trump’s interview with George Stephanopoulous of ABC News, in which the President appeared to suggest that he would accept opposition research from foreign entities during the 2020 Presidential campaign without informing the F.B.I.

The Six Remotes in Your Dad’s Entertainment Center

Jun 15, 2019

Description:

Evan Allgood writes a humorous description of the remotes in a dad’s entertainment center.

The Right to a Stable Climate Is the Constitutional Question of the Twenty-first Century

Jun 15, 2019

Description:

Carolyn Kormann reports on the oral arguments in Kelsey Cascadia Rose Juliana v. the United States, better known as the climate kids’ lawsuit, which is an attempt to compel government action on climate change.

How Families Separated at the Border Could Make the Government Pay

Jun 15, 2019

Description:

Sarah Stillman on Suny Rodríguez, a Honduran asylum seeker who was the first person to sue the government for monetary damages related to family detention and separation at the border.

What to Stream This Weekend: A Claire Denis Car Commercial, Rescued from Obscurity

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody recommends streaming Claire Denis’s short film “Keep It for Yourself,” a long-form car commercial for Nissan starring Sophie Simon, Michael James, Sarina Chan, and Vincent Gallo.

The House Judiciary Committee Considers Antitrust Law, the Tech Giants, and the Future of News

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on the House Judiciary Committee panel this week on antitrust protections for media organizations, the power of Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Apple, and the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act.

The Profound Silence of Marshawn Lynch

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

Hua Hsu writes about the documentary “Lynch: A History,” by the director David Shields, about the former star running back of the Seattle Seahawks Marshawn Lynch and his silence in the face of the media.

David Remnick Talks with Robert Caro, a Living Legend Among Nonfiction Writers

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, he celebrated historian and biographer talks about himself for a change; and Sue Halpern considers whether Big Tech’s honeymoon with Washington is over.

Can Elizabeth Warren Win It All?

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

Sheelah Kolhatkar on the senator from Massachusetts, who made her name attacking Wall Street and is running for the Democratic Presidential nomination.

“Rolling Thunder Revue,” Reviewed: Martin Scorsese’s Slippery Chronicle of Bob Dylan in Concert

Jun 14, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Rolling Thunder Revue,” Martin Scorsese’s new film about Bob Dylan.

Andrea Lee Reads “The Children”

Jun 11, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Andrea Lee, who reads her short story “The Children,” from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Elizabeth Warren’s Theory of the Case

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the Democratic Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s detailed policy proposals, including plans to tackle childcare, student debt, and the opioid crisis, which have pushed her ahead in the polls.

The Arrest of a Russian Investigative Journalist Prompts Outrage and Solidarity

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on the arrest and detention of the Russian investigative journalist Ivan Golunov, which has resulted in protests in Moscow and an unprecedented show of defiance and solidarity by Russian media.

The Chaotic Magic of Bob Dylan’s “Rolling Thunder Revue”

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

David Remnick on Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which was conceived as an anti-corporate return to the days of travelling tricksters, medicine shows, and carnivals and is streaming on Netflix.

A Gay Russian, Exiled in Ireland

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Vladimir Putin has long used the L.G.B.T.Q. community as a political scapegoat. Masha Gessen talks with an activist targeted by the Russian President’s regime.

The Secret Rebellion of Amelia Bedelia, the Bartleby of Domestic Work

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Sarah Blackwood writes on the “Amelia Bedelia” book series, by Peggy Parish, and how it illuminates and captures the feeling of the often invisible realm of women’s work.

The L.A. Drivers You’ll Meet on Your Morning Commute

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Neha Potalia humorously describes a number of drivers you might encounter on a morning commute in Los Angeles.

People Are Still Getting Married, and This Book Is Here to Help

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman writes about “Marriageology: The Art and Science of Staying Together,” by Belinda Luscombe, a book about how to make marriages last.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, June 10th

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Evan Lian’s Daily Cartoon shows a Venn diagram of the moon and Mars.

Trump Says He Has Made Deal to Add Hawaii as Fiftieth State

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that President Donald Trump made the bold choice to add Hawaii as the nation’s fiftieth state.

The 2019 Tony Awards: “Hadestown” Triumphs, Elaine May Sparkles, and Billy Porter Wins the Red Carpet

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman reviews the telecast of the Tony Awards, hosted by James Corden, in which Rachel Chavkin, Elaine May, and others gave winning speeches.

The Durable Feeling That a Child Is Always at Risk

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Rachel Pearson describes the history, causes, and effects of vulnerable-child syndrome, and the patients and parents whom she sees in pediatrics, both in and outside medical crisis.

Why Famous, Powerful Presidential Candidates Are Begging You for Five Dollars

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

Eric Lach writes about the rising popularity of small donations to Democratic candidates and its impact on elections and campaign-finance reform.

Ta-Nehisi Coates Revisits the Case for Reparations

Jun 10, 2019

Description:

In an interview with David Remnick, Ta-Nehisi Coates looks back at “The Case for Reparations,” his article for The Atlantic on slavery, racism, and racial justice, and also speaks about the 2020 election and Elizabeth Warren.

Hot Comb: The Pinnacle of Hair Care

Jun 9, 2019

Description:

Introducing an excerpt from her new graphic novel “Hot Comb,” Ebony Flowers talks about her relationship to hair and hair products.

“Big Little Lies” Season 2, Reviewed: Meryl, Meryl, Meryl

Jun 9, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix reviews the second season of the HBO series “Big Little Lies,” starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, Zoë Kravitz, Laura Dern, and Meryl Streep.

Sunday Reading: Pride and the Fiftieth Anniversary of Stonewall

Jun 9, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Anthony Hiss, Frances FitzGerald, Alex Ross, Michael Specter, Ariel Levy, Masha Gessen, and Mark Seliger on the evolution of the gay-rights movement, the fight for same-sex marriage, the AIDS epidemic, and transgender visibility.

A Weakening Economy May Be the Biggest Threat to Donald Trump

Jun 8, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about a weak jobs report that sent Donald Trump into a tirade against the Fed chairman, and Trump’s threats to impose tariffs on Mexico.

Woman Quits Job After Being Forced To Spend Week With Trump

Jun 8, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Theresa May is quitting her job as British Prime Minister not because of Brexit but because of being forced to endure a week with President Donald Trump.

Healing Crystals and How to Shoplift Them

Jun 8, 2019

Description:

Sarah Lazarus jokes about how to steal different kinds of crystals based on the energy they emit, including rose quartz, jasper, lapis lazuli, tiger’s eye, amethyst, and turquoise.

“1984” at Seventy: Why We Still Read Orwell’s Book of Prophecy

Jun 8, 2019

Description:

Louis Menand on persistent relevance of George Orwell’s “1984,” which was published seventy years ago.

The Truffaut Essays That Clear Up Misguided Notions of Auteurism

Jun 8, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about “Chroniques d’Arts Spectacles 1954-1958,” a book of critical essays by François Truffaut, on the subject of the film director as auteur.

Bernie Sanders’s Walmart Speech May Offer a Preview of Larger Labor Proposals

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes about Bernie Sanders’s speech at Walmart’s annual shareholders’s meeting, in which the Democratic Presidential candidate touted the benefits of corporate co-governance.

“The Last Black Man in San Francisco” and the Fear of Being Erased

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Nathan Heller writes about “The Last Black Man in San Francisco,” directed by Joe Talbot and starring Jimmie Fails, Jonathan Majors, and Danny Glover, a movie about memory and displacement.

From Stonewall to the Present, Fifty Years of L.G.B.T.Q. Rights

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, Masha Gessen on the sweeping changes for L.G.B.T.Q. people that have taken place since the 1969 Stonewall uprising. Can the movement advance in the face of political backlash?

Conversations with Ma: Prenatal Vitamins and Owl Pellets

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Julia Wertz illustrates a humorous conversation with her mother, in which Ma insists on taking prenatal vitamins and poking at an owl pellett.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, June 7th

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Barry Blitt’s Daily Cartoon stages an intervention for the President.

A D Day Journey in the Spirit of A. J. Liebling

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead revisits A. J. Liebling’s visit to Weymouth sixty-four years after D Day, seventy-five years after the Second World War.

Han Ong Reads “Javi”

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Han Ong, who reads his short story “Javi,” from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Conspiracy Theories for the Ultra-Rational

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Alex Baia and Thatcher Jensen write a satirical list of too-real conspiracy theories.

Ross Douthat on the Crisis of the Conservative Coalition

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner and the New York Times columnist Ross Douthat discuss the crisis of the conservative coalition, the ideas of David French, and the religious right’s response to Trumpism.

“The Greatest Urdu Stories Ever Told” Is a Belated Introduction to a Thrilling Canon

Jun 7, 2019

Description:

Saira Khan writes about the short-story collection “The Greatest Urdu Stories Ever Told.”

The Campaign Volunteer Whose Brilliance Haunted Robert F. Kennedy

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

David Margolick on Pat Sylvester, a young supporter of Eugene McCarthy who challenged Robert F. Kennedy in a late-night conversation just weeks before Kennedy was assassinated.

“Late Night,” Reviewed: Emma Thompson and Mindy Kaling’s Incisive Comedy about the Gender Politics of TV

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Late Night,” directed by Nisha Ganatra and written by Mindy Kaling, who stars alongside Emma Thompson.

Republicans Have Become the Except-When-Trump-Does-It Party

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Susan B. Glasser writes about President Donald Trump’s visit to Europe, his D Day speech in France, and the fact that the Republican Party has not opposed Trump’s policies, like the Mexico tariffs, which they would normally be against.

Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Debate About the Best Way to Get Donald Trump Out of Office

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about Nancy Pelosi’s comment that she wants to see Donald Trump imprisoned and the Democratic Party’s debate about whether he should be imprisoned or impeached.

In China, the Unspoken Trauma of Tiananmen Square

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan joins Eric Lach to discuss how the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre figures into China’s cultural memory.

A Gobshite American President in Ireland

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about President Donald Trump’s visit to Ireland and the reaction of the country’s Prime Minister, Leo Varadkar.

Amber Gray’s Ferocious Twist on the Goddess Persephone in “Hadestown”

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Rachel Syme writes about Amber Gray’s performance as the Greek goddess Persephone in the Broadway musical “Hadestown.”

Europe and America Seventy-Five Years After D Day

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Adam Gopnik on Europe and America’s relationship seventy-five years after D Day, in light of President Trump’s European visit.

How to Compliment Your Friends Who Can’t Take a Compliment

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Ivan Ehlers humorously illustrates methods for giving compliments to friends who can’t take compliments.

Witnesses to D Day

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Roger Angell on the New Yorker writers and editors A. J. Liebling and Gardner Botsford, who witnessed the events of D Day, either as reporters or as soldiers.

Hollywood Writers Attempt Life Without Agents

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt writes about the Hollywood screenwriters who fired their agents en masse at the behest of their union, the Writers Guild of America, after failed contract negotiations.

Daily Cartoon: Thursday, June 6th

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Daily Cartoon goes to Buckingham Palace with Trump.

Jalen Rose Has a Problem with Basketball Analytics

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the retired basketball player and current TV analyst Jalen Rose about analytics, the N.B.A. Finals, and the moon landing.

F.A.Q. About the Board Game at Your Favorite Bar

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Jonny Auping asks and answers some questions about the board game available at your local bar.

The Persistent Ghost of Ayn Rand, the Forebear of Zombie Neoliberalism

Jun 6, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about her interest in Ayn Rand when she was a teen-ager, and the way that Rand continues to haunt modern conservative politics.

The Best Episode of the New “Black Mirror” Is a Princess Tale Starring Miley Cyrus

Jun 5, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews the best episode of Season 5 of “Black Mirror,” “Rachel, Jack and Ashley Too,” a self-aware princess tale starring the pop star and former Disney Channel actress Miley Cyrus.

Review: The Disappointing Blandness of “The Last Black Man in San Francisco”

Jun 5, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “The Last Black Man in San Francisco,” which is directed by Joe Talbot and stars Jimmie Fails.

Ta-Nehisi Coates Reads “Conduction”

Jun 4, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman hosts the author Ta-Nehisi Coates, who reads his short story “Conduction,” from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Pure Weirdness of the Psychedelic-Rock Icon Roky Erickson

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich writes about the music of the psych-rock guitarist and singer Roky Erickson, from the 13th Floor Elevators, who is best known for the song “You’re Gonna Miss Me.”

Ava DuVernay on “When They See Us” and the Boys Who Became the Central Park Five

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

The New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb interviews the filmmaker Ava DuVernay about her new Netflix series, “When They See Us,” which revisits the case of the Central Park Five and the way the American justice system deals with black citizens.

Continental Shift

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin writes about the European elections.

Keanu Reeves Is Too Good for This World

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Naomi Fry reflects on Keanu Reeves, the star of the “John Wick,” “The Matrix,” and “Bill & Ted” movies, and his cameo in Ali Wong’s new Netflix movie, “Always Be My Maybe.”

“Baara”: A Must-See Film of Patriarchal Abuse, at the New York African Film Festival

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews the drama “Baara” (“Work”), from 1978, by the Malian director Souleymane Cissé.

The Book That Exposed the Cynical Politics of Donald Duck

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Dan Piepenbring on the book “How to Read Donald Duck: Imperialist Ideology in the Disney Comic,” by Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart, which points to the capitalist agenda pushed by international editions of the Disney cartoon.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, June 3rd

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Maddie Dai’s Daily Cartoon tries to interpret a leader’s directive.

R. Kelly and the Damage Done

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Jim DeRogatis, the critic who has reported on allegations of sexual assault against R. Kelly for years, shares an excerpt from “Soulless: The Case Against R. Kelly,” about his years of investigation and Kelly’s victims.

Bruce Eric Kaplan’s “Bedtime Stories”

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Bruce Eric Kaplan about his cover for this year’s Fiction Issue of The New Yorker.

“Javi,” by Han Ong

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Han Ong: “She takes out the fake I.D., glances at it for a moment, and then gives it to Javier. No fuss, as if she weren’t handing him a new lease on life.”

Jim Sciutto Returns to Regis High School for Debate Prep

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

The last time the CNN anchor was in the debate team’s fourth-floor practice room, there was a Nerf basketball hoop on the door frame, Eric Lach writes.

A Standoff at the Last Abortion Clinic in Montgomery

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea on the country’s most restrictive abortion ban, which Alabama’s governor has signed into law. 

Andrea Lee on Cross-Cultural Encounters

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews Andrea Lee about “The Children,” her short story from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Terrence McNally in the Age of #MeToo

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

In 2019, it’s sometimes hard to hear the odd tenderness and the funny pathos of “Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune” over the din of possible disaster, Vinson Cunningham writes.

Stonewall on the Opera Stage

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Michael Schulman on “Stonewall,” the first major opera to feature a trans character written for a trans performer.

Venezuela’s Two Presidents Collide 

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Jon Lee Anderson on Juan Guaidó’s uprising, which was backed by the U.S. but failed to depose Nicolás Maduro, and whether the country’s divisions will lead to a crisis.

Ocean Vuong’s Life Sentences

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino reviews Ocean Vuong’s début novel, “On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous,” in which the poet tells a story of surviving the violence of America.

Breaking and Entering with Megan Mullally

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on the “Will & Grace” actress and Gucci Mane cover singer’s visit to the Carlyle suite of her late friend Elaine Stritch.

Bill Callahan Makes Good Use of Quiet

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Amanda Petrusich on Bill Callahan’s new double album, “Shepherd in a Sheepskin Vest,” which is a powerful meditation on home and its comforts.

“Conduction,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Ta-Nehisi Coates: “I was fresh out of Virginia, fresh out of the pit, my remarkable escape still alive in my mind.”

“The Children,” by Andrea Lee

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Andrea Lee: “For years, Harena has nourished herself on the myth of her Italian father, and now it is impossible to keep the subject within the bounds of simple conversation.”

The Unexpected Profundity of Curious George

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Rivka Galchen writes about Hans and Margret Rey, the creators of the Curious George children’s book series, who fled from the Nazis before ending up in New York.

“I Wanted to Be Surprised,” by Jane Hirshfield

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Jane Hirshfield: “To such a request, the world is obliging.”

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons June 10 & 17, 2019

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

“People, Power, and Profits,” “The Dictionary Wars,” “The Red Daughter,” and “The Affairs of the Falcóns.” 

Poorly Mapped, by Dinaw Mengestu

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Memoir by Dinaw Mengestu: Inside my family’s home, I could lay full claim to being an Ethiopian; on the streets of Addis Ababa, however, I had to contend with the obvious facts.

Geneva, 1959, by Orhan Pamuk

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Memoir by Orhan Pamuk: I couldn’t seem to get hold of the language that everyone else was using so casually.

The Mail

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to James Wood’s review of Martin Hägglund’s new book, Ariel Levy’s report on land redistribution in South Africa, and Elizabeth Kolbert’s article about species extinction.

The Wild West Meets the Southern Border

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

At first glance, frontier towns near the U.S.-Mexico border and along common migration corridors seem oblivious both of history and of the current political reality, Valeria Luiselli writes.

Han Ong on Straying into Topicality

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Deborah Treisman interviews Han Ong about “Javi,” his short story from the June 10 & 17, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Hereafter, Faraway, by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Memoir by Viet Thanh Nguyen: My eternal scene takes place in a faraway country, the one in which I was born and of which I have no memory.

William Steig’s Books Explored the Reality That Adults Don’t Want Children to Know About

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Rumaan Alam on the children's-literature author and illustrator William Steig, whose books blend fable and realism to teach young readers about the world.

Hard Seat, by Jennifer Egan

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Memoir by Jennifer Egan: Ah, the hubris of the young English speaker whose knowledge of Chinese consisted, in my case, of being able to count to ten.

Stonehenge, by Min Jin Lee

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Memoir by Min Jin Lee: In their attractive, polished faces, I saw that Stonehenge was as familiar to them as having a gun held to my face was to me.

“The Ledge,” by Glyn Maxwell

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Glyn Maxwell: “You said you wanted to be young again, / which left me with this nothing left to say.”

Andrew Sean Greer Reads Dorothy Parker

Jun 3, 2019

Description:

Andrew Sean Greer joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “I Live on Your Visits,” by Dorothy Parker, from a 1955 issue of The New Yorker.

The Hidden Identity in April Dawn Alison’s Self-Portraits

Jun 2, 2019

Description:

Hilton Als, in an excerpt from the book entitled “April Dawn Alison,” forthcoming from MACK, writes on the Polaroid photographs of April Dawn Alison, who became a woman for the camera.

Dear Pepper: Conflicted Dating and Night Snacking

Jun 2, 2019

Description:

Liana Finck illustrates a humorous advice-column comic in the voice of her dog, Pepper.

Europe’s Fragmented Center

Jun 2, 2019

Description:

Amy Davidson Sorkin on the unsettled mood after the European Parliamentary elections, which makes this a dangerous moment, but also a potentially promising one.

Sunday Reading: Banking Scandals

Jun 2, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Ed Caesar, Dexter Filkins, Patrick Radden Keefe, Connie Bruck, Nick Paumgarten, and Sheelah Kolhatkar on global financial scandals involving institutions like Deutsche Bank, Alfa Bank, Countrywide, and Wells Fargo, and their connection to U.S. politicians.

The Startling Image of a Blood-Spattered Victim of the Virginia Beach Shooting

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Michael Luo writes about an image, from the newspaper the Virginian-Pilot, of a man covered in blood after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach.

Movie Review: “Rocketman” and the Inevitable Shortcomings of the Hollywood Popstar Biopic

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Rocketman,” directed by Dexter Fletcher, which looks at the life of the musician Elton John.

A Climax to the Saga of Benjamin Netanyahu and Avigdor Lieberman

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Bernard Avishai on the politics of the Israeli elections and the complicated history between Prime Minister Benjami​n Netanyahu, of the Likud Party, and Avigdor Lieberman, the head of the Yisrael Beiteinu Party.

Trump Says He Would Be a Much Better Princess Than Meghan Markle

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Calling the Duchess of Sussex “a nasty woman,” the President said, “If I were a princess, I would not be nasty. People would say, ‘Donald Trump is the nicest princess.’ ”

Sorry I’m Late

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Noah Gebstadt imagines humorous excuses given by an acquaintance who is running late for a rendezvous.

The Envies of Eating in Springtime

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Charlotte Mendelson writes about the joys—and the expense—of shopping at farmers’ markets in the spring.

Why Mitch McConnell Outmaneuvers Democrats at Filling the Supreme Court

Jun 1, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on Mitch McConnell stating that he would push through a Republican Supreme Court nominee in 2020, an election year, even though he blocked Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland in 2016.

Trump’s Crazy Mexico Tariff Is Stoking a Meltdown on Wall Street

May 31, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about President Donald Trump’s threat to impose tariffs on Mexican goods and whether there will be repercussions in the economy and stock market.

Ava DuVernay on the Central Park Five, and #MeToo on TV

May 31, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, the director Ava DuVernay discusses her new miniseries, about five youths convicted and exonerated of an infamous crime; and The New Yorker’s television critic, Emily Nussbaum, explains a “deluge” of #MeToo plots on television.

Ta-Nehisi Coates Revisits the Case for Reparations

May 27, 2019

Description:

The writer set out to make America stop laughing at jokes about reparations. Five years later, Presidential candidates are taking his research very seriously.

This Summer’s Do’s, Don’ts, and Things That Will Inevitably End Up Happening

May 27, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Caplan writes a humorous, realistic advice to navigating summer hobbies, fashion, romance, and more.

The Impeccably Understated Modernism of I. M. Pei

May 27, 2019

Description:

Nikil Saval writes about the modernist architect I. M. Pei, who died this month and whose buildings include the pyramid outside the Louvre, the John Hancock Tower, the East Building of the National Gallery, and the Society Hill Towers.

Antonio Salieri’s Revenge

May 27, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on Antonio Salieri, who was falsely cast as Mozart’s murderer and music’s sorest loser but is now getting a fresh hearing.

Scents and Sensibility

May 27, 2019

Description:

Anna Russell on Ron Winnegrad, the perfumer behind Love’s Baby Soft, who coaches his synesthesia students on how to see the colors summoned by pencil shavings, “whale poop,” and the dried glands of the beaver.

Parenting by the Numbers

May 27, 2019

Description:

Lizzie Widdicombe on the economist Emily Oster, who challenges the conventional wisdom on child rearing.

The Bittersweet Poetry of “Lima :: Limón” 

May 27, 2019

Description:

Dan Chiasson reviews Natalie Scenters-Zapico’s latest poetry collection, “Lima :: Limón,” which probes the richness of contradiction.

TV’s Reckoning with #MeToo

May 27, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum on the creators who are visibly struggling to adjust to the changing landscape, rejecting the “very special episode” path and seeking something more honest.

Timelessness in Works by Thomas Cole and Brice Marden

May 27, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl on two small shows in the Hudson Valley that hint at long spiritual rhythms that are not lost in the staccato frenzies of our day.

“See You Yesterday” and the Perils—and Promise—of Time-Travelling While Black

May 27, 2019

Description:

Maya Phillips on how “See You Yesterday,” a Netflix movie, produced by Spike Lee, upends the trope of the white, male time traveller and actually deals with the complicated ways that history affects black Americans.

“The Chorus,” by Craig Morgan Teicher

May 27, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Craig Morgan Teicher: “It’s, you know, the part that repeats, / the bit you’re supposed / to remember.”

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

May 27, 2019

Description:

“Germaine,” “The Age of Disenchantments,” “The Crazy Bunch,” and “Guestbook.”

Ayşegül Savaş on Imitation and Identity

May 27, 2019

Description:

Cressida Leyshon interviews Ayşegül Savaş about “Canvas,” her short story from the June 3, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

The Mail

May 27, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to David Owen’s investigation of the effects of noise pollution, Adam Gopnik’s piece about aging, and Joshua Yaffa’s article on Maxim Osipov.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons June 3, 2019

May 27, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Junior Offender

May 27, 2019

Description:

Andrew Marantz on the Harvard-bound Kyle Kashuv, a former leader of the young-conservative organization Turning Point, whose racial slurs and hate speech surfaced online.

Beto O’Rourke Stays on the Road

May 27, 2019

Description:

William Finnegan on Beto O’Rourke’s attempts to revive his Presidential campaign despite flagging poll numbers.

“Afghan Funeral in Paris,” by Aria Aber

May 27, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Aria Aber: “Each natural passing articulates / the unnatural.”

N.Y.U.’s Graduation Marathon Man

May 27, 2019

Description:

Tyler Foggatt on the university’s president, Andrew Hamilton, who gave twenty commencement speeches this year, around the city and at campuses in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai.

How Football Leaks Is Exposing Corruption in European Soccer

May 27, 2019

Description:

While Rui Pinto sits in jail, his revelations are bringing down the sport’s most famous teams and players, Sam Knight writes.

Chloë Sevigny Can Make You an It Girl, Too

May 27, 2019

Description:

Sheila Marikar on the actress and director’s new line of cool-girl eyeglass frames for Warby Parker.

Creative

May 27, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Ian Frazier: As I once told Harold Pinter, creativity is like a third arm, and my job is to help you free it. He ran off screaming, and that became his first play.

“Canvas,” by Ayşegül Savaş

May 27, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Ayşegül Savaş: “Stories she thought had left her memory without a trace would come back to strike her with their strangeness.”

How Nancy Pelosi’s Tactics Affirm the Trumpian Style of Politics

May 26, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes on the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s tactics in opposing Donald Trump, and the House Democrats’ impeachment strategy amid concerns about acquittal in the Senate.

The Case to Impeach Trump for Bigotry

May 26, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu on Representative Al Green’s proposals to impeach President Donald Trump for bigotry, based on his discrimination against Muslims, transgender people, and immigrants.

New Careers for the Noteworthy

May 26, 2019

Description:

Tracey K. Berglund humorously illustrates alternative careers for famous creative types like Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Jane Austen, Marie Antoinette, Betsy Ross, René Magritte, and Agatha Christie.

The Challenge at the Border Shows No Signs of Abating

May 26, 2019

Description:

Another migrant child has died in the custody of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a system where the quality of mercy is under extreme strain, Margaret Talbot writes.

Sunday Reading: School Drama

May 26, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Lillian Ross, Melanie Thernstrom, Muriel Spark, David Samuels, Calvin Trillin, Don DeLillo, Dana Goodyear, Roger Angell, Jonathan Blitzer, and Jelani Cobb on the campus lives of high-school and university students.

Can Data Be Human? The Work of Giorgia Lupi

May 25, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Lange writes about the information designer Giorgia Lupi, a partner at the graphic-design firm Pentagram and the co-author of the book “Dear Data.”

Amazon Recommends Some Books Based on Your Failures

May 25, 2019

Description:

Irving Ruan and Alex Watt imagine some humorous recommendations Amazon might make to customers based on their life failures.

The Victims of Larry Nassar Who Dared to Come Forward First

May 25, 2019

Description:

Eren Orbey on the more recent journalistic investigations—among them “Believed,” the podcast, and “At the Heart of Gold,” a new HBO documentary by Erin Lee Carr—that have shifted the public’s focus to the stories of Larry Nassar’s lesser-known victims, exposing the culture that enabled his abuse.

Charging Julian Assange Under the Espionage Act Is an Attack on the First Amendment

May 24, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes about the Justice Department’s announcement that it is charging the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange under the Espionage Act, and how that is an attack on the First Amendment.

What to Stream This Weekend: The Third Season of Joe Swanberg’s “Easy”

May 24, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody writes about the Netflix TV show ”Easy,” directed by Joe Swanberg and featuring Jake Johnson, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Elizabeth Reaser, and Michael Chernus.

Is America Ready to Make Reparations?

May 24, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, the debate on making reparations for slavery is as old as the Republic. Will the nation finally face up to its history?

The Coolest, Sickest, Hottest New Shoes

May 24, 2019

Description:

Jennifer Xiao writes and illustrates a humorous list of the shoes you simply have to own.

Theresa May Resigns, Forever Stained by Brexit

May 24, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead writes about Theresa May’s resignation as Prime Minister in the wake of the challenges posed by Brexit, and names May’s possible successors, including Boris Johnson, Andrea Leadsom, and Michael Gove.

It’s Not Entirely Up to School Students to Save the World

May 24, 2019

Description:

Bill McKibben writes about the plan to stage a one-day global strike on September 20th as a call to action on the climate disaster.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, May 24th

May 24, 2019

Description:

Brendan Loper’s Daily Cartoon spends Memorial Day with the beach goths.

The Growing Dangers of Trump’s Trade War with China

May 24, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about the chances that the Trump Administration’s trade war with China could spill over into a more protracted conflict.

An Indian Political Theorist on the Triumph of Narendra Modi’s Hindu Nationalism

May 24, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the writer Pratap Bhanu Mehta, the vice-chancellor of Ashoka University and the co-editor of “The Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution” about the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalism and what the future holds for India’s Muslims.

The Results of Our Public-Opinion Poll Are In

May 24, 2019

Description:

Ali Ruth imagines the results of a satirical public-opinion poll on topics ranging from health care and stem-cell research to Donald Trump.

Szechuan Mountain House Gives Proletarian Fare the Palace Treatment 

May 24, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan reviews Szechuan Mountain House, where classic dishes get poetic reinventions and opulent plating—with the same dedication to capsaicin as the originals. 

How Abortion Changed the Arc of Women’s Lives

May 24, 2019

Description:

Katha Pollitt on so-called fetal-heartbeat bills and the broad impact the availability of abortion has had on the lives of American women in the years after Roe v. Wade.

“Aladdin” and “The Fall of the American Empire,” Reviewed

May 24, 2019

Description:

Anthony Lane reviews Guy Ritchie’s live-action “Aladdin,” featuring Will Smith, and Denys Arcand’s “The Fall of the American Empire.”

Does Trump Have an Off-Ramp on Iran?

May 24, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes about Donald Trump’s conflict with Iran and President Hassan Rouhani over the nuclear deal, and the history of U.S. Presidents’ relationship with the country.

“Hostile Planet”: Animals Are Struggling to Adapt, and National Geographic Is, Too

May 24, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson on the National Geographic show “Hostile Planet,” hosted by Bear Grylls, which is meant to lure people to care about animals’ fates on a warming planet.

Karl Rove and a Pitch for a Nationwide 5G Network Tailor-Made for Trump’s 2020 Campaign

May 24, 2019

Description:

Sue Halpern writes on an insurgent telecommunications company Rivada, chaired by Declan Ganley, with funding from Peter Thiel and Karl Rove, and its play to monetize the Defense Department’s unused radio spectrum, to bring 5G cellular services to rural America.

Barry Blitt’s “The Shining”

May 23, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Barry Blitt about his cover for the June 3, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“The Souvenir,” Reviewed: Joanna Hogg’s Ambitious, Frustrating Autobiographical Drama

May 23, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews Joanna Hogg’s autobiographical drama “The Souvenir,” starring Honor Swinton Byrne, Tom Burke, and Tilda Swinton.

The Frivolous Arrest of Another Russian Dissident, Leonid Volkov

May 23, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen writes on the latest arrest of Leonid Volkov, a Russian software engineer closely aligned with the Russian anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny.

My Brother Tom’s Schizophrenia

May 20, 2019

Description:

Marin Sardy, the author of “The Edge of Every Day: Sketches of Schizophrenia,” writes about her brother’s struggles with schizoaffective disorder and homelessness, in their home state of Alaska.

A Philosopher of Law on the Dangers of Trump’s Plan to Pardon American War Criminals

May 20, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Scott Shapiro, a professor of law and philosophy at Yale and the co-author, with Oona A. Hathaway, of “The Internationalists: How A Radical Plan To Outlaw War Remade the World.”

“Booksmart,” Reviewed: Olivia Wilde’s Toothless Teen Comedy

May 20, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Booksmart,” Olivia Wilde’s first feature, which stars Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever.

Two Perspectives on the Future of the Green New Deal

May 20, 2019

Description:

The activist Varshini Prakash, co-founder of the Sunrise Movement, says that there’s no choice but to strive, but no one knows better than Carol Browner, President Barack Obama’s former “climate czar,” how hard the fight for environmental legislation will be.

The Threat to Roe

May 20, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on the abortion fight, Roe v. Wade, and the pretense of precedent.

What Survives After the “Game of Thrones” Finale

May 20, 2019

Description:

Emily Nussbaum writes about the finale of “Game of Thrones,” which offered closure for characters like Jon Snow (Kit Harington), Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke), and others.

Cut and Paste: “Sunny Side of the Mountain”

May 20, 2019

Description:

Roz Chast humorously transforms text from a country-music album, “Sunny Side of the Mountain,” to create a collage comic.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, May 20th

May 20, 2019

Description:

Farley Katz’s Daily Cartoon says goodbye to “Game of Thrones.”

“Game of Thrones” Season 8 Finale Recap: The Iron Throne

May 20, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson recaps the series finale of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” in which Daenerys Targaryen, Jon Snow, Tyrion Lannister, and others make their final choices.

The Whitney Biennial in an Age of Anxiety

May 20, 2019

Description:

Peter Schjeldahl on the mostly youthful artists who gravitate to identity or otherwise communitarian politics and familiar modes of art.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

May 20, 2019

Description:

“The Flight Portfolio,” “Dawson’s Fall,” “Women’s War,” and “Democracy and Truth.”

Joe Beef and the Excesses of Restaurant Culture

May 20, 2019

Description:

Hannah Goldfield on what happens when the chefs behind North America’s most hedonistic restaurant quit drinking.

The Shed Attempts to Inject Culture Into Hudson Yards

May 20, 2019

Description:

Alex Ross on how the new arts venue the Shed will consort with the capitalist behemoth surrounding it.

Is Mac DeMarco Growing Up?

May 20, 2019

Description:

Charles Bethea on Mac DeMarco, who reflected on the death of his friend Mac Miller and nursed a two-day hangover before appearing on “The Tonight Show.”

Adaptive Fashion on the Red Carpet

May 20, 2019

Description:

Brent Crane on the actress and disability-rights advocate Lauren (Lolo) Spencer, who headed to Cannes in her wheelchair to promote the film “Give Me Liberty,” with help from a stylist.

Malika Favre’s “Summer Hours”

May 20, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Malika Favre about her cover for the May 27, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Rammstein’s Heavy and Cathartic Camp

May 20, 2019

Description:

By condensing Germany’s history into a parade of horrors, the hardcore band is lampooning the country’s delicate and complex relationship with its own past, Amanda Petrusich writes.

The Teen Who Thwarted Bill de Blasio’s Presidential Announcement

May 20, 2019

Description:

Tyler Foggatt on how Gabe Fleisher, a high-school junior in St. Louis, got the scoop that forced the New York City mayor’s campaign team to rejigger its strategy.

23 and Him

May 20, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by Patricia Marx: Your genetic-test results are in! Good news: you probably won’t develop childhood rickets. Bad news: your DNA matched DNA found at a crime scene.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons May 27, 2019

May 20, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Emotional Malnourishment in “Curse of the Starving Class”

May 20, 2019

Description:

The playwright Sam Shepard’s matter-of-fact observations about where his characters stand in the world tell us so much about the world they inhabit, Hilton Als writes.

David Milch’s Third Act

May 20, 2019

Description:

Mark Singer on how dementia has given David Milch a new sense of urgency to produce his work.

“High Force,” by Frances Leviston

May 20, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Frances Leviston: “This was / infinity’s house, house of perpetual motion.”

Losing Religion and Finding Ecstasy in Houston

May 20, 2019

Description:

Personal History by Jia Tolentino: Christianity formed my deepest instincts, and I have been walking away from it for half my life.

“Ross Perot and China,” by Ben Lerner

May 20, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Ben Lerner: “When he turned to see what effect his speech had had, she was gone, jeans and sweater in a little pile with the pipe and lighter.”

The Mail

May 20, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Guinevere Turner’s Personal History about her experience with the Lyman Family.

The Undercover Fascist

May 20, 2019

Description:

Ed Caesar on a young Englishman who got mixed up in a white-supremacist movement and then learned of a plot to kill a politician.

The Crisis Called for Goats

May 20, 2019

Description:

Paige Williams on the Riverside Park Conservancy’s hiring of a herd of twenty-four goats to chew through a hillside of poison ivy and other invasive species. 

How Legalization Changed Humboldt County Marijuana

May 20, 2019

Description:

Emily Witt writes about in an isolated Northern California community where the last remnants of the counterculture are giving way to marijuana agribusiness.

The Troubled History of Psychiatry

May 20, 2019

Description:

Jerome Groopman on challenges to the legitimacy of the profession which have forced it to examine itself, including the fundamental question of what constitutes a mental disorder.

Ben Lerner on Adolescence and His Forthcoming Novel

May 20, 2019

Description:

Cressida Leyshon interviews Ben Lerner about “Ross Perot and China,” his short story from the May 27, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

“Business,” by Gregory Fraser

May 20, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Gregory Fraser: “The world / is my business, and the world is none of my business.”

Daenerys Tells All!

May 20, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson interview Emilia Clarke about the finale of “Game of Thrones,” her meeting at an Oscars after party with Beyoncé, and the sad fate of Daenerys Targaryen.

New Uses for the Iron Throne

May 19, 2019

Description:

Ali Solomon humorously illustrates alternative uses for for the Iron Throne from the popular “Game of Thrones” series.

The Abortion Fight and the Pretense of Precedent

May 19, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin on the Draconian new laws proposed on the assumption that, when they come before the Supreme Court, they will be used to vanquish Roe v. Wade.

Sunday Reading: The Power of Political Satire

May 19, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Ian Parker, Eric Schlosser, Emily Nussbaum, Adrian Chen, Louis Menand, and Tad Friend, on notable political satires, including “Dr. Strangelove” and “Veep,” and the impact of comedians like Jon Stewart.

The Odd Nostalgia of a New “Catch-22”

May 18, 2019

Description:

Troy Patterson reviews “Catch-22,” a six-part series, on Hulu, based on Joseph Heller’s novel, from 1961, which told the story of a bombardier squadron in the Second World War.

The Trump Administration to Congress: Drop Dead

May 18, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and the White House counsel Pat Cipollone’s defiance of subpoenas ordering them to present President Donald Trump’s tax returns to Congress.

Skateboard Tricks to Seriously Impress the Ladies

May 18, 2019

Description:

Charlie Dektar imagines a humorous list of skateboarding tricks that help further gender equality.

Can “Indie” Social Media Save Us?

May 18, 2019

Description:

Cal Newport on the IndieWeb’s answer to social-media giants like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: decentralized platforms, including Mastodon and Micro.blog.

How “The Big Bang Theory” Normalized Nerd Culture

May 18, 2019

Description:

Neima Jahromi writes about how the long-running CBS sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” normalized nerd culture, and what it drew from the nineties sitcom “Friends.”

I. M. Pei and the Asian-American Experience

May 17, 2019

Description:

Jiayang Fan on I. M. Pei, the architect most famous for designing the glass pyramid at the entrance to the Louvre, who has died, at the age of a hundred and two.

“John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum,” Reviewed: Keanu Reeves, Empty Fight Scenes, and a Paranoiac Chill

May 17, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum,” directed by Chad Stahelski and starring Keanu Reeves, Ian McShane, Anjelica Huston, Laurence Fishburne, and Halle Berry.

On Iran, North Korea, and Venezuela, It’s Bolton vs. Trump

May 17, 2019

Description:

Dexter Filkins joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss where the national-security adviser’s views on foreign policy contradict the President’s.

Live: James Taylor and Lucinda Williams

May 17, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, James Taylor gives Adam Gopnik a quick guitar lesson, and Lucinda Williams bares her soul to Ariel Levy.

Tel Aviv, in Need of Distraction, Hosts the Eurovision Song Contest

May 17, 2019

Description:

Bernard Avishai writes about the Eurovision Song Contest, which has arrived in Tel Aviv as Israel faces a handful of major crises.

Tips for Handling a Centipede in Your Bathroom

May 17, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst illustrates humorous ways to deal with having a centipede in the bathroom of your apartment.

The Messiness of Reproduction and the Dishonesty of Anti-Abortion Propaganda

May 17, 2019

Description:

Jia Tolentino writes about the movie “Unplanned,” about the anti-abortion activist Abby Johnson, and recent legislation in Georgia, Alabama, and Ohio that avoids the complexities of pregnancy and childbirth.

In San Francisco, Tech Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness

May 17, 2019

Description:

Anna Wiener writes about the conflicts facing the city of San Francisco as a wave of new tech I.P.O.s crashes over the city.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, May 17th

May 17, 2019

Description:

Emily Flake’s Daily Cartoon mourns the death of Grumpy Cat.

Virginia Reeves’s New Novel Explores What It Feels Like When the Mind Breaks

May 13, 2019

Description:

Katy Waldman reviews Virginia Reeves’s new novel, “The Behavior of Love.”

Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert: Is It Too Late to Save the World?

May 13, 2019

Description:

Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert, two leading environmental writers, wonder if a new sense of urgency around climate change is coming too late.

Last Chances

May 13, 2019

Description:

Elizabeth Kolbert reports on climate change and the new age of extinction.

Spring-Jacket Cliques

May 13, 2019

Description:

Rachel Merrill illustrates a humorous set of groups defined by their spring jackets.

Trump Urges Americans to Boycott Chinese Goods and Just Buy Things at Walmart

May 13, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump’s solution to a trade war with China is to urge Americans to buy more products at Walmart.

A Times Reporter Documents the Horror of Syria’s Torture Sites

May 13, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner talks to Anne Barnard, of the New York Times, who wrote an extensive new article covering horrific abuses in Syria’s political prisons.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, May 13th

May 13, 2019

Description:

Joe Dator’s Daily Cartoon recategorizes the dystopian canon.

Notre-Dame and the Paradoxes of Historical Preservation

May 13, 2019

Description:

Thomas du Monchaux writes about the history of building and rebuilding the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris over the centuries, and about the debate that surrounds the current efforts to restore its spire after the recent fire.

“Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 5 Recap: Hell’s Bells

May 13, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson writes about the fifth episode of the final season of “Game of Thrones,” in which Daenerys Targaryen sacks King’s Landing.

“The Presentation on Egypt,” by Camille Bordas

May 13, 2019

Description:

Fiction by Camille Bordas: “The word ‘relax’ made Danielle tense. Lately, everybody seemed to want her to make it a part of her life.”

Electronic Pop for the Surveillance Era

May 13, 2019

Description:

Holly Herndon’s collaborator for her new album, “PROTO,” is an artificial neural network that she taught to sing, Hua Hsu writes.

A Reparations Movement Begat at Georgetown

May 13, 2019

Description:

Kitty Kelley on a sixty-five-year-old student who is a descendant of slaves that the school once sold wants to make sure “the Jesuits atone for their sins.”

A Début Novel Remixes the Trope of the Missing Girl

May 13, 2019

Description:

Laura Miller reviews Julia Phillips’s “Disappearing Earth,” in which a chorus of characters offer clashing perspectives on a local abduction.

Rhiannon Giddens and What Folk Music Means

May 13, 2019

Description:

The roots musician is inspired by the evolving legacy of the black string band, John Jeremiah Sullivan writes.

A New Generation of Activists Confronts the Extinction Crisis

May 13, 2019

Description:

Osita Nwanevu writes on the activism and politics around climate change and species conservation, in the wake of an I.P.B.E.S. report stating that a million plant and animal species may be at risk of extinction.

“I’m Sorry,” by Stanley Moss

May 13, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Stanley Moss: “I’m sorry, exhausted, except for funds.”

“Cairn at 4 A.M.,” by Anna McDonald

May 13, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Anna McDonald: “I have learned what my body is for.”

Confessions of a Presidential Candidate

May 13, 2019

Description:

Jill Lepore on how the political memoir evolved.

Camille Bordas on Family Secrets

May 13, 2019

Description:

Willing Davidson interviews Camille Bordas about “The Presentation on Egypt,” her short story from the May 20, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Tom Gauld’s “Dog Walking 2.0”

May 13, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Tom Gauld about his cover for this year’s Innovation Issue of The New Yorker.

The Kentucky Derby, as Told by the Horses

May 13, 2019

Description:

Shouts & Murmurs by John Kenney: Everyone was running, so I ran. I assumed it was a fire alarm. Also, there was a small man clinging to my back. I don’t know why.

Joanna Hogg’s Self-Portrait of a Lady

May 13, 2019

Description:

Rebecca Mead on the filmmaker, who is known for her unflinching portrayals of well-to-do Britons and is now turning her lens on herself in “The Souvenir.”

A “Veep” Star Finds His Inner Pirate

May 13, 2019

Description:

Ian Parker on Timothy Simons, who trades in Jonah, the terrible person he plays on TV, to get slingshot onto a flying ship for a kids’ podcast.

Can We Live Longer but Stay Younger? 

May 13, 2019

Description:

With greater longevity, the quest to avoid the infirmities of aging is more urgent than ever, Adam Gopnik writes.

The Mail

May 13, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to Elizabeth Kolbert’s article on conspiracy theories, Emily Nussbaum’s review of “Gentleman Jack,” Rebecca Mead’s piece about Airbnb’s effect on Barcelona, and James Lasdun’s essay on the northern lights.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons May 20, 2019

May 13, 2019

Description:

New cartoons from the magazine.

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

May 13, 2019

Description:

“France in the World,” “What You Have Heard Is True,” “Hold Fast Your Crown,” and “If I Had Two Lives.”

Climate Change and the New Age of Extinction

May 13, 2019

Description:

People easily forget “last of” stories about individual species, but the loss of nature also threatens our existence, Elizabeth Kolbert writes.

Ballet Kink at the Guggenheim

May 13, 2019

Description:

Betsy Morais on Brendan Fernandes, who drills dancers in rope bondage and consent for the museum’s Young Collectors Party. 

The Art of Building Artificial Glaciers

May 13, 2019

Description:

Portfolio by Vasantha Yogananthan: At the edge of the Himalayas, an ancient tradition is reinvented for the era of climate change.

The U.S. Has a Long History of Provoking Wars. Could Iran Be Next?

May 13, 2019

Description:

Robin Wright writes on the Trump Administration’s provocations toward Iran, and the history of American Presidents instigating foreign wars.

If God Is Dead, Your Time Is Everything

May 13, 2019

Description:

James Wood on Martin Hägglund, who argues that rigorous secularism leads to socialism.

Philippe Besson’s Book of a Lifetime

May 13, 2019

Description:

Lauren Collins on “Lie with Me,” which was translated by Molly Ringwald and is being hailed as the “Brokeback Mountain” of France.

Which Baby-Shower Gift Giver Are You?

May 12, 2019

Description:

Siobhán Gallagher humorously illustrates various gift-giving styles at a baby shower.

A Daughter’s Portrait of Her Mother Through Dementia

May 12, 2019

Description:

Alexandra Schwartz writes about the photographer Cheryle St. Onge’s series “Calling the Birds Home,” which chronicles her mother’s dementia.

Jackie MacMullan Is the Great Chronicler of Basketball’s Golden Age

May 12, 2019

Description:

Louisa Thomas interviews the acclaimed N.B.A. writer on her days as the only woman in the locker room, and the evolving challenge of reporting on sports.

Sunday Reading: Motherhood

May 12, 2019

Description:

From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Tad Friend, Alice Munro, Jill Lepore, Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan, Hilton Als, and Rachel Aviv on childhood memories of their mothers and the experiences of mothers as they immigrate to the U.S. to give their children better lives.

Michael Oren Cuts Short a Conversation About Israel

May 11, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews the Israeli politician Michael Oren about the Benjamin Netanyahu’s victory and Israel’s current political climate.

Doris Lessing’s “The Fifth Child” and the Spectre of the Ambivalent Mother

May 11, 2019

Description:

Emily Harnett writes about Doris Lessing’s novel “The Fifth Child,” the child-psychologist D. W. Winnicott’s theory about the “good-enough” mother, and the impossible choices of motherhood.

My Last Letter from My Mother

May 11, 2019

Description:

On the occasion of Mother’s Day, Robin Wright writes about her relationship with her mom, who wrote her letters when she was travelling the world as a war correspondent.

Hi, It’s Your Mom, and I Have Some Advice for Your Job Search

May 11, 2019

Description:

Micah Osler offers humorous suggestions from your mom regarding your job search, including looking on Facebook, applying to Facebook, and talking to Jim Nestler.

The Fight for Voting Rights in Florida Isn’t Over

May 10, 2019

Description:

Daniel A. Gross writes about Amendment 4, which restored the voting rights of Florida residents with felony convictions, and Senate Bill 7066, which Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, intends to sign into law.

Karen Russell on Nature, and Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert on the End of Nature

May 10, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, two leading environmental writers wonder if the sense of urgency is coming too late. Plus Heidi Schreck on the Constitution, and Karen Russell’s move from Florida to Oregon.

Putin and Trump’s Ominous Nostalgia for the Second World War

May 10, 2019

Description:

Masha Gessen on Russian celebrations of Victory Day and Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump’s shared nostalgia for the Second World War.

“Return to Bollène,” Reviewed: An Arab Man’s Painful Homecoming in the South of France

May 10, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews “Return to Bollène,” a film about the interpersonal and political struggles of a Muslim family in France, directed by Saïd Hamich.

Teas You Should Probably Get Rid of Already

May 10, 2019

Description:

Ysabel Yates and Claire Lordon present a humorous list of various teas that you should probably get rid of already.

School Shootings and the Heroes Who Shouldn’t Be

May 10, 2019

Description:

Doreen St. Félix on the recent school shootings at STEM School Highlands Ranch, in Colorado, and at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and students’ roles as unwitting heroes.

The Constitutional System Is Not Built to Resist Trump’s Defiance of Congress

May 10, 2019

Description:

Jeffrey Toobin writes about Donald Trump’s blockade of all congressional oversight and its threat to the constitutional system.

Donald Trump’s Business Failures Were Very Real

May 10, 2019

Description:

John Cassidy writes about Donald Trump’s tax returns and his business failures in the nineteen-eighties and nineties.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, May 10th

May 10, 2019

Description:

Tim Hamilton’s Daily Cartoon concludes an address by Donald Trump.

Brands Targeting Women Living in a Simulation

May 6, 2019

Description:

Annah Feinberg imagines a satirical list of brands marketing products to women living in a simulation.

Netflix and Suicide: The Disturbing Example of “13 Reasons Why”

May 6, 2019

Description:

Stephen Marche writes about the Netflix show “13 Reasons Why” and a study about teen suicide at the time of its release.

Daily Cartoon: Monday, April 6th

May 6, 2019

Description:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s Daily Cartoon enjoys the fleeting beauties of spring.

Trump Furious That Another Baby Is Getting All The Attention

May 6, 2019

Description:

Andy Borowitz jokes that Donald Trump is mad that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal baby is getting all of the attention.

“Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 4 Recap: Sex, Lies, and Hellfire

May 6, 2019

Description:

Sarah Larson recaps “Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 4, “The Last of the Starks,” in which Euron Greyjoy (Pilou Asbæk) helps Cersei (Lena Headey) to assert her power in King’s Landing.

Tracy Morgan Turns the Drama of His Life Into Comedy

May 6, 2019

Description:

Vinson Cunningham on how the actor’s near-fatal car crash and TV series have made him become even more ambitious.

A Village Doctor’s Literary Calling

May 6, 2019

Description:

Maxim Osipov finds inspiration in a rural Russian town, Joshua Yaffa writes.

“Visiting San Francisco,” by Vijay Seshadri

May 6, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Vijay Seshadri: “I wanted to curl up / in the comfortable cosmic melancholy of my past.”

Sketchbook: Mother’s Day

May 6, 2019

Description:

Sketchbook by Ana Juan.

Science Fiction Doesn’t Have to Be Dystopian

May 6, 2019

Description:

Joyce Carol Oates on Ted Chiang’s new collection of stories, in which technology can be a force for human and robotic good.  

Briefly Noted Book Reviews

May 6, 2019

Description:

“The Parisian,” “Feast Your Eyes,” “Mama’s Last Hug,” and “El Norte.”

The Mail

May 6, 2019

Description:

Letters respond to John Seabrook’s reporting on robot farmers, Adam Gopnik’s review of Emily Bazelon’s “Charged,” and Paul Elie’s piece about sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

" ‘That the Earth is suspended . . . ,’ ” by Rosanna Warren

May 6, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Rosanna Warren: “The world is in flux / said Anaximander.”

Maggie Siff and the Women of Wall Street

May 6, 2019

Description:

The “Billions” star visits the New York Stock Exchange and talks fashion, finance, and “Fearless Girl,” Rachel Syme writes.

Diana Ejaita’s “Iya Ni Wura (Mother Is Gold)”

May 6, 2019

Description:

Françoise Mouly talks to the artist Diana Ejaita about her Mother’s Day cover, for the May 13, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Who Owns South Africa?

May 6, 2019

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Ariel Levy on a fiercely debated program of land reform that could address racial injustice—or cause chaos.

Lauren Groff on the Animal Ecstasy of Athletics

May 6, 2019

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Cressida Leyshon speaks with Lauren Groff about “Brawler,” her short story from the May 13, 2019, issue of The New Yorker.

Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons May 13, 2019

May 6, 2019

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New cartoons from the magazine.

Garry Winogrand and Jeff Wall: Photography in Two Phases

May 6, 2019

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Peter Schjeldahl on ravishing shows, at the Brooklyn Museum and the Gagosian Gallery, that contrast a master of spontaneous street photography with one of plotted theatricality.

“Brawler,” by Lauren Groff

May 6, 2019

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Fiction by Lauren Groff: “The girl put her food on the floor, and lifted her mother. She was a skin bag with chalk in it, far too light to be human.”

Is Noise Pollution the Next Big Public-Health Crisis?

May 6, 2019

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David Owen on research that shows that loud sound can have adverse effects on ecosystems and human health.

O.K., You Can Get a Dog

May 6, 2019

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Shouts & Murmurs by Colin Nissan: Losing a pet is difficult. So is burying one, which is something you’ll be doing. This is going to be your dog, not Mommy and Daddy’s. 

Deep Cuts from Pete Buttigieg’s Rhodie Résumé 

May 6, 2019

Description:

At Oxford, the Presidential candidate kept a library of exotic whiskeys and studied everywhere, from a freighter to the shared rest room, Charles Bethea writes.

The Castmates Who Make You Care in “Beetlejuice” and “Tootsie”

May 6, 2019

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Hilton Als reviews the new musicals “Beetlejuice” and “Tootsie,” which feature performers who help you see the narrative behind all the flash.

Rub-a-Dub Theatre

May 6, 2019

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A new interactive play can be performed in the bathroom of your apartment, provided you have a tub, Patricia Marx writes.

A Sensual Dinner for Renoir’s Nudes

May 6, 2019

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At the Explorers Club, a Renoir-themed dinner party features an edible portrait and scents from the painter’s work, Nicolas Niarchos writes.

Robert Mueller’s and William Barr’s “Baby” and the History of Presidential Obstruction

May 5, 2019

Description:

Jeannie Suk Gersen writes on the obstruction-of-justice charges against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, and why the case against Donald Trump, in the wake of the Mueller report, might be distinct.

In Memory of the Englishman Who Kept a Shark on His Roof

May 5, 2019

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Lou Stoppard writes about the history and possible future of “Untitled 1986,” a fibreglass sculpture of a twenty-five-foot shark that is installed in the roof of a house in Headington, Oxford, England.

Edward Steed Visits Yankee Stadium

May 5, 2019

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The cartoonist Ed Steed illustrates some scenes from a recent New York Yankees game in the Bronx.

Magazines for Gen Z

May 5, 2019

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Pia Mileaf-Patel humorously illustrates fake magazines that target Generation Z.

Sunday Reading: The Brain

May 5, 2019

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From The New Yorker’s archive, pieces by Oliver Sacks, Margaret Talbot, Burkhard Bilger, Elif Batuman, Michael Specter, and Christine Kenneally about neuroscience and the brain's fascinating mechanisms.

Trump, Barr, and the Rule of Law

May 5, 2019

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Serving as Trump’s Attorney General seems to mean treating anything that does not serve his interests as an urgent threat, Margaret Talbot writes.

Xi Jinping Tries to Crash the May Fourth Movement’s Centenary

May 4, 2019

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The May Fourth Movement, a wave of student protests, helped usher China into the modern era, but its legacy reveals how China’s Communist Party became the kind of dictatorial, bureaucratic behemoth its founders had tried to banish, Jiayang Fan writes.

Dancing to Bach’s Cello Suites

May 4, 2019

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Marina Harss on Jerome Robbins’s “A Suite of Dances,” a collection of solos, set to Bach’s cello suites, that was originally choreographed for Mikhail Baryshnikov and is now performed in New York City by the ballet dancer Gonzalo García.

After a Strong Jobs Report, Economic Questions Linger for 2020

May 4, 2019

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John Cassidy writes about the strong April jobs report from the Labor Department, Donald Trump’s feud with the Federal Reserve, and the implication of the report on the 2020 Presidential election.

Project EATS and Other Highlights from the Frieze Art Fair

May 4, 2019

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Andrea Scott writes about the organization founded by Linda Goode Bryant, the gallerist turned agrarian crusader, which develops farms in low-income neighborhoods around New York City.

First Woman First: An Interview with Selina Catherine Meyer

May 4, 2019

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Jane Mayer speaks with Selina Catherine Meyer, the fictional star of the HBO series “Veep,” about her Presidential candidacy for the 2020 election.

A Plot in L.A. to Avenge the Christchurch Shooting

May 3, 2019

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Dana Goodyear on a man’s arrest for plotting a catastrophic terrorist act in the Los Angeles area in retribution for the shooting at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in March.

“Non-Fiction,” Reviewed: A Vacuum-Sealed View of France’s Culturati

May 3, 2019

Description:

Richard Brody reviews the director Olivier Assayas’s film “Non-Fiction,” about France’s publishing industry, that depicts old-fashioned, old-world culture, without any level of difficulty.

The Pioneering Cartoons of Nurit Karlin

May 3, 2019

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Liza Donnelly writes a remembrance of the cartoonist Nurit Karlin, who died this week, in Tel Aviv, at the age of eighty, and who contributed cartoons to The New Yorker for more than a decade.

Rhiannon Giddens Plays Live, and Pete Holmes Finds Religion

May 3, 2019

Description:

On the New Yorker Radio Hour, a reigning diva in the Americana scene shows her global side, a comedian meditates on God, and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand thinks she is Donald Trump’s “kryptonite.”

“Uncover: The Village”: A Serial Killer, Toronto’s Gay Community, and a Podcast That Transcends True Crime

May 3, 2019

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Sarah Larson on “Uncover: The Village,” a podcast, from the Canadian Broadcasting Company, about a series of murders in Toronto’s gay community, reported and hosted by Justin Ling.

The Periodic Table of My Anxieties About Meeting New People

May 3, 2019

Description:

Irving Ruan writes and Jeremy Nguyen illustrates a periodic table of society anxieties about meeting new people.

Daily Cartoon: Friday, May 3rd

May 3, 2019

Description:

Avi Steinberg’s Daily Cartoon welcomes Peter Mayhew into heaven.

A Sociologist of Religion on Protestants, Porn, and the “Purity Industrial Complex”

May 3, 2019

Description:

Isaac Chotiner interviews Samuel L. Perry, whose book “Addicted to Lust: Pornography in the Lives of Conservative Protestants” explores shame about pornography in conservative Christian marriages.

Does Joe Biden Have a #MeToo Problem?

May 3, 2019

Description:

Jane Mayer and Evan Osnos join Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how Biden’s history, including his handling of the 1991 Clarence Thomas hearings, may affect his candidacy for President.

I’m Working from Work Today

May 3, 2019

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Kathryn Kvas writes a satirical e-mail in the style of an out-of-office message explaining delays caused by an office environment.

An Eleven Madison Park Alum Sets a New Tone at Crown Shy

May 3, 2019

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Hannah Goldfield reviews James Kent’s charming restaurant in the financial district, where both food and atmosphere walk the line between elegant and fussy.

The Delights and Discomforts of “The Bold Type,” a Woke Fantasy of Magazine Journalism

May 3, 2019

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Jia Tolentino writes about the Freeform show “The Bold Type,” which mixes the fanciful with realistic story lines in its vision of magazine journalism.

The Sartorial Confections of the Met Gala’s 2019 Theme: “Camp: Notes on Fashion”

May 3, 2019

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See two hundred and fifty looks that capture the spirit of extravagance at the Costume Institute’s exhibition, which opens on May 9th.

“Cutting My Mother,” Reviewed: A Filmmaker’s Ingenious Web Series, Made in Collaboration With His Mom

Apr 29, 2019

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Richard Brody on the series “Cutting My Mother,” in which the director Nathan Silver, which is both a moving tribute to his mother and an ingeniously crafted work of first-person meta-cinema.

“Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 3 Recap: The Stab Heard Round the World

Apr 29, 2019

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Sarah Larson writes about the great battle of Winterfell in “Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 3.

David Brooks’s Conversion Story

Apr 29, 2019

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Benjamin Wallace-Wells writes about the columnist David Brooks’s new book about spiritual awakening, “The Second Mountain.”

William Barr’s Secret Passion: The Bagpipes

Apr 29, 2019

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The Attorney General’s role in the City of Washington Pipe Band, which included Secret Service and F.B.I. agents, may be the best evidence we have of a “deep state,” Tyler Foggatt writes.

The B.Q.E.’s Promenade Problem

Apr 29, 2019

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Luci Gutiérrez illustrates proposals the city is considering to save the promenade above the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

“My Life,” by Matthew Zapruder

Apr 29, 2019

Description:

Poetry by Matthew Zapruder: “we made so / many plans.”

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