Curtis Mohr, K5CLM | Amateur Extra | Podcaster | Blogger

Everything Ham Radio Podcast

Your One Stop Shop For Everything Ham Radio
Everything Ham Radio Podcast

Description

Your one stop shop for everything hamradio. We talk about everything from radios, to antennas, digital to analog and everything in between. Come and check us out!

Episodes

ETH100 - All Good Things Must Come To An End

Mar 29, 2018 13:09

Description:

I have had an absolute blast over the past 26 months of doing this podcast. I have learned so much and talked to a bunch of really great people. However, no matter how much fun it is, Life Comes First. Between the adoption of our kids, trying to start a busines and work, like I said in episode 98, something has to give. Unfortunately, this was what had to give. I will still be doing blog posts on my website, but I will no longer be doing any podcast episode. Thank you to everyone who has supported, listened to, shared, came onto my show and did an interview with me, and sent me emails. I love this hobby and the people that are in it, well most of them anyway..:) I also want to thank my show sponsors West Mountain Radio and Dan Romanchik, KB6NU, author of the No-Nonsense Study Guides 73 yall! K5CLM

ETH099 - A Look Back Over The Past 100 Episodes

Mar 15, 2018 38:27

Description:

In this episode we look back over the past 100 episodes as we approach episode #100!

ETH098 - A Non-Ham XYLs View of the Hobby

Feb 28, 2018 43:45

Description:

This episode I am joined by my wife or XYL, Jessica Mohr and getting her take one what it is like to be a non ham that is married to a ham.

ETH097 - An Oopsy Causes A Big Scare In Hawaii!

Feb 15, 2018 01:14:23

Description:

In the episode, Ian and I talk about the major oopsy that happens over the past couple weeks in Hawaii. An Emergency Alert Message went out to everyone in the state that a Ballistic Missle was heading their way...

ETH096 - School Club Roundup, Hamvention Update and More

Feb 1, 2018 46:24

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! We are going to be talking about the School Club Roundup, some new information about this years Hamvention and more...

ETH095 - Winter Field Day, The ARRL Board and More...

Jan 18, 2018 01:41:55

Description:

In this episode we talk about Winter Field Day, What's going on with the ARRL Board of Directors, Haran Arena and Hamvention, some DXpeditions and an app for android that allows you to listen to most, if not all, the ham radio podcasts.

ETH094 - Merry Christmas and Plans for 2018

Dec 21, 2017 48:33

Description:

From my family to yours, Merry Christmas and a happy New Year! In this episode, I talk about some of my plans I have for 2018, a couple questions for you, my listener, and a new year long ARRL contest and more...

ETH093 - NASA On The Air(NOTA)

Dec 7, 2017 43:47

Description:

In today episode we talk with Rob Suggs, KB5EZ about the new year long special event that will be starting in a few days on December 11, 2017 called NASA On The Air(NOTA).

ETH092 - The HamCasters

Nov 23, 2017 02:06:20

Description:

In this episode, I was a guest on the HamRadioNow Live Show on Sunday Night along with 6 other podcast hosts/Youtube Creators

ETH091 - 2017 Christmas Wish List

Nov 9, 2017 02:26:23

Description:

In this episode we have Ian Kahn, KM4IK, with us as a guest co host and we talk about a bunch of different products that you may want to add to your Christmas Wish List

ETH090 - WSPRnet, Field Radio Podcast and More

Oct 26, 2017 01:21:15

Description:

In this episode we talk with John Jacobs, W7DBO, with the Hamradio 360: Field Radio Podcast. We talk about WSPRnet, His Podcast, and more...

ETH089 - World Wide Flora and Fauna

Oct 12, 2017 01:03:35

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Vance Martin, N3VEM, about World Wide Flora and Fauna or as it is known here in the US, Parks On The Air

Find the show notes at: http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/89

Regional POTA/KFF Managers:

0 – NU0C – Jim Shorney
1 – N1TYH – Steve Olivieri
2 – WX2I – Bob Jonas
3 – KB3ZUK – Jeff Dahn
4 – KA9JAC – Bob Gedemer
5 – N1TYH – Steve Olivieri
6 – KA9JAC – Bob Gedemer
7 – W7JKC – John Calnan
8 – AC8RH – Gene Bunner
9 – KA9JAC – Bob Gedemer

 

WWFF Standardize Frequencies

Phone:

3.744 7.144 14.244 18.144 21.244 24.944 28.444

CW:

3.544 7.024 10.124 14.044 18.084 21.044 24.894 28.044

ETH088 - Near Vertical Incidence Skywave (NVIS)

Sep 28, 2017 48:41

Description:

In this episode we talk with Ben Doran, N8BD, about Near Vertical Incidence Skywave or NVIS for short.

Check out the show notes for more information and to listen to the episode at:

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/88

ETH087 - Traveling With Your Ham Radio Gear

Sep 21, 2017 01:03:54

Description:

In this episode we talk with Vance Martin, N3VEM, about Traveling with your ham radio gear, and operating while Traveling.

See the full show notes at: http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/87

ETH086 - Boy Scouts Jamboree on the Air(JOTA/JOTI)

Sep 14, 2017 01:14:27

Description:

Please help me welcome by guest for today’s episode, Bill Stearns, NE4RD. You might have heard of Bill from the Amateur Radio Newsline podcast or from the Linux in the Ham Shack Podcast.

Bill is a great advocate for the Boy Scouts. He is highly involved in the Boy Scouts with the K2BSA group. The K2BSA group is the amateur radio wing of the Scouts in his home area.

Links Mentioned In This Episode The K2BSA Website Frequencies where you can make contact with Scouts during JOTA/JOTI Scout Link Boy Scouts of America

 

ETH085 - JT Modes with Ria Jairam, N2RJ

Sep 7, 2017 56:47

Description:

In this episode we talk again with Ria Jairam, N2RJ. This time we are talking about the JT Modes, JT65, JT9 and the newest craze FT8.

For more information about this episode and to check out all the links we talk about, goto the show notes at:

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/85

ETH084 - Hurricane Harvey, the Solar Eclipse and more...

Aug 31, 2017 01:38:49

Description:

In this episode we have a special guest co-host. Ian Kahn, KM4IK is on with me today. You may remember Ian from episode 67 where we talked about PSK31 and episode 71 where we talked about Field Day!

In this episode we talk about probably the biggest things going on right now, Hurricane Harvey and the Solar Eclipse, as well as a few other things.

Check out the Show notes for more information and all the links that we talked about in this episode. http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/84

ETH083 - Remote Operations with Ria Jairam, N2RJ

Aug 24, 2017 01:06:04

Description:

In this episode with talk again with Ria Jairam, N2RJ. This time we talk about Remote Operations, controlling your ham radio equipment from somewhere else.

This works out great for those that travel a lot, that want to catch that rare DX when it happens in the middle of the day, or live in a HOA or a place where they cant put up an antenna.

Check out the show notes at:

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/83

Amateur Satellite, ISS and More with Gabreil Zeifman, NJ7H - ETH082

Aug 17, 2017 55:35

Description:

In this episode we talk with Gabreil Zeifman, NJ7H about Amateur Satellite, the ISS and more. Gabriel recently sent about a week in Greenland where he managed to get a VUCC Award for making 100 contacts using satellite.

Check out the full show notes at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/82

Flying Around the World with Brian Lloyd, WB6RQN - ETH081

Aug 10, 2017 01:30:21

Description:

In this episode we talk with Brian Lloyd, WB6RQN about his 80th anniversary commemorative flight around the world following Amelia Earharts trip back in 1937.

We also hear from Bob Hankins KD5AT about the USS Slater Special Event Station this Sat Aug 12!

The show notes are located at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/81

Amateur TV with Tom O'Hara, W6ORG - ETH080

Aug 3, 2017 57:03

Description:

In this episode of the Everything Ham Radio Podcast, we talk with Tom O'Hara, W6ORG about Amateur TV. 

For more information and to find all the links that we talk about in this episode, please check out the show notes at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/80

System Fusion, Solar Eclipse and More - ETH079

Jul 27, 2017 01:09:15

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about the System Fusion DR-2X Repeater, the upcoming Solar Eclipse and More...

Facebook Question of the Week:

What is you favorite digital voice mode?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/79/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

RepeaterBook - The FREE Online Repeater Directory - ETH078

Jul 20, 2017 01:07:15

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Garrett Dow, KD6KPC, about RepeaterBook. 

Facebook Question of the Week:

How do you find repeaters when you travel?

Tech Corner - RepeaterBook

RepeaterBook.com

History

In this episode we talk with Garrett Dow, who is the creator of the website RepeaterBook.com. RepeaterBook is an online repeater directory that started in 2006 as HWHam.com. He started the website and online repeater directory to have a online directory that he could access from anywhere without having to have a paper directory that is basically outdated before he even bought it.

A couple years later, he was approached by James Ewen, VE6SRV from Alberta, Canada and requested that he added the repeaters in Canada to the database. From there it grew fairly rapidly to encompass the entire US and then eventually to several countries around the world.

The directory currently has over 32,000 repeaters listed in its database and is adding more everyday. RepeaterBook has the status of the repeater as well that is unique to other repeater directories. The status of the repeaters are set by one of the 95 admins or by user input from the community at large.

Mobile Versions

While the website is great to have, in this day and age, the use of mobile devices has made it where a website is just not enough. So phone apps were developed for IOS, Andriod and Kindle devices. They are powerful in and of themselves with a ton of features. One of the neat features of the mobile apps is that the entire repeater directory is built into the app, so you don't have to have internet access to use the app. If you are somewhere that doesn't have cell service, you can still find a repeater to use. The app is updated about every two weeks with all the updated information.

The app uses the GPS on your device to find the list of repeaters within your set distance from you and list them in whatever order you have set in your app setting, but it defaults to distance from you. In the andriod version, there is a search feature that you can use to bring up a list of repeaters in another location other than where you are right now. They are working to bring this feature over to IOS as well.

Programming Software

RepeaterBook.com has a direct access link from both Chirp and RTSystems. If you have these programs to program your radios, you can pull repeater information from the website directly to program to program your radio.

If you use something other than these two programs you can export a list of repeaters to a CVS or several other formats and manually import them into your programming software.

Social Media Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Repeaterbookcom/128708780551588 Twitter: @repeaterbook https://twitter.com/repeaterbook Google+: https://plus.google.com/communities/103169382395875005017 LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/repeaterbook-com Partnerships ZBM2 Software http://www.zbm2.com/ BlueCAT http://www.zbm2.com/bluecat.html CHIRP http://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home G4HFQ Software: http://www.g4hfq.co.uk/ RT SYstems: https://www.rtsystemsinc.com/

 

Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase.

West Mountain Radio

West Mountain Radio - RepeaterBook

Do you have an old fashioned Analog Volt and Amp meter hooked to your station? Are you looking to find something that has more bells and whistles? Check out the West Mountain Radio PWRcheck.

The PWRcheck has eight display modes including voltage, current flow in either directions, wattage and amp-hours and will measure from 0-60V with 40A continuous load. It is accurate to within +/- 10mV and +/-10mA.

It has a backlit graphics LCD that will display data in digital, analog and bar graph formats. You can even monitor your backup battery with a programmable “gas gauge”.

The non-volatile memory stores more than 100,000 data points without power. That is nearly two and a half months worth of data @ 1 point per minute!

It has a USB computer interface for configuration and data download and you can program it to sound an alarm for over current, over or under voltage and amp-hours.

The software that comes with it allows your to program every aspect of the PWRcheck operation such as data logging rate, display formats and alarm conditions. You can display current, voltage, wattage and amp-hours in real time. It has integrated charting software that automatically collects and displays data. All the data can bed downloaded and stored for later analysis!

For more information about the West Mountain Radio PWRcheck and how to receive your $50 off, click here.

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Goto http://ww.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

Kicking It With the Ham Radio 360: Workbench Podcast Crew - ETH077

Jul 13, 2017 01:21:59

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are kickin it with George and Jeremy from the Hamradio 360: Workbench Podcast Question of the Week: What's on your workbench? Tech Corner - Mini Data Radios, HR360 Workbench Podcast and Reflections on Hamvention 2017 In this episode we are kicking it with George, KJ6VU and Jeremy, KF7IJZ from the Ham Radio 360: Workbench podcast. If you don't know what the Workbench podcast is, it is a spin off of the Ham Radio 360 podcast with Cale Nelson, K4CDN. It is a bi-weekly podcast that deep dives into all thing technical in the amateur radio world. Links and products mentioned in this episode: Ham Radio 360 Workbench Episode 15 - Micro Controllers in the Real World Episode 16 - Wireless Comms for Microcontrollers and Single Board Computers Episode 26 - BITX40 - An Introduction 18b20 maxim semiconductor 2-3 dollars - temperature sensor - Buy at Mouser Electronics 36 Sensor Pack for the Arduino Small Computers Aurdio Pic Microcontroller - SparkFun Electronics Data Radios Digi International - XBEE Data Radios Zigbee Nordic Semiconductor NRF24L01 - 2-5 data radio - Specs - Click Here to buy one or more from Symmetry Electronics Other Podcasts Mentioned Solder Smoke Podcast Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase.   West Mountain Radio

West Mountain Radio - Workbench

     

Do you have an old fashioned Analog Volt and Amp meter hooked to your station? Are you looking to find something that has more bells and whistles? Check out the West Mountain Radio PWRcheck.

The PWRcheck has eight display modes including voltage, current flow in either directions, wattage and amp-hours and will measure from 0-60V with 40A continuous load. It is accurate to within +/- 10mV and +/-10mA. It has a backlit graphics LCD that will display data in digital, analog and bar graph formats. You can even monitor your backup battery with a programmable “gas gauge”. The non-volatile memory stores more than 100,000 data points without power. That is nearly two and a half months worth of data @ 1 point per minute! It has a USB computer interface for configuration and data download and you can program it to sound an alarm for over current, over or under voltage and amp-hours. The software that comes with it allows your to program every aspect of the PWRcheck operation such as data logging rate, display formats and alarm conditions. You can display current, voltage, wattage and amp-hours in real time. It has integrated charting software that automatically collects and displays data. All the data can bed downloaded and stored for later analysis! For more information about the West Mountain Radio PWRcheck and how to receive your $50 off and to get your free USB Port Monitor, click here. Ham Blog Spotlight Update from NO1PC’s Handsfree Information Site on the CA law making it illegal for hams to use their radios while driving This week we received confirmation that we (BARA/California Amateur Radio Operators) are registered in opposition to AB-1222 in its present form. This is supposed to give us recognition and a brief time to address the CA Senta Transportation and Housing Committee at their meeting July 11, 1:30 PM. Given the significant list of those in support vs our lone opposition, this is a pretty daunting moment for two-way and amateur radio. Norm and I knew we could face this dilemma, and our last words before his untimely passing were to "stay the course." There is no question but to stand up to the effort I started, honor Norm's efforts and those of everyone else who have supported us. At the very least we got some traction/progress in mildly improving CVC 23123.5 into AB-1222. It's been our belief all along that in such a simple, obvious matter, it could be better - this is California - it's what we've been told and that's what we expect - yes? Addressing this all along, and especially now is a monumental challenge of patience and doing the right thing. I am very pleased and proud and appreciative for all of the support and assistance! This is NOT a specific call to action, but if your local Senator is a member of the Senate Transportation committee, it wouldn't hurt to give their office a call and share some support for us and this process. If you want to "be there" with us on Tuesday, these links may take you to live and archived video: CA State Media Site CA Senate Media Site CA Senate Document re: AB1222 In closing today, I ask you reserve a moment of silence for our dear friend Norm Lucas, WB6RVR (sk). This effort I dedicate to Norm and his years of leadership and friendship as we served the NARCC Board together, and now this. Thank you Norm and everyone! Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

Software Defined Radios with Ria Jairam, N2RJ- ETH076

Jul 6, 2017 59:35

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Software Defined Radios with Ria Jairam, N2RJ. Question of the Week: How Was Your Fourth of July? Tech Corner - Software Defined RadiosRia Jairam, N2RJ In this episode we talked with Ria Jairam, N2RJ about Software Defined Radios. SDR’s can view up to 30 MHz of bandwidth at one time. Some SDRs can show you a waterfall display for up to eight different frequency ranges at one time. Links mentioned in this episode: Radios FlexRadio Systems FlexRadio User Community Apache Labs - Anan Radios SunSDR Radio Icom 7300 RTLSDR Radio Modes JT65 Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase.   West Mountain Radio West Mountain Radio - Software Defined Radios Do you have an old fashioned Analog Volt and Amp meter hooked to your station? Are you looking to find something that has more bells and whistles? Check out the West Mountain Radio PWRcheck. The PWRcheck has eight display modes including voltage, current flow in either directions, wattage and amp-hours and will measure from 0-60V with 40A continuous load. It is accurate to within +/- 10mV and +/-10mA. It has a backlit graphics LCD that will display data in digital, analog and bar graph formats. You can even monitor your backup battery with a programmable “gas gauge”. The non-volatile memory stores more than 100,000 data points without power. That is nearly two and a half months worth of data @ 1 point per minute! It has a USB computer interface for configuration and data download and you can program it to sound an alarm for overcurrent, over or under voltage and amp-hours. The software that comes with it allows your to program every aspect of the PWRcheck operation such as data logging rate, display formats and alarm conditions. You can display current, voltage, wattage and amp-hours in real time. It has integrated charting software that automatically collects and displays data. All the data can bed downloaded and stored for later analysis! If you enter the coupon code EHSUMMER you will get $50 off your purchase of the PWRcheck bringing it down to $134.95! For more information on the PWRcheck and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with your purchase, click here. Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

RFinder with Bob Greenberg, W2CYK - ETH075

Jun 29, 2017 52:58

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about RFinder with the programs maker, Bob Greenberg, W2CYK. Facebook Question of the Week: How was your Field Day? Did you participate in it? What were some of your issues and what might you do different next year? Tech Corner - RFinder http://www.rfinder.net What is RFinder? The RFinder (RepeaterFinder) Worldwide Repeater Directory is a steadily growing worldwide repeater directory including IRLP, Echolink, AllStar, DStar, MotoTRBO, and even Winlink information.  We currently have over 175 countries in the directory! Buy RFinder on Itunes - Iphone - IPad Buy RFinder on Google Play Youtube - RFinder Killer [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaeRzcnNNdQ]   Youtube - RFinder Pi [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42FWxug221c] http://www.androiddmr.com Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase. West Mountain Radio

West Mountain Radio - RFinder

Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.    Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

13 Colonies Special Event with Bob Josuweit, WA3PZO - ETH074

Jun 22, 2017 58:59

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Bob Josuweit, WA3PZO, about the 13 Colonies Special Event Station over the 4th of July week. Question of the Week: What is your favorite special event?   Tech Corner - 13 Colonies Special Event Bob Josuweit, WA3PZO - WM3PEN Bonus Station Call sign http://www.13colonies.net/index.html   The special event goes from July 1 at 1300 UTC through July 7 at 0400 UTC. However, please check the 13 colonies website for more information about when operators will be around the radio for sure. They will be operating on all but 60 meters, including some on DStar, Fusion, and Allstar digital modes. There will be operators from New York(K2A), Virginia(K2B), Rhode Island(K2C), Conecticut(K2D), Delaware(K2E), Maryland(K2F), Georgia(K2G), Massachusetts(K2H), New Jersey(K2I), North Carolina(K2J), New Hampshire(K2K), South Carolina(K2L) and Pennsylvania(K2M). There will also be two bonus stations, WM3PEN who will be operating from Philadelphia and GB13COL from Great Britain. Because the times that individual operators will be working, Bob recommends that you check the spotter networks like DX Summit or the 13 Colonies Facebook Page to find out if someone is operating from one or more of these states.   Stamps for the Wounded WM3PEN also participates in the Stamps for the Wounded program, sponsored by The Lions International Stamp Club. They take all the stamps that are received on mail that comes in with the QSL cards that people send to the and donate them to the program. If you have any additional stamps that you would like to donate to this cause, you can include them in your QSL card request or just send the stamps to them. The address where to send them can be found on the WM3PEN QRZ page. Log Submission If you browse to the 13 Colonies Website and click on Log Sheets at the top of the page, or click here to go directly to the page, you can print off a log sheet that you can manually fill out or you can use their log sheet generator that has drop down boxes and fields that you can fill out and it will generate a log sheet for you already filled out. All you will have to do then is print it out and mail it in.   Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase.   West Mountain Radio

West Mountain Radio - 13 Colonies

Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.  For more information on the RIGblaster Advantage and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with you purchase, click here. Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

Operating Bicycle Mobile with Mike Nickolaus, NF0N

Jun 15, 2017 01:05:38

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Operating Bicycle Mobile with Mike Nickolaus, NF0N Facebook Question of the Week: So far we have talked about two topics that join another hobby with amateur radio, what other hobbies out there work well with amateur radio? Tech Corner - Operating Bicycle Mobile Today with talk with Mike Nickolaus, NF0N about how to operate Bicycle Mobile. Mike is one of the founding members of the Bicycle Mobile Hams of America club. The club was formed in June of 1989 by Hartley Alley, NA0A in large part because of an article in QST magazine that month where the author was trying to get in contact with other hams who operated bicycle mobile. [caption id="attachment_2568" align="aligncenter" width="487"]Bicycle Mobile - Field Day 2009 NF0N Mike, NF0N, Working Field Day 2009 with his Bike and cargo trailer[/caption] That year, Hartly, rode his bike from his home town to Dayton Hamvention, some 1200 miles according to Mike, documenting the trip in a journal and taking pictures. The following year started an annual forum at the Dayton Hamvention that continues to this day! The first year they were placed in a smaller room that only had seating for about 75 people and they filled the room to standing room only. Currently the club has about 300 members or so and is free to join. If you either already operate bicycle mobile or you would like to find out more, check out their website or yahoo group for help on how to get started. You can find past newsletter issues with a ton of information. If you would like to join the club, it is free to join and is as simple as going to their website. Thank you to Mike for coming on and talking with me and sharing his experiences about this subject. If you have any questions for Mike, his email address if nf0n at arrl dot net. Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase. West Mountain Radio West Mountain Radio - Bicycle Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.  For more information on the RIGblaster Advantage and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with you purchase, click here.   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio with Glen Popiel, KW5GP - ETH072

Jun 8, 2017 01:33:41

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Glen Popiel, KW5GP, about all kinds of projects that you can do with an Arduino and about his two books dealing with the Arduino, Arduino for Ham Radio and More Arduino for Ham Radio. Facebook Question of the Week: Have you ever used an Arduino to build something? If so, what did you build? Tech Corner - Arduino Projects Glen Popiel, KW5GP author of Arduino for Ham Radio, More Arduino for Ham Radio and High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Hamvention interview on 40m qrp transceiver video https://www.facebook.com/ARRL.org/videos/10154849135407408/   I had a great conversation with Glen in this episode. Glen is a great guy and is funny as it gets. Glen has been a ham for a long time and has a lot of experience in electronics and Ham Radio. He combines the love of electronics and the love of amateur radio in a way that everyone can understand. Some of the stuff that we talked about that are in his books, and realizing that you can get an arduino for SOOOO cheap, I cant wait to get his More Arduino for Ham Radio book and try out some of the stuff in there. I might even have to buy both of the books and see if my oldest daughter wants to build some of the projects with me as well. It would be some great father-daughter time if she did. Below is a list of each of Glen's books and the description of them as well as links to both Amazon using my affiliate link and a direct link to the ARRL if you want to buy directly from them. Arduino for Ham Radio Arduino for Ham Radio Arduino Microcontroller Projects You Can Build Today!The Arduino has become widely popular among hobbyists and ham radio operators. Hams are exploring these powerful, inexpensive microcontrollers, creating new projects and amateur station gear. With its Open Source model, the Arduino community freely shares software and hardware designs, making projects easier to build and modify. Arduino for Ham Radio introduces you to the exciting world of microcontrollers and Open Source hardware and software. It starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of various Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of ham radio-related practical projects. Beginning with simple designs and concepts and gradually increasing in complexity and functionality, there is something here for everyone. Projects can be built quickly and used as-is, or they can be expanded and enhanced with your own personal touches. Projects Random Code Practice Generator CW Beacon and Foxhunt Keyer Fan Speed Controller Digital Compass Weather Station RF Probe with LED Bar Graph Solar Battery Charge Monitor On-Air Indicator Talking SWR Meter Talking GPS/UTC Time/Grid Square Indicator Iambic Keyer Waveform Generator PS/2 CW Keyboard Field Day Satellite Tracker Azimuth/Elevation Rotator Controller CW Decoder Lightning Detector CDE/Hy-Gain Rotator Controllers Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL More Arduino for Ham Radio More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio More Arduino Microcontroller Projects for Your Ham Radio Station!Building on the success of Arduino for Ham Radio, this book — More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio — includes 15 completely new practical and functional Arduino projects for the ham shack. This time, we branch out to use some of the newer Arduino variants and devices. Each project is complete and functional as-is, but room has been left for you to add personal touches and enhancements. That’s part of the fun of the Arduino and Open Source communities — building on the work of others, and then sharing your designs and innovations for others to learn, modify, and improve. More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of the many new Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of practical ham radio-related projects that showcase a wide variety of applications. There is something here for everyone. Projects Auto On/Off Mobile Power Control Station Power Monitor AC Current Monitor Load Tester Voice Memory Keyer Wireless Remote Coax Switch Wireless Remote Telemetry GPS-Based Ethernet Network Time Protocol Server Yaesu FT-series Transceiver Rotator Controller Interface Yaesu G-450A/G-800SA Rotator Controller Rebuild Yaesu Rotator Controller Modification 1 to 30 MHz DDS VFO Antenna SWR Analyzer 40 Meter QRP CW Transceiver 40 Meter QRP JT65 Transceiver Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Build a High Speed Amateur Radio Microwave NetworkUsing commercial off-the-shelf equipment and developing their own software, groups of hams have created high speed wireless Amateur Radio digital networks with wide area coverage. The possible uses for these high speed data networks in the Amateur Radio community are endless. Virtually any service that works on the regular Internet can be adapted to an Amateur Radio high speed multimedia (HSMM) network, including video conferencing, instant messaging, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), network sensors and cameras, remote station control, and many other services. With the capability to send real-time video and data files, the public service and disaster support aspects of Amateur Radio are expanded tremendously. This book introduces HSMM networking, explains the basics of how it works, and describes the various technologies in use today. Later chapters explain in detail how to deploy your own HSMM network, along with various applications to put it to work. Well illustrated step-by-step instructions will guide you through the process of installing and configuring software needed to get your HSMM network up and running. Includes: Introduction to High Speed Multimedia High Speed Multimedia Technologies HSMM Equipment for Amateur Radio TCP/IP for HSMM HSMM Applications Security and Filtering Backup and Redundancy Deploying HSMM Networks The Future of HSMM Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL If you have any questions regarding the Arduino, or would like to collaborate on a project, Contact Glen and He will be happy to help any way that he can. Click here to send him an email. Links that we talked about in this episode: Amateur Radio Round Table - A live amateur radio show with Tom and the gang. Tom has one of the longest running amateur radio programs on today. His Tuesday night live webcasts are even retransmitted on a Shortwave radio station. Hamradio 360 - This podcast is one of my favorite podcasts. Cale, George and Jeremy do an awesome job with being ambassadors to the hobby of ham radio. George and Jeremy are the hosts of the Hamradio 360 Workbench podcast that does a more of a deep dive into the  technical side of the hobby. Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase. West Mountain Radio West Mountain Radio - Arduino Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.    For more information on the RIGblaster Advantage and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with you purchase, click here. Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

Field Day 2017 with Ian Kahn, KM4IK - ETH071

Jun 1, 2017 02:13:52

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Field Day 2017 with Ian Kahn, KM4IK!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What Class Station Is Your Club or You Running?

Field Day 2017 Dates

Field Day is always the fourth full weekend of June, beginning at 1800 UTC Saturday and running through 2059 UTC Sunday. Field Day 2017 is June 24-25. If your club is not doing field day or you would just like to check out other field day locations, check out the ARRL's Field Day Locator to find other field day locations in your area.

Bands

Any Amateur Radio band except 12, 17, 30 and 60 Meters.

Rules, Entry Forms and Information Packets 2017 Field Day Packet (complete)  Ver 2 - Update 21 March 2017 2017 Field Day Rules (there were no substantive changes from 2016) 2017 GOTA FAQ 2017 GOTA Scoring 2017 Control Operator Information 2017 Safety Officer Info/Checklist - Vers 2 - Updated 21 March 2017 2017 Field Day Summary Sheet 2017 W1AW / K6KPH Bulletin Schedule 2017 Field Day Public Relations Packet 2017 Social Media 2017 Educational FAQ 2017 How to Succeed - by Really Trying 2017 Field Day Information Flier 2017 Field Day VHF/UHF Information (minor changes from 2016) 2017 Field Day Log Sheet (keep for your records - don't send to ARRL) 2017 Field Day Dupe Sheet (send Dupe Sheet or Cabrillo File Page 1 to ARRL with your bonus documents {do not send Log Sheet]) 2017 ARRL/RAC Section List (no changes from 2016) Logging Software N1MM Logger+ N3FJP Other topics that we talked about in this episode: Stealth Antennas Lightning Protection National Traffic System Broadband Hamnet

 

West Mountain Radio

West Mountain Radio - Field Day

Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has:

A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio.

Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48. For more information and to learn how to get your free USB Port monitor, click here.

Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase.

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH070 - Remote Controlled Drones, Planes and More With Jason Howard, K6DGN

May 25, 2017 01:42:25

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Remote Controlled Drones and More with Jason Howard, K6DGN, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks.

Facebook Question of the Week:

What did you buy at Hamvention or what would your have bought?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/70/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

Hamvention 2017 - ETH069

May 18, 2017 59:47

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Hamvention 2017!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What did you think of Hamvention this year?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/69/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH068 - Are You Weather Aware?

May 11, 2017 01:08:31

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about how to be Weather Aware, We talk about W5KUB and his Hamvention Marathon at Hamvention next weekend, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Facebook Question of the Week:

Are You Going To Hamvention next weekend?

 

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/68/

 

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

 

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH067 - I Think I Have the PSK31 Bug! Interview with Ian Kahn, KM4IK

May 4, 2017 01:34:09

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about PSK31 with Ian Kahn, KM4IK, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Facebook Question of the Week:

What was your biggest hurdle in getting or upgrading you license?

 

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/67/

 

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.


If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH066 - Perfect Example of Growing Up As A Ham and The Allstar Link Network

Apr 26, 2017 01:32:44

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Allstar with Jim Aspinwall, NO1PC, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks.

Facebook Question of the Week:

What is your favorite brand of radio and why?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/66/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH065 - Follow Up Class Ideas After A Technician Class

Apr 20, 2017 53:16

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about some ideas for follow up classes after you give a technician class, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What is the funniest phonetics you can think of for your callsign?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/65/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH064 - How To Teach A Technician Class with Dan Romanchik, KB6NU

Apr 13, 2017 01:17:32

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Dan Romanchik about How to Teach a Technician Class, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks.

Facebook Question of the Week:

What is your most exciting contact you’ve made?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/64/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH063 - Texas State Parks On The Air with Paul Estes, K5VOP

Apr 6, 2017 01:10:41

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Texas State Parks On The Air, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Facebook Question of the Week:

How long have you had your license?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/63/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

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ETH062 - Northern California DX Foundation with Kevin Rowett K6TD

Mar 30, 2017 01:22:17

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about DX Beacon Network, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What time and Frequencies are some good HF nets on?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/62/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH061 - Echostation

Mar 23, 2017 55:05

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Echo Station, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What does your mobile setup look like?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/61/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH060 - QRP Operations

Mar 16, 2017 54:28

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about QRP Operations, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Facebook Question of the Week:

What is your favorite mode to operate?

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/60/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH059 - QSL Cards and Services

Mar 9, 2017 52:35

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about QSL Cards and Services, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/59/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH058- Military Auxiliary Radio System(MARS)

Mar 2, 2017 53:54

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Military Auxiliary Radio System(MARS), we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/58/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH057 - So You Want To Be A Ham?

Feb 23, 2017 55:02

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about things you need to know about when you first get your license, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/57/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH056 - Lighting Protection

Feb 16, 2017 01:23:50

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about lightning protectio, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/56/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH055 - Are You Ready For Storm Season?

Feb 9, 2017 57:48

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about things to do to get yourself ready for storm season, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Winners:

Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com - Eric Broyles, KJ4KEU N3FJP Software Package - Alan Meeker, KM4ZLD

 

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/55/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH054 - Building Antennas

Feb 2, 2017 01:14:04

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about building antennas, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

I would like to thank George Zafiropoulos, KJ6VU with Packtenna.com, Dan Romanchik, KB6NU and Scott Davis, N3FJP for donating items for give-away prizes for this episode.

Winners:

$100 gift certificate to Packtenna.com - Curtis Abma, AB4MA - Prize Claimed Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com - Eric Broyles, KJ4KEU N3FJP Software Package - Custom call sign desk plate made by me…:) Larry Nutt, N4NXX - Prize Claimed Ron Bauer, N8IKG - Prize Claimed Travis Pederson, N5TP - Prize Claimed

 

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/53/

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH053 - Stealth Antennas

Jan 26, 2017 01:12:16

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Stealth Antennas, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Please let me know what you think about my podcast by taking my short survey. It really has given me some insight as to what y'all think, what I could change or do better even though I have only had 6 people take it so far.

Ep 50 Give away winners:

$100 gift certificate to Packtenna.com - Curtis Abma, AB4MA - Prize Claims Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com - Frank Gonzalez, K7PGP N3FJP Software Package 15 - Ron Bauer, N8IKG Custom call sign desk plate made by me…:) Larry Nutt, N4NXX Travis Pederson, N5TP - Prize Claimed

For those that have not claimed their prizes, you have until January 30th to do so. Any prize that is not claimed by then, a new winner will be picked for it.

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/53

ETH052 - What Is Good To Have On A Workbench

Jan 19, 2017 01:00:50

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we talk about Workbenches and some things you should have on them, we talk about the  in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/52

ETH051 - We Made It To One Year!!

Jan 12, 2017 52:26

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! We made it to one year, well almost, this coming Sunday, Jan 15, will be the one year anniversary of this podcast! Before we get started in todays show, I would like to thank each and every one of yall that listen to my podcast. Yall are the reason that I do this. I thank you listening, for sharing, and supporting me either mentally or financially! In this episode we are going to be talking about everything we have done over the past year, we talk about the Maple Valley Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Please let me know what you think about my podcast by taking my short survey. It really has given me some insight as to what y'all think, what I could change or do better even though I have only had 6 people take it so far.

I would like to thank George Zafiropoulos, KJ6VU with Packtenna.com, Dan Romanchik, KB6NU and Scott Davis, N3FJP for donating items for give-away prizes for this episode.

Winners:

$100 gift certificate to Packtenna.com Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com N3FJP Software Package Custom call sign desk plate made by me…:)

 

 

West Mountain Radio

I would like to welcome my first podcast sponsor, West Mountain Radio! For those of you that don't know who they are, they make some awesome equipment that I have had the pleasure of using over the past 15 or so years. They make several pieces of equipment that are so well built and are so useful. Things like the RIGBlaster, RIGrunner and the DC-to-Go Boxes. I talked a little bit about the RIGblaster in my last episode and I've talked about the RIGrunner several times in previous episode but today I wanted to tell y'all about their DC-to-Go Boxes.

These are neat cases that you can put a battery in to protect your station’s floor from an unfortunate battery accident, however, they are so much more than that as well. These boxes have a Super PWRgate PG40 and a RIGrunner 4007U or 4008 built into them as well.

The PWRgate provides you an uninterruptible power supply in case you lose AC power it will automatically switch to the battery in the box. This is a perfect solution for a repeater backup and/or event like the upcoming Winter Field Day!

The RIGrunner 4008 provides you with 40 amps of D.C. Power plug over 8 slots while the 4007u gives you 40 amps across 7 slots but it has some extra feature like a digital load meter and USB charging port as well as a solid state push button on/off switch and an automatic shutoff for high or low voltages!

Both of these are mounted to the side of the battery box. All you have to do is drop a battery inside and hook up the leads and you are ready to roll!!

Here are the links for the premade versions of the DC-to-Go boxes. It you can also Custom make one to your own choices!

DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RIGrunner & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1381), $249.95 DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RR4007U & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1577), $269.95 Custom make your own! Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Maple Valley Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.kc7key.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/106949826001472/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KC7KEY

Meetings Monthly meetings are held at 10 AM on the fourth Saturday of each month (except July-August and November-December) at Fire Station #81 near SR169 & SR18, 22225 SE 231st Street Maple Valley, WA 98038

 

Repeaters Analog Voice on 2M FM (KF7NPL)147.260MHz +PL 103.5Hz IRLP (Node 3615) and Echolink (KF7NPL-R) D-Star Digital Voice on 70CM (KF7NPL_B) 442.675MHz +

 

Nets

MVARC holds a weekly social net on simplex and on the Maple Valley Repeater. The net starts at 2000 hours local time, Tuesday nights, on the repeater on 147.260+ (103.5). After the first round we switch to 146.540 simplex.

 

Activities

Bra Dash Lake Wilderness Triathlon Cascadia Rising exercise Maple Valley Days Parade Maple Valley Days Bear Run Lake Meridian Triathlon ARRL Field Day Lake Meridian Triathlon Black Diamond Triathlon Summer's End Fun Run

If you would like to have your amateur radio club highlighted on my podcast, please send an email to k5clm@everythinghamradio.com. In that email please give me the name of your club, your club’s website address and tell me a little about your club.

 

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

 

Don’t forget to rate and review my podcast. Go to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/itunes/ to be taken to my podcast on ITunes. Please give me an honest star rating and review. This helps greatly in my standings in ITunes and will help others find my podcast other than searching for it directly.


If you like what you hear on my podcast and would like to help financially there are several ways that you can do just that. You can make a one time donation through paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or simply shop on Amazon using my affiliate link. Check out http://www.everythinghamradio.com/support/ for more information

ETH050 - Winter Field Day!

Jan 5, 2017 01:23:15

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the cold season cousin of The ARRL Field Day, Winter Field Day and some of the challenges that come along with it, we talk about the Chesapeake Amateur Radio Service in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

Donations

Thank you to Brian Stanford for you $1 per episode pledge on Patreon!

Thank you to Andrew Cornwall for you $10 donation!

Thank you!!

Downloads for December: 6,286 - best month to date!

Year end total: 47,436! That's an average of 968 downloads per episode! If you ask me that is pretty awesome for the first year! Thank you to all of you who listen and thank you for sharing my podcast with your friends, please continue to do so and help me grow even more!

Please let me know what you think about my podcast by taking my short survey. It really has given me some insight as to what y'all think, what I could change or do better even though I have only had 6 people take it so far.

I would like to thank George Zafiropoulos, KJ6VU with Packtenna.com for donating a and Dan Romanchik, KB6NU for donating as give-a-way prizes for this episode.

Prizes $100 gift certificate to Packtenna.com Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com N3FJP Logging Software Package by N3FJP Software Custom call sign desk plate made by me…:) How To Win?

Being that this is the 50th episode of this podcast, I am going to do this a little different than I have in the past. The only thing that you need to do is to sign up for my email list. If you are already signed up for my email list, then you are already entered. Signing up is super easy, just fill out the form below and click Sign Me Up! Check your email and click on the confirmation link in the email.

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Tech Corner - Winter Field!

Winter Field Day Association Website

Winter field Day Association Facebook Page

When?

Winter Field Day runs for 24 hours during the last full weekend in January each year from 1900 UTC (2pm EST) Saturday to 1900 UTC (2pm EST) Sunday. For 2017, the dates are January 28th and 29th. Station set-up may commence no earlier than 1900 UTC (2pm EST) on Friday, January 27th. Station setup may consume no more than 12 hours total. How & when you schedule/spend those 12 hours is up to you.

History

During 2006 the suggestion for SPAR to sponsor a Winter Field Day was made and after discussions in the Forum, rules and a date were set. On January 13-14, 2007, the First Annual Winter Field Day was held and based on comments from the participants; this will indeed go down in the record books as the start of an annual tradition.

It all started last June when Charles, N5PVL asked if SPAR would be interested in sponsoring a winter field day activity. There followed a discussion, proposed rules and modifications, all culminating in a vote in September approving SPAR's sponsorship. Next came a flurry of activities to get the word out on fairly short notice and finally, the actual contest in January.

Walt (W5ALT), Charlie (KY5U) contributed greatly to the success of SPAR and WFD. However, due to medical issues activity within SPAR, their forum and support of WFD have declined. Walt did state in the forum that he was somewhat overloaded.

Many amateur operators were upset that 2015 scores were not posted and we could not get a response out of SPAR. They also thought that WFD would just fade away. That is when several of us band together and formed Winter Field Day Association.

The rules are the same and the date is still the last full weekend in January. A temporary committee has been setup to get things up and running. They are: Tom (WD8MBE), Bill (VE3CLQ), Erik (WX4ET), Dave (W3DET) and Ken (N8KC).

For now, if there are any questions, suggestions, or complaints; please email them to wfda@winterfieldday.com

  Winter Field Day 2015 VK3KQ/P Sunday Rules Entry Categories: Indoor:

Operation from inside a remote, insulated, heated (or cooled, depending on your local weather), and weather-protected structure where an Amateur station is normally not available. (Park buildings/cabins, community center, EOC, senior center, club shack, etc).

Winter Field Day in Fairdale Kentucky Outdoor:

Operation from a location partly or fully exposed to the elements and at least 30 feet away from your normal station location and not using any part of a previously erected antenna system or ham station. A campground, park pavilion, canopy, picnic table, tent, pop-up camper, or a backyard shed/tent/deck, etc may be used. Operation from a non-insulated car/truck/van/boat (mobile or not) is considered "outdoor".

Home:

Operation from inside a home or inside another structure attached to a home that could or would be the usual location of an Amateur station (garage, sunroom, etc), generally using a previously erected antenna system. A "Home" entrant may still be eligible to claim the "alternate power" bonus if not using commercial power. Use of any pre-existing (on site) or permanently installed antenna system or station components renders your station a "Home" station.

Entry Class:

Your entry "class" is a number designated by the number of stations in your entry that are capable of simultaneous transmission. (Explained further in summary below)

Exchange:

Your WFD exchange will be a combination of your "class" and "category" and your ARRL section as described below, using an appropriate letter designator or phonetics (examples: 1I, 2H, 5I, 6O, 3H, 9I, etc) In short: Call sign, Class + Category, ARRL Section. (Example: K4YM this is KB8X, we are Two Hotel, Ohio ...or in CW: K4YM de KB8X TU 2H OH... KB8X this is K4YM, thank you, we are Twelve India, West Central Florida ..or in CW: KB8X TU 12I WCF)

QSO Points:

1 point per Phone QSO, 2 points per CW and Digital QSO. Busted exchanges will be penalized by 1 additional point for each missed exchange or callsign. Duplicate contacts (same call, band and mode) will not be counted, but will not be penalized.

Mode and Band Multipliers:

Count 1 multiplier for each mode operated per band. For example, operating CW and Phone on 80, 40, 15 and 10 meters, CW and PSK31 on 20m, FM on 2meters and 440MHz would be a total multiplier of 12x.

Power Output Multipliers: >100W = 1x 100W or less = 2x QRP = 4x(QRP defined below) Bonus Points: You may claim 1500 bonus points if no commercial power is used in powering your WFD sattion. (see "alternate power" definition below) Your "logging-only" computer may use any available power. You may claim 1500 bonus points if your operation is "Outdoors" (see definition below). You may claim 1500 bonus points if your operation is not a "Home" operation (remote). You may claim 1500 bonus points for making a QSO via Satellite (once only. see Satellite rule) Log submission deadline and contents

Logs must be submitted to www.wfda@winterfieldday.com via email before 0000 UTC March 1st to be considered. Emailed logs should contain the following in the subject line.."WFD 2017 Log KD8XXX" with KD8XXX being the callsign you used for the event.If simply submitting a question about WFD, please put "WFD Questions" in the subject line to ensure your query gets to the right in-box. All logs must be in Cabrillo format and should contain the following information: Frequency, Modes in the log, Date and time, QSO data required: Entrants's Call, Class + Category, ARRL/RAC Section, and Bonus Points.

Winter Field Day Rules

Logging Programs that the WFDA recommends:

N3FJP Log Program W3KM Log program N1MM Log program

Now that we have all the official stuff out of the way, let's talk a little about some of the challenges of Winter Field Day over The ARRL Field Day.

Weather

Probably the most prominent thing that pops into my head is the weather and especially for those of you that are in the north! During the ARRL Field Day, those of us in the the south especially, have to deal with the blistering heat. Here in Texas it is typically in the upper 90’s or lower 100’s during Field Day in June. With Winter Field Day it isn't as bad here in the south as it is typically around 50 for the highs here in Texas, but for those of you up North, you might struggle to get above freezing, which presents a whole slew of different problems.

When thinking about things that the cold could affect, the first thing I think about is how am I going to stay warm? If I am wanting to operate the outside class, I am going to need some way to get out of the elements, like a tent or some kind of shelter and a wind block. I am definitely going to have to have more layers of clothes, as well as some kind of gloves. Of course, that brings me to another thought, If I am wearing gloves, how is that going to affect my operating experience. Is it going to be harder to tune the radio? If it going to be harder to type or write my contacts in my log?

The next question that you have to ask yourself is how is the cold going to affect your equipment. You radio and computers, it probably won't hurt much, but what about things like antennas or coax. If you are getting any snow or ice, how is it going to affect you antennas. If there is any ice build up, it could affect your SWR’s. What about grounding your antenna system. If you have a lot of snow, or the ground is frozen, it is going to be harder to drive the ground rod in the ground to get that proper grounding.

On top of the antenna and grounding questions, what about your coax? I'm sure that if you have worked with coax in the cold you know that it is a pain to work with when it's cold. It doesn't want to lay flat, it doesn't want to uncoil, it's stiff. All this and more I'm sure!

 

West Mountain Radio

I would like to welcome my first podcast sponsor, West Mountain Radio! For those of you that don't know who they are, they make some awesome equipment that I have had the pleasure of using over the past 15 or so years. They make several pieces of equipment that are so well built and are so useful. Things like the RIGBlaster, RIGrunner and the DC-to-Go Boxes. I talked a little bit about the RIGblaster in my last episode and I've talked about the RIGrunner several times in previous episode but today I wanted to tell y'all about their DC-to-Go Boxes.

These are neat cases that you can put a battery in to protect your station’s floor from an unfortunate battery accident, however, they are so much more than that as well. These boxes have a Super PWRgate PG40 and a RIGrunner 4007U or 4008 built into them as well.

The PWRgate provides you an uninterruptible power supply in case you lose AC power it will automatically switch to the battery in the box. This is a perfect solution for a repeater backup and/or event like the upcoming Winter Field Day!

The RIGrunner 4008 provides you with 40 amps of D.C. Power plug over 8 slots while the 4007u gives you 40 amps across 7 slots but it has some extra feature like a digital load meter and USB charging port as well as a solid state push button on/off switch and an automatic shutoff for high or low voltages!

Both of these are mounted to the side of the battery box. All you have to do is drop a battery inside and hook up the leads and you are ready to roll!!

Here are the links for the premade versions of the DC-to-Go boxes. It you can also Custom make one to your own choices!

DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RIGrunner & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1381), $249.95 DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RR4007U & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1577), $269.95 Custom make your own!

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Chesapeake Amateur Radio Service

Website: http://w4car.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/w4car/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/w4car/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/w4car/
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaXNsBCvysELbYOsr7aVFUA/

Meetings 1st Monday of every month at 116 Reservation Road in the Great Bridge section of Chesapeake Repeaters 146.610 - PL 162.2 146.820 - PL 162.2 444.000 - PL 162.2 System Fusion Nets CARS Weekly Club Net - Sunday at 8pm - 146.820 Repeater CARES (ARES) Net - Wednesday at 8pm - 146.820 Repeater Activities Virginia QSO Party Field Day Battle of Great Bridge Special Event ARES Tour de Cure Shack Day - 3rd Sat of the Month the club shack is opened to all members and the general public.

 

Upcoming Events

 

QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 6 PODXS 070 Club PSKFest 0000Z-2400Z, Jan 7 WW PMC Contest 1200Z, Jan 7 to 1200Z, Jan 8 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Jan 7 to 2400Z, Jan 8 Original QRP Contest 1500Z, Jan 7 to 1500Z, Jan 8 Kid's Day Contest 1800Z-2359Z, Jan 7 ARRL RTTY Roundup 1800Z, Jan 7 to 2400Z, Jan 8 EUCW 160m Contest 2000Z-2300Z, Jan 7 and
  0400Z-0700Z, Jan 8 DARC 10-Meter Contest 0900Z-1059Z, Jan 8 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 11 AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest 2300Z, Jan 11 to 2300Z, Jan 12 and
  2300Z, Jan 14 to 2300Z, Jan 15 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 13 NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 13 Old New Year Contest 0500Z-0900Z, Jan 14 UBA PSK63 Prefix Contest 1200Z, Jan 14 to 1200Z, Jan 15 North American QSO Party, CW 1800Z, Jan 14 to 0559Z, Jan 15 NRAU-Baltic Contest, SSB 0630Z-0830Z, Jan 15 NRAU-Baltic Contest, CW 0900Z-1100Z, Jan 15 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Jan 16 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 18

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

 

Hamfests

01/07/2017

FreezeFest - Locust Fork, AL LARC's Annual HAMFEST - White Pine, TN West Allis RAC's 45th Annual Midwinter Swapfest - Waukesha, WI

01/08/2017

New York City/Long Island Section Convention (Ham Radio University 2017) - Bethpage, NY

01/14/2017

Greenwood Hamfest - Greenwood, SC San Antonio Radio Fiesta - Schertz, TX TARCFest - Tampa, FL TechFest 2017 -  Lawrenceville, GA Thunderbird Hamfest 2017 - Phoenix, AZ Winston-Salem Firstfest - Winston-Salem, NC Winter Hamfest 2017 - Lovleland , CO

01/15/2017

Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest - Nelsonville, OH

 

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

 

News New Amateur Radio FM Transponder CubeSat Now in Space

12/29/2016

The BY70-1 CubeSat launched on December 28 from the Taiyuan Space Launch Center in China, but in a lower orbit than intended. The satellite carries an Amateur Radio FM transponder.

BY70-1 was intended to go into a 530-kilometer (approximately 329-mile) circular Sun-synchronous orbit, but it appears the orbit is 524 × 212 kilometers, which will give the spacecraft an orbital lifetime of just a month or two.

Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, reported working Wyatt Dirks, AC0RA, through the FM transponder during the 1709 UTC pass on December 28. “Uplink requires precise frequency adjustment, and there’s a delay on the downlink, but the signal is strong,” Stoetzer said.

BY70-1 is a 2U CubeSat project for education and Amateur Radio. It features 3-axis stabilization and deployable solar panels. In addition to the FM transponder, BY70-1 has a camera, and plans call for downloading images and telemetry via a 9600 bps BPSK downlink. The IARU Amateur Satellite Frequency Coordination pages list an uplink of 145.920 MHz, and a downlink of 436.200 MHz.

AMSAT-UK has more information.

FCC Denies Expert Linears’ Request for Waiver of 15 dB Rule, Petition Pending

12/27/2016FCC Logo - Winter Field Day

The FCC has denied a request by Expert Linears America LLC to waive §97.317(a)(2) of the Amateur Service rules limiting amplifier gain. Expert, of Magnolia, Texas, distributes linears manufactured by SPE in Italy. Its waiver request, filed in June, would have allowed Expert to import an amplifier capable of exceeding the current 15 dB gain limitation as it awaits FCC action on its April petition (RM-11767) to revise the same Amateur Service rules. That petition remains pending. Expert has asserted that there should be no gain limitation on amplifiers sold or used in the Amateur Service. Most commenters supported Expert’s waiver request, but a couple of commenters — including FlexRadio — demurred.

“In light of the conflicting comments regarding the desirability of eliminating the 15 dB limitation, we conclude that waiving the limitation at this stage of the rulemaking proceeding would prejudice the rulemaking proceeding and prematurely dispose of commenters’ concerns,” the FCC said in denying the waiver. “Moreover, we agree with FlexRadio that granting Expert’s waiver request while the rulemaking petition remains pending would provide an unfair market advantage for one equipment model over other manufacturers’ RF power amplifiers that would still be limited by [the existing rules].”

The FCC said it would rather give full consideration to “the pending issues” and apply the result of the rulemaking proceeding to all Amateur Radio Service equipment. The Commission said rule waivers “generally” are not warranted “merely to accommodate technical parameters that are based solely on harmonization with the manufacturer’s products available abroad.”

The FCC said a minority of those commenting on the waiver request expressed concern that eliminating the 15 dB limitation would lead to an overall increase in power levels, “including transmissions that intentionally or unintentionally exceed the maximum power limit.”

In its April rulemaking petition, Expert maintained that the 15 dB gain limitation is an unneeded holdover from the days when amplifiers were less efficient and the FCC was attempting to rein in the use of Amateur Service amplifiers by Citizens Band operators.

Although the FCC had proposed in 2004 to delete the requirement that amplifiers be designed to use a minimum of 50 W of drive power — and subsequently did so — it did not further discuss the 15 dB limit in the subsequent Report and Order in that proceeding.

Expert has pointed to its Model 1.3K FA amplifier as an example of a linear “inherently capable of considerably more than 15 dB of amplification,” which would make it a suitable match for low-power transceivers now on the market.

National Parks on the Air Contact Tally Tops 1 Million!

12/21/2016National Parks On The Air(NPOTA) Logo - Winter Field Day

Participants in the ARRL’s National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) program have completed more than 1 million contacts! Activators operating from National Park Service units across the US and Chasers around the world pushed the contact tally over its goal this week. ARRL sponsored NPOTA to help the National Park Service celebrate its centennial.

“National Parks on the Air has become one of the most popular events in the history of the League,” NPOTA Administrator Sean Kutzko, KX9X, said. “It’s been fun seeing so many hams take part.”

Kutzko said the NPOTA Facebook group really helped drive participation, especially in the last 3 months, when it became clear that the 1 million-QSO goal was within reach. “Some 25,000 NPOTA contacts were uploaded to Logbook of The World (LoTW) every week since October,” he noted. “The entire group came together and simply willed the 1 million-contact mark to be broken. It was incredible to watch!” He said some real friendships developed among those who frequented the NPOTA Facebook page.

Those taking part in NPOTA made nearly 20,000 visits to 460 of the 489 NPS units eligible for NPOTA credit, including portions of the National Trails System and the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Nearly 150 Chasers completed contacts with more than 400 of the 489 NPOTA units this year, while one Activator transmitted from more than 250 different NPS units in 2016. Kutzko said the activations effectively transported those National Park Service units via radio to all 50 states and more than 100 countries during 2016.

Kutzko said NPOTA garnered interest from hams at all proficiency levels, but he was especially gratified to see how it encouraged less-experienced hams to acquire new skills, such as operating a portable station on battery power, learning CW, or discovering digital modes. “Pileups from some activations rivaled those during a major DXpedition — if only for a few hours at a time,” he added.

Jim Clark Jr., an NPS Ranger at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont, said NPOTA helped to generate greater awareness of his unit. “National Parks on the Air has afforded us the opportunity to connect with a much larger and more diverse audience than we could have ever imagined,” he told ARRL. “We are pleased and proud that the world of Amateur Radio helped us to celebrate 100 years of service to the nation.”

Kutzko said being able to blend Amateur Radio with the history and scenery offered by the National Park Service was a wonderful gift. “We heard from countless amateurs who learned something about our country while operating from an NPS unit and experiencing ‘the other side’ of a pileup. There will be other on-air events from ARRL, but National Parks on the Air was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I don’t think there will ever be anything quite like it in Amateur Radio again. I will miss it.”

Until month’s end, NPOTA Activators will make a big push to get on the air from NPS units all across the country in a final sprint to the finish line. Get in on the action as NPOTA ends with a roar on December 31 at 2359 UTC!

-------------------------

As of this recording there was 1,062,159 QSOs over 20,184 separate activations. It really surprised me when I went through the list of activation states and there was 16 parks that were not activated!

Another thing that was really interesting to me was on the leaderboard page. The person that had the highest number of activations was Stuart H Thomas, KB1HQS. He has 500 activation points, the second place person is N4CD with 335. Stuart was a guest over on the Hamradio 360 podcast a couple months ago, click here to listen to that episode. He is on the cover of the 11th edition of the ARRL Operating Manual for Radio Amateurs and did a write up about tips, tricks  and techniques for portable operating in the book starts in page 1.76. He also has an article in the November 2016 QST on page 69. He is also featured in the 2017 ARRL Calendar in August.

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

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Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM




script

script

ETH049 - Merry Christmas

Dec 22, 2016 56:24

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the some new scholarships that are available through the ARRL, My Christmas Wishlist and the latest episode of the Hamradio 360 Podcast, we talk about the    St. Albans Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Tech Corner - Merry Christmas

 

Two new ARRL Scholarship programs announced The Helen Laughlin AM Mode Memorial Scholarship is intended for female amateur radio operators, First choice Texas, then Arkansas then West Gulf Coast Region $1000 The Atlanta Radio Club Scholarship is for Georgians between 17 and 25 years old. $500 ARRL has 80 scholarships that can be applied for: http://www.arrl.org/scholarship-descriptions

 

Christmas Wish List

 

HF KENWOOD TS-480SAT - $839.95 -  100 watt HF Plus Six Meters Mobile Yaesu FTM-400XDR - $549.95 = 2m/430MHz: 50W FM, C4FM FDMA w/ GPS for APRS(1200/9600bps), Micro SD, RX: 108-990MHz KENWOOD TM-D710G - $529.95 - 2M/440 TRANSCEIVER APRS/TNC GPS

 

HT Yaesu FT2DR - $333.00 - C4FM 144/430 MHz Dual Band Digital Handheld Transceiver KENWOOD TH-D72A - $379.95 - 144 / 430 MHz Dual Band FM Hand Held with Integrated GPS / APRS Misc RIGblaster Advantage - 199.95

 

Things You Can Do with a RIGblaster

PSK31 (all models) WinMOR HF-Email (WL2K) MFSK16 (all models) ALE MT63 (all models) Hellschreiber (all models) SSTV (all models) Digital SSTV (all models) RTTY AFSK (all models) RTTY FSK (RIGblaster Pro, Plus II, and Advantage) PACKET 300 &1200 baud AX25 (all models) APRS with packet sound card software (all models) MCW transmit and receive (all models) CW transmit and receive (RIGblaster Pro, Plus II, Plug & Play, and Advantage)

 

Contest Voice Keying (RIGblaster Pro, Plus II, Advantage, and Blue) WSJT FSK441 High Speed FSK meteor scatter (all models) WSJT JT65 Extreme weak signal Tropo and EME (all models) FM repeater announcements, automatic and unattended. (all models) EchoLink® (web) Internet radio linking with the EchoLink®system. (all models) Simplex or duplex repeater control with EchoStation. (all models) Digital voice over SSB bandwidth on HF (all models) Transmit Speech Processing: EQ and Compression (RIGblaster Pro) Computer RIG control (RIGblaster Pro, Plus II, Plug & Play, Advantage, and Blue) DX beacon monitoring (RIGblaster Pro, Plus II, Plug & Play, Advantage, and Blue)

 

Hamradio 360 - AREDN

 

ETH Ep 29 - Broadband Hamnet

 

  Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Saint Albans Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.starc.org

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starcinc/

Meetings Last Thursday of the month at 7:30pm at the St. Albans VFW 353 Lake Road, St. Albans, VT

 

Repeaters ( Listen Live ) 145.230 - PL 100 St. Albans 146.745 - PL 100 Jay Peak 443.400 + PL 162.2 St Albans 447.225 + PL 100 Jay Peak Nets STARC Weekly net - Every Thursday evening at 7:00pm on the 145.230 Repeater Activities Switchback Bike for the Lake Run For Jim Races QSO Parties Field Day Testing Sessions

 

Upcoming Events




+ RAEM Contest

0000Z-1159Z, Dec 25

+ DARC Christmas Contest

0830Z-1059Z, Dec 26

+ SKCC Sprint

0000Z-0200Z, Dec 28

+ AGB New Year Snowball Contest

0000Z-0100Z, Jan 1

+ SARTG New Year RTTY Contest

0800Z-1100Z, Jan 1

+ AGCW Happy New Year Contest

0900Z-1200Z, Jan 1

+ AGCW VHF/UHF Contest

1400Z-1700Z, Jan 1 (144) and

 1700Z-1800Z, Jan 1 (432)

+ QRP ARCI New Years Sprint

1500Z-1800Z, Jan 1

+ QRP ARCI New Years Sprint

1500Z-1800Z, Jan 1

+ ARS Spartan Sprint

0200Z-0400Z, Jan 3




*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

 

Hamfests

 

None

 

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

 

News Next Kids Day is Saturday, January 7

12/14/2016

The first Saturday in January is Kids Day — the time to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and fun that Amateur Radio can provide.

Kids Day gets under way on Saturday, January 7, at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age, location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short as each participant prefers.

Kids Day is the perfect opportunity to open your shack door and invite kids over to see what Amateur Radio has to offer. Details are on the ARRL website.

Suggested Exchange-

Name, age, location and favorite color. Be sure to work the same station again if an operator has changed. To draw attention, call “CQ Kids Day.”

 

 

Kids Day on the Ham Radio at Valley Christian Schools from Werner Vavken on Vimeo.

 

 Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH048 - Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)

Dec 15, 2016 01:02:46

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES), we talk about the Bridgeland Amateur Radio Club in Logan, UT in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

 

Tech Corner - Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)   What is ARES?

ARES is an organization started by the ARRL that consists of licensed amateurs who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty when disaster strikes. Every licensed amateur is eligible to apply for ARES membership.

ARES is broken down into four levels: national, section, district and local. The national level emergency coordination is handled at the ARRL headquarters by the ARRL Field Services and Field Sport Manager or his/her designee. They are responsible for advising all ARES officials regarding their problems, maintaining contact with federal government and other national officials concerned with amateur emergency communications potential, and in general carrying out the ARRL’s policies regarding emergency communications.

At the section level, the section emergency coordinator is an assistant to the section manager for emergency preparedness. The SEC is appointed by the section manager to handle all things dealing with emergency communications. Part of the SEC’s job is to support and help grow their sections participation in ARES functions. They are the person that is responsible for collecting all the district activity reports and making a consolidated report to the section manager and ARRL headquarters. They are also responsible to maintain a good work relationship with state and local governments, civil preparedness, Federal Emergency Management agencies, the Salvation Army, MWS, etc.

In large sections, the SEC has the option of breaking down the geographical area in smaller, more management areas or districts. If this is done, the SEC would make recommendations for a district emergency coordinator. This person would be a go between between the local and section levels with much of the same duties as the SEC has but on a smaller scale.

Lastly, we come to the local level. Each local area will have their own Emergency Coordinator that is appointed by the SEC. The local level EC is the most hands on of all the levels and is responsible for more as well. Parts of the local EC’s responsibilities are;

Promoting and enhancing the activities of the ARES for the benefit of the public. Manage and coordinate training, organization, and emergency preparedness of interested amateurs in the area. Establish and maintain a good working relationship with local and state government officials. Develop detailed local operational plans with served agencies and partners in their jurisdiction. Establish a local communications network Establish an emergency communications plans And more…

Training

The majority of the training that you will receive when you join your local ARES team will be done at meetings and on the air during nets. However, there are a few things that you can take as well and depending on your local ARES group some may be required as well.

NIMS - IS-100.b NIMS - IS-700.A ARRL - EC-001 - Introduction to Emergency Communications ARRL - EC-016 - Public Service and Emergency Communicationss Management for Radio Amateurs ARRL - EC-015 - ARRL Public Relations - This is a good course to take if you are the Public Information Officer for your club or ARES group. Skywarn Storm Spotter Training - If your ARES group doubles as you local Skywarn team, this training may also be required, typically once every two years.

Along the same lines of training, what are you good at? Are you a good multitasker? Are you good under stress? Are you good at fixing things?  There is so much that goes on during a disaster and the planning before hand that has to be done, if something is your “cup of tea” make sure that someone knows about it. If you are a good multitasker and you do good under stress, you should volunteer to be net control. If you are a good organizer, maybe you can help with the emergency planning before a disaster hits, or help design a drill. Even though our main responsibility with ARES and as a ham in general is communictions, there is so much more that goes on, make sure you let your local EC know what you are good at, what you like to do, or what you would like to learn to do so that they know and can assign you to what you are good at or get you training before a disaster hits so that you can do what you like to do.

Traffic Handling

Traffic handling is a very important part of our job as communicators. During an ARES operation, messages are passed using the RadioGram format of the National Traffic System. It is important to use this format when passing traffic because it keeps a record of the message, it is more concise which makes its faster when done correctly, and it’s easier to copy because the receiving station knows the order of the information that they are receiving therefore resulting in fewer errors and less repeats. Traffic handling is required training for all ARES members.

Planning

Pre-disaster planning is also an important part of the ARES organization. Planning before a disaster happens allows the organization to identifying those who may need amateur radio communications. After they are identified, you need to find out what the nature of the information they will need to communicate and who they will need to communicate with. Once all this information is obtained, drills should be done to make sure that everything is done correctly before a disaster happens.

 

Further Reading

ARRL - ARES ARRL ARES Manual ARRL Field Resource Manual  

 

  Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Bridgeland Amateur Radio Club  

Website: http://barconline.org/

Meetings Second Saturday of each month (Jan – May & November) at 10:00 AM on the 3rd floor of the Cache County Sheriff’s office (1225 West 200 North, Logan, Utah). During other months, the club is active in activities that they consider as meetings   Repeaters 146.720(-) PL 103.5 Mt. Logan link 147.26, 449.625, 145.31 449.625(-) PL 103.5 Mt. Logan link 146.72, 145.31, 147.26 145.310(-) PL 103.5 Red Spur (west of Randolph) link 146.72, 147.26, 449.625 147.260(+) PL 103.5 Promontory link 146.72, 145.31, 449.625 146.640(-) No PL Logan Valley Floor 147.200(+) PL 103.5 Logan Valley Floor IRLP node 3381 Echolink node 495125 449.650(-) PL 100 Mt Pisgah (TV Translator Site) Intermountain Intertie Link Nets Weekly Bridgerland Amateur Radio Club net is held every Tuesday at 9pm local time on the 146.720 The BARC Ladies Net is every 2nd and 4th Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. on the BARC Repeater and Linked Systems (146.720). Northern Utah Technical Society (NUTS) D-Star Net - Sunday evening at 8:00 pm Mountain time. It is held on the 449.575 – NU7TS B, 447.975 – AC7O – B, 145.150 AC7O-C, 447.950 KF7VJO-B or 447.925 N7RDS-B repeaters and the D-Star Reflector 029C Beehive Utah Net - daily at 12:30pm local at 7.272 MHz Activities Field Day Swaptoberfest Top of Utah Marathon Bear 100 Rocket Recovery LOTOJA - Bicycle Race Little Red Riding Hood - Ladies Only Bicycle Race      

 

Upcoming Events    

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 16

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 16

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 16

Russian 160-Meter Contest

2000Z, Dec 16 to 2400Z, Dec 17

AGB-Party Contest

2100Z-2400Z, Dec 16

OK DX RTTY Contest

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 17

RAC Winter Contest

0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17

Feld Hell Sprint

0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17

Padang DX Contest

1200Z-2359Z, Dec 17

Croatian CW Contest

1400Z, Dec 17 to 1400Z, Dec 18

Stew Perry Topband Challenge

1500Z, Dec 17 to 1500Z, Dec 18

ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW

1800Z-2359Z, Dec 18

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0200Z-0400Z, Dec 19

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 21

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 21

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 21 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 21 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 22

NAQCC CW Sprint

0130Z-0330Z, Dec 22

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 23

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 23

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 23

RAEM Contest

0000Z-1159Z, Dec 25

DARC Christmas Contest

0830Z-1059Z, Dec 26

SKCC Sprint

0000Z-0200Z, Dec 28

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 28

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 28

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 28 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 28 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 29

   

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

  Hamfests    

12/17/2016

MARA Annual Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA    

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News ARRL Vows Continued Pursuit of the Amateur Radio Parity Act in the 115th Congress  

12/09/2016
The Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, died an unbefitting death as the 114th Congress of the United States drew to a close today. After having passed the House of Representatives on a unanimous vote, the bill stalled in the Senate due to the intervention of only one member, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL).

Over the course of the past year, Sen. Nelson has received thousands of e-mails, letters, and phone calls from concerned constituents asking for his support of H.R. 1301. Numerous meetings were held with his senior staff in an effort to move the legislation forward. Negotiations, which led to an agreement with the national association of homeowner’s associations and publicly supported by CAI and ARRL, were brushed aside by Sen. Nelson as irrelevant.

In a final meeting with the Senator’s staff earlier this week, it became clear that no matter what was said or done, the Senator opposed the bill and refused to allow it to move forward. Unfortunately, as the bill did not receive floor time, the only manner in which it could get passed in the Senate would be through a process that required unanimous consent, which means no one opposes the bill.

The legislation will be reintroduced in both houses of Congress after the 115th Session begins in January. We have already been in contact with the sponsors of the bill to allow for an early introduction, which will give us more time to obtain success. We believe that we can get his bill adopted given the fact that we were inches away from crossing the goal line. We will continue to need the support of the membership, particularly in Florida, as we go forward through the next year.

  Phil Anderson, VE3FAS, Named to Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame  

12/09/2016
The Board of Trustees of the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame has announced the appointment of Phil Anderson, VE3FAS, of Amaranth, Ontario, to the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for 2016. The Constitution for the Hall of Fame specifies that the appointment is made “for outstanding achievement and excellence of the highest degree, for serious and sustained service to Amateur Radio in Canada, or to Amateur Radio at large.” The Board of Trustees determined that Anderson is “most worthy of this honour.”

Licensed in 1961, Anderson had a distinguished engineering career in defense research and space design, after which he became an instructor at Humber College. His Amateur Radio involvement includes 50 years of service with the National Traffic System, and he was awarded the prestigious Brass Pounders League Medallion for outstanding achievement in passing third-party traffic. He served the National Traffic System (NTS) Eastern Area and served as manager of the Eastern Canadian Net and Transcontinental Corps (TCC). He was also a QSL bureau volunteer for 20 years.

Anderson will be formally inducted to the Hall of Fame at a club event in 2017. Thanks to Ed Frazer, VE7EF, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame

  Emergency Communication Exercise Uses “Hamsphere®” to Introduce Youth to Virtual Ham Radio  

12/07/2016
Fifty students in Dominica were introduced to ham radio on November 23, in the form of a simulated emergency drill conducted via the virtual Amateur Radio platform HamSphere. W1AW at ARRL Headquarters monitored the exercise. HamSphere is a virtual Amateur Radio transceiver, available for iOS and Android devices. Under supervision, selected youth teams competed for speed and accuracy in a hurricane emergency communication drill, dubbed “Haminica 2016,” while becoming familiar with the virtual version of Amateur Radio.

Sponsoring the project was Dominica’s National Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (NTRC), and NTRC Executive Director Craig Nesty and Engineer George James, J73GJ, were on hand for the exercise. ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey, KI1U, observed “Haminica 2016” at W1AW using the Hamsphere 3.0 platform. Well-known DXer Martti Laine, OH2BH — an enthusiastic Hamsphere supporter — and Brian Machesney, K1LI/J75Y, organized “Haminica 2016” and helped to conduct the Dominica exercise. While in Dominica, Laine celebrated his 70th birthday on the air as J70BH.

The exercise scenario was a hurricane about to make landfall on the island. Laine said that, at one point, the group conducting the exercise had to evacuate the station on short notice.

Laine said the NRTC is producing a video about the training exercise, and the event caught the attention of the national TV station, which reported the story in prime time.

Source

ARRL News

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH047 - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Servies

Dec 8, 2016 01:11:16

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service(RACES), we talk about the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club from Cleveland, TN in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

 

Tech Corner - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services(RACES) What is RACES?  

Founded in 1952, the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) is a public service provided by a reserve (volunteer) communications group within government agencies in times of extraordinary need. During periods of RACES activation, certified unpaid personnel are called upon to perform many tasks for the government agencies they serve. Although the exact nature of each activation will be different, the common thread is communications.

 

ACS, in its RACES and other reserve emergency communications functions, provides a pool of emergency communications personnel that can be called upon in time of need. ACS/RACES units across the country prepare themselves for the inevitable day when they will be called upon. When a local, county, or state government agency activates its ACS unit, that unit will use its communications resources (RACES, if necessary) to meet whatever need that agency has.

 

Traditional RACES operations involve emergency message handling on Amateur Radio Service frequencies. These operations typically involve messages between critical locations such as hospitals, emergency services, emergency shelters, and any other locations where communication is needed. These communications are handled in any mode available, with 2 meters FM being the most prevalent. During time of war, when the President exercises his War Emergency Powers, RACES might become the only communications allowed via amateur radio. Activating under the FCC's restrictive RACES Rules is not always necessary when using Amateur Radio Service frequencies for emergency communications. For example, ACS communicators may need to communicate with ARES or other radio amateurs who are not government-certified to operate in a RACES net. ACS personnel also might become involved in non-amateur public-safety or other government communications, Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staffing, and emergency equipment repair.

Who Does RACES Operate Under?  

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides planning guidance and technical assistance for establishing a RACES organization at the state and local government level.

 

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is responsible for the regulation of RACES operations. RACES is administrated by a local, county, or state civil defense agency responsible for disaster services. This civil defense agency is typically an emergency services or emergency management organization, sometimes within another agency such as police or fire. RACES is a function of the agency's Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS), sometimes known as DCS (Disaster Communications Service), ECS (Emergency Communications Service), ARPSC (Amateur Radio Public Service Corps), etc. Many ACS units identify themselves solely as RACES organizations, even though their communications functions and activities typically go beyond the restrictions of RACES operations. Other ACS units combine government RACES and non-government ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) activities and identify themselves as ARES/RACES organizations. Yet other ACS units who use amateur radio for emergency government communications identify themselves solely as ARES organizations, whether or not they activate under FCC RACES Rules.

 

The Amateur Radio Regulations, Part 97, Subpart E, §97.407, were created by the FCC to describe RACES operations in detail. Although no longer issued or renewable, RACES station licenses were issued in the past by the FCC to government agencies for RACES operations. The agencies may continue to conduct RACES operations without these licenses, using primary or club call signs.

Training

While each RACES organization may not require the same thing, there are a few “classes” that are required by the NIMS for all entry level first responders. These are the NIMS courses, IS-100b and IS-700b.While these two are the only ones that are required by the NIMS system for first responders, several RACES groups that I have looked at also require the IS-200 and/or IS-800.b.

 

Even though RACES and Skywarn are two separate entities on paper, because of the way that both of them work, sometimes Skywarn is run under the RACES flag so to speak. Since they are pushed together so often, some RACES groups require Skywarn training as well.

 

Other types of training should also be done within the RACES organization. Things like Net training, search and rescue operations, how to send a radiogram, and so much more. While most training is done in person there also should be on the air training. With RACES however, you are limited to one hour of on the air training a week. You can extend the one hour per week to up to 72 in length with the permission but you can only do this twice a year. This type of training is typically a large scale training event involving multiple agencies.

Standardization  

One of the things that we have learned over the years, since 9/11/2001 especially, is that things should be more standardized across different organizations or agencies. One of the things that a lot of RACES organizations have done all across the US is to standardize their power connections. When I first got my license 20+ years ago, there were several different types of power connections and each manufacture had a different style.

 

Things have gotten better over the years and now most radios have the same type of connections. I have not personally see any new radios in a while so I'm not sure if they are the same type of connects as they use to be, however, many RACES organizations have adopted a standardized power connection called the Anderson Powerpole Connectors.

 

One of the many reasons that I can think of to goto this type of power plug is because of the awesome power distribution system that West Mountain Radio has developed called the Rig Runner.These power distribution systems are an awesome piece of equipment and are very versatile!

Liability Issues?  

One of the things that I hear a lot when it comes to people volunteering is that they don't want to put themselves in a position where they can be sued. While this question doesn't come up a lot in the amateur radio community because a lot of people that are hams got into it to help people, this is still a valid concern. Thankfully, those that volunteer to be a RACES, ARES and Skywarn volunteer are protected under the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997.

 

While this act is not a get out of jail free card or total protection from a lawsuit, it does protect you from prosecution if you if you are doing what you are suppose to be doing. By that I'm saying that if you:

  Work within the scope of your responsibilities,    The harm was not caused by willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless misconduct, or a conscious, flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the individual harmed by the volunteer If appropriate or required, the volunteer was properly licensed, certified, or authorized by the appropriate authorities for the activities or practice in the State in which the harm occurred, where the activities were or practice was undertaken within the scope of the volunteer's responsibilities in the nonprofit organization or governmental entity The harm was not caused by the volunteer operating a motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or other vehicle for which the State requires the operator or the owner of the vehicle, craft, or vessel to-- possess an operator's license; or maintain insurance.   RACES Organizations Around the Country Arlington County RACES Resource Library  

Flashback:

Comment by NA4IT on QRZ about Ep 46 ETH026 - Youth In Amateur Radio ETH035 - Elmers, Are You Doing Your Part?     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Cleveland Amateur Radio Club  

Website: https://www.carc.cc/

Twitter: @carc_tn

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carcradioclub/

Club Callsign: W4GZX

 

The CARC is one of the few amateur radio clubs that owns its own building which is a huge blessing.  This allows for club member to congregate anytime they want.  Every Saturday our clubhouse is open from 8 AM to noon for members to come and work on radio projects, get on the air, or have a cup of coffee with fellow hams.  The CARC clubhouse is located centrally in Cleveland, TN on a high ridge and serves Cleveland and Bradley Co as an emergency communications staging area.  Testing has proved that this location is ideal allowing for VHF simplex coverage throughout the county and beyond.  

History Larry G. Ledford KA4J prepared “The Beginning of the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club” for the club’s 50th anniversary in 2012. It is an excellant insight into the people who pioneered amateur radio in Bradley County and were able to share their interest in wireless communications with the founders of the club.


The article can be viewed by clicking here.

 

Meetings

General Club Meeting - 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month except December at 7pm Tutoring Meeting - Most Saturdays 8a-11a CW Classes - Tuesday Evenings 6:30p - 7:30p  

Repeaters

146.925 - PL 114.8 System Fusion (Listen Live) 444.275 + System Susion  

Nets

Southeast Tennessee Amateur Radio(STAR) net - 1st, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays at 8:30pm on the 147.180 Repeater (Listen Live) The Bradley County Emergency Services Net is held every Monday night at 8:00 PM on the 146.925 repeater, Cleveland Amateur Radio Club Slow Speed CW Net (CARC SSCW). - 1st, 2nd and 4th Thursday nights of every month at 7PM EST/EDT (2300 / 0000 UTC), on a frequency of 7.070 MHz +/- QRM.

Activities

Field Day ARRL Sweepstakes CQ World Wide TN QSO Party ARRL VHF Contests Community Service   Upcoming Events    

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 9

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 9

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 9

ARRL 10-Meter Contest

0000Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

1200Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11

International Naval Contest

1600Z, Dec 10 to 1559Z, Dec 11

AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party

2300Z, Dec 10 to 2300Z, Dec 11 and

 2300Z, Dec 17 to 2300Z, Dec 18

CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run

2100Z-2259Z, Dec 11

NAQCC CW Sprint

0130Z-0330Z, Dec 14

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 14

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 14

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 14 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 14 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 15

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 16

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 16

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 16

Russian 160-Meter Contest

2000Z, Dec 16 to 2400Z, Dec 17

AGB-Party Contest

2100Z-2400Z, Dec 16

OK DX RTTY Contest

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 17

RAC Winter Contest

0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17

Feld Hell Sprint

0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17

Croatian CW Contest

1400Z, Dec 17 to 1400Z, Dec 18

Stew Perry Topband Challenge

1500Z, Dec 17 to 1500Z, Dec 18

ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW

1800Z-2359Z, Dec 18

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0200Z-0400Z, Dec 19

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 21

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 21

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 21 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 21 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 22

  *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests 12/09/2016 West Central Florida Section Convention (Tampa Bay Hamfest) - Plant City, FL  

12/10/2016

Pearl River County ARC Hamfest - Poplarville, MS SantaFest - Cheltenham, MD  

12/17/2016

MARA Annual Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar     News ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs

11/30/2016

A growing number of campus radio clubs and student radio amateurs have begun to share ideas and suggestions on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI) Facebook page, which is aimed at sparking renewed participation, activity, and idea-sharing among this special sector of the Amateur Radio community. The now-expanded initiative stemmed from two well-attended ARRL New England Division Convention forums for radio amateurs attending college, one hosted by the Amateur Radio clubs at Harvard (W1AF) and Yale (W1YU). As the forum explained, the activity level at campus Amateur Radio club stations can vary wildly from one year to the next, as students graduate and newcomers arrive.

“The most common difficulty stems from uneven interest over time,” said ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, in his “Second Century” editorial, “Cheers for College Amateur Radio: Sis-boom-bah!” in December 2016 QST. “Even the strongest leaders in college Amateur Radio graduate every 4 years, sometimes leaving their clubs without adequate continuity or leadership succession.”

Gallagher pointed out that “recognized” student activities require students in order to maintain that status. However, even officially recognized college club stations may find themselves at the mercy of administrations in terms of space for a station and antennas, and some clubs have had to move more than once to accommodate their schools’ space requirements. Issues involving safety and security can also affect college radio clubs.

In a recent post, Kenny Hite, KE8CTL, a graduate teaching assistant at West Virginia University, said the university’s Amateur Radio club, W8CUL, has been unable to participate in recent on-the-air events “due to lack of working equipment and questionable antenna setups,” as he put it. “We are working to identify working equipment/coax lines.” Another poster, Dennis Silage, K3DS, who’s associated with the Temple University Amateur Radio Club (K3TU), said, “A key to a successful and long-running college club seems to be faculty involvement for stability and recognition.” He invited other CARI participants to check out the club’s website to see what members have been doing.

“It occurred to us that, if college Amateur Radio could galvanize [mutual interests], then colleges might just provide the ideal bridge between youthful interest in the subject and lifelong participation in our community,” Gallagher wrote.

Some ideas are already being suggested, and the Facebook page has spurred communication among an ever-widening network of those involved or interested in Amateur Radio on campus, from students, faculty members, and administrators to college radio club alums. One suggestion has been to harness the competitive nature of colleges to organize operating events — perhaps with “conferences” resembling those for sports — to keep interest alive.

ARRL received permission to rebrand the Collegiate Amateur Radio Operators Facebook group, initially organized by Sam Rose, KC2LRC, as the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative. All collegiate radio amateurs, clubs, and alumni are invited to participate and to get involved in activities that advance the art and enjoyment of Amateur Radio. All suggestions are welcome.

December Youngsters on the Air Event Set

11/29/2016

The annual Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event takes place during the entire month of December, with YOTA stations attempting to contact many other young radio amateurs around the world. The event offers an excellent opportunity for get radio amateurs in their teens and early 20s to get together on the air.

“The idea of this is to show the Amateur Radio hobby to youth and to encourage youngsters to be active within the hobby,” said International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1) Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS. “Consider giving a demonstration at a school or local club, gather together with your friends, grab a pizza, and make some QSOs, or enjoy a great pile-up. Let’s show this great hobby to the world!”

This is not a formal contest but a way to get young people on the air with their peers. Numerous participating stations, primarily in Region 1, will be sporting YOTA call sign suffixes.

   

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH046 - Skywarn

Dec 1, 2016 50:39

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Skywarn, we talk about the Sioux Empire Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

 

Tech Corner - Skywarn

Skywarn is a little different from ARES and RACES in that it is not as much of a club type organization like ARES and RACES is. With Skywarn yopu don’t even have to be an amateur radio operator to be a skywarn spotter.

Skywarn was started by the National Weather Service in the late 1960’s, but it didn’t really take off until the mid 1970’s. Since then it has grown to between 350,000 and 400,000 trained spotters and it continues to grow every year. Skywarn spotters are the general public’s first line of defense when it comes to the wrath of mother nature. On an average year, there are over 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes across the US.

Anyone with access to some form of communications can be a skywarn spotter. Skywarn spotters can be police officers, firefighters, EMS personnel, dispatchers, and public utility workers. Even people affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches and nursing homes or even someone in the general public.

So what do you have to do to become a skywarn spotter? Basically all you have to do is take a skywarn class given by the National Weather Service. Classes are given on an annual basis. To locate a class near you, click here. Training is free and typically lasts about two hours.

Training consists of:

Basics of thunderstorm development Fundamental of Storm Structure Identifying potential severe weather features Information to report and how to report it Basic severe weather safety

So are skywarn personnel storm chasers like I saw on the movie Twister?

No, skywarn personnel are not storm chasers. Storm chasers normally fall into three categories. The first category are meteorologist that are doing research. Second are those people that are trying to get pictures to sell to the news media. The third is thrill seekers. Skywarn personnel generally stay close to home or at the very least in their own county.

2016 SKYWARNTM Recognition Day

When: December 3, 2016, from 0000z to 2400z


SKYWARNTM Recognition Day was developed in 1999 by the National Weather Service and the American Radio Relay League. It celebrates the contributions that SKYWARN volunteers make to the NWS mission, the protection of life and property. Amateur radio operators comprise a large percentage of the SKYWARN volunteers across the country. The Amateur radio operators also provide vital communication between the NWS and emergency management if normal communications become inoperative. During the SKYWARN Special Event operators will visit NWS offices and contact other radio operators across the world.

   

 

  Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Sioux Empire Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.w0zwy.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/W0ZWY/

Club Callsign: W0ZWY

   

Meetings

First Tuesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. at the Minnehaha Co. Emergency Management Building – 608 Sigler Ave., Sioux Falls, SD 57104  

Repeaters

146.895 - PL 146.2 - Sioux Falls, SD Multiple RX 444.200 + PL 82.5 - Sioux Falls, SD  Fusion & IRLP 7346 442.750 + Sioux Falls, SD D-STAR  

Nets

Tuesday 6:45 P.M. – 2m SEARC Net – W0ZWY 2m (146.895 Mhz.) Wednesday 9:00 P.M. – South Dakota Link Net – KD0ZP (444.825 Mhz.) Saturday 9:00 A.M. – SEARC Traders Net – W0ZWY (444.200 Mhz.) Third Thursday of Month 7:00 P.M. – SEARES Monthly Net – W0ZWY (444.200 Mhz.)

Activities

Summer Swap Meeting in July Field Day License Classes Bike Races Walk-a-thons SD QSO Party    

 

Upcoming Events    

NRAU 10m Activity Contest

1800Z-1900Z, Dec 1 (CW) and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 1 (SSB) and

 2000Z-2100Z, Dec 1 (FM) and

 2100Z-2200Z, Dec 1 (Dig)

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 2

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 2

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 2

ARRL 160-Meter Contest

2200Z, Dec 2 to 1600Z, Dec 4

TARA RTTY Melee

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 3

Wake-Up! QRP Sprint

0600Z-0629Z, Dec 3 and

 0630Z-0659Z, Dec 3 and

 0700Z-0729Z, Dec 3 and

 0730Z-0800Z, Dec 3

TOPS Activity Contest

1600Z, Dec 3 to 1559Z, Dec 4

Ten-Meter RTTY Contest

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 4

SARL Digital Contest

1300Z-1600Z, Dec 4

ARS Spartan Sprint

0200Z-0400Z, Dec 6

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 7

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 7

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 7 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 7 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 8

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 9

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 9

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 9

ARRL 10-Meter Contest

0000Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

1200Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11

International Naval Contest

1600Z, Dec 10 to 1559Z, Dec 11

AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party

2300Z, Dec 10 to 2300Z, Dec 11 and

 2300Z, Dec 17 to 2300Z, Dec 18

CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run

2100Z-2259Z, Dec 11

NAQCC CW Sprint

0130Z-0330Z, Dec 14

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 14

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 14

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 14 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 14 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 15

     

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

    Hamfests    

12/03/2016

Fulton County Winter Fest - Delta, OH SSRC 2016 HAMFEST - Ocala, FL Superstition SuperFest 2016 - Mesa, AZ  

12/04/2016

LCARC Amateur Radio Swap/Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI  

12/09/2016

West Central Florida Section Convention (Tampa Bay Hamfest) - Plant City, FL  

12/10/2016

Pearl River County ARC Hamfest - Poplarville, MS SantaFest - Cheltenham, MD    

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News   Mark Twain Birthday Special Event Set

11/22/2016

Members of ARRL Headquarters staff will be on the air as W1T, November 28-December 4, in honor of Mark Twain’s 181st birthday. On November 30, Twain’s actual birthday, the Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford, Connecticut has granted permission for a special event station to be set up in the front yard of the house from 9 AM until 4 PM EST (1400-2100 UTC).

Born in Missouri in 1835, Twain lived in Hartford from 1874 to 1891 and wrote many of his greatest works during that time, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

“We are so excited to have our neighbors at ARRL with us on Mark Twain’s 181st birthday!” said Betsy Maguire, Manager of Living History at the Mark Twain House and Museum. “This is a rare treat for the Museum staff, our visitors, and hopefully, many amateur operators across the country who make contact with the station. As a lover of the science and technology of his day, Samuel Clemens would definitely approve of a ‘special event station’ on the grounds of ‘the loveliest home that ever was.’”

W1T activity on November 30 will be exclusively from the Mark Twain House and Museum; all other W1T activity during the week will be conducted from other sites, as ARRL staff time permits. All bands and modes will be considered, including satellite operation. A special W1T QSL card will be available to commemorate the event. Complete information is available on the W1T listing at qrz.com.

Ham Astronaut Peggy Whitson, KC5ZTD, Poised to Set Time-in-Space Record

11/21/2016

New ISS crew members Peggy Whitson, KC5ZTD, Thomas Pesquet, KG5FYG, and Cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy are settling in on board the International Space Station this week. The trio headed into space on November 17 for a 6-month stay. Welcoming the Expedition 50/51 crew members were Expedition 50 Commander pShane Kimbrough, KE5HOD, and crew members Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko, who have been aboard the complex since October.

Whitson, who will turn 57 during this ISS duty tour, is marking her third trip to space. She will become the first woman to command the space station twice. Her first tenure as commander was in 2007, when she became the first woman to hold this post. The crew is scheduled to return to Earth next spring.

Whitson not only is the oldest woman in space at age 56, but she is projected during this mission to once again become the US astronaut logging the most time spent in orbit. All told, she’s already spent more than a year of her life in space. By the time she returns to Earth next spring, she’ll have 534 days of off-planet time under her belt.

JOTA 2016 Report Shows Participation was Up

11/21/2016

The Boy Scouts of America has released the final report on the 2016 Jamboree on the Air (JOTA), and the news is good. Participation was up from 2015 despite what the report called “terrible propagation.”

According to the report, 10,761 Scouts took part, an increase of more than 50% from a year earlier, and the number of stations filing reports, at 267, jumped by 28% from 2015 (the record was 271 in 2013). The number of Amateur Radio operators was up by 14% to 1,120, although the number of radios reported in use dropped by 25% to 631.

Total JOTA 2016 contacts remained flat at 8,254. Over the next several months, the BSA National Radio Scouting Committee will review various suggestions to determine improvements that can be made for JOTA 2017. These included concerns over conflicting on-the-air activities and the need for better advance publicity. — Thanks to JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND

SOTA “Summit-to-Summit” Activation Declared a Success

11/25/2016

The November 19 Summits on the Air (SOTA) “Summit-to-Summit” event between Europe and North America is being called “a great success.” SOTA is an awards program that encourages portable operation in mountainous areas.

Despite cold, rainy weather in parts of Europe and just-average band conditions, all activators reported successful and enjoyable experiences. In addition to Europe-to-North America contacts, some stations logged contacts with other parts of the world; one activator was on holiday in the Canary Islands. Three bands were used for intercontinental contacts — 20, 17, and 15 meters — with most contacts made on 20.

“The consensus seems to be that, from a propagation point of view, 17 meters was the best,” said Ed Durrant, DD5LP. “We even have some reports of chasers from [Australia] catching some of the EU activators via short path.” Sixty-six summits had been announced, but 77 were activated.

A North America-Australia SOTA event may take place in 2017. — Thanks to Southgate Amateur Radio News

   

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH045 - Being A Net Control

Nov 24, 2016 01:06:07

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Net Control , we talk about the Columbia Amateur Radio Club from Columbia, SC  in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Tech Corner - How To Be A Net Control  

Characteristics of a Good Net Control

  Good Listener Ear to Hand Multitasking Speaking Clearly Good Handwriting or computer skills Good under pressure Decision making skills  

Member Accountability

 

Always know where you net members are located, and always make sure that everyone is accounted for. There is nothing worse than someone not answering a roll call, or ending a net and someone not checking secure and you have to go and look for them. If you don’t know where they were, you don't even know where to look. Just like my role as a 911 dispatcher, it is your responsibility to do everything in your power to make sure that those that you are “working” with” go home safely.

 

Know your radio

 

During an emergency is not the time to find out that you don't know how to do something on your radio. Make sure that you know how to do all the functions with your radio before you are put in a position where you HAVE to know how to do something and you can't figure it out.

It is also a good idea to make sure that you have your radio manual with you as well. That way in case you don't know how to do something or you have forgotten to do something you can always look it up.

 

Whether the radio that you will be using during a net is your own personal radio or if you go to a location like an Emergency Operations Center to run the net, you need to train using whatever radio you will be using. If you will be using a radio that is not yours, you should always try and use it as much as possible before you have to use it in an emergency situation.

 

Know your logging program(if you use one)

 

Short of using a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you understand how to use whatever you will use to do your logging with. If you are just going to use a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you write neat enough to where others can read your handwriting, especially if someone will be taking over from you.

 

If you will be using a computer program, make sure that you know how to use the program well before you need to use it during an emergency. Make sure you understand all the functionality of it and how to start the program in case it crashes on you or if you are the first one to use it during a net.

 

Mistakes Happen

 

If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, correct it and move on! Everyone is human and everyone makes a mistake. The difference is if you make a mistake, you need to acknowledge it and correct it. This will not only make sure that everyone that is listening to you has the correct information, but it will also help earn their respect for you as a net control operator.

 

Think before you key up

 

There are two things that are my biggest pet peaves when it comes to taking on the radio. One is when you don't listen to whats going on and I have to say something twice or more. The second is when people key up to give a weather report or something and they  say something then they will say like ahhh or ummm and then something else and then umm again and it just take forever to get done saying whatever it is that they are trying to say.

 

When you have something that you need to say on the radio, think about what you are going to say, get all your thoughts together and then key up, say it and unkey. Not only does this make whoever is talking look like they don't know what they are doing, but it also reflects on the organization for not training them enough and it ties up the frequency for other people to use that have something to report as well.

 

Use Standard Phonetic Alphabet

 

When you are operating on a net, make sure that you use the official International Phonetic Alphabet. If you use something other than that, the receiving person will have to think about it more than if you use the standard alphabet. I talked with one person on the radio one day that had a suffix of CFS and he identified himself as Chicken Fried Steak. While it may be “cute”, it still took me a extra second or two to realize what his callsign was. Partly because it wasn't the standard Charlie Foxtrot Sierra and partly because I was laughing when I heard it.

 

Have a Backup

 

There are two backups that you need to have planned for on a net, a backup net control and a backup frequency. Both should be announced at the beginning and during the net. You should have a backup net control in case something happens to you station during the net or if you need to take a bathroom break or a phone call or something. I have been on several nets where something has happened to the net control stations equipment and they just all the sudden when silent. One person I know that was running a net and his house got hit by lightning and everything got fried. There wasn't a backup in place and the net was in limbo until someone took over for him.

 

The other thing that you need to make sure that you have in place is a backup frequency. Just like that something could happen to your own station, something could happen to the repeater that you are using as well. If lightning were to strike the repeater and knock it out, the whole net would come to a halt. If you have a backup repeater or frequency in place and everyone knows it, if no one responds to you, you could automatically change to the backup frequency and continue with the net.

 

Be Respectful

 

No matter what happens either before, during or after a net, ALWAYS be respectful to who you are working with. If you don’t have the respect of those you are working with, things could be very stressful for both you and those you are working with.

 

If something happens during a net or event that was done against what you asked the person to do, don't talk to that person about it during the net or in front of others. Handle what needs to be handled during the event and afterwards, pull that person aside and talk to them about what happened. Don't jump down their throat or chew them out, talk to them civilly and with respect. The way that you talk to them could have all the difference in the world in later interactions.

 

Pace Yourself

 

Being net control can be very demanding on you. There is so much going on, multiple frequencies and radios to monitor, phones, other people and so much more. It is very easy to get overwhelmed. No matter how good of a net control that you are you need to pace yourself. Never stay as net control for more than two hours at a time. If you have the personnel, change every hour or thirty minutes depending on how busy you area in the net.

 

If at all possible, stagger your helper shift and your net control shifts. Have the first hour of your shift as a helper with someone else as net control. After an hour take over as net control and a new helper will take over for you. An hour later, you rotate out, your helper rotates to net control and a new helper takes over as helper.

 

Tactical Call Signs

 

Tactical call signs are probably one of the most useful things that I use as a net control. A tactical call sign is a word used to describe a location where a station is located at. For example, if you are running a net and you have two shelters, a Red Cross building, and an EOC. If each location has two operators at them, you may never know who is at the radio as net control. So if you call a location by call sign, you might have to call a couple times because you don't know exactly who to call.

 

Instead use a tactical call sign like Shelter 1, Shelter 2, Red Cross, and EOC. By doing this, no matter who is at the radio at that location, they will know who you are calling.

   

 

  Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

The Columbia Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://w4cae.com/

 

The Carolina Amateur Radio Club is a service-oriented club and has been in existence for more than 40 years. Originally known as the Carolina Repeater Society, it was an offshoot of the Palmetto Amateur Radio Club (which is the oldest South Carolina amateur radio club, having been founded in 1928 on “the Horseshoe” at the University of South Carolina).

Around 1976 the club name was changed to the Columbia Amateur Radio Club to include a broader range of interests, not just repeaters. From the beginning the club was active in promoting amateur radio, giving classes for new hams, and maintaining a testing team.

 

Meetings

First Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the SCETV Telecommunications Center, 1041 George Rogers Blvd, Columbia, SC 29201  

Repeaters

146.775 - PL 156.7 Ft. Jackson 147.330 + PL 156.7 Columbia  

Nets

Every Sunday and Wednesday Evenings at 8:30pm on the 147.330 Repeater  

Activities

Annual Picnic Field Day Workshops License Classes Testing Sessions Bike Races Walk-a-thons Hamfest - in 2016 it was on the first Saturday of April.    

 

Upcoming Events    

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 25

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 25

CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW

0000Z, Nov 26 to 2400Z, Nov 27

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Nov 30

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 30

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 30 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 30 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 1

UKEICC 80m Contest

2000Z-2100Z, Nov 30

NRAU 10m Activity Contest

1800Z-1900Z, Dec 1 (CW) and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 1 (SSB) and

 2000Z-2100Z, Dec 1 (FM) and

 2100Z-2200Z, Dec 1 (Dig)

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Dec 2

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 2

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 2

ARRL 160-Meter Contest

2200Z, Dec 2 to 1600Z, Dec 4

TARA RTTY Melee

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 3

Wake-Up! QRP Sprint

0600Z-0629Z, Dec 3 and

 0630Z-0659Z, Dec 3 and

 0700Z-0729Z, Dec 3 and

 0730Z-0800Z, Dec 3

TOPS Activity Contest

1600Z, Dec 3 to 1559Z, Dec 4

Ten-Meter RTTY Contest

0000Z-2400Z, Dec 4

SARL Digital Contest

1300Z-1600Z, Dec 4

ARS Spartan Sprint

0200Z-0400Z, Dec 6

QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Dec 7

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Dec 7

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Dec 7 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Dec 7 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 8

   

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

    Hamfests    

11/25/2016

Fair Lawn ARC Ham Radio Auction - Fair Lawn, NJ  

11/26/2016

OARC Hamfest in the Woods - Okeechobee, FL  

12/03/2016

Fulton County Winter Fest - Delta, OH SSRC 2016 HAMFEST - Ocala, FL Superstition SuperFest 2016 - Mesa, AZ  

12/04/2016

LCARC Amateur Radio Swap/Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI    

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, Overcomes Challenge to Win Election  

11/18/2016
ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, has won election to a 3-year term. As Vice Director, Allen assumed the Director’s seat last January, after the Board of Directors elected former Director Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, as Second Vice President. Allen outpolled challenger Garth Crowe, WY7GC (ex-N7XKT) 1112 to 528 votes, to win the seat in his own right.

Ballots were counted November 18 at ARRL Headquarters. The Rocky Mountain Division Director’s seat was the only contested election for the 2017-2019 cycle.

Allen served previously as Wyoming Section Manager, from 2005 until 2007.

New terms of office begin on January 1, 2017, at 12 Noon Eastern Time.

Work Continues to Strengthen Relationship between Amateur Auxiliary, FCC  

11/17/2016

Work continues to promote the visibility of Amateur Radio enforcement within the FCC, the ARRL Executive Committee was told recently. The EC met on October 22 in Rosemont, Illinois. ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, chaired the session.

ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, reported that meetings have been held with the FCC concerning more effective FCC use of the volunteer resources of the Amateur Auxiliary (Official Observers) program, the current FCC-ARRL Amateur Auxiliary Agreement, and the development of a new Memorandum of Understanding that better incorporates the Amateur Auxiliary program — especially in light of the FCC’s recent closing of field offices and reduction of Spectrum Enforcement Division staff.

The EC directed Second Vice President Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, to continue work on the review and revitalization of the Amateur Auxiliary, in cooperation with the FCC, to ensure active use of the Amateur Auxiliary program.

In other FCC-related issues. The EC provided guidance in the domestic implementation of the worldwide Amateur Radio allocation at 5 MHz, agreed upon at World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) last fall. Delegates to WRC-15 reached consensus on 15 kilohertz-wide band, 5351.5-5366.5 kHz, with stations limited to an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 15 W.

 

Imlay, in conjunction with ARRL International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and Midwest Division Director Rod Blocksome, K0DAS, will review of the National Broadband Plan, with an eye toward determining any impact it might have on Amateur Radio allocations.

 

In addition, Imlay and West Gulf Division Director Dr David Woolweaver, K5RAV, will meet with officials of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and congressional offices to address the effect on Amateur Radio antenna systems between 50 and 200 feet tall of new painting and lighting requirements required under the FAA Reauthorization Act (H.R. 636).

 

ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, told the panel that several new educational initiatives under way, and, as those pilot programs are assessed and refined, the programs will be made available to the Amateur Radio community.

 

In his report, Bellows told the EC that the IARU Administrative Council has begun preparations to represent Amateur Radio at various meetings to be held in advance of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019.

Minutes of the October 22 meeting are available on the ARRL website.

    New ARRL Repeater Directory Will Leverage Crowdsourcing Technology  

11/14/2016
ARRL partner RFinder, the creator of a web and app-based directory of Amateur Radio repeaters worldwide, will supply all data for the 2017-2018 ARRL Repeater Directory®. RFinder will employ its crowdsourcing technology to aggregate timely and accurate information for the Directory, marking the first time crowdsourcing has been put to use in the production of an ARRL publication. “Crowdsourcing” is a means of using data gathered from public resources — in this case, repeater owners and frequency coordinators — via the Internet to obtain the necessary listing information more quickly and flexibly. Including RFinder’s data in The Repeater Directory will help users seeking the most complete listing of on-air repeaters. The Repeater Directory will continue to publish repeater listings according to state, city, frequency and mode.

Although RFinder’s data is primarily user supplied, ARRL has invited volunteer frequency coordinators to contribute their coordination data to RFinder. RFinder has setup an online portal to accept uploaded data from coordinators. Every coordinator that supplies repeater data to RFinder will have its listings credited as coordinated repeaters both in the RFinder smartphone apps and web listings, and in the hard-copy Repeater Directory.

As part of this program, RFinder will make the RFinder database available to all frequency coordinators free of charge, with the exception of the Apple iOS version app, which requires a $9.99 license. The Android-compatible database is a free download.

“We believe this will help you in your coordination activities, as it will provide you with a complete map of machines, both coordinated or not,” RFinder said. “It will also assist coordinators to bring uncoordinated machines into coordination.”

ARRL earlier this year established an agreement with RFinder to be the membership association’s preferred online resource of repeater frequencies. RFinder’s steadily growing worldwide repeater database now includes more than 60,000 repeaters in some 170 countries around the globe. RFinder listings are dynamic, regularly reflecting new, updated, revised, and deleted information.

RFinder is integrated directly with EchoLink on both Android and iPhone and provides the ability to share repeater check-ins on Facebook, Twitter, and APRS. RFinder is integrated with RT Systems and CHIRP radio programming applications and has a routing feature that lets users find repeaters worldwide over a given route. Video demos of RFinder features are available on YouTube.

ARRL had previously discontinued its own products that supported digital listings of repeater data including the TravelPlus for Repeaters™ software and its own apps.

RFinder is $9.99 per year. Subscribe to RFinder by visiting http://subscribe.rfinder.net/ from your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or from your Android smartphone or tablet.

RFinder also includes the ability to report radio jamming anywhere. Those without a device or subscription can file reports online. Individuals or entities responsible for coordinating anti-jamming activities also can request access to view jamming reports for their area.

Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, SK  

11/17/2016
ARRL Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, of Cocoa, Florida, died unexpectedly on November 9. He was 69. Licensed as WB4CTZ in 1966, he served the ARRL Southern Florida Section for many years in various capacities, most recently as Space Coast District Emergency Coordinator (DEC) and Assistant Section Manager (ASM).

Kassis had been the Brevard County Emergency Coordinator (EC) since 1991, and he was instrumental in constructing several mobile communications units in the area. He was the owner of, and air personality on, WWBC radio, where he maintained a second ham station.
p“We have suffered a great loss in our Section family with Ray’s passing,” said Southern Florida Section Manager Jeff Beals, WA4AW. “Ray was a dear friend and a valued member of my section staff.”

 

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH044 - Future Plans and General Discussion

Nov 17, 2016 45:26

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Tones, we talk about the Newport County Amateur Radio Club from Middletown, RI in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

  Tech Corner

In todays episode we talk about what some of my future plans are for this podcast. Things like adding some new pages to the site and plans on having shirts and possibly other items that yall will be able to buy.

 

We talk about an email that I received from Larry Nutt, KM4YPF

    Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Newport County Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://w1sye.org/

 

The Newport County Amateur Radio Club started in 1945. They have an extensive history on their website as well as some old pictures of members doing various things.

 

Club History - This is a 17 page pdf that was written by a member. It is a very interesting read!

 

Meetings

Second Monday of every month at 7:00 PM. (If that Monday happens to be a legal holiday, then the meeting will be held on Tuesday).  Meetings are held at the KVH Manufacturing Facility located at: KVH Industries, 75 Enterprise Drive, Middletown, RI 02842 Informal meetings for breakfast every Thursday morning at 8:15 AM. The breakfast place is Chelsea’s Restaurant, 1015 Aquidneck Ave, Middletown, RI.  

Repeaters

145.450 - PL 100 Hz FM Analog 145.300 - D-STAR with gateway  

Nets

An informal net convenes every evening at 1900 Monday-Friday and on Sunday Morning at 0815 on 145.450 An open D-STAR net linked to Reflector 69C convenes every Tuesday evening at 8 PM on the D*Star repeater, W1AAD, 145.300  

Activities

JOTA ARISS Field Day Fox Hunting NCRC Island Activiations NPOTA DXCC International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekends    

 

Upcoming Events  

+ NAQCC CW Sprint

0130Z-0330Z, Nov 17

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 18

+ QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Nov 18

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 18

+ YO International PSK31 Contest

1600Z-2200Z, Nov 18

+ ARRL EME Contest

0000Z, Nov 19 to 2359Z, Nov 20

+ SARL Field Day Contest

1000Z, Nov 19 to 1000Z, Nov 20

+ LZ DX Contest

1200Z, Nov 19 to 1200Z, Nov 20

+ All Austrian 160-Meter Contest

1600Z, Nov 19 to 0700Z, Nov 20

+ Feld Hell Sprint

1700Z-1859Z, Nov 19

+ RSGB 2nd 1.8 MHz Contest, CW

1900Z-2300Z, Nov 19

+ ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB

2100Z, Nov 19 to 0300Z, Nov 21

+ Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party

1300-1500Z, Nov 20 (40m) and

 1500-1700Z, Nov 20 (80m)

+ Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0200Z-0400Z, Nov 21

+ SKCC Sprint

0000Z-0200Z, Nov 23

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 23

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 23 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 23 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 24

+ RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW

2000Z-2100Z, Nov 24

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 25

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 25

+ CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW

0000Z, Nov 26 to 2400Z, Nov 27

+ QRP Fox Hunt

0200Z-0330Z, Nov 30

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 30

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 30 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 30 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Dec 1

+ UKEICC 80m Contest

2000Z-2100Z, Nov 30

       

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

    Hamfests   11/19/2016 Alabama State Convention (MARC Hamfest 2016) - Montgomery, AL Cy Harris Memorial Free Flea - Oakland Park, FL Upper Pinellas ARC Ham Fest - Palm Harbor, FL   11/20/2016 JARSFest 2016 - Benson, NC  

11/25/2016

Fair Lawn ARC Ham Radio Auction - Fair Lawn, NJ  

11/26/2016

OARC Hamfest in the Woods - Okeechobee, FL    

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News Two Radio Amateurs Set to Join ISS Crew  

11/11/2016

Astronauts Peggy Whitson, KC5ZTD, and Thomas Pesquet, KG5FYG, and Cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy will head into space on November 17 for a 6-month stay aboard the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage will begin at 1730 UTC on November 16. The launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan will be at 1820 UTC on November 17.

It will take the Expedition 50/51  crew members 2 days to reach the ISS in their Soyuz vehicle.

Welcoming the new crew increment will be Expedition 50 Commander Shane Kimbrough, KE5HOD, and crew members Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko, who have been aboard the complex since October.

Whitson will become the first woman to command the space station twice. Her first tenure as commander was in 2007, when she became the first woman to hold this post. The crew is scheduled to return to Earth next spring. -- Thanks to NASA

  Chinese Students’ FM Transponder Satellite Launched

11/11/2016
“Dream 1” (CAS-2T), a “technical verification satellite” for the CAMSAT CAS-2 series of Amateur Radio satellites, was launched on November 9 on board a Long March CZ-11 rocket.

Developed by middle school students with the support of China’s Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, the Science and Technology Museum, and the Eastern Highlands Qian Youth Space Sciences Organization, the 2U CubeSat carries a ham radio 145/435 MHz FM transponder.

CAS-2T will not separate from the final stage of its launcher rocket, so the orbital life may be just 10 to 30 days before the final stage of the rocket re-enters Earth’s atmosphere.

CW telemetry beacon: 435.710 MHz. Transponder uplink: 145.925 MHz FM. Transponder downlink: 435.615 MHz — thanks to Alan Kung, BA1DU

  Houston, We Have a Problem!  

As many in the Texas area know, Houston Amateur Radio Supply is no more. My thinking is that in a city with that many hams, there needs to be a store. A full line store with all brands and models in stock and ready to sell. At least that is what I think. We have been receiving a few emails and phone calls from folks wanting us to look into it. Folks have been asking us for years now to put a store in that area.

Well, We have been looking into it. It seems there is a little interest there but we want to hear from the hams of the area. Would you like to see us put a store in there?  I was there last week. If we were to move forward with this, it would be very soon but we don't want to do anything until we hear from the hams in the area. This would be a huge move for us. It would be a major undertaking. Our plan is for a second location. I would have to spend a lot of time there. It will mean lots of hard work, long hours and dedication on our part to bring you a first class store in Houston. It will be a major sacrifice yall on us and our families. It is three hundred miles away. We do have a plan. We are really looking at putting out this kind of investment in the Ham community there but we want to make sure the locals are on board before we proceed any further. We have sent out a few emails to a few of our customers and friends in the area asking what they thought. It seems there will be no way to make everyone happy as far as a location. Houston is huge. There are more hams in Houston than there are people in the city of Paris Texas. I know that this may seem a little unprofessional but we always try and keep our customers abreast of what is going on here. We want you to know us and who we are. We are mom and pop and that is who we will be there in Houston as well. Will MTC, our company,  thrive there as it does here in the small town of Paris Texas?  So what do you think? Do you live in the Houston Texas Area? Do you want a ham radio store there? Would you support the store if we had it there? This is a major decision for our families here. Please take a few minutes to complete a very short survey and send us your very honest comments. We want to do this but we want to hear from you first. We cant do it without your support.


Click Here for the survey

Thank You
Richard Lenoir-Owner
Main Trading Company

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

   

ETH043 - CTCSS & DTMF, What is That?

Nov 10, 2016 59:19

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Tones, we talk about the Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

 

Tech Corner - Tones  

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/ctcss-do-you-hear-what-i-hear/

 

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/dtmf-dual-tone-multi-frequency-tones/

   

 

    Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.marc-radio.org

 

Meetings

Fourth Tuesday at 7p at the Newtown Public Library - Community Room, 201 Bishop Hollow Rd, Newtown Square, PA  

Repeaters

145.130 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 147.060 & 445.675 Repeaters 147.060 +PL 131.8 Newtown Square - Linked to the 145.130 & 445.675 Repeater 147.360 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 224.500 & 444.050 Repeaters 224.420 - PL 131.8 Bryn Mawr Hospital 224.500 - PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 444.050 Repeaters 444.050 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 224.500 Repeaters 445.675 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 145.130 & 147.060 Repeaters  

Nets

MARC Club Net - Wednesdays at 8:30PM on the 145.130, 147.060, & 445.675 Repeaters(Linked).  

Activities

Field Day MARC Ham Fest - July 8, 2017 Boy Scouts Christmas Party Elmer Program License Testing Breakfast Eyeball QSO - Second Saturday at 0900 - Country Squire, 2560 W. Chester Pike, Broomall, PA Penn Wynne 5k Run 5 Mile Radnor Run Vietnam Veterans Run  

 

Upcoming Events  

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 11

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 11

WAE DX Contest, RTTY

0000Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13

10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital

0001Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13

JIDX Phone Contest

0700Z, Nov 12 to 1300Z, Nov 13

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

1200Z, Nov 12 to 2400Z, Nov 13

OK/OM DX Contest, CW

1200Z, Nov 12 to 1200Z, Nov 13

Kentucky QSO Party

1400Z, Nov 12 to 0200Z, Nov 13

CQ-WE Contest

1900Z-2300Z, Nov 12 (CW/Digital) and

 0100Z-0500Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and

 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and

 0100Z-0500Z, Nov 14 (CW/Digital)

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 16

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 16 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 16 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 17

NAQCC CW Sprint

0130Z-0330Z, Nov 17

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 18

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 18

YO International PSK31 Contest

1600Z-2200Z, Nov 18

ARRL EME Contest

0000Z, Nov 19 to 2359Z, Nov 20

SARL Field Day Contest

1000Z, Nov 19 to 1000Z, Nov 20

LZ DX Contest

1200Z, Nov 19 to 1200Z, Nov 20

All Austrian 160-Meter Contest

1600Z, Nov 19 to 0700Z, Nov 20

Feld Hell Sprint

1700Z-1859Z, Nov 19

RSGB 2nd 1.8 MHz Contest, CW

1900Z-2300Z, Nov 19

ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB

2100Z, Nov 19 to 0300Z, Nov 21

Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party

1300-1500Z, Nov 20 (40m) and

 1500-1700Z, Nov 20 (80m)

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0200Z-0400Z, Nov 21

SKCC Sprint

0000Z-0200Z, Nov 23

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 23

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 23 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 23 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 24

     

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

    Hamfests   11/11/2016 Jackson County ARA Hamfest - Ocean Springs, MS   11/12/2016 Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/HamFest - Kamuela, HI Flamingo Net / University of Miami ARC Free Flea - Coral Gables, FL GSARC "BEACHFEST 2016" - Conway, SC Indiana State Convention (Fort Wayne Hamfest & Computer Expo) - Fort Wayne, IN New Orleans Ham Radio & Computer Flea Marlet - Harahan, LA Oro Valley ARC Hamfest -  Marana, AZ Raytown ARC Hamfest - Kansas City, MO SPARCFest 2016 - Pinellas Park, FL   11/19/2016 Alabama State Convention (MARC Hamfest 2016) - Montgomery, AL Cy Harris Memorial Free Flea - Oakland Park, FL Upper Pinellas ARC Ham Fest - Palm Harbor, FL   11/20/2016 JARSFest 2016 - Benson, NC    

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, SK

11/02/2016

ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, of Dallas, Texas, died on November 1. He was 73. His death followed a period of ill health. Haynie was elected as the 13th President of ARRL on January 21, 2000, succeeding Rod Stafford, W6ROD (ex-KB6ZV).

“Jim was a remarkable individual who made a huge personal commitment to Amateur Radio and the ARRL,” said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “He had a great sense of humor that was often quite helpful as we addressed some serious matters when Jim was President. His vision guided us to try new things that are still helping Amateur Radio and the League to this day.”

A radio amateur for more than 40 years, Haynie was twice re-elected by the ARRL Board to the ARRL’s top volunteer office, serving until January 2006, when Joel Harrison, W5ZN, succeeded him. Prior to assuming the ARRL presidency, Haynie was ARRL West Gulf Division Director during two different periods — from 1987 until 1990 and from 1997 until 2000, and an ARRL Vice President from 1990 until 1992.

During his 6 years as president, Haynie focused on promoting Amateur Radio in the classroom, and his ARRL Amateur Radio Education Project — which he dubbed the “Big Project” — was an initiative to offer a turnkey Amateur Radio curriculum as well as radio equipment to schools. His project eventually grew into the ARRL Education & Technology Program (ETP).

A gregarious and accessible individual, Haynie was also skilled at promoting Amateur Radio as often as he could, frequently on the road to attend as many ham radio gatherings as he could squeeze into his schedule, including Dayton Hamvention each spring. Once, he was also a guest of Art Bell, W6OBB, on his Coast to Coast AM overnight radio talk show.

On several occasions, Haynie traveled to Washington, DC, to meet with FCC and other government officials and with lawmakers on Capitol Hill to promote Amateur Radio issues and to communicate concerns. Those included the League’s position on deed restrictions or CC&Rs. During his tenure, the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act and the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Consistency Act — an early bill to address the CC&R issue — were introduced in Congress. In 2003, Haynie testified on Capitol Hill on behalf of the Spectrum Protection Act.

Not long after he became president, Haynie arranged for the gravely injured 13-year-old Willem van Tuijl — shot by pirates while cruising in the South Pacific with his parents Jacco, KH2TD, Jannie, KH2TE, van Tuijl — get medical treatment in the US.

After the 9/11 terror attacks, Haynie rallied radio amateurs to assist, and he praised the actions of Amateur Radio volunteers who turned out in New York City and Washington, DC. “Radio amateurs in New York City and elsewhere around the country are doing everything they can to support the authorities in locating and assisting victims,” he said in the immediate aftermath of the attacks.

A few years later, Haynie provided written testimony on Amateur Radio’s response in the Hurricane Katrina disaster to the US House Government Reform Committee.

In 2007, after he had left the presidency, Dayton Hamvention® named Haynie as its Amateur of the Year. Hamvention said Haynie’s League leadership “helped define Amateur Radio’s role in emergency communication.”

Among other highlights of Haynie’s tenure as the League’s president was the signing of a Statement of Affiliation between the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, which made ARRL a Citizen Corps affiliate.

The following year, he headed an ARRL delegation to the White House to discuss concerns about broadband over power line technology, meeting with an official of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

In 2013, the ARRL West Gulf Division honored Haynie with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Service details have not yet been announced.

RSGB Criticizes TV Broadcast Portraying Radio Amateur as “Nightmare Neighbour”

11/01/2016

The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) has weighed in following the airing of a Channel 5 TV Nightmare Neighbour Next Door episode [the program may have been removed from the website — Ed.] that featured an Amateur Radio operator. In the program, neighbors of 75-year-old Armando Martins, M0PAM, of Kent, made unsubstantiated claims that RF radiating from his 30-foot vertical antenna was detrimental to their health.

“Unfortunately, the RSGB was not invited to be part of Channel 5’s Nightmare Neighbour Next Door programme or to verify any facts,” the RSGB said. “We have, of course, contacted Channel 5 about our concerns and have highlighted the positive aspects of Amateur Radio. We have also offered our expertise and input for future programmes where Amateur Radio is mentioned.”

Channel 5 broadcast the offending episode on October 27, and it drew criticism from radio amateurs across the UK, some of whom may have used a program complaint service form provided by telecommunications regulator Ofcom. Critics complained that the program was replete with false claims and note that Ofcom has never found any problems with Martins’ station.

Martins, a veteran radio amateur, was put off the air in 2010 by the Canterbury City Council after moving into a council house — a form of public housing — and was not allowed to install his antenna in the back garden, although that was more of a zoning issue. He subsequently moved to Kent, where the health claims began.

A radio amateur for more than 60 years, Martins was first licensed as CR6IL in Portuguese West Africa (Angola).

“Our volunteers spend a lot of time helping radio amateurs with planning applications,” the RSGB said. “It is by putting forward facts during those processes that we can help to dispel myths about Amateur Radio and any impact on the public or environment.”

The RSGB said it would let its members know if it receives a response from Channel 5.

  National Parks on the Air Update

With just 2 months left in the ARRL National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) program, the push for 1 million contacts from eligible NPS units remains strong. November 1 saw the 800,000th contact uploaded to Logbook of the World, breaking 25,000 contacts for the second straight week.

 

ARRL Media and Public Relations Manager Sean Kutzko, KX9X, and QST Managing Editor Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY, were interviewed by NPS Ranger Bill Urbin during their September NPOTA activation of Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (NS14). Video of that interview is available on the ARRL Facebook page.

 

Thirty-two activations are on tap for November 3-9, including Big Bend National Park in Texas, and Everglades National Park in Florida.

 

Details about these and other upcoming activations can be found on the NPOTA Activations calendar.

 

Keep up with the latest NPOTA news on Facebook. Follow NPOTA on Twitter (@ARRL_NPOTA).

     

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH042 - Propagation

Nov 3, 2016 01:02:32

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Propagation, in the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight we will be talking about the Valley Radio Club in Eugene, OR, We talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

 

Tech Corner - Propagation

VHF/UHF signals are all line of sight. Meaning that if there is something between you and what you are talking to, your signal may or may not be received by the receiving station. This could be a building, mountain, or even the curvature of the Earth.

 

 

The approximate distance (in miles) to the radio horizon can be calculated by multiplying the square root of the antenna height (in feet) by 1.415 times. For example, the distance to the radio horizon for an antenna 1,000 feet above the ground is just under 45 miles

 

Because of the way that radio waves travel through the air and get refracted more than light waves do, you will be able to talk on the radio for a little bit longer than you can see. Radio waves travel approximately 15% farther than light waves do. For example, if you and a friend start walking away from each other on a flat surface, you would loose sight of each other at about 5 miles apart but you will still be able to talk to each other for another 30% since both you and your friend have an extra 15% each.

  Knife Edge Propagation  

Much like signals being reflected off the ionosphere, sometimes a VHF signal can be heard in places that are not direct line of sight from each other. If two people live on opposites side of a ragged hill, they may still be able to talk to each other and here is why. VHF signals are transmitted in a vertical polarization, so when those vertical signal strike a sharp edge of a distant  object the bottom half of the way will drag along the ground and turn the wave downward. Once the wave gets a clear light it will again travel in a straight line and since it was turned downward, it will travel down the backside of the hill, allowing you to talk to your friend. This is called Knife-edge diffraction.  

  Tropospheric Scatter  

Tropospheric scatter, or Tropospheric ducting as it is more commonly called, allows your signal to be caught in that layer of warm air and travel many miles before coming out of that layer and return back to the surface for reception. This occurs quite frequently over water where there is a layer of cool air along the surface level, and cool air in the upper ionosphere, but a layer of warm, moist air is held in between the two in the troposphere.

  Multipath Propagation  

This occurs when the receiving station receives a signal from the same transmitter at different times. The happens because when someone transmits a signal, the radio wave takes off at all different angles. Sometimes the signal can bounce off buildings, mountains, or other surfaces or even sometimes on HF, came in from the exact opposite from the direction that you would think it would, but we will talk about this in a minute.

 

When the same signal comes from different directions to the same receiver because of the signal bouncing off other surfaces, it could have taken that signal longer to get to the receiver and therefore cause distortions because the signals are not in phase with each other. It could also have the opposite effect and boost the signal strength if they are in phase. There are many things that can happen with radio frequencies to make them either constructive or destructive to the receiving station.

 

As I mentioned above, sometimes you can receive a HF signal from the opposite direction from where you might think it should come from. Let’s say that you are in Texas and you are talking to someone in Europe somewhere. The short path would be from the East and would typically be where you would think to point your beam antenna to receive that signal. However, if you get a bad signal when you beam is pointed East, sometimes you can turn your beam around 180 degrees or so and get the signal better, this is called the Long Path.

 

 

    Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Valley Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.valleyradioclub.org/

 

The Valley Radio Club of Oregon (formerly Valley Radio Club of Eugene), located in Eugene, Oregon, was chartered in 1932, and is one of the oldest, continuously operated club stations in the United States. It has been affiliated with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) since 1932, and associated with the American Red Cross since 1951.

 

Meetings

1st Friday at 7pm in the Red Cross Building at 862 Bethel Dr., Eugene, OR  

Repeaters

146.720 - PL 100  

Nets

HF Net: Peak Radio Association Mondays at 7:30pm Pacific Time on 7.250 Mhz HF Net: Up the Crick Thursdays at 7:30pm Pacific Time on 25.450 Mhz  

Activities

Saturdays - Noon - 2p - Science Factory 2300 Leo Harris Pkwy, Eugene, OR. Get on the Air, Open Ham Station. DX Special Interest Group Testing Sessions - 2nd Wednesday at 7pm Technician Classes General Classes Assisting in Locating sources of RFI Field Day March of Dimes Community Service  

 

Upcoming Events  

NRAU 10m Activity Contest

1800Z-1900Z, Nov 3 (CW) and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 3 (SSB) and

 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 3 (FM) and

 2100Z-2200Z, Nov 3 (Dig)

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 4

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 4

IPARC Contest, CW

0600Z-1000Z, Nov 5 and

 1400Z-1800Z, Nov 5

Ukrainian DX Contest

1200Z, Nov 5 to 1200Z, Nov 6

RSGB International Sprint Contest, SSB

1700Z-2100Z, Nov 5

ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW

2100Z, Nov 5 to 0300Z, Nov 7

IPARC Contest, SSB

0600Z-1000Z, Nov 6 and

 1400Z-1800Z, Nov 6

EANET Sprint

0800Z-1200Z, Nov 6

High Speed Club CW Contest

0900Z-1100Z, Nov 6 and

 1500Z-1700Z, Nov 6

DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest

1100Z-1700Z, Nov 6

ARS Spartan Sprint

0200Z-0400Z, Nov 8

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 9

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 9 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 9 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 10

RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB

2000Z-2100Z, Nov 9

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Nov 11

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 11

WAE DX Contest, RTTY

0000Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13

10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital

0001Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13

JIDX Phone Contest

0700Z, Nov 12 to 1300Z, Nov 13

SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

1200Z, Nov 12 to 2400Z, Nov 13

OK/OM DX Contest, CW

1200Z, Nov 12 to 1200Z, Nov 13

Kentucky QSO Party

1400Z, Nov 12 to 0200Z, Nov 13

CQ-WE Contest

1900Z-2300Z, Nov 12 (CW/Digital) and

 0100Z-0500Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and

 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and

 0100Z-0500Z, Nov 14 (CW/Digital)

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 16

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 16 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 16 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 17

   

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

    Hamfests 11/05/2016 Enid ARC Hamfest - Enid, OK FARAFest - Bourne, MA GARC Hamfest - Georgetown, OH Georgia State Convention (Stone Mountain Hamfest) - Lawrenceville, GA HARKFEST - Congress, AZ LARA Tailgate - Tavares, FL Link McGarity WV4I Memorial Free Flea - West Palm Beach, FL MRC91 Radio Fest - Milwaukee, WI NARCfest 2016 - Nixa, MO TechFest - Lakewood, CO   11/06/2016 Davenport RAC Hamfest & Computer Show - Davenport, IA FCARC Swapfest - Appleton, WI WACOM HAMFEST 2016 - Washington, PA   11/11/2016 Jackson County ARA Hamfest - Ocean Springs, MS   11/12/2016 Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/HamFest - Kamuela, HI Flamingo Net / University of Miami ARC Free Flea - Coral Gables, FL GSARC "BEACHFEST 2016" - Conway, SC Indiana State Convention (Fort Wayne Hamfest & Computer Expo) - Fort Wayne, IN New Orleans Ham Radio & Computer Flea Marlet - Harahan, LA Oro Valley ARC Hamfest -  Marana, AZ Raytown ARC Hamfest - Kansas City, MO SPARCFest 2016 - Pinellas Park, FL      

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

   

 

News   Rule Making Petition to FCC Calls for Vanity Call Sign Rule Changes  

10/27/2016
The FCC is inviting comments on a Petition for Rule Making (RM-11775) from a Nevada radio amateur that seeks changes to the rules governing the Amateur Radio Vanity Call Sign Program. Christopher LaRue, W4ADL, of North Las Vegas, is proposing that any licensee obtaining a vanity call sign be required to keep it for the full license term. LaRue contends in his petition that excessive and frequent vanity call sign filings are hampering the ability of other qualified licensees to obtain vanity call signs in one of the more desirable 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 formats. LaRue said that since the FCC dropped the fee to file for a vanity call sign, some applicants are taking advantage by regularly obtaining new call signs, thereby keeping them out of circulation.

“Some are changing call signs almost monthly, just to keep the newer code-free Extra class operators from obtaining a shorter call sign,” he said in his petition. “I even saw an older operator that said he does it all the time and has not even owned a radio in over 6 years. When I looked him up, he has had 16 different [call signs] in 18 months.”

LaRue said his proposed minor rule change would require any licensee applying for and obtaining an Amateur Radio vanity call sign “be required to keep it for the duration of the license, which is currently 10 years.”

He said this would “alleviate a lot of the stress on the ULS system and manpower requirements” at the FCC. “It will also keep inactive amateurs from changing call signs regularly, thereby tying up call signs for 2 years after dismissal of said call.”

Interested parties may comment using the FCC Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). Comments are due within 30 days of the October 26 posting date.

  California Hams Looses the ability to go mobile thanks to a new law!  

As of September 26, 2016, California Governor signed the bill no. 1785 which restricts the use of any mobile radio use that requires your hands to use in the state of California.  

 

This is a hard hit to all amateur radio operators in California. From what i am reading from the text of the new bill, pretty much any electronic communication device is out unless you are a first responder.

 

The only way that I can see to get around this would be to use a headset with a foot switch, or using your radio using VOX. If you would like to read the full bill, click on the link below.

 

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB1785

   

ARES/RACES Supports Office of Emergency Management during Presidential Debate

10/27/2016
ARES/RACES volunteers stepped up to support communication for the Clark County, Nevada, Office of Emergency Management (OEM), during the third US presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 19. Clark County OEM Chief John Steinbeck, asked ARES/RACES to activate and support the County’s Multi-Agency Coordination Center (MACC).

Seven Clark County ARES/RACES members operated UHF and VHF voice as well as VHF packet and mesh VoIP from the MACC as well as from the Clark County IT Department communications van throughout the event. In addition, ARES/RACES members provided back-up monitoring of all event communications.

Among the Amateur Radio volunteers supporting the effort were ARRL Nevada Section Traffic Manager Jim Bassett, W1RO; Nevada Southern District Emergency Coordinator Jay Peskin, KE7EGO; Jim Davis, KF7GCT; Steve Deveny, KF7WGL; Frank Kostelac, N7ZEV, and Jack Cook, N8RRL. Also providing support from the communications van was ARES/RACES member, Keith Aurich, KD7TOF, of the Clark County IT Department.

In addition, more than a dozen Clark County ARES/RACES members remained on standby, monitoring communications from home and mobile stations, in case a wider activation was required.

Clark County ARES/RACES Emergency Coordinator Bill Smith, W7HMV, praised the ARES/RACES members who volunteered their time, equipment, and skills to support the OEM for the event.

The activation marked the first time that ARES/RACES members operated from the MACC’s new location, which, as yet, has no radio equipment installed. They were able to test and verify the capability to utilize existing external communication resources, using their own equipment from a new and potentially challenging venue. — Thanks to Jim Davis, KF7GCT


 

KC0W Regroups in Wake of Pacific Island Theft

10/28/2016
Tom Callas, KC0W, who was forced to abruptly cancel the rest of his “Cows Over the World” Pacific DXpeditions after his belongings were stolen in Kiribati, has been regrouping.

“I will be in the Philippines from October 26-November 25, and the call sign will be 4I7COW,” Callas said on his QRZ.com profile. “This unique prefix has never been issued before, so it should generate some good interest.” Callas said he’s canceled his planned TG/KC0W DXpedition to Guatemala in favor of pending DXpeditions to Equatorial Guinea and Annobon, following his Philippines activity.

He reports “fantastic progress” in acquiring the 3C and 3C0 licenses. Equatorial Guinea is number 43 on the ClubLog DXCC Most Wanted List. Annobon is number 35. He hopes to be on the air from Equatorial Guinea and Annobon for 50 or 60 days and said to stay tuned for more information.

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH041 - Morse Code

Oct 27, 2016 59:22

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about CW or Morse Code, the South Canadian Amateur Radio Society in Norman, OK, some upcoming events/contests and Hamfest a for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!

 

Tech Corner - Morse Code - CW What is Morse Code and It’s History?

 

Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, Lights, of clicks. Morse code started way back in 1836! It was originally developed by an Amateur artist by the name of Samuel F.B. Morse, an American physicist Joseph Henry, and Alfred Vail. Their system sent electric pulses through wiring to a receiving station that used an electromagnet to make a mark on a piece of “paper”. Once the message was completed, the operator would translate the message visually. The original morse codep was only numbers that corresponded with words in a codebook. This didn't last to long because Alfred Vail soon expanded the code to include the letters of the alphabet as a few special characters.

It was soon discovered by the operators of the telegraph stations that they could translate the clicks that the mechanical armature made when receiving a current. It was soon realized that operators could translate a message faster by listening to the clicks over let the machine do that work, then translating it from the “paper”.

When Morse Code was adapted for radio communications, the characters we sent using a tone. In the 1890s, Morse code began to be used extensively for early radio communication, before it was possible to transmit voice. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, most high-speed international communication used Morse code on telegraph lines, undersea cables and radio circuits. In aviation, Morse code in radio systems started to be used on a regular basis in the 1920s.

By the 1930’s all civilian and military pilots were required to learn morse code, both for use in early communications methods and for identification of navigational beacons which continually transmitted a two or three letter identifier in morse code.

Morse code was used as an international standard for maritime distress until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress Safety System. Before 1999, the standard phrase for distress was SOS ( … --- … ), who can tell me what it was before it was changed to SOS?

When the French Navy ceased using Morse code on January 31, 1997, the final message transmitted was "Calling all. This is our last cry before our eternal silence.” In the United States the final commercial Morse code transmission was on July 12, 1999, signing off with Samuel Morse's original 1844 message, "What hath God wrought", and the prosign "SK".

As of 2015 the United States Air Force still trains ten people a year in Morse. The United States Coast Guard has ceased all use of Morse code on the radio, and no longer monitors any radio frequencies for Morse code transmissions,p including the international medium frequency (MF) distress frequency of 500 kHz.

User Proficiency

Morse code speed is measured in Words-Per-Minute(WPM) or Characters-Per-Minute(CPM). Being that characters have different lengths, therefore words will have different lengths to them as well. The WPM is therefore measured by using a standard word, such as PARIS or CODEX. This allows the standardization of WPM speeds.

Operators proficient at morse code can receive(copy) morse code transmissions at 40+ wpms in their heads. International contests in code copying are still occasionally held.  In July 1939 at a contest in Asheville, North Carolina in the United States Ted R. McElroy set a still-standing record for Morse copying, 75.2 wpm. However it is believed that there are some operators out there that can copy morse code in their heads at over 100 WPMs.

Today among amateur operators there are several organizations that recognize high speed code ability, one group consisting of those who can copy Morse at 60 wpm. Also, Certificates of Code Proficiency are issued by several amateur radio societies, including the American Radio Relay League. Their basic award starts at 10 wpm with endorsements as high as 40 wpm, and are available to anyone who can copy the transmitted text. Members of the Boy Scouts of America may put a Morse interpreter's strip on their uniforms if they meet the standards for translating code at 5 wpm.

International Morse CodeInternational Morse Code

Morse code has been in use for more than 160 years—longer than any other electrical coding system. What is called Morse code today is actually somewhat different from what was originally developed by Vail and Morse. The Modern International Morse code, or continental code, was created by Friedrich Clemens Gerke in 1848 and initially used for telegraphy between Hamburg and Cuxhaven in Germany. Gerke changed nearly half of the alphabet and all of the numerals, providing the foundation for the modern form of the code. After some minor changes, International Morse Code was standardized at the International Telegraphy Congress in 1865 in Paris, and was later made the standard by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Morse's original code specification, largely limited to use in the United States and Canada, became known as American Morse codeor railroad code. American Morse code is now seldom used except in historical re-enactments.

 

Amateur Radio

The original amateur radio operators used Morse code exclusively, since voice-capable radio transmitters did not become commonly available until around 1920. Until 2003 the International Telecommunication Union mandated Morse code proficiency as part of the amateur radio licensing procedure worldwide. However, the World Radiocommunication Conference of 2003 made the Morse code requirement for amateur radio licensing optional. Many countries subsequently removed the Morse requirement from their licence requirements

Until 1991 a demonstration of the ability to send and receive Morse code at a minimum of five words per minute (wpm) was required to receive an amateur radio license for use in the United States from the Federal Communications Commission. Demonstration of this ability was still required for the privilege to use the HF bands. Until 2000 proficiency at the 20 wpm level was required to receive the highest level of amateur license (Amateur Extra Class); effective April 15, 2000, the FCC reduced the Extra Class requirement to five wpm. Finally, effective on February 23, 2007 the FCC eliminated the Morse code proficiency requirements from all amateur radio licenses.

Since Morse Code is not a requirement any long to obtain you amateur radio licence or to upgrade to a higher class, there has been an influx of people getting and upgrading their license. There has also been a rift forming with some operators who obtained their license before the code requirement was dropped. It is sad, but true. Some ofp those operators have not been very friendly to operators that got their license after the code was dropped. What are your feeling about the code requirement being dropped?

Learning Morse Code

There are three major methods on learning amateur radio, Mnemonics, the Farnsworth Method and the Koch Method. The Farnsworth method is probably the best way to learn according to a lot of people that I have talked to and/or read articles from.

Dichotomic Search Chart - Morse Code

Mnemonics

When I first upgraded to the Tech + class, I had to get 5 wpm code. I didn't have any plans on going any higher than that really. I just wanted a little sliver of 10 meter voice that I could possibly use to talk home on while I was in college. That didn't happen though, because my father didn't get his upgrade until after I had graduated college.

While I did learn morse code and I got my tech + license, the way that I learned morse code was definitely not the best way that I could have. I learned using the Mnemonics method. What this means in that every letter has a sound-a-like that followed the pattern of the morse code dits and dahs. For example, let letter A has a sound alike of “Say Aww” and the letter B has a sound alike of “Band rat it tat”.

While this method is OK for use at slow speeds, it really hampers ypou when or if you want to increase your speed. When you learn morse code with this method, you brain will automatically translate the morse code character into the sound alike and then into the letter. This adds an extra step when trying to receive a morse code message and limits how fast you can receive.

Koch Method

The Koch Method is named after a German Psychologist Ludwig Koch. This method is probably the second most popular method of learning morse code. The way that this method works is that you learn all the characters at full speed from the start. However, you start with only two letters and build from there once you can copy those two at 90% accuracy.

Farnsworth Method

The Farnsworth Method is probably the most popular method on learning morse code. It was developed by Donald R. Farnsworth, W6TTB, This method is similar to the Koch Method, however there is one real difference. With the Farnsworth method, all the characters are sent at your target speed, typically 13 or 20 wpms, but the spaces between the letters and words are exaggerated to make the overall speed of only about 5 wpm. This exaggerated space between the characters are so that you have extra time to think of the character.

Bother the Koch and the Farnsworth Methods allow you to easily increase your speed of sending and receiving because you learning the sound of the actual character rather than the sound alike of the character.

Keyers Straight KeyStraight Key - Morse

The straight key is probably the first keyer that anyone uses. It is a mechanical key so it doesn't have any electrical parts and can be used with pretty much any kind of radio. This style of keyer has an up-down motion to it and contacts on the bottom of the arm. When the arm and the base meet it causes a tone to be sent out on the radio. The longer you hold the key down the longer the tone will be.

I'm sure that most of yall have used or at least played with one of these types of keys at some point in your life. These keys are the easiest to use, since they are so simple, however, it is hard to achieve a speed of more that 20 wpm with them and that is probably pushing it. The other negative thing about these types of keys it the up and down movement of them can cause wrist issues like carpal-tunnel.

SideswiperSide Swiper - Morse

A sideswiper keyer is similar to a straight key in that the longer you hold the contacts together the longer the tone that is transmitted will be. The other similarity is that they are totally mechanical. The major difference is that instead of an up-down motion, the key arm goes left and right with contacts on both side.

The two advantages of having the key arm moving left and right instead of up and down, is that a higher rate of speed can be achieved and you don't have the carpal-tunnel issues that a straight key has.

 

Vibroflex “Bug”Vibroplex - Morse

A Vibroflex “bug” expands on a Sideswiper style keyer in that is goes left and right, however the biggest difference is that the Vibroflex is a semi automatic keyer. When you push the key one way it will make a dit sound that will repeat at a set speed and the dah will be made when you press it the other. The dahs however, do not repeater so the tone will be transmitted for as long as you hold the key down.

The Vibroflex was the most common form of speed keyer used before electronic keyers.

Electronic Keyers

The the advent of electronic keyers, the speed at which you can send morse code that Single Lever Key - Morseincreased dramatically. With electronic keyers, you can set the speed you want to send at and then like the Vibroflex, when you hold down one side it will send dits but when you hold down the other side it will send dahs. Unlike the Vibroflex though, when you hold down the dah side it will repeatedly send dahs instead of just one single tone.

Electronic keyers are typically referred to as paddles because of their shape. There is also two kinds of electronic keyers, one with a single paddle, the other with two. With the single paddle it is much like the sideswiper in that there are contacts on both sides. However, unlike the sideswiper, one side is for dits and the other for dahs and both sides repeater.

Paddles - MorseThe other type of electronic keyer is double paddle style. This type uses a squeeze type methodology. One side is for dits the other for dahs. The biggest difference with this type of keyer is that you can hold down one side and squeeze the other side together and they keyer will alternate whether a dit or a dah is sent out. This comes in handy when you are doing like a “R” or a “K”. With the electronic keyer, you can press one side down the squeeze the other and it will do a dit dah did or a dah dit dah depending on which side is pressed down first.

Do you use morse code? How fast can you send and receive?

From My Listeners

 

Back in August I received an email from Fred Wilson:

 

Curtis

 

 

Just found your podcast last week, and I have been lessening to all I can find. I am new to Ham and looking to take my technical class license next month. I have got three guys from work going to take it with me. My dad was a ham back in the 70s and I can't believe I've waited this long to get started. And thanks to you I think I got a jump on it. Thanks for all the info. Even though a lot of it is over my head. LOL

 

Fred Wilson

 

At the time, he was not licensed as you can see. We talked back and forth a few times, talked about radios, how his studying was going, if he had taken the test yet, etc. Last Monday, Oct 17, 2016, I got this email:

 

Curtis

 

Well I did it, I couldn’t wait for my friends to take the test with me. I passed the technician class test this weekend. Didn’t know you got to take the general for free. I didn't study for it and was only two questions short of getting my general ticket. So now I’m studying for the general and extra.

I’ll let you know when I get my call sign for technician

.

Thanks for the encouragement, I’ve learned a lot from your show.

Fred Wilson
73

 

He emailed me on Wednesday when he got his call sign, KG5PWA. My original call sign was KC5PWP. He almost ended up with the same suffix as I had and I told him so. His reply was:

 

Wow that is close. Well I'm already studying for my general an extra class hopefully by the end of next month I should be sending you a new call sign. I think the reason why I almost passed my general class without studying was because I listen to you every week. I've learned a lot from your show.

THX

73
Fred Wilson, KG5PWA

 

It is so awesome when I get emails like these. Once again, congratulations Fred on joining the ranks of amateur radio. Maybe one day we can talk on the air or in person!

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

South Canadian Amateur Radio Society

 

Website: http://www.w5nor.org

Facebook: http://www.w5nor.org/Facebook

 

SCARS is not a Canadian Club, we're just located in the South Canadian River area. The founding fathers didn't want to limit the scope of the club to a certain town, or village, so this name was chosen. 40 years later, we've expanded to have members from across the state, and country. With the Internet experience, we've even attracted regulars from around the globe. For more information on the South Canadian River area, please see the South Canadian River Facebook Group.

 

Meetings

2nd Saturday of each month (3rd Saturday in June) at Fire Station #7 near Westheimer Airport / Field. Coffee and donuts start at 9am, meeting starts at 9:30am. Informal Meetings - McDonalds at 1720 W. Lindsey St. Every day but Sunday, a cast of about a dozen meet for coffee and breakfast between about 9:00 am and 11:00 am

 

Repeaters

147.060 + PL 141.3 Norman, OK 443.700 + PL141.3 Norman, OK 144.399 APRS Digipeater Norman, OK

 

Nets

SCARS hosts the N5HZX Memorial Net (In memory of N5HZX Fred Goodwin) every Wednesday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 28.445 MHz USB Each Tuesday, at 8:00 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Cleveland County ARES traffic net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater Each Tuesday, at 8:30 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Weekly Gossip net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater SCARS hosts the KD5JSD Memorial Net (In memory of KD5JSD John Sauer) every Monday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 50.200 MHz USB

 

Activities

Field Day Technician and General Classes Central Oklahoma Radio Amateurs Ham Holiday Storm spotter Training OKC Memorial Marathon NPOTA Bike MS Event Jamboree On The Air National Weather Festival Christmas Party Training at every meeting Community Service

 

Upcoming Events

 

RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 27 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 28 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 28 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Oct 29 to 2400Z, Oct 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 2 CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 2 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 2 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 3

UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 2 NRAU 10m Activity Contest

1800Z-1900Z, Nov 3 (CW) and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 3 (SSB) and

 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 3 (FM) and

 2100Z-2200Z, Nov 3 (Dig)

NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 4 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 4 IPARC Contest, CW

0600Z-1000Z, Nov 5 and

 1400Z-1800Z, Nov 5

Ukrainian DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 5 to 1200Z, Nov 6 RSGB International Sprint Contest, SSB 1700Z-2100Z, Nov 5 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 5 to 0300Z, Nov 7 IPARC Contest, SSB

0600Z-1000Z, Nov 6 and

 1400Z-1800Z, Nov 6

EANET Sprint 0800Z-1200Z, Nov 6 High Speed Club CW Contest

0900Z-1100Z, Nov 6 and

 1500Z-1700Z, Nov 6

DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Nov 6 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 8 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 9 CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 9 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 9 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 10

RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 9

 

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar

 

Hamfests

 

10/29/2016 Halloween Hamfest - Kirkwood, MO Hazard Hamfest - Hazard, KY Jacksonville FREE Hamfest - Jacksonville, FL Tri-City ARC Auction - Gales Ferry, CT

 

10/30/2016 Long Island Hamfest and Electronics Fair - Hicksville, NY USECA Swap & Shop Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI

 

11/05/2016 Enid ARC Hamfest - Enid, OK FARAFest - Bourne, MA GARC Hamfest - Georgetown, OH Georgia State Convention (Stone Mountain Hamfest) - Lawrenceville, GA HARKFEST - Congress, AZ LARA Tailgate - Tavares, FL Link McGarity WV4I Memorial Free Flea - West Palm Beach, FL MRC91 Radio Fest - Milwaukee, WI NARCfest 2016 - Nixa, MO TechFest - Lakewood, CO

 

11/06/2016 Davenport RAC Hamfest & Computer Show - Davenport, IA FCARC Swapfest - Appleton, WI WACOM HAMFEST 2016 - Washington, PA

 

*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar

 

News Time to File Your JOTA Station Report

10/19/2016

Now that Jamboree On The Air (JOTA) 2016 is history, the Boy Scouts are urging participants to file a JOTA Station Report, in order to determine how things went.

“It's your perfect opportunity to share your stories, photos, and some numbers,” JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said. “The reports I've seen so far show some good turnout, particularly from Cub Scouts. We feel this is due to the new requirement for the Arrow of Light Award that asks Scouts to participate in JOTA-JOTI. This is also no doubt responsible for the big increase in JOTI registrations in the US, from roughly 100 last year to what looks like close to 500 this year.”

Reports are due by November 1. Every station that files a report will be entered into a drawing for an Icom ID-51A Plus dualband handheld transceiver and will receive a 2016 Jamboree on the Air Certificate. Five runners up will receive an Icom America Ham Crew T shirt. Only Boy Scouts of America stations are eligible.

“Worldwide we had 11,534 register for the event,” Wilson said, adding that a rough estimate indicated 800 US registrations and nearly 300 of those indicating Amateur Radio call signs. If that number holds, he said, it would indicate a dip in JOTA participation from 2015, when 346 turned out. “Some of that could have been due to the complexity of the registration system,” he allowed. “I assure you that the reporting system now is much simpler.

Wilson said the US JOTA 2016 Report should be out in early December. “Thanks again for all your support to Radio Scouting and Jamboree on the Air,” he said.

It’s estimated that more than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries took part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences.

Source:
ARRL News

Apparent ARISS Radio Failure Prompts Shift to Russian Service Module Ham Gear

10/20/2016
The VHF handheld transceiver that the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program has used to connect students worldwide with astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) for more than 16 years has begun to display an error message and is unusable at this time.

While the ARISS technical team evaluates the best path to restore operation from the ISS Columbus module, ARISS contacts will be supported using the Kenwood radio in the Russian Service Module.

During this period, the packet digipeater will be unavailable. Switching to the 70 centimeter capability on board the Columbus module for some operations is being coordinated. ARISS said to expect further updates as it works to resolve the problem.

A reminder: The deadline is November 1 for formal and informal education institutions and organizations to submit proposals to host an Amateur Radio contact with an ISS crew member. ARISS anticipates that contacts will take place between July 1 and December 31, 2017. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits determine contact dates.

To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the ham radio contact into a well-developed education plan. — ARISS Bulletin

Source:
ARRL News

Georgia Section Manager Changing on November 1

 

10/20/2016
Georgia Section Manager Gene Clark, W4AYK, of Albany, has announced that he’s stepping down at the end of October, after serving since October 2009. David Benoist, AG4ZR, of Senoia, has been appointed as Georgia Section Manager, effective November 1, to complete the current term of office, which extends until September 30, 2017.

When a Section Manager vacancy occurs between elections, the position is filled by appointment. Clark recommended to Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, that Benoist succeed him. Patton then consulted with Southeastern Division Director Doug Rehman, K4AC, before making the appointment.

Benoist has served as Georgia Section Emergency Coordinator and as an Emergency Coordinator.

Source:
ARRL News

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH040 - Batteries

Oct 20, 2016 56:06

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Batteries, the Milford Amateur Radio Club, Upcoming events and hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap up the episode with some news from around the community!

 

 

Tech Corner - Batteries

Nearly all large rechargeable batteries in common use are Lead-Acid type. The acid is typically 30% Sulfuric acid and 70% water at full charge. NiFe (Nickel-Iron) batteries are also available. These have a very long life, but rather poor efficiency (60-70%) and the voltages are different, making it more difficult to match up with standard 12v/24/48v systems and inverters.

 

Batteries are divided into two types based on application:

 

Starter

Deep Cycle

• Designed to deliver short bursts of high amps

• Designed to deliver sustained power

• NOT designed to discharge to low levels

• Designed to discharge lower without damage

• Not designed to absorb power rapidly

• Can absorb (recharge) rapidly

 

Deep Cycle Batteries

 

Sometimes called "fork lift", "traction" or "stationary" batteries, are used where power is needed over a longer period of time, and are designed to be "deep cycled", or discharged down as low as 20% of full charge (80% DOD, or Depth of Discharge).

 

Deep cycle batteries have much thicker plates than automotive batteries. They are often used in larger PV systems because you can get a lot of storage in a single (very large and heavy) battery.

 

Plate thickness (of the Positive plate) matters because of a factor called "positive grid corrosion". This ranks among the top 3 reasons for battery failure. The positive (+) plate is what gets eaten away gradually over time, so eventually there is nothing left - it all falls to the bottom as sediment.

 

Thicker plates are directly related to longer life, so other things being equal, the battery with the thickest plates will last the longest.

 

Automotive batteries typically have plates about .040" (4/100") thick, while forklift batteries may have plates more than 1/4" (.265" for example in larger RollsSurrette) thick - almost 7 times as thick as auto batteries. The typical golf cart will have plates that are around .07 to .11" thick.

 

While plate thickness is not the only factor in how many deep cycles a battery can take before it dies, it is the most important one.

 

Flooded batteries are the most common type of battery. They require maintenance (check acid level, add water). They can spill and leak if not stored properly (upright).

 

Sealed batteries are made with vents that cannot be removed. The so-called “Maintenance Free” batteries are also sealed, but are not usually leak proof. Sealed batteries are not totally sealed, as they must allow gas to vent during charging. If overcharged too many times, some of these batteries can lose enough water that they will die before their time. There is no way to add water.

 

Gel Deep Cycle Batteries

 

Gelled batteries, or "Gel Cells" contain acid that has been "gelled" by the addition of Silica Gel, turning the acid into a solid mass that looks like gooey Jell-O. It is impossible to spill acid even if they are broken. However, they must be charged at a slower rate (C/20) to prevent excess gas from damaging the cells. They cannot be fast charged or they may be permanently damaged. This is not usually a problem with solar electric systems, but current must be limited to the manufacturers specifications.

 

Not typically used any more, replaced by AGM.

 

AGM Deep Cycle Batteries

 

A newer type of sealed battery uses "Absorbed Glass Mats", between the plates. This is a very fine fiber BoronSilicate glass mat. These are also called "starved electrolyte", as the mat is about 95% saturated rather than fully soaked. That also means that they will not leak acid even if broken.

 

Nearly all AGM batteries are "recombinant“. The oxygen and hydrogen recombine INSIDE the battery, turning back into water while charging and prevent the loss of water through electrolysis. The recombining is typically 99+% efficient, so almost no water is lost.

 

Charging Batteries

 

It is absolutely crucial to understand that batteries must be charged at the battery manufacturers specification!

 

A battery that does not charge at the proper voltage will never, ever, achieve a full charge.

 

Lots of people make this mistake and either assume that all batteries use the same voltage or use what the charge controller says. WRONG!

 

Wiring Batteries to the Charger

 

Method 1

The connections to the main installation are all taken from one end, i.e. from the end battery. The interconnecting leads will have some resistance. It will be low, but it still exists, and at the level of charge and discharge currents we see in these installations, the resistance will be significant in that it will have a measurable effect.

 

If we draw 100 amps from this battery bank we will effectively be drawing 25 amps from each battery. Or so we think. In actual fact what we find is that more current is drawn from the bottom battery, with the current draw getting progressively less as we get towards the top of the diagram. The effect is greater than would be expected. Whilst this diagram looks simple, the calculation is incredibly difficult to do completely because the internal resistance of the batteries affects the outcome so much.

 

However look at where the load would be connected. The power coming from the bottom battery only has to travel through the main connection leads. The power from the next battery up has to travel through the same main connection leads but in addition also has to travel through the 2 interconnecting leads to the next battery. The next battery up has to go through 4 sets of interconnecting leads. The top one has to go through 6 sets of interconnecting leads. So the top battery will be providing much less current than the bottom battery.

 

During charging exactly the same thing happens, the bottom battery gets charged with a higher current than the top battery. The result is that the bottom battery is worked harder, discharged harder, charged harder. It fails earlier. The batteries are not being treated equally.

 

The problem is that in very low resistance circuits (as we have here) huge differences in current can be produced by tiny variations in battery voltage. I'm not going to produce the calculations here because they really are quite horrific. I actually used a PC based simulator to produce these results because it is simply too time consuming to do them by hand.

 

Battery internal resistance = 0.02

Ohms Interconnecting lead resistance = 0.0015 Ohms per link

Total load on batteries = 100 amps

 

The bottom battery provides 35.9 amps of this.

The next battery up provides 26.2 amps.

The next battery up provides 20.4 amps.

The top battery provides 17.8 amps.

 

So the bottom battery provides over twice the current of the top battery.

 

Method 2

In this diagram the main feeds to the rest of the installation are from diagonally opposite posts. Everything else in the installation remains identical. Also, it doesn't matter which lead (positive or negative) is moved, Whichever is easiest is the correct one to move. The results of this modification, when compared to the original diagram are shown: With the same 100 amp load....

 

The bottom battery provides 26.7 amps of this.

The next battery up provides 23.2 amps.

The next battery up provides 23.2 amps.

The top battery provides 26.7 amps.

 

Method 3

This looks more complicated. It is actually quite simple to achieve but requires two extra interconnecting links and two terminal posts. Note that it is important that all 4 links on each side are the same length otherwise one of the main benefits (that of equal resistance between each battery and the loads) is lost. The difference in results between this and the 2nd example are much smaller than the differences between the 1st and 2nd but with expensive batteries it might be worth the additional work.

 

This method isn't always so easy to install because of the required terminal posts. In some installations there is simply no room to fit these. Especially when using a large quantity of batteries (8, 16, etc).

 

Method 4

Another wiring method that achieves perfect battery balancing.

 

What has been done here is to start with 2 pairs of batteries. Each wired in the proper "cross diagonal" method. Then each pair is wired together, again in the cross diagonal method. Notice that for each individual battery, the current always goes through a total of one long link and one short link before reaching the loads. This method also achieves perfect balance between all 4 batteries and may be easier to wire up in some installations.

 

Wiring Batteries to the Charger

 

The previous examples demonstrate wiring concerns when using 12V charging from the solar charger. However, consider the using 24V or 48V storage might be more appropriate. This can be done by wiring several 12V systems in series. It can get complicated.

 

With 12V storage, you need to use very heavy wire to reduce the voltage loss when using high amps.

 

With 24V or 48V storage, you can use much lighter wire because your amperage will be lower by comparison. This can make your installation easier and cheaper.

 

Batteries and Temperature

 

Lead-acid batteries temporarily lose approximately 20% of their effective capacity when their temperature falls to 30°F (-1°C). This is compared to their rated capacity at a standard temperature of 77°F (25°C). At higher temperatures, their rate of permanent degradation increases. So it is desirable to protect batteries from temperature extremes. Where low temperatures cannot be avoided, buy a larger battery bank to compensate for their reduced capacity in the winter. Avoid direct radiant heat sources that will cause some cells to get warmer than others. The 77°F temperature standard is not sacred, it is simply the standard for measurement of capacity. An ideal range is between 50 and 85°F (10-29°C).

 

Arrange batteries so they all stay at the same temperature. If they are against an exterior wall, insulate the wall and leave room for air to circulate. Leave air gaps of about 1/2 inch (13 mm) between batteries, so those in the middle don't get warmer than the others.

 

Batteries and Ventilation

 

The enclosure should keep the batteries clean and dry, but a minimum of ventilation is required by the National Electrical Code, Article 490.9(A). A battery enclosure must provide easy access for maintenance, especially for flooded batteries. Do not install any switches, breakers, or other spark-producing devices in the enclosure. They will ignite an explosion of the hydrogen gas bubbles gassing out during charging.

 

 

 

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While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome!

Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now!

GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of...

EHR10

...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!

 

 



Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Milford Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.w8mrc.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MilfordAmateurRadioClub/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/milfordarc

 

Meetings

Second Thursday at 7:30pm except March and December. Meetings are held at Faith Church 5910 Price Rd, Milford, OH 45150

 

Repeaters

147.345 +

 

Nets

Sundays at 9pm

 

Activities

VE Testings - Before every meetings at 6pm Multiple on the air contests Field Day



 

Upcoming Events




NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Oct 21

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 21

MCG Autumn Sprint

1600Z-2000Z, Oct 21

ARRL EME Contest

0000Z, Oct 22 to 2359Z, Oct 23

UK/EI DX Contest, SSB

1200Z, Oct 22 to 1200Z, Oct 23

Stew Perry Topband Challenge

1500Z, Oct 22 to 1500Z, Oct 23

SA Sprint Contest

2000Z-2400Z, Oct 22

SKCC Sprint

0000Z-0200Z, Oct 26

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 26

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Oct 26 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 26 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 27

UKEICC 80m Contest

2000Z-2100Z, Oct 26

RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB

1900Z-2000Z, Oct 27

NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Oct 28

NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 28

CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB

0000Z, Oct 29 to 2400Z, Oct 30

   

Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Nov 2

CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Nov 2 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 2 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Nov 3

UKEICC 80m Contest

2000Z-2100Z, Nov 2



*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar



Hamfests



10/21/2016

Arizona State Convention (CopaFest 2016) - Maricopa, AZ Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Texoma Hamarama - Ardmore, OK

 

10/22/2016

4th Annual TailgateFest - Hollywood, MD Hamfest Chattanooga 2016 - East Ridge, TN Shelbyville Tailgate 2016 - Shelbyville, IN Wiregrass ARC Fall Tailgate - Headland, AL Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference - Wisconsin Rapids, WI

 

10/23/2016

Mason-Dixon Hamfest - Upperco, MD Massillon ARC Hamfest - Massillon, OH

 

10/29/2016

Halloween Hamfest - Kirkwood, MO Hazard Hamfest - Hazard, KY Jacksonville FREE Hamfest - Jacksonville, FL Tri-City ARC Auction - Gales Ferry, CT

 

10/30/2016

Long Island Hamfest and Electronics Fair - Hicksville, NY USECA Swap & Shop Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI



*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar



 

News Pacific Seafarer’s Net Assists in Rescue of Sailors on Sinking Sailboat

A great story sent by David Richer, WB6VGO about how amateurs helped rescue a sinking vessel in the Pacific.

Excellent work!

On September 28, 2016 at approximately 0300 UTC, Charles Houlihan, KD6SPJ, a net relay relay station for the Pacific Seafarer’s net while monitoring 14.300 received a call for assistance from the captain of the Sailing Vessel (SV) Rafiki. The captain reported that the SV Rafiki, a 35 foot sailing vessel, was taking on water. Charles who was the captain of the SV Jacaranda and located at sea, contacted Randy VanLeeuwen, KH6RC also a net relay and located in Hawaii. Randy contacted the US Coast Guard Station to report the incident and provide Rafiki’s location, 230 miles south of Cold Bay, Alaska.

Randy remained in constant radio contact with the Rafiki until contact with lost. Fred Moore W3ZU (Florida) and Peter Mott, ZL1PWM (New Zealand) additional net relays maintained contact with the captain of the Rafiki until the arrival of the Coast Guard the subsequent rescue.

According to a press release issued by the United States Coast Guard Station–17th District, a Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter and an Air Station Kodiak HC-130 Hercules were dispatched to the Rafiki’s last reported position. Upon arrival the crew of the Jayhawk helicopter were successfully able to hoist the captain and one additional crew member to safety aboard the helicopter.around 1000 hours UTC. Both men were reported to be uninjured. The vessel was abandoned.

This real-life incident happened during the daily “roll-call” conducted by the amatuer radio operators (or “hams”) and members of the Pacific Seafarers Net. Everyday at 0300 UTC amateur radio operators from North America, Hawaii, New Zealand and Australia monitor the progress of maritime amateur radio operators who are sailing on the Pacific.

Prior to the start of the roll call for “maritime mobile” vessels, a call for medical, emergency or priority traffic is broadcasted. It was after such a call for any emergency traffic that the call for assistance from the Rafiki was received.

According the the net’s website (www.pacseanet.com): “The Pacific Seafarer’s Net is a network of volunteer Amateur Radio Operators that handles radio and internet email communication traffic between sailing and motoring vessels operating on all oceans and land-based parties. The land station Net Control Amateur Stations are located in various locations throughout the Continental United States, Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand. Communications traffic consists of daily position reporting and automatic posting of positions on several websites, message handling via email relays, Health and Welfare traffic, phone patch services, search and rescue coordination, and vessel equipment inventories for search and rescue operations. Life threatening emergencies are taken from any vessel whether or not they have ham radio licenses. Net control stations keep computer databases on participating vessels and their movements throughout the oceans.”

 

Source: Amateurradio.com



Repeater Coordination Pioneer John Crockett, W3KH, SK

John Crockett, W3KH, of Columbia, South Carolina, died on October 12. An ARRL Life Member, he was 69. Licensed in 1963, Crockett was the developer of and project manager for the Southeastern Repeater Association (SERA) Universal Coordination System, as well as project manager for the entire SCHEART system, analog VHF and UHF linked repeaters, and, most recently, the Digital Mobile Radio linked repeater system. He was a member of the SERA Board of Directors and served as SERA Vice President.

“John was perhaps one of, if not the most beloved hams in South Carolina, but known far and wide,” said ARRL Roanoke Division Director Dr Jim Boehner, N2ZZ, who previously served as South Carolina Section Manager. “He is probably responsible for more Amateur Radio licensures in South Carolina than any other individual.”

Crockett worked with the South Carolina State Guard, sponsoring licensing classes and was a mentor and technical advisor. He was President of the Columbia Amateur Radio Club.

In 2011, Boehner and past Roanoke Division Director Dennis Bodson, W4PWF (SK), presented Crockett with the Roanoke Division ARRL Vic Clark W4KFC Service Award for his contributions to Amateur Radio.

“He was probably the best diplomat I’ve ever known,” Boehner said. “He worked with multiple repeater owners, clubs and groups, and helped them work together — a skill that has thoroughly impressed me.”

Crockett was an electrical engineer and, in his professional life, was Vice President of Engineering for the South Carolina Educational Television. He was an ardent advocate of emergency communication and served as net manager for the South Carolina Statewide ARES VHF/UHF Net, which met on the SC HEART Linked Repeater System.

“Amateur Radio and emergency communications had no greater advocate in South Carolina than John Crockett,” said Jenny Myers, WA4NGV, the president of the Charleston Amateur Radio Society, of which Crockett was an honorary member. “He will be greatly missed.”

Crockett served in the US Air Force and was a Vietnam War veteran. In the past, he held the call signs KC4YI, WA3EAJ, WA4EVC, WA4VUS, and HS3MC.

Boehner said Crockett was a strong supporter of the ARRL and very modest of his accomplishments. “When I think of an individual who has truly made a difference in Amateur Radio, his name comes right to the top,” Boehner said.

Source:

ARRL News



 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH039 - Jamboree On The Air(JOTA)

Oct 13, 2016 42:49

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Jamboree On The Air, the Red River Radio Amateurs Amateur Radio Club, Upcoming events and hamfests for the next two weeks and Hurricane Matthew and other news.

Tech Corner - Jamboree On The Air

Jamboree-on-the-Air(http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx), or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually the third full weekend in October. JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams around the world, around the nation, and in your own community. This jamboree requires no travel, other than to a nearby amateur radio operator's ham shack. Many times you can find the hams will come to you by setting up a station at your Scout camporee, at the park down the block, or perhaps at a ham shack already set up at your council’s camp.

 

Tell Me More

Scouts of any age can participate, from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts and Venturers, including girls. Once at the ham radio station, the communication typically involves talking on a microphone and listening on the station speakers. However, many forms of specialized communication may also be taking place, such as video communication, digital communication (much like sending a message on your smartphone but transmitted by radio), or communication through a satellite relay or an earth-based relay (called a repeater). The exchanges include such information as name, location (called QTH in ham speak), Scout rank, age, and hobbies. The stations you’ll be communicating with can be across town, across the country, or even around the world! The World Scout Bureau reported that nearly 1 million Scouts and almost 20,000 amateur radio operators participated in the 2015 JOTA, from more than 17,776 stations in 151 countries.

 

When Is It?

Jamboree-on-the-Air is held the third weekend in October. There are no official hours, so you have the whole weekend to make JOTA contacts. The event officially starts Friday evening during the JOTA Jump Start and runs through Sunday evening.

 

Frequencies To Use HF SSB Voice

Band

WOSM Calling Frequencies

Suggested Band Segment for US Stations

Notes

80 m

3.940 & 3.690(1)

3.920 – 3.940

3.670 – 3.690 (1)

(1) Extra segment

40 m

7.190 & 7.090 (2)

7.180 – 7.200

7.270 – 7.290

(2) 7.090 not available in Region 2

20 m

14.290

14.270 – 14.290

14.320 – 14.340

 

17 m

18.140

18.140 – 18.150

 

15 m

21.360

21.360 – 21.400

 

12 m

24.960

24.960 – 24.980

 

10 m

28.390 (3)

28.350 – 28.400 (3)

(3) Includes Novices & Techs

6 m

50.160

50.160 – 50.200

  HF CW

Band

WOSM Calling Frequencies

Suggested Band Segment for US Stations

Notes

80 m

3.570 (3)

3.560 – 3.570 (3)

(3) Includes Novices & Techs

40 m

7.030 (3)

7.030 – 7.040 (3)

(3) Includes Novices & Techs

20 m

14.060

14.050 – 14.060

 

17 m

18.080

18.070 – 18.080

 

15 m

21.140 (3)

21.130 – 21.140 (3)

(3) Includes Novices & Techs

12 m

24.910

24.900 – 24.910

 

10 m

28.180 (3)

28.170 – 28.180 (3)

(3) Includes Novices & Techs

6 m

50.160

50.150 – 50.160

  HF PSK-31

http://bpsk31.com

Call CQ JOTA. The chart below shows the commonly used frequencies for PSK-31.

Band

Frequency

Notes

80 m

3.580

 

40 m

7.080 (4)

(4) Region 2 (USA).

7.040 to 7.060 for Regions 1 & 3

30 m

10.142

 

20 m

14.070 (5)

(5) Most activity for JOTA will be on 20 m

17 m

18.100

 

15 m

21.080 (6)

(6) Most activity can be found at 21.070

12 m

24.920

 

10 m

28.120

  2 Meter FM Simplex

147.450, 147.480, 147.510, 147.540* * Use 147.540 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. Avoid 146.520, the National FM Simplex Calling Frequency, as well as 146.550, which is commonly used by mobiles and RVers.

70 CM FM Simplex

446.000*, 445.950, 446.050, 446.100, 446.150 * Use 446.000 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link.

D-STAR

http://www.dstarinfo.com

REF033A has been allocated as a full-time JOTA/Radio Scouting D-STAR Reflector. After contact is established, stations should disconnect from REF033A and connect to one or other repeater or migrate to an unused Reflector.

SIMPLEX Channels: 145.670*, 145.640, 145.610, 438.010. * 145.670  and 438.010 are commonly used as the National D-STAR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.

DMR

http://www.dmr-marc.net

All wide area talkgroups are permitted for use for JOTA for establishing contacts. After contact is established, stations should utilize as few resources as possible. For international, national, and regional QSO's, stations should move their transmissions to one of the DMR-MARC UA talkgroups or to the DCI TAC-310 talkgroup.

 

For intrastate contacts, stations may use their area's statewide talkgroup (if applicable). The use of your repeater's local talkgroup (if applicable) is always permitted. A full list of repeaters and their available talkgroups can be found at http://www.dmr-marc.net/repeaters.html .

 

SIMPLEX Channels: 441.0000*, 446.5000, 446.0750, 433.4500, 145.7900*, 145.5100. All simplex frequencies operate on time-slot 1 and use color code 1. (*are commonly used as the National DMR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.)

IRLP

http://irlp.net

http://www.irlptopics.net

Use Topic Channel Node 9091 as a Common Meeting Place or Calling Channel. After contact, disconnect from 9091 and one station should connect to another's local node.

EchoLink

http://www.echolink.org

Software or apps available for Windows, Mac, iPhone/iPad, and Android. Dedicated Conference Node *JOTA-365* (node 480809). When contact is made on a Conference Node, it is recommended the two parties establish direct contact with each other to free up the Conference Node.

APRS

144.39

http://aprs.org

http://aprs.org/cqsrvr.html

http://www.aprs-is.net/CQSrvr.aspx

CQSRVR: CQ JOTA

CQSRVR: CQ SCOUTS (other times of the year)

 

General Guidelines Jamboree-on-the Air is about getting young people to talk to each other using amateur radio. Arrange for the use of a club call sign, or apply for a special-event call sign in plenty of time. Prepare some simple diagrams and explanations showing how radio works and how signals can be transmitted around the world as well as to the nearest repeater. Arrange with the Scout leaders regarding venue, QSL cards, patches, participation certificates, other activities, physical arrangements, publicity, and details required for the JOTA report form on this website. Notify the national JOTA organizer of your event using the details on the registration form on this site. Go to Scout meetings beforehand to introduce the subject. Organize activities such as kit building, soldering practice, SSTV, FSTV, packet radio, and weather satellite reception. The simplest of things, such as a closed-circuit RTTY station, can generate a great deal of excitement. Offer to train Scouts for the Radio merit badge. Offer a Technician license preparation course for those interested in learning and doing more with ham radio. Ensure that no more than three Scouts are watching one Scout on the air. Keep Scouts involved and active or they will quickly grow bored. Ensure that the station is safe for young visitors. Observe your license conditions, especially regarding third-party traffic. Involve the Scouts in the contact. The goal is to involve as many Scouts as possible in making a contact. It is not to maximize the number of contacts or the distance of the contacts; it's about the experience for the Scouts. Try to use plain, understandable English where possible. When you do use Q-signals and other ham radio terms, take time to explain them to the Scouts. Don't try to work weak stations from remote locations. Go for stronger, more local stations that unpracticed ears can hear easily and understand. Local FM repeaters can be just as exciting for Scouts. Don't feel you have to keep the station on the air with no Scouts present.

 

Useful Internet Sites

K2BSA Amateur Radio Association

http://www.k2bsa.net

BSA JOTA Information

http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx

World Organization of the Scout Movement JOTA Information

http://www.scout.org/jotajoti/

ARRL JOTA Information

http://www.arrl.org/jamboree-on-the-air-jota

Ultimate resources site for everything ham radio

http://www.ac6v.com/

 

Discussion Groups

Best all-around Radio Scouting discussion group

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ScoutRadio/

Worldwide coverage; however, be certain to post identical information at ScoutRadio at Yahoo

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JOTAskedbook

Emphasis on discussion, announcements, and promoting getting "Scout Camps on the Air (SCOTA)"

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scoutcamps_ota/



 

 

Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com.

While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome!

Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now!

GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of...

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Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Red River Radio Amateurs

 

Website: http://rrra.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/W0ILO

 

Meetings

Third Tuesday of each month at 7PM in the basement of the Cass County Annex, 1010 2nd Ave South, Fargo, ND 58103 . Please enter through the north doors adjacent to the 2nd Ave S parking lot.

 

Repeaters

145.350 - PL 123 Moorhead, MN 146.760 - PL 123 Grandin, ND 147.255 + PM 123 Wheatland, ND 444.875 + PM 123 Moorhead, MN

 

Nets

Sundays at 9p - RRRA Repeater System Sundays at 8p - 146.520 Simplex

 

Activities

Skywarn Class Hamfest Hospital Exercise Fargo Marathon Headwaters Rally ADA Tour de Cure Field Day MS TRAM Ride Ojibwe Forests Rally FM Rotary Ride 2016 Simulated Emergency Test Jingle Bell Run License Testing



 

Upcoming Events

 

+ Classic Exchange, CW

1300Z, Sep 11 to 0800Z, Sep 12 and

 1300Z, Sep 13 to 0800Z, Sep 14

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Sep 14

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Sep 14 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Sep 15

+ RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB

1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Sep 16

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Sep 16

+ AGB NEMIGA Contest

2100Z-2400Z, Sep 16

+ ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest

0600 local, Sep 17 to 2400 local, Sep 18

+ SARL VHF/UHF Analogue/Digital Contest

1000Z, Sep 17 to 1000Z, Sep 18

+ Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW

1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18

+ All Africa International DX Contest

1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18

+ SRT HF Contest SSB

1300Z, Sep 17 to 1300Z, Sep 18

+ QRP Afield

1600Z-2200Z, Sep 17

+ New Jersey QSO Party

1600Z, Sep 17 to 0359Z, Sep 18 and

 1400Z-2000Z, Sep 18

+ New Hampshire QSO Party

1600Z, Sep 17 to 0400Z, Sep 18 and

 1600Z-2200Z, Sep 18

+ Washington State Salmon Run

1600Z, Sep 17 to 0700Z, Sep 18 and

 1600Z-2400Z, Sep 18

+ Feld Hell Sprint

1800Z-1959Z, Sep 17

+ North American Sprint, RTTY

0000Z-0400Z, Sep 18

+ BARTG Sprint 75

1700Z-2100Z, Sep 18

+ Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0100Z-0300Z, Sep 19

+ 144 MHz Fall Sprint

1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 19

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Sep 21

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Sep 21 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 21 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Sep 22

+ NAQCC CW Sprint

0030Z-0230Z, Sep 22

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23

+ ARRL EME Contest

0000Z, Sep 24 to 2359Z, Sep 25

+ CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY

0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25

+ Maine QSO Party

1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25

+ Texas QSO Party

1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and

 1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25

+ AGCW VHF/UHF Contest

1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and

 1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432)

+ RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW

1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24

+ UBA ON Contest, 6m

0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25

+ Classic Exchange, Phone

1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and

 1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28

+ Peanut Power QRP Sprint

2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25



*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar



Hamfests

 

10/13/2016

Microwave Update 2016 Conference - St. Louis, MO

 

10/14/2016

 

Pacific Division Convention (PACIFICON) - San Ramon, CA

 

10/15/2016

Al Brock Memorial Hamfest/Tailgate - Rome, GA Anderson RC's 38th Annual Hamfest - Anderson, SC ARRL Day in the Park - Columbia, MS Coastal ARS Savannah Swapmeet - Savannah, GA Greeneville Hamfest - Greeneville, Tn Kingman Ham Fest - Kingman, AZ Muskegon Color Tour Hamfest - Muskegon, MI Socorro Hamfest -  Socorro, NM SouthSide ARC Hamfest - Belton, MO Swaptoberfest - Rickreall, OR

 

10/16/2016

2016 Kalamazoo HamFest and Amateur Radio Swap & Shop - Kalamazoo, MI Conneaut ARC Hamfest - Conneaut, OH Connecticut State Convention (Nutmeg Hamfest) - Meriden, CT FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA RF Hill ARC Hamfest - Sellersville, PA

 

10/21/2016

Arizona State Convention (CopaFest 2016) - Maricopa, AZ Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Texoma Hamarama - Ardmore, OK

 

10/22/2016

4th Annual TailgateFest - Hollywood, MD Hamfest Chattanooga 2016 - East Ridge, TN Shelbyville Tailgate 2016 - Shelbyville, IN Wiregrass ARC Fall Tailgate - Headland, AL Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference - Wisconsin Rapids, WI

 

10/23/2016

Mason-Dixon Hamfest - Upperco, MD Massillon ARC Hamfest - Massillon, OH



*Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar



 

News “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS” Webinar Set for October 25

10/04/2016

Registration is open for the webinar “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS,” October 25 at 8 PM ET (0000 UTC on October 26).

US Air Force MARS Chief Dave Stapchuk, KD9DXM, will discuss the history of the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) program and membership requirements for Amateur Radio operators. He also will highlight the Joint MARS Phone Patch network, which provides daily support to US armed forces. The phone patch network facilitates not only morale/welfare phone patches but routinely handles mission-related radio calls and occasionally assists US air crews with in-flight emergency phone patches when air traffic control cannot be reached.

US Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, will discuss the quarterly US Department of Defense (DOD) contingency communication exercises, which promote interoperability between the Amateur Radio community and the DOD. English will also discuss initiatives for promoting the use of 60 meters between Amateur Radio and the federal government as well as the types of information MARS operators will request from the Amateur Radio community during the upcoming quarterly DOD communications exercise (COMEX), October 30-November 1.

Webinar registrants will receive a confirming e-mail that contains information about joining the webinar.

Hurricane Watch Net Stands Down Following Record Activation for Hurricane Matthew

10/09/2016

After the longest activation in its history, the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) secured operations for Hurricane Matthew on October 9 at 0400 UTC. HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, reports the net was in continuous operation for 6 days, 7 hours, gathering real-time ground-truth weather data and passing it along to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) via the Center’s WX4NHC. Various Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) nets also activated along the Eastern Seaboard over the past week. The first major hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season and, at one point, a Category 5 storm, Matthew has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, as it’s poised to head out into the Atlantic.

As of 0900 UTC, Matthew was still generating strong winds over eastern North Carolina, as it moves to the east-northeast just off the Outer Banks. The NHC reported that record-breaking flooding continues over portions of eastern North Carolina. The storm was some 30 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, with maximum sustained winds of 75 MPH, moving east at 14 MPH. The Hurricane Warning from Little River Inlet to south of Cape Fear has been discontinued, and the Hurricane Warning from Cape Fear to Surf City has been replaced with a Tropical Storm Warning, the NHC said.

“Many have perished in Haiti and Cuba as a result of Matthew, and the death-toll rises still,” Graves noted. “Many residents in the Bahamas and the US East Coast states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina have felt the impact of Matthew as well.”

Graves was appreciative of the Amateur Radio volunteers who took part in the HWN activation as well as of those who accommodated the net's lengthy operation on 20 and 40 meters. “As always, having a clear frequency benefits our net control stations and [lets us copy] those in the affected areas,” he said. “It’s unfortunate we had to occupy these frequencies for an extended time, but, no two emergencies are alike. And Matthew was certainly unlike any storm anyone has ever seen before.”

As Hurricane Matthew pulls away from the US East Coast, the Voice over Internet Protocol SKYWARN/Hurricane Net (VoIPWX) attracted a number of visitors, according to net managers. “On board Saturday afternoon, in addition to WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center, stations representing a number of Federal Emergency Management Agency regional offices and the National Response Coordination Center monitored the net for actionable intelligence to be used to plan recovery operations,” said net Public Affairs Officer Lloyd Colston, KC5FM. The net also activated on October 3 for Hurricane Matthew.

The net said its Georgia Reflector was linked to the WX-Talk conference, so net managers could help to relay relaying reports to local National Weather Service offices on NWSchat and the NHC.

According to Chief of Operations Dennis Dura, K2DCD, the net established a link up the East Coast into North Carolina and continued to monitor for damage assessment in areas the hurricane had already passed.

The net supported the NHC on the WX-Talk Conference, Node #7203 onEchoLink. IRLP Reflector 9219. IRLP Reflector 9553 was the backup.

The Salvation Army Team Emergency Network (SATERN) on 14.265 MHz also was active for Matthew, handling outbound emergency, priority, or health-and-welfare traffic from hurricane-affected areas.

Matthew was the first Category 5 Hurricane to form in the Atlantic Basin since Hurricane Felix in 2007.




 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH038 - Can You Hear Me Now? The RST Reporting System

Oct 6, 2016 50:26

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the RST Reporting System, the Moore County Amateur Radio Society and we are going to announce the winner of the Nanuk 904 case provided by Gigaparts.com.

 

Tech Corner - RST Reporting System History of the RST Reporting System

Many years ago, right around 1934 to be specific, an amateur radio operator by the name of Arthur W Braaten, W2BSR, made up the current reporting system that we use today. At the time there wasn’t a standardized system in place that amateurs could use to tell the transmitting station what their side of things sounded like. Of course, they could’ve just used the S-meters that was on their radio’s, if they had them that is. But that really doesn’t tell you a whole lot about how you sound.

There has been times in my limited conversations on the HF bands, where I could hear the other station just fine. They were clear and very understandable, but they barely moved the S meter on my radio. If I had told the other station that they were an S1-S3, they might take it that I was having a hard time hearing them. This is the way that it normally is on FM modes. If you have a low S meter reading on the receiving side, then you will probably be very noisy and hard to make out. However, Single Side Band(SSB) and High Frequency(HF) is an entirely different beast.

How Does it Work?

RST stands for Readability, Strength and Tone. Each part of the RST components go towards a different aspect of your transmission. In the example above, you may notice that we were only given a 59 report, what about the missing part of the system? In voice communications, you only use the first two parts, Readability and Strength. The last part, Tone, is only when you are using CW. It describes the Tone of the CW characters that you hear.

Let’s break it down a little further, shall we?

Readability

The “official” definition of Readability according to Wikipedia is:

A qualitative assessment of how easy or difficult it is to correctly copy the information being sent during the transmission.

When you are talking with CW, it refers to how easy or difficult it is to distinguish the characters of the message being received. In voice, it refers to how easy or difficult it is to understand what the transmitting station is saying.

The Readability is measured on a scale of 1 to 5:

 

Strength

The S in the RST Reporting System stands for Strength. Strength is the power of the signal coming in. This can be done simply by looking at the S meter on your radio and can be given by what the reading is. I have even heard people say “You are 59 plus 20 dB”. This comes from the signal being so strong that the S meter on the radio goes past S9. Quality HF receivers as calibrated in such a way that S9 is set to a signal of 50 microvolts with a change of 6dB per S unit. On VHF and above, receivers quality receivers are calibrated to that a S9 signal is 5 microvolts at the antenna connection. Both of these measurements require a 50 ohm antenna connection for best results

The Strength part of this system is measured on a scale of 1 to 9:

 

Tone

The T in the RST Reporting System stands for Tone. This part of the reporting system is only used when you are talking on CW or digital modes as it refers to the sounds of the tone itself.

Tone is measured on a scale of 1 to 9:

 

I have read a few articles that state there some people are trying to get the Tone part of the RST system changed to Q for Quality. There reasoning is that the Tone part is a limited feature being that it is only used in CW or Digital modes, whereas if it was changed to Quality, it could be used on voice as well to tell about the quality of your signal. My question is, isn’t that basically the same as the Readability part? What do yall think? Leave your comments below

QSL Reporting

If you have ever sent or received a QSL card, you probably know that there is a RST box that needs to be filled out on it. This box is a must to fill out, and really important that you fill it out correctly. In online log books, like Logbook of the World, I think that this is a mandatory field as well. I have heard of some people who just put down a 599 in the box and move on, especially during contests. I understand that if you are the one running the event or contest and you have a few thousand QSL cards to send out that you might get lazy and just put a 599 report on the card to save you some hassle. Or maybe when you log the QSO you don’t put it in right then, so later on you just have to guess.

Either way, as ham radio operators, our job is to pass information with the utmost accuracy during emergencies, so why should we be any different when there isn’t an emergency? One of the things that I have learned while being a 911 telecommunicator, is that if you don’t use it, you can, not have it when you need it. When I first started in this field over twelve years ago(wow, has it been that long), I learned a lot and generally used all that I learned on a regular basis. About four years after I started, I changed to a different dispatch and it was slower and was only fire, so some of my police things faded into the abyss of my mind. Now five years after that, I am back at a Sheriff’s Office and back to using those skill and am having to relearn some of them

What all this boils down to is this, and this applies to everything in life not just in amateur radio: Learn how to do something the correct way and always do it that way. If you do it in your everyday life the correct way, then when you are in a time of heightened emotions, such as an emergency, your training will take over.

My dad, KC5PWQ, always told me that “If something aint worth doing right, it aint worth doing at all!” So do like I did and take these words to heart and always do things the right way the first time. At the very least, it will save you have from having to do it over again because you did it wrong the first time.

Conclusion

To summarize what all we talked about in this post:

Readability – How well you can understand Strength – How strong is the signal Tone – How clear is the sound of the CW/Digital Accurate Reporting – Do it the right way the first time

And lastly,

Your thoughts on changing Tone to Quality

 

 GigaParts Logo

Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com.

While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome!

Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now!

GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of...

EHR10

...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

Moore County Amateur Radio Society

Website: http://mocars.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NC4ML/

Meetings

The third Thursday of every month (except December) at the Moore County Health Department, 705 Pinehurst Ave, Carthage, at 7:00p. Doors usually open just after 6:00p for people to come and ragchew. Occasionally meetings are held at other locations when special interests are addressed.

 

Repeaters

147.240+ PL 91.5 tone - Carthage, NC

 

Nets

2 meter net is Sunday and Wednesday evenings at 8:00 on 147.240 Repeater The Sandhills 6 meter net is Monday evenings at 8:00 on 50.200 USB

 

Activities

Winter Field Day Uwharrie Mountain Run Southern Pines Springfest Carthage Buggy Festival Badin Bomber Crash 1944 American Radio Relay League Field Day Moore County Fair Sardine Festival Uwharrie 100 Simulated Emergency Training Christmas Luncheon

 

Upcoming Events

 

+ NRAU 10m Activity Contest

1700Z-1800Z, Oct 6 (CW) and

 1800Z-1900Z, Oct 6 (SSB) and

 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 6 (FM) and

 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 6 (Dig)

+ SARL 80m QSO Party

1700Z-2000Z, Oct 6

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Oct 7

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 7

+ Makrothen RTTY Contest

0000Z-0759Z, Oct 8 and

 1600Z-2359Z, Oct 8 and

 0800Z-1559Z, Oct 9

+ Oceania DX Contest, CW

0800Z, Oct 8 to 0800Z, Oct 9

+ Microwave Fall Sprint

0800 local - 1400 local, Oct 8

+ SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

1200Z, Oct 8 to 2400Z, Oct 9

+ Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB

1200Z, Oct 8 to 1200Z, Oct 9

+ QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party

1200Z, Oct 8 to 2359Z, Oct 9

+ Pennsylvania QSO Party

1600Z, Oct 8 to 0500Z, Oct 9 and

 1300Z-2200Z, Oct 9

+ Arizona QSO Party

1600Z, Oct 8 to 0600Z, Oct 9 and

 1400Z-2359Z, Oct 9

+ FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint

1700Z-2100Z, Oct 8

+ PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint

2000Z, Oct 8 to 2000Z, Oct 9

+ North American SSB Sprint Contest

0000Z-0400Z, Oct 9

+ UBA ON Contest, CW

0600Z-0900Z, Oct 9

+ 10-10 Int. 10-10 Day Sprint

0001Z-2359Z, Oct 10

+ NAQCC CW Sprint

0030Z-0230Z, Oct 12

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 12

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Oct 12 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 12 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 13

+ RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW

1900Z-2000Z, Oct 12

+ NCCC RTTY Sprint

0145Z-0215Z, Oct 14

+ NCCC Sprint

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 14

+ MCG Autumn Sprint

1500Z-1900Z, Oct 14

+ JARTS WW RTTY Contest

0000Z, Oct 15 to 2400Z, Oct 16

+ 10-10 Int. Fall Contest, CW

0001Z, Oct 15 to 2359Z, Oct 16

+ Iowa QSO Party

1400Z-2300Z, Oct 15

+ New York QSO Party

1400Z, Oct 15 to 0200Z, Oct 16

+ Worked All Germany Contest

1500Z, Oct 15 to 1459Z, Oct 16

+ South Dakota QSO Party

1800Z, Oct 15 to 1800Z, Oct 16

+ Feld Hell Sprint

2000Z-2359Z, Oct 15

+ Asia-Pacific Fall Sprint, CW

0000Z-0200Z, Oct 16

+ UBA ON Contest, 2m

0600Z-1000Z, Oct 16

+ Illinois QSO Party

1700Z, Oct 16 to 0100Z, Oct 17

+ RSGB RoLo CW

1900Z-2030Z, Oct 16

+ Run for the Bacon QRP Contest

0100Z-0300Z, Oct 17

+ ARRL School Club Roundup

1300Z, Oct 17 to 2359Z, Oct 21

+ Telephone Pioneers QSO Party

1900Z, Oct 17 to 0300Z, Oct 18

+ Phone Fray

0230Z-0300Z, Oct 19

+ CWops Mini-CWT Test

1300Z-1400Z, Oct 19 and

 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 19 and

 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 20

 

*Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar


Hamfests

 

10/07/2016

Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Pacific Northwest VHF Society Conference - Bend, OR

 

10/08/2016

Alpena Swap - Alpena, MI BARA Fall Hamfest - Township of Washington, NJ Helena Hamfest - Helena, AL Kitsap County ARC Hamfest 2016 - Bremerton, WA LaGrange Hamfest -  LaGrange, GA Parkersburg/Wood County Hamfest - Mineral Wells, WV Randy Griffin Memorial Ham Fest - Morrilton, AR SwaptoberFest 2016 - Logan, UT WCLARC's 39th Annual Hamfest - Leesville, LA

 

10/09/2016

CARAFest 2016 - West Friendship, MD HOSARC Hamfest - Queens, NY Maysville Hamfest - Maysville, NC SEWFARS Swapfest - Hubertus, WI

 

10/13/2016

Microwave Update 2016 Conference - St. Louis, MO

 

10/14/2016

 

Pacific Division Convention (PACIFICON) - San Ramon, CA

 

10/15/2016

Al Brock Memorial Hamfest/Tailgate - Rome, GA Anderson RC's 38th Annual Hamfest - Anderson, SC ARRL Day in the Park - Columbia, MS Coastal ARS Savannah Swapmeet - Savannah, GA Greeneville Hamfest - Greeneville, Tn Kingman Ham Fest - Kingman, AZ Muskegon Color Tour Hamfest - Muskegon, MI Socorro Hamfest -  Socorro, NM SouthSide ARC Hamfest - Belton, MO Swaptoberfest - Rickreall, OR

 

10/16/2016

2016 Kalamazoo HamFest and Amateur Radio Swap & Shop - Kalamazoo, MI Conneaut ARC Hamfest - Conneaut, OH Connecticut State Convention (Nutmeg Hamfest) - Meriden, CT FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA RF Hill ARC Hamfest - Sellersville, PA

 

 

News ARRL Foundation Invites Scholarship Applications for 2017-18 Academic Year

09/28/2016

The ARRL Foundation will begin accepting scholarship applications on October 1 from eligible radio amateurs planning to pursue post-secondary education in the 2017-2018 academic year. Completed applications must be received by January 31, 2017. Individuals and clubs support many of the more than 80 scholarships, ranging from $500 to $5,000, that are awarded annually. Applicants for all scholarships must be active radio amateurs and must complete and submit the online application.

“The ARRL Foundation Board of Directors is very pleased to be entrusted with managing this program. The scholarship program is a wonderful way to encourage students to continue their Amateur Radio activities while assisting them with the costs of their higher education,” says ARRL Foundation Secretary and ARRL Development Manager Lauren Clarke, KB1YDD. “All ARRL Foundation scholarships are made possible by individuals or clubs, and we are grateful for their support.”

The Foundation reported that 81 radio amateurs were the recipients of 2016-2017 academic year scholarships it administers. Awards totaled $120,150.

Students planning to apply for 2017-18 academic year awards should first carefully review the eligibility requirements and scholarship descriptions. Although only one application per applicant is required, applicants may ask to be considered for as many of the scholarships for which they are eligible (some scholarships have geographic criteria or other requirements). Check off only the scholarships for which you would like to be considered. In addition to completing the online application, applicants must submit a PDF of their academic transcript from their most recently completed school year.

Applications are due on January 31, 2017, by 11:59 PM ET. Applications without accompanying transcripts will not be considered. Awards winners typically are notified in mid-May by USPS mail and e-mail.

Established in 1973 as an independent and separate IRS 501(c)(3) organization, the ARRL Foundation manages grant and scholarship programs to support the Amateur Radio community. All grants and scholarships are funded entirely by the generous contributions of radio amateurs, clubs and friends. Individuals, groups or clubs wishing to establish an ARRL Foundation Scholarship Fund should visitthe ARRL Foundation website.

For more information about ARRL Foundation scholarships, e-mail the ARRL Foundation (foundation@arrl.org) or call 860-594-0348.

More than 200 US Stations Signed Up for Scouting’s Jamboree on the Air

09/28/2016

So far, 219 US stations have registered to take part in Scouting’s 2016 Jamboree on the Air (JOTA), which will take place October 14-16. Registration remains open for the 59th annual event. Last year, 400 US stations registered. JOTA officials are asking JOTA 2016 participants not only to register for this year’s event, but to follow up with a post-JOTA report.

“We expect to have several thousand stations around the world signed up by JOTA weekend,” JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said in a JOTA-JOTI (Jamboree on the Internet) update. “Make sure you register your station.” Designated Scouting frequencies are on the “Guidelines for Amateur Radio Operators“ page. “Twenty meters is probably the go-to band during the daytime. Try moving off the calling frequency and spreading out while making those QSOs.” Wilson said that in addition to the DX spotting websites, there’s a Scout station spotting cluster.

He also suggested taking advantage of other communication modes, including the dedicated D-Star Scouting reflector 033A, as well as DMR, IRLP with topic channel 9091, and Echolink, with conference node JOTA-365. Doug Crompton, WA3DSP, and Elliott Liggett, W7QED, have set up Allstar node 41760 for JOTA/Scouting conversations, Wilson added. In addition to social media,ScoutLink is an excellent way to connect to Scouts around the world with only an Internet connection, he said.

“Dave Edwards, KD2E, and Andy O’Brien, K3UK, have developed a Scout scheduling page,” Wilson said. “You can use this to post your frequency and to pick up on other stations as well.”

More than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries — at nearly 18,000 stations — are expected to take part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences. “JOTA is about conversations across town and around the world, rather than about contacts,” Wilson said.

Further Reading:

Jamboree on the Air(JOTA/JOTI) - ETH Blog Post on 09/10/2015

 

“Cows Over the World” DXpedition May Be at an End

09/28/2016

[UPDATED 2016-09-30 @ 1505 UTC] The one-man “Cows Over the World” DXpedition has ended — prematurely, abruptly, and on a sad note. Tom Callas, KC0W, reported that a theft this week in Kiribati has left him with nothing. He toldThe Daily DX that his Cows DXpedition is "permanently QRT."

“Everything I own was stolen on 28 September from here in Kiribati,” Callas posted on his QRZ.com page. “They took all the radios, computers, amplifiers, antennas, coax, everything. They even took my clothing and shoes. I have literallynothing left. I type this with tears in my eyes.”

The “Cows Over the World” DXpedition got under way last spring, when the Minnesota DXer fired up as KH8/KC0W from American Samoa. Other stops followed. After a short hiatus, Callas had announced plans last week to resume with his T30COW operation from Western Kiribati, but he said his intended “Top 25 Most Wanted” DXpeditions would not happen. He has been financing the round-robin DXpedition on his own. Callas was awaiting permission to operate from Tokelau and Nauru. All call signs in the all-CW DXpedition tour have included a “COW” suffix.Callas has told The Daily DX that “all logs” for his T30COW operation have been uploaded to ClubLog. He also expressed his appreciation on his QRZ.com profile page.

“I have read the many supportive comments posted on both QRZ and eHam. A heartfelt thanks. Some guys have asked about financially donating to my plight. This is very generous, but I respectfully and humbly decline. Us people from the Midwest are like that. Either too proud (or too dumb) to accept money without actually working for it. Please donate your time helping a kid learn Morse code if you want to “donate” anything at all.

“My bank wired me funds so I can now eat again (literally). No joke, they even stole all my food. I have cancelled all future DXing activity until I return back to the USA and purchase new equipment. Gud DX es Long Live CW from here in Western Kiribati, where it’s always 5NN (except for when local ‘QRM’ makes you go QRT really quick).”

In addition to T30COW, his Cows DXpedition has also included operations as 5W0COW, T2COW, and YJ0COW. Announced plans of operating from the Solomons, Tokelau, Bangladesh and other locations now are off the table.

In the past, Callas has operated from St Helena Island (ZD7X), Cambodia (XU7XXX), Haiti (HH5/KC0W), and Martinique (TO0O), and he has handed out more than 100,000 contacts overall, including those logged from his Pacific operations.

 

Conclusion

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH Special Episode - International Podcast Day

Sep 30, 2016 10:13

Description:

IDP Banner

This is a special episode of the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! This is just a short episode that I wanted to get up today where I talk about International Podcast Day. It is started today, 9/29/16 at 3pm PDT and goes for about 30 hours. There is a new live stream every hour! 

Fellow Podcasters, people that might be interested in doing a podcast, or just those that might be curious, check it out.

http://www.internationalpodcastday.com

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2016/09/eth-idp/

 

ETH037 - We Have The Power!

Sep 29, 2016 01:21:55

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Power

Tech Corner - Power Cords Where to Connect Power on a Mobile Setup

You should always connect the positive side to either the hot terminal of the battery or the input leg of the fuse bose as close to the battery as possible. The negative side should be connected to the chassis where your your battery is connected.

The reasoning behind this is because vehicle come standard now with a battery monitoring system that monitors the battery voltage as well as power consumption needs of the vehicle(i.e. When the A/C is turned on, more power is needed). The monitor is typically connected between the batteries negative terminal and the chassis ground. You need to bypass this monitor when connecting radio equipment so alway connect your negative side to the same location as the negative battery lead is connected to. Because you are more than likely going to be killing the power to the entire vehicle, you could potentially activate the anti-theft device on your car radio and have to enter a security code to get it to work again. In some cases this could affect the starting of the vehicle as well, which could potentially have to be fixed at a dealership.

Selecting the Correct Size Wire

Make sure that you a big enough gauge wire to handle the amperage you need to power your equipment. There are several things to consider when selecting the size wiring you need. First off, you need to know what you Peak Current draw will be, not the average. A typical 100 watt radio draws about 22 peak amps while a 50 watt radio is about half that at about 11 amps. If you throw an amp in the mix that is even more.

High Power Installations

In high powered setups, like those that will include an amplifier, you should also install a second battery in your vehicle. This is typically done in the truck of the vehicle, if it has one. If you are going to install a second battery, you should use at least a 4 AWG wire or 2 AWG wire if the length of the wire is over 20 feet. You also need to make sure that you fuse the hot wire at both ends with about a 60 amp fuse to protect the wire. Also, make sure that you connect the negative side of that battery to the same chassis ground as your other battery, again bypassing the battery monitoring system.

Multiple Devices Needing Power

Whether you have a high powered setup or just multiple radios(which could technically be the same thing), one way to get power to all them the easiest is to use some kind of distribution power block, like a Rig Runner from West Mountain Radio. Like any other installation you need to know what you peak amperage is going to be when installing something like this. The higher gauge wire is only needed from the battery to the distribution block(Rig Runner). From there, you can use smaller gauge wire to each piece of equipment.

 

Can I Just Use the Existing Wiring? You never want to use the existing wiring in your vehicle to power you radios. Things like Accessory plugs(Cigarette lighter plugs), or tapping into the fuse panel inside your vehicle. While this may seem like the easiest way to do it, and I have been guilty of it myself, this can cause problems down the road. The high power consumption needs of your radio equipment can cause the wiring to overheat and cause RFI in your system.

You would think that it would be ok to tap into your fuse panel because an open fuse spot on the fuse block can “kill two birds with one stone”. One it could fuse your power cord and two you don't have to go through the fire wall. While you could do it for the short term and it probably be ok, I highly recommend that you take to time to install your equipment properly. Boing through the fuse panel doesn't allow you bypass the battery monitoring system and could potentially cause problems.

 

If you use the accessory plug to power your radio, you can get RFI because of the circuitry that is built into the plug. Another possible cause of potential RFI is arcing can occur between the spring loaded tip of the plug and the socket. Both of these potential problems could cause errors to show up in your vehicle’s computer and causing your check engine light to come on or other warning lights or error messages to show up.

Fuses

We have talked already about how you should fuse you wiring, but let's dive a little deeper into it shall we.

First off, what is a fuse? A fuse is a short piece of enclosed wire that is designed to melt if it is subjected to to high of a current. When the wire melts it will open the circuit and power will stop being supplied to your equipment. However, if you use a fuse that is rated for a higher amperage than what is required for whatever you are powering, it may not open or it may open but with a long delay. You want your fuse to do it’s job before the wire itself acts as a fuse and opens the circuit by potentially starting a fire.

The above picture is a perfect example of using the wrong size fuse. The wire used in the picture above is a 6 AWG wire which is rated for a maximum of 100 amps, however, the fuse that the wire is connected to is 200 amps.

There are several types of fuse holders out there for different types of fuses, but which should you use?

Barrel Fuses

The most common type of fuse that you see is a barrel type fuse. While there are several types of fuse holders for these type fuses, the most common that you will see are the inline ones. These are not the best kind to use, and here is why. With a barrel type in line fuse, you have two butt connections that you have make which are hard to solder and the wire that is supplied with the fuse holder is often two small of wire.

If you are going to use this type of fuse, I recommend using a fuse block or something along those lines with proper end connectors. I recommend using the round end connectors over the split ones so that they maintain good connection and not slip out. Also, you should use insulated connector whenever possible so that they don't inadvertently come in contact with something else.

Blade Fuses

Another type of fuse that you see quite often is a blade fuse. You really see these in the automotive industry, however, the fuses that you use in your car are not the same type of fuses that you should use in your radio installation. The fuses that you use in your car are called ATO fuses. These fuses are not sealed and if moisture winds up getting inside of them, it can cause corrosion. You should use ATO style blade fuses because they are sealed.

These are the type of fuses that you will see used in a Rig Runner or other type of commercially available power distribution system. There are also inline fuses that use these type of fuses, however you still run into the problem of have to use butt connectors to put them inline and the gauge wire issues are the same.

Circuit Breakers

Another option that sometimes is used is a circuit breaker. While you may think that this is a better option, because then all you have to do is reset the breaker if something happens, this is not really the case. Both fuses and circuit breakers have a time delay on when they open the circuit. With circuit breakers, that time is longer than with fuses. So your equipment will be subjected to a high amount of amperage for a longer period of time before the circuit breaker trips, potentially causing more damage to your equipment.

How to Run the Wires

First off, let's talk about the firewall. This is probably one of the most dreaded things for most people to do. It is right up there with drilling holes in your roof or truck to install an antenna. Car manufacturers don't typically design their firewalls with amateur radio in mind. That being said, there is, sometimes, a extra hole that is not used that is in the firewall for installation of high end radio installations that you can use.

If your vehicle has one, great! Use it! If not, rather than trying to squeeze a wire through one that already has wires going through it, is often not a very good idea to try. Most of the time, these holes are already pretty much full and you won't be able to get another wire through it, especially if you are using a higher gauge wire. So, as a dentist says, we have to drill!

Crap, I Have to Drill!

If you have to drill, there are a few things that you need to remember when you are planning out where you are going to drill. Most modern vehicles have a fresh air inlet just behind the hood. Sometimes this area will also have the windshield washer assembly or the cabin air filter. For this reason, the upper area of the firewall should be avoided.

Another thing to pay attention to, is in diesels and most high end vehicles, there is a second firewall that is in place to reduce engine noise in the cabin. The second firewall should also be avoided.

Thirdly, often times, the brake lines are attached to the engine side of the firewall directly behind the brakes.

Wherever you decide to drill, always make sure that you know what is on the other side of the firewall, so you don't damage anything that could potentially cost you a lot of money to get fixed.

Once you have the hole drilled, make sure that you put the appropriate size grommet in the hole. This is to protect whatever wires you have coming through from rubbing on the side of the hole and causing them to fray or get cut.

The last thing that you need to consider when choosing the location to drill, is make sure that the wires that you will be putting through the hole are not in a place where they will be stepped on or pinched. The closer to the outside of the vehicle on the driver side the better.

Probably one of the best bits to use to drill through your firewall is a Rotacut drill bit. They are pricey but they do an outstanding job according to their website and reviews.

We Are Going Under!

There is another way that you can get to the battery from inside your vehicle, especially if it is a truck. Sometimes there is a hole that can be punched out under the driver or passenger seat. Sometimes, if you are lucky there is already a grommet there, sometimes not. On my 2008 Ram, there was, but on my 2012 Ram, there wasn't.

If you decide to go this route, just remember to route your wires in a way where they won't be pinched and you will need to make sure and put some extra insulation on the outside of wiring to protect from moisture and heat.

Make sure that you stay away from the exhaust system, suspension members, factory wiring and fuel lines. On some vehicles, you can follow the brake lines and use the hard points to secure your wiring. On my 2012 Ram, I was able to run my wires through my frame most of the way. In doing this, I was able to protect the wire from road debris, and to an extent, moisture.

I'm Through the Firewall, Now What?

Now that the hard part is done and we are through the firewall, the next thing that you need to think about is how you are going to run your wires inside the cab of your vehicle to make it look nice. I know of some people that it doesn't really matter to them if wires are going everywhere, but if this is not you, then keep reading.

There are channels along the door that you can run your wires through. All you have to do is pull up the door kick plate and you will see it. These door trim pieces, just snap in and out. They generally pop out fairly easy and are just as easy to reinstall. See the picture below for an example of what I'm talking about. This picture is not of my installation although I did the exact same thing. This picture was taken from Alan Applegates, K0BG, website. I'm not sure if it is a picture of his installation or someone elses.

You can also route you wires under the carpet of your vehicle, but sometimes this can be a real pain the butt, however, it can be done.

The major thing that you need to remember when doing this, is to pay attention where you wires are lying. If they are lying in a place where they can get cut, or a screw be screwed through it, it is a recipe for disaster and you can see in the picture below.

What About Base/Home Setups?

So we have pretty much just been talking about mobile installations here, however, a lot of what we have talked about transfers over to a home or base station as well. The major differences is that you don't have to worry so much about external temperature, extra installation on your wiring, and going through the firewall…:)

You will still need to make sure you have proper wiring size, fusing your connections and to a certain degree, a neat installation. Guys you know what I'm talking about, I'm sure your wife is probably like mine and don’t want a bunch of wires running all over the place making the desk look nasty!

Further Reading:

K0BG - Wiring and Grounding Ham Radio Mobile Installation - Going Mobile - Ham Radio School.com

 

----------------------------------------------------- 

Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com.

While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome!

Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now!

GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of...

EHR10

...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Hall of Science Amateur Radio Club

Website: http://www.hosarc.org/

 

Meetings

Meetings which are held at the NY Hall of Science cafeteria (47-01 111th Street, Queens, NY) are open to the public and are held on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 PM. No meetings in July, August and December.

 

Repeaters

WB2ZZO 444.200 (+5mhz offset), PL 136.5 Located in Alpine NJ KC2PXT 145.270 (-600 khz offset), PL 136.5 Will be up soon

Activities

Hamfest - Oct 9, 2016 starting at 9am - Flyer

 

Upcoming Events NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2 German Telegraphy Contest - 0700Z-1000Z, Oct 3 ARS Spartan Sprint - 0100Z-0300Z, Oct 4 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 5 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Oct 5 and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 5 and 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 6 432 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Oct 5 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 5 NRAU 10m Activity Contest - 1700Z-1800Z, Oct 6 (CW) and 1800Z-1900Z, Oct 6 (SSB) and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 6 (FM) and 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 6 (Dig) SARL 80m QSO Party - 1700Z-2000Z, Oct 6 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 7 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 7 Makrothen RTTY Contest - 0000Z-0759Z, Oct 8 and 1600Z-2359Z, Oct 8 and 0800Z-1559Z, Oct 9 Oceania DX Contest, CW - 0800Z, Oct 8 to 0800Z, Oct 9 Microwave Fall Sprint - 0800 local - 1400 local, Oct 8 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2400Z, Oct 9 Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 1200Z, Oct 9 QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2359Z, Oct 9 Pennsylvania QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0500Z, Oct 9 and 1300Z-2200Z, Oct 9 Arizona QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0600Z, Oct 9 and 1400Z-2359Z, Oct 9 FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 8 PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint - 2000Z, Oct 8 to 2000Z, Oct 9 North American SSB Sprint Contest - 0000Z-0400Z, Oct 9 UBA ON Contest, CW - 0600Z-0900Z, Oct 9

 

*Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar



Hamfests



10/01/2016

2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY

 

10/02/2016

BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA

 

10/07/2016

Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Pacific Northwest VHF Society Conference - Bend, OR

 

10/08/2016

Alpena Swap - Alpena, MI BARA Fall Hamfest - Township of Washington, NJ Helena Hamfest - Helena, AL Kitsap County ARC Hamfest 2016 - Bremerton, WA LaGrange Hamfest -  LaGrange, GA Parkersburg/Wood County Hamfest - Mineral Wells, WV Randy Griffin Memorial Ham Fest - Morrilton, AR SwaptoberFest 2016 - Logan, UT WCLARC's 39th Annual Hamfest - Leesville, LA

 

10/09/2016

CARAFest 2016 - West Friendship, MD HOSARC Hamfest - Queens, NY Maysville Hamfest - Maysville, NC SEWFARS Swapfest - Hubertus, WI



 

News Amateur Radio Credited with Helping Injured Cyclist

09/23/2016

Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club (HARC) in Alabama had a role in getting help for a Louisiana cyclist injured in a September 17 group ride in Madison County, Alabama.

A representative of the sponsoring Spring City Cycling Club told WHNT-19 News that a number of riders, including Brian Guerrero, fell as a motor vehicle was passing in the opposite direction. The club spokesperson said it was unlikely that the motorist caused or contributed to the accident, and an investigation continues. The club praised the action of first responders and first aid from fellow cyclists — a trauma surgeon and a nurse.

“Their actions in first aid and in directly calling for MedFlight likely saved his life. Huntsville Amateur Radio Club volunteers were instrumental in coordinating the communications amongst event organizers and volunteers, emergency personnel, and law enforcement. We extend our gratitude to law enforcement, first responders and HARC for their able and quick response to this terrible incident,” the club said.

Guerrero remains hospitalized in Huntsville. — Thanks to WHNT-19 News

Momentum Building to Urge Senate Passage of the Amateur Radio Parity Act

09/22/2016

The response to ARRL’s call to action urging the support of US Senators for the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, has been gratifying — although the campaign continues. More than 50,000 e-mails have been sent to Capitol Hill viaRally Congress, and all 100 US Senate members have been contacted. The League continues to encourage members of the Amateur Radio community who have not yet done so to reach out to their two US Senators seeking their support. Just where things stand with respect to the bill’s future in the US Senate is not yet entirely clear.

“As of this moment, we have no date set for action by the Senate,” said ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who has been deeply involved in promoting passage of the legislation. “The Senate will adjourn the September work period soon and members will return home to campaign. If we do not achieve consideration before they go into hiatus, we will have to wait until they return after Election Day.”

On September 12, the US House of Representatives approved H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules, culminating many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The bill calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.”

Shepherded by ARRL, the overwhelming grassroots support for H.R. 1301 from the Amateur Radio community was credited for getting the bill through the US House, but it faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate. The earlier U.S. Senate version of the bill, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote on the version of H.R. 1301 that the House adopted this month. The vote came after ARRL worked with the Community Association Institute — which represents homeowners associations — to develop language that both organizations could support.

Rally Congress makes it easy to generate letters to Senators in support of The Amateur Radio Parity Act. The entire process takes just a couple of minutes.

“So it is critical that ARRL members continue to write their Senators,” Lisenco urged. “To those who have already written, thank you! If you haven’t done so already, please do so today. We can only do so much. After that, it becomes the responsibility of the membership to participate.”

According to the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”

More information on The Amateur Radio Parity Act is on the ARRL website.

 

ARRL Outgoing QSL Service to Raise Rates

09/22/2016

Although ARRL believes it’s important to maintain the long-standing tradition of the ARRL Outgoing QSL Service as a membership benefit, increased administration costs will require an increase in rates, in order to keep the Service available and viable.

“The Service has been a member benefit for decades,” an ARRL statement said. “Since its official formation in November 1976, tens of millions of QSL cards have been shipped from ARRL Headquarters to Amateur Radio QSL bureaus of other national societies worldwide. At one time, this benefit offered a safe, reliable, and inexpensive way to exchange QSL cards for a fraction of the cost of the postal service. What Amateurs saved in financial cost, however, was made up for in time; it could take months, or even years, to send and receive a QSL through the bureau.”

Effective November 1, the rate for 1 ounce of outgoing QSLs via the Service will increase to match the 1 ounce USPS international postage rate. As of September 2016, this rate is $1.15 per ounce — about 10 cards. An additional service fee of $7 will be charged per individual transaction, to cover administrative costs.

ARRL said QSLing is very different now, and, while postal services are generally more reliable than in years past, international shipping costs have risen significantly. “With the advent of the Internet and online QSL confirmation services such as ARRL’s Logbook of The World, fewer and fewer paper cards are being exchanged,” the ARRL statement observed.

Calling the Outgoing QSL Service “a significant tradition in the world of Amateur Radio,” the League said it’s committed to keeping that tradition and service alive for members who enjoy using it. “We are committed to ensuring our members will be able to send their QSL cards through the Service for decades to come,” the ARRL statement concluded.

 

Amateur Radio Volunteers on Call during Major Puerto Rico Power Outage

09/23/2016

Amateur Radio volunteers went on alert following an afternoon explosion on September 21 at the Aguirre Central Power Generator in Salinas that left some 1.5 million residents of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico without power. ARRL Public Information Coordinator Angel Santana, WP3GW, said that as Wednesday evening wore on, the most sought-after item was ice, followed by potable water — which depends on electricity to power the pumps that deliver it. The outage also resulted in traffic jams from non-functioning signal lights. The governor of Puerto Rico has declared a State of Emergency.

“On the Amateur Radio side, the VHF/UHF linked repeater system of the Federación de Radio Aficionados de Puerto Rico (FRA), an ARRL-affiliated club, was the main source of information,” Santana told ARRL. “As soon as the situation began, lots of mobile and portable stations got on the air from east to west to report on the power loss, and ham radio was among the first to report the explosion, as smoke was observed soaring toward the sky.”

According to FEMA, the fire at the Salinas switching station caused the island-wide power generation plant to shut down as a safety precaution. FEMA reported on September 23 that power had been restored to nearly 950,000 customers, with complete power restoration expected late in the day. FEMA said 305,000 customers were left without drinking water due to the loss of power to pumping stations.

FEMA said that all critical facilities were operating on back-up generators, and airports, police stations, and water plants were “expected to receive first priority as power is restored.” The agency said telecommunications were operating normally.

Santana said the eastern side of the island was covered by the 145.110 MHz repeater in Cayey, the western by a machine on 145.290 MHz, and in the center by the 146.830 MHz from the FRA. Repeaters on 70 centimeters became the main network for any emergency or health care traffic, Santana said.

A routine Wednesday VHF net made it on the air as scheduled, and most comments and messages involved local situations as well as information about an October 9 FRA event. “Other repeater systems were on the air as part of a regular monitoring schedule, and some were active with normal conversations,” Santana said.

On HF, Antonio Santiago, KP4IA, in Toa Alta was on the air from his energy-efficient home. Santana said KP4IA was “the main source of what was happening even before the situation got to the mainland news services,” checking into nets on 20, 40, and 75 meters and relaying information about the situation to other amateur stations on the mainland.

Santana said local schools remained closed on September 23 and public services were to resume at 10 AM, as power and water service is returning gradually.

“There are still Autoridad de Energía Eléctrica (AEE) customers who are without electricity,” Santana said. “Two cellular companies had problems. There was at least one death because of generator emissions and a few vehicle accidents. Kudos to the police personnel directing traffic.”

FEMA said untreated wastewater and sewage were being discharged into spillways, hospitals were running on back-up generators and cisterns, and buses are being used to move passengers as the light-rail system is down.

NASA provided a view from space, showing how Puerto Rico appears at night with full power as well as how it looked during the outage.

Source:

ARRL News

 

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Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

ETH036 - Don't Skimp on the Coax

Sep 22, 2016 01:06:00

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about

 

 

Tech Corner - Coax

Coax is probably one of the main components of your station that you should NOT skimp on the cost of. You should always get the best coax that you can afford! You can have the best radio and the best antenna but have crappy coax and your neighbor could have a crappy radio and antenna but awesome coax, and your neighbor will nine times out of ten have a better signal than you do.

 

Let's do some math…

 

For easy math, let's say that your coax has a line loss of 3 dB per 100 feet and you have a 100 foot run, your radio has a transmitter power of 100 watts and your antenna has a 3 dB gain.

 

100(w) - 3 dB(coax loss) = 50(w)

50(w) + 3 dB(Antenna Gain) = 100(w)

 

In this example, you didn't gain anything but you also didn't loose anything. Let’s take it one step more now and say that you have 200 foot run now.

 

100(w) - 6 dB(200 ft coax loss) = 25(w)

 

*every 3 dB, your sign either doubles or halves; so at 3 dB you have 50 watts and for the next 3dB you are down to 25 watts

 

25(w) + 3 dB(antenna gain) = 50(w)

 

By doubling your coax length, you cut your radiated power in half.

 

In this example, we are also assuming that you have perfect 1:1 SWR on your antenna. If it is more than that, you have even less being radiated. You also have to take into account what frequency you are talking on. A coax that has a loss of 3 dB around 100 MHz or the 2 meter band, might have a 6 dB loss around 400 MHz or or the 70 cm bands.

 

Coax dB Loss per 100 Feet using common coax types:

dB Loss / 100 feet

Frequency Mhz

Cable Type

1.0

10

50

100

200

400

900

1000

3000

5000

6A, 212

.26

.83

1.9

2.7

4.1

5.9

6.5

9.8

23.0

32.0

8 MINI, 8X

 

1.1

2.5

3.8

5.4

7.9

8.8

13.0

26.0

 

LMR -240

.24

.76

1.7

2.4

3.4

4.9

7.5

7.9

14.2

18.7

8, 8A, 10A, 213 (RG8/8A hard to find )

.15

.55

1.3

1.9

2.7

4.1

7.5

8.0

16.0

27.0

9913, 9086, 9096

   

0.9

1.4

1.8

2.6

4.2

4.5

 

13.0

4XL8IIA, FLEXI 4XL

   

0.9

1.4

1.8

2.6

4.2

4.5

 

13.0

LMR-400

   

.9

1.2

 

2.5

4.1

4.3

   

LMR-500

   

.7

1.0

 

2.0

3.2

3.4

   

LMR-600

   

.6

.8

 

1.4

2.5

2.7

   

8214

 

.60

1.2

1.7

2.7

4.2

 

7.8

14.2

22.0

9095

   

1.0

1.8

2.6

3.8

6.0

7.5

   

9, 9A, 9B, 214

.21

.66

1.5

2.3

3.3

5.0

7.8

8.8

18.0

27.0

11,11A,12,12A,13,13A, 216

.19

.66

1.6

2.3

3.3

4.8

 

7.8

16.5

26.5

14, 14A, 217

.12

.41

1.0

1.4

2.0

3.1

 

5.5

12.4

19.0

17,17A,18,18A, 218, 219

.06

.24

.62

.95

1.5

2.4

 

4.4

9.5

15.3

55B, 223

.30

1.2

3.2

4.8

7.0

10.0

14.3

16.5

30.5

46.0

58

.33

1.2

3.1

4.6

6.9

10.5

14.5

17.5

37.5

60.0

58A, 58C

.44

1.4

3.3

4.9

7.4

12.0

20.0

24.0

54.0

83.0

59, 59B

.33

1.1

2.4

3.4

4.9

7.0

11.0

12.0

26.5

42.0

62, 62A, 71A, 71B

.25

.85

1.9

2.7

3.8

5.3

8.3

8.7

18.5

30.0

62B

.31

.90

2.0

2.9

4.2

6.2

 

11.0

24.0

38.0

141,141A, 400, 142, 142A

.30

.90

2.1

3.3

4.7

6.9

 

13.0

26.0

40.0

174

2.3

3.9

6.6

8.9

12.0

17.5

28.2

30.0

64.0

99.0

178B,196A

2.6

5.6

10.5

14.0

19.0

28.0

 

46.0

85.0

100

188A, 316

3.1

6.0

9.6

11.4

14.2

16.7

 

31.0

60.0

82.0

179B

3.0

5.3

8.5

10.0

12.5

16.0

 

24.0

44.0

64.0

393, 235

 

.6

1.4

2.1

3.1

4.5

 

7.5

14.0

21.0

402

 

1.2

2.7

3.9

5.5

8.0

 

13.0

26.0

26.0

405

             

22.0

   

LDF4-50A

.06

.21

.47

.68

.98

1.4

2.2

2.3

4.3

5.9

LDF5-50A

.03

.11

.25

.36

.53

.78

1.2

1.4

2.5

3.5

Note: These tables are typical specifications for comparison only.

Values may not be exactly as quoted by a specific mfg.

*http://www.hamuniverse.com/coaxdata.html

Connectors

 

The other aspect of coax that you need to pay attention to is the end connectors that you use. While it is tempting to use the cheap $0.25 to $0.50 a piece PL-259 connectors that you can get at most hamfests, it is better to use a more high quality version of them. The cheap ones that you find are often very cheaply made and can be damaged easily while you are trying to solder it onto the coax. Often while you are soldering these ends on you can very easily get to much heat in the center point and melt the insulation before you are able to solder the shielding to the sides of the connector.

 

Check out this page,  K0BG.com - Coax and PL259 for more information about coax and connectors. It is a very nice article written by Alan Applegate, K0BG. He was the guest on episode 28, where we talked about mobile installations.



 

 

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While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome!

Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now!

GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of...

EHR10

...at check out to receive 10% off the price of the case!

 

 



Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Socorro Amateur Radio Association

 

Website: http://www.socorroara.org/

About SARA

Amateur radio has been part of the landscape in Socorro since the 1930's. By the mid-1970's, informal meetings of members and their families were occurring and SARA made the transition to a formal association on May 1, 1976.  Although participation in the association has ebbed and flowed since, SARA has remained a vital element of both the amateur radio and Socorro communities since its formation.  Although a smaller southwest community, Socorro is very high tech.  The ARRL featured Socorro and SARA in the QST article, "Socorro, New Mexico -- Ham City, USA? (QST, December 1996, pp. 43-45)," an article by Dave Finley (N1IRZ) that highlighted the area's high per capita interest in amateur radio.   New Mexico Tech is a high quality, Socorro-based university offering bachelors degrees through doctorates in science, mathematics and engineering disciplines.  The NSF-funded National Radio Astronomy Observatory is located on the NMT campus and coordinates activities of the Very Large Array and Very Large Baseline Array.  Employees from diverse research endeavors ranging from the geophysics to defense make Socorro and SARA home.

 

Repeaters 146.680 - 100 or 123 input tone, 123 output tone - Socorro Peak 444.500 + D-Star Repeater

 

Netsp Weekly Socorro ARES Net - Wed 1930 - 146.680 Repeater Weekly Tri-County ARES Net - Thur 1930 - URFMSI System via the 146.680 Repeater New Mexico D-Star Net - Thur 2000 on DStar REF055A

 

Meetings SARA Club Meeting - Second Wed @ 1930(Except December) - Socorro County Annex, 198 Neel Ave. Burger King: Coffee every Saturday ~8:00 to 9:30 hrs at Burger King.   Capitol Bar on the Plaza - Weenie Wednesdays (on the patio in good weather) beginning in late afternoon. Twisted Chili - Friday Happy Hour beginning at 5:30 PM (on the patio in good weather).

 

Activities DX QRP Digital Modes Community Service Hamfests - Oct 15 8a-2p Field Day



 

Upcoming Events

Contests

EME Contest Objective: To work as many amateur stations as possible via the earth-moon-earth path on any authorized amateur frequency above 50 MHz. Dates - Three full weekend 48-hour periods (0000 UTC on Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday). Dates for 2016 are: 2.3 GHz & Up - September 24-25, 50 to 1296 MHz - October 22-23 and November 19-20 Log Submission Deadline - All entries must be emailed or postmarked no later than 2359z Wednesday, December 21, 2016. NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY - 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25 Maine QSO Party - 1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25 Texas QSO Party - 1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and 1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25 AGCW VHF/UHF Contest - 1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and 1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432) RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW - 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24 UBA ON Contest, 6m - 0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25 Classic Exchange, Phone - 1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and 1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28 Peanut Power QRP Sprint - 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25 220 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 27 SKCC Sprint - 0000Z-0200Z, Sep 28 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 28 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 28 and 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 28 and
 0300Z-0400Z, Sep 29 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Sep 28 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW - 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 29 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2

 

*Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar



Hamfests

 

09/23/2016

W4DXCC DX and Contest Convention - Pigeon Forge, TN

 

09/24/2016

41st Annual Elmira International HamFest - Horseheads, NY Bloomington ARC Hamfest  - Bloomington, IN CLARC ANNUAL HAMFEST - Alexandria, LA Covington Hamfest - Covington, GA DVRA 2016 Hamfest - West Windsor, NJ FreeGate 2016 - Greensboro, NC North Dakota State Convention (RRRA Hamfest) - West Fargo, ND ORC Regional Fall Swapfest - Cedarburg, WI Pasco County HamFest - Odessa, FL Pensacola Hamfest - Pensacola, FL RADIO EXPO 2016 - Belvidere, IL Reno Ham Swap - Verdi, NV Richmond KY Hamfest - Richmond, KY San Joaquin Valley Section Convention (Rally in the Valley) - Modesto, CA SMARTSFEST 2016 - Henderson, MN Washington State Convention (Spokane Hamfest) - Spokane Valley, WA

 

09/25/2016

Cleveland Hamfest and Computer Show - Berea, OH Ocean Monmouth County ARC Tailgate and Hamfest - Wall Township, NJ

 

10/01/2016

2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY

 

10/02/2016

BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA

 

 

News

 

Amateur Radio Parity Act Passes in the US House of Representatives!

09/14/2016
“The bill is passed without objection.” With those words, Amateur Radio history was made on September 12, when the US House of Representatives approved the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules. The focus of the campaign to enact the legislation into law now shifts to the US Senate. The House victory culminated many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301 shepherded by ARRL that a bill made it this far. The legislation faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate, however.

“This is huge step in our effort to enact legislation that will allow radio amateurs who live in deed-restricted communities the ability to construct an effective outdoor antenna,” ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said. “Thanks to everyone for their help in this effort thus far. Now we must turn our full attention to getting the bill passed in the Senate.”
RARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee, has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward. “This has been a multiyear effort that is finally seeing some light,” he said. “The passage of the bill in the House is a major accomplishment, due to the hard work of so many — from the rank-and-file member to the officers and directors.”

Lisenco said it’s not a time to rest on our laurels. “We are only halfway there. The focus now shifts to our effort in the Senate,” he said. “We are beginning a massive e-mail campaign in which we need every member to write their two Senators using our simplified process. You will be hearing from President Roderick and from your Directors, asking you to go to our ‘Rally Congress’ page. Using your ZIP code, e-mails will be generated much like our recent letter campaign. You’ll fill in your name and address and press Enter. The e-mails will be sent directly to your Senators without you having to search through their websites.”

Lisenco said getting these e-mails to members’ Senators is a critical part of the process. “Those numbers matter! Please help us help you by participating in this effort,” he said.

As the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”

During this week’s limited debate, the House bill’s sponsor, Rep Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), thanked ARRL and the Community Associations Institute (CAI) for reaching an agreement to move the bill forward “in a bipartisan and very positive manner.” He pointed out to his colleagues that Amateur Radio antennas are prohibited outright in some areas.

“For some this is merely a nuisance,” Kinzinger said, “but for others — those that use their Amateur Radio license for life-saving emergency communications — a dangerous situation can be created by limiting their ability to establish effective communication for those in need.”

Kinzinger said that in emergencies, hams can provide “a vital and life-saving function” when conventional communication systems are down. He also praised the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), a US Department of Defense-sponsored program, comprised largely of Amateur Radio volunteers, that also supports communication during emergencies and disasters.

Cosponsor US Rep Joe Courtney (D-CT) also urged the bill’s passage. “This is not just a feel-good bill,” Courtney said, recounting how Hurricane Sandy brought down the power grid, and “we saw all the advanced communications we take for granted…completely fall by the wayside.” Ham radio volunteers provided real-time communication in the storm’s wake, he said, saying the legislation was a way “to rebalance things” for radio amateurs who choose to live in deed-restricted neighborhoods by enabling them to install “non-intrusive antennas.”

Courtney noted that he spoke recently with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, and said that Wheeler “strongly supports this legislation.”

Leading up to the vote, Rep Paul Tonko (D-NY) also spoke in support of the legislation, calling it a commonsense approach that would build “fairness into the equation for Amateur Radio operators” in dealing with homeowners associations.

The earlier U.S. Senate version of the Amateur Radio Parity Act, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote by unanimous consent on the version of H.R. 1301 that was adopted by the House on September 12.

 

New Section Manager Appointed in Northern New Jersey

 

09/16/2016

Steve Ostrove, K2SO, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, has been appointed as ARRL Northern New Jersey Section Manager, effective September 16. He takes the reins of the Northern New Jersey Field Organization after Richard Krohn, N2SMV, announced that he was stepping down. Krohn, of Manalapan, has served as the Northern New Jersey Section Manager since July 2008.

ARRL Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, received Krohn’s resignation and recommendation for his replacement. He then consulted with ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, before making the appointment.

Ostrove will complete the current term of office that extends until June 30, 2017.

Ostrove has served as Assistant Section Manager in Northern New Jersey since 2009, and was the Section Emergency Coordinator from 2001 through 2008. He is currently a District Emergency Coordinator, Official Emergency Station, and Official Relay Station.

 

SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net Debuts

 

09/14/2016

The SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net is on the air, encouraging young radio amateurs to get on the air and learn about the SKYWARN weather-spotting network and basic weather facts.

The SKYWARN Youth Net meets on most Southwest Missouri SKYWARN repeaters Sunday evenings at 7:30 PM CT and is open to all hams via EchoLink.

The net will first take check-ins from young hams aged 25 and younger. The net also will offer an opportunity for participation by unlicensed young people in ham radio households who may be interested in obtaining a ham ticket.

“As this net grows and evolves, we hope to create and present brief educational segments,” said George Sfair, KJ6TQ. “We invite all young hams, their families, and the Amateur Radio community in general to check into this net. Young hams are the future of this hobby, and we encourage them to get involved, to get out on the air and talk, and to invite their friends to become hams as well.”

The SKYWARN Youth Net is held on Missouri linked repeaters in Fordland/Springfield, 145.49 MHz (136.5 Hz tone); Joplin, 145.35 MHz (91.5 Hz tone); Walnut Grove, 147.33 MHz (162.2 Hz tone); Buffalo, 147.18 MHz (136.5 Hz tone), and Branson, 147.15 MHz (162.2 Hz tone), as well as on EchoLink node 291849 or NNWS-R. — Thanks to George Sfair, KJ6TQ

 

Source:

ARRL News



 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 




ETH035 - Elmers, Are You Doing Your Part?

Sep 15, 2016 59:14

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Elmers

 

 

Tech Corner - Elmers

Origin of the term "Elmer"

The term "Elmer"--meaning someone who provides personal guidance and assistance to would-be hams--first appeared in QST in a March 1971 "How's DX" column by Rod Newkirk, W9BRD (now also VA3ZBB). Newkirk called them "the unsung fathers of Amateur Radio." While he probably was not trying to coin a term at the time, here's how Newkirk introduced "Elmer" in his column and, as it turned out, to the rest of the Amateur Radio world:

"Too frequently one hears a sad story in this little nutshell: 'Oh, I almost got a ticket, too, but Elmer, W9XYZ, moved away and I kind of lost interest.'"

Newkirk went on to say, "We need those Elmers. All the Elmers, including the ham who took the most time and trouble to give you a push toward your license, are the birds who keep this great game young and fresh."--Rick Lindquist, N1RL

As you can see, the term is not very old. Prior to the first use of Elmer as the one who guided and encouraged us, what were these folks called? We have received a lot of suggestions; teacher, mentor, tutor, guide, helper, sage? All are appropriate, but first and foremost they are called friend.

Elmer Award

Elmer Booklet - for the New or Prospective Radio Amateur - A little old but has some decent information



 

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Cape May County Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.cmcarc.org/

The Stone Harbor Amateur Radio Klub "SHARK" was formed in March of 1975, having primary objectives of: providing a public service to the nearby shore communities through the development of supplemental emergency communications facilities; to encourage and assist interested individuals in qualifying for an amateur radio operators license; and to promote friendship and cooperation among amateurs who live in or visit the shore area. In 1980 the Stone Harbor Amateur Radio Klub changed its name to the Cape May County Amateur Radio Club to reflect the membership base that had been established.

 

Repeaters

146.610 - PL 88.5 Cape May County Crest Haven Complex

Nets

Thursdays @ 8pm - 146.610 PL 88.5 Monday @ approx 9:30am - 7.197 LSB

Meetings

Third Wednesday @ 7pm - Operations room at the Cape May County Office of Emergency Management located in the basement of the County Library, 30 W. Mechanic St., Cape May Court House Wednesday @ 10am - Villas Diner & Pizzaria, 2100 Bayshore Road, Villas, NJ

Activities

Field Day ILLW Lighthouse Lightship weekend Bicycle races Marathons Special Kids Fish For Fun Day Special Event Station Christmas Social

 

 

Upcoming Events

Contests

10 GHz and Up Objective -  The objective of 10 GHz and Up is for North American amateurs work as many amateur stations in as many different locations as possible in North America on bands from 10-GHz through Light. Amateurs are encouraged to operate from more than one location during this event. See the detailed rules for restrictions. Dates - Third full weekend of August and September (August 20-21, 2016 and September 17-18, 2016). Operations may take place for 24 hours total on each contest weekend. Each weekend begins at 6:00 AM local Saturday though 12:00 midnight local Sunday. Log Submission Deadline - Logs must be submitted no later than 0000 UTC Tuesday, October 18, 2016. EME Contest Objective: To work as many amateur stations as possible via the earth-moon-earth path on any authorized amateur frequency above 50 MHz. Dates - Three full weekend 48-hour periods (0000 UTC on Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday). Dates for 2016 are: 2.3 GHz & Up - September 24-25, 50 to 1296 MHz - October 22-23 and November 19-20 Log Submission Deadline - All entries must be emailed or postmarked no later than 2359z Wednesday, December 21, 2016. New Jersey QSO Party Objective - Contact as many NJ amateurs in as many NJ counties as possible. NJ stations contact as many amateurs in the US, Canada and the world as possible. Dates - September 17 & 18, 2016. Sat. 1200 (noon) EDST (1600 UTC) to 2359 EDST (0359 UTC) and Sun. 1000 EDST (1400 UTC) to Sun. 1600 EDST (2000 UTC) Log Submission Deadline - Only electronic Cabrillo logs will be accepted. All logs must be emailed tonjqp at comcast.net by October 1. NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 16 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 16 AGB NEMIGA Contest - 2100Z-2400Z, Sep 16 SARL VHF/UHF Analogue/Digital Contest - 1000Z, Sep 17 to 1000Z, Sep 18 Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW - 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 All Africa International DX Contest - 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 SRT HF Contest SSB - 1300Z, Sep 17 to 1300Z, Sep 18 QRP Afield - 1600Z-2200Z, Sep 17 New Hampshire QSO Party - 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0400Z, Sep 18 and 1600Z-2200Z, Sep 18 Washington State Salmon Run - 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0700Z, Sep 18 and 1600Z-2400Z, Sep 18 Feld Hell Sprint - 1800Z-1959Z, Sep 17 North American Sprint, RTTY - 0000Z-0400Z, Sep 18 BARTG Sprint 75 - 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 18 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest - 0100Z-0300Z, Sep 19 144 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 19 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 21 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 21 and 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 22 NAQCC CW Sprint - 0030Z-0230Z, Sep 22

 

*Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar

 

Hamfests

09/16/2016

The ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference - St. Petersburg, FL W9DXCC DX Convention & Banquet - Schaumburg, IL

 

09/17/2016

All-Arkansas Hamfest - Little Rock, AR Augusta Hamfest - Grovetown, GA Gadsden Hamfest -  Attalla, AL GRAHamfest 2016 - Wyoming, MI Illinois State Convention (Peoria Superfest) - Peoria, IL OH-KY-IN Hamfest -  Cincinnati, OH St. Croix Valley ARC Hamfest - Alexander, ME Tenth Annual Sacramento Valley Hamfest - Lincoln, CA

 

09/18/2016

Adrian Hamfest - Adrian, MI FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA Garden State ARA Hamfest - Tinton Falls, NJ

 

09/23/2016

W4DXCC DX and Contest Convention - Pigeon Forge, TN

 

09/24/2016

41st Annual Elmira International HamFest - Horseheads, NY Bloomington ARC Hamfest  - Bloomington, IN CLARC ANNUAL HAMFEST - Alexandria, LA Covington Hamfest - Covington, GA DVRA 2016 Hamfest - West Windsor, NJ FreeGate 2016 - Greensboro, NC North Dakota State Convention (RRRA Hamfest) - West Fargo, ND ORC Regional Fall Swapfest - Cedarburg, WI Pasco County HamFest - Odessa, FL Pensacola Hamfest - Pensacola, FL RADIO EXPO 2016 - Belvidere, IL Reno Ham Swap - Verdi, NV Richmond KY Hamfest - Richmond, KY San Joaquin Valley Section Convention (Rally in the Valley) - Modesto, CA SMARTSFEST 2016 - Henderson, MN Washington State Convention (Spokane Hamfest) - Spokane Valley, WA

 

09/25/2016

Cleveland Hamfest and Computer Show - Berea, OH Ocean Monmouth County ARC Tailgate and Hamfest - Wall Township, NJ


 

News Higher Bands Will Pick Up this Fall, Data Suggest Smaller Solar Cycles Lie Ahead

09/08/2016

Propagation guru Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA, says that, while conditions on 12 and 10 meters will pick up as they always do in the fall, F2 propagation on those bands will decline thereafter, with only sporadic E during the summer months as a possible saving grace. On the other hand, the lower bands — 160, 80, and 40 meters — should be good going forward, and 20 and 17 meters will be the mainstays of daylight HF propagation. Luetzelschwab made these observations during an August 23 World Wide Radio Operators Foundation (WWROF)-sponsored webinar “Solar Topics — Where We’re Headed.” He said data suggest that Cycle 24, the current solar cycle, will bottom out in 2020, and advised that radio amateurs may need to lower their expectations on the higher bands (and 6 meters) looking beyond that.

“I think the only conclusion we can make with some confidence is that we are headed for some small cycles,” he told his audience. He cited various evidence related to the Sun’s polar fields — which appear to be decreasing in strength, A index trends, and cosmic ray data to support his assertion. Luetzelschwab cautioned, however, that past performance does not necessarily predict future performance.

“There seems to be a good correlation between how long a solar minimum is and the next solar cycle,” said Luetzelschwab. “The longer you spend at solar minimum, the smaller the next cycle.”

He observed that hams active since the 1950s and 1960s have experienced short inter-cycle solar minimums of approximately 2 years, until the one between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24, which lasted about 4 years. He also allowed that the science is not fully understood, and that some things appearing to be patterns may just be coincidences.

On the other hand, he said, it looks like the downward trend of disappearing sunspots has leveled off, suggesting that Cycle 25 may see a lower smoothed sunspot number as opposed to zero or near-zero sunspots.

Counting those sunspots can be a subjective business. “That’s a tough job,” he said of the task, noting that it appears observer bias also has been a factor over the years, affecting historical sunspot data. “We now have new corrected data that are believed to be more accurate.”

Luetzelschwab’s article “The New Sunspot Numbers,” appearing in the October issue of QST, will discuss the new sunspot numbers.

Luetzelschwab cited historical sunspot cycle data going back centuries — including the “Maunder Minimum” of zero and near-zero sunspots between the years 1645 and 1715 and a later, less-drastic “Dalton Minimum.” He pointed out that over the last 11,000 years, 19 notable grand maximums — including Cycle 19 and the cycles around it — and 27 notable grand minimums were recorded. “We’re likely to have more of both grand maximums and grand minimums in the future,” he predicted. The current system of numbering sunspot cycles begins with Cycle 1 in the mid-18th century.

“We don’t fully understand the process inside the Sun that makes solar cycles,” Luetzelschwab said. “Thus, you should exercise caution with statements seen in the news.”

 

Amateur Radio Sleuthing Pins Down Source of Strange RF Interference

08/09/2016

Police in Evanston, Illinois, contacted the ARRL Lab, after an apparent interference source began plaguing wireless vehicle key fobs, cell phones, and other wireless electronics. Key fob owners found they could not open or start their vehicles remotely until their vehicles were towed at least a block away, nor were they able to call for help on their cell phones when problems occurred. The police turned to ARRL for help after striking out with the FCC, which told them it considered key fob malfunctions a problem for automakers, although the interference was affecting not just key fobs but cell phones, which are a licensed radio service. ARRL Lab EMC Specialist Mike Gruber, W1MG, believes the FCC should have paid more attention.

“This situation is indicative of what can happen as a result of insufficient FCC enforcement, especially with regard to electrical noise and noncompliant consumer devices,” Gruber said.

Evanston authorities worried that a serious situation could develop if someone were unable to call 911, putting public safety at risk. They also were concerned that the RFI could be intentional and indicate some nefarious or illegal activity.Given the seriousness of this situation, Gruber contacted Central Division Director Kermit Carlson, W9XA, to ask if he could look into the matter.

On June 2, Carlson met with an Evanston police officer, her sergeant, a local business owner, and the local alderman, and he quickly confirmed that the 600 block of Dempster Avenue in Evanston was plagued with an odd RFI problem. Carlson determined that the problem prevailed along a set of eight on-street parallel parking spots in the downtown commercial district of the North Chicago suburb.

Carlson employed a Radar Engineers 240A Noise Signature Receiver and UHF Yagi antenna to survey the affected block. Since key fobs typically operate at around 315 MHz and 433 MHz, he looked on both frequencies. The survey identified several noise sources in the affected block, but in particular a strong signal in the middle of the block. The interference source turned out to be a recently replaced neon sign switching-mode power supply, which was generating a substantial signal within the on-street parking area just across the sidewalk, between 8 and 40 feet from the sign.

The problematic power supply interference also disabled Carlson’s cell phone when he was within a few feet of the device. Carlson anticipated that further investigation would show that the harmful interference could disrupt licensed radio services in close proximity. The troublesome transformer was not replaced, but the building owner agreed to turn off the sign should problems arise.

Carlson called the Evanston case “a particularly alarming example of radio interference,” especially since local authorities considered it a public safety matter. “This situation demonstrates the electromagnetic compatibility problems that are evolving in an atmosphere of noncompliant, unintentional RF-emitting devices,” he said.

A return visit to the area with calibrated antennas and equipment capable of measuring the radiated signal strength with quasi-peak detection is planned for later this year. Since the initial visit, several other instances of unexplained key fob malfunctions have been reported in the Greater Chicago area. — Thanks to Kermit Carlson, W9XA, and Mike Gruber, W1MG

 

Source:

ARRL News

 

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

ETH034 - The Parrot of Amateur Radio

Sep 8, 2016 01:16:03

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to try something a little different than I have in the past. Since I have added some new responsibilities at home, I am now totally limited to working on my podcast at work. So I am pretty much limited to the solo head style of podcasting unless I can get lucky and get someone that wants to get up early on Saturday between 7 and 9:30 am. My interviews will probably be limited only the Amateur Radio Club Spotlights if I can get in contact with someone early enough.

I want to extend a big THANK YOU to Fred Kemmerer who is the president of the club that I featured in this episode. I emailed their club email on Friday afternoon to just let them know that I was featureing them in my podcast episode and mentioned that if someone would be available on Saturday morning that we could possibly do an interview about their club. He was able to check the email in time and we were able to do the interview. Not only once, but twice because I failed to push the record button the first time!

 

Tech Corner - Repeaters What is a Repeater?

A repeater is a piece of equipment that receives a signal and retransmits it at a higher power. A repeater is very useful for covering a large geographical area. Repeaters are used by not only ham radio operators but also by the government, businesses, or even just a small family needing better covering for their radios around a large farm.

 

There are a few types of repeaters:

Simplex Repeater - A simplex repeater is located on a single frequency and uses a digital recorder. It will receive a signal, typically up to about 30 seconds. Once person A unkeys their radio, the simplex repeater will retransmit what it recorded. This type of repeater is typically used by an individual or a family that wants to talk on a smallish geographical area. Conventional Repeater - This type of repeater is what most of us use. When you transmit, the repeater will receive the signal on a frequency, then retransmit on a different frequency at a higher power level. For example, a 2 meter repeater may be on 145.490 for it's output frequency. When you key up your radio, if it's settings are correct, you will transmit on 144.890 or 600 kHz down. The repeater receives on that frequency and immediately retransmits what you are saying on it's output frequency of 145.490. There is only minimal delay or maybe half a second or so. Out of Band Repeater - There isn't many Out of Band repeaters anymore. They were also primarily used in government repeaters. For example, in California there was a system where it’s input was on the 46 MHz band and it's output was on the 154 MHz band.

 

Along with the different types of repeaters, there are a couple different types of repeaters that you may come into contact with.

Analog Repeater - An analog repeater is still the majority of the repeaters that are out there. An analog repeater has the largest bandwidth of all the types of repeaters that we are going to talk about in this episode. Digital Repeaters - There are several types of digital repeaters now a days. There is DStar repeaters, System Fusion Repeaters, DMR Repeaters and even P.25 Repeaters that are used in government entities. Digipeaters - These are a type of repeaters that are different than a voice ones that you may be use to using. These type of repeaters are for computers to use in applications like packet and APRS.

 

 

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Nashua Area Radio Club

 

Website: http://n1fd.org/

Club Callsign: N1FD

Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC - President - Personal Blog

Meetings

Club Meetings on the first Tuesday of each Month. Our meetings include presentations from club members and local experts on a variety of topics related to Amateur Radio. The last club meeting, two daysN ago, Tuesday, September 6th at 7pm featured Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, CEO of the ARRL, as speaker. Tom was be joined by Dave Patton, NN1N – ARRL Manager, Field Services and Radiosport; Tom Frenaye, K1KI – ARRL New England Division Director; and Peter Strohrer, K1PJS – ARRL NH Section Leader.

Tech Night - Second Tuesday of the Month. How-to technical topics.

Nets

Sunday Night Chat Net - 8:30 PM Eastern - 28.500 Range MHz on SSB Phone Youth Net - N1NMO Repeater Network - Starting around October 2016

 

Activities

Hamfest - Boxboro Hamfest - Sep 9-11 Multiple National Parks On The Air Activations Our 2016 Field Day Operation - Typically run 7 or 8 A Operating as K2K New Hampshire in the Thirteen Colonies Special Event Our Winning Entries in the 2016 ARRL Rookie Roundup Contest Operating as N1FD/M in the 2016 New England QSO Party The N1FD/M Dayton and Back Counties Activation Tour Our 35th Anniversary Club Operating Event Picnic in the Park



 

Upcoming Events Contests September VHF Objective -  For amateurs in the US and Canada (and their possessions) to work as many amateur stations in as many different 2 degrees x 1 degree Maidenhead grid squares as possible using authorized frequencies above 50 MHz. Dates - The second full weekend of September. Begins 1800 UTC Saturday and runs through 0259 UTC Monday (September 10-12, 2016) Log Submission Deadline - All submissions must be emailed or postmarked no later than 0300 UTC Wednesday, October 12, 2016. Email logs to septembervhf@arrl.org 10 GHz and Up Objective -  The objective of 10 GHz and Up is for North American amateurs work as many amateur stations in as many different locations as possible in North America on bands from 10-GHz through Light. Amateurs are encouraged to operate from more than one location during this event. See the detailed rules for restrictions. Dates - Third full weekend of August and September (August 20-21, 2016 and September 17-18, 2016). Operations may take place for 24 hours total on each contest weekend. Each weekend begins at 6:00 AM local Saturday though 12:00 midnight local Sunday. Log Submission Deadline - Logs must be submitted no later than 0000 UTC Tuesday, October 18, 2016. Hamfests

09/09/2016

47th Annual Queen Wilhelmina Hamfest - Mena, AZ New England Division Convention - Boxborough, MA

 

09/10/2016

AK-SAR-BEN Amateur Radio Club Flea-Esta -  Springfield, NE GMARC September Trunk Swap -  Shelby Township, MI Kentucky State Convention (Greater Louisville Hamfest 2016) - Shepherdsville, KY Lubbock ARC's Third Annual Hamfest - Lubbock, TX Rush City Radio Rendezvous - Rush City, MN Virginia Section Convention (Virginia Beach Hamfest) - Virginia Beach, VA

 

09/11/2016

38th Annual Gloucester County ARC Hamfest - Mullica Hill, NJ BCARA SwapFest - Butler, PA Findlay Hamfest - Findlay, OH Lancaster NY Hamfest - Lancaster, NY Saratoga County NY Hamfest - Ballston Spa, NY

 

09/16/2016

The ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference - St. Petersburg, FL W9DXCC DX Convention & Banquet - Schaumburg, IL

 

09/17/2016

All-Arkansas Hamfest - Little Rock, AR Augusta Hamfest - Grovetown, GA Gadsden Hamfest -  Attalla, AL GRAHamfest 2016 - Wyoming, MI Illinois State Convention (Peoria Superfest) - Peoria, IL OH-KY-IN Hamfest -  Cincinnati, OH St. Croix Valley ARC Hamfest - Alexander, ME Tenth Annual Sacramento Valley Hamfest - Lincoln, CA

 

09/18/2016

Adrian Hamfest - Adrian, MI FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA Garden State ARA Hamfest - Tinton Falls, NJ

 

 

News ARRL CEO Urges New York City-Area Hams to Join Him as Marathon Volunteer

09/01/2016

ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF — a New York City Marathon volunteer since 1981 — is urging radio amateurs in the New York metropolitan area to join him on the race course this fall to, as he put it, “participate in one of the world’s most important public service events.”

On Sunday, November 6, Amateur Radio volunteers will provide communication support for the 46th running of the TCS New York City Marathon. The Marathon starts near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on Staten Island and continues through Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx before finishing 26.2 miles later in Manhattan's Central Park. Amateur Radio volunteers provide emergency medical and logistics communication support throughout the course, working in concert with the New York Police Department and Fire Department of New York Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to aid the more than 50,000 athletes expected to take part this year.

“Additional ham radio operators are still needed to staff some mile points along the course as well as some post-finish locations inside Central Park,” said TCS NYC Marathon Amateur Radio Communications Director Deborah Kerr, KC2GPV.

Radio amateurs interested in serving the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon should register online.

The New York City Marathon originated in 1970 as a low-budget event confined to Central Park. That first marathon attracted 127 entrants. In 1976 — the US Bicentennial Year — the marathon was expanded to encompass the city’s five boroughs.

For many years, Steve Mendelsohn, W2ML (SK), served as the Marathon’s communications director, overseeing the approximately 400 ham radio volunteers supporting race communications. Inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame a week before he died in 2012, Mendelsohn, had served as ARRL Hudson Division Director and as ARRL First Vice President.

“I feel as though I have been given this amazing opportunity to continue Steve's legacy and continue to give other ham the opportunity to enjoy an event that I hope will continue in the years to come,” Kerr said.

Ham Radio Outlet Refurbishes, Reopens Former AES Milwaukee Location

08/31/2016

Ham Radio Outlet (HRO) opened its latest Amateur Radio retail outlet at the site of the former Amateur Electronic Supply (AES) headquarters store at 5710 West Good Hope Road in Milwaukee on August 27. AES closed its Milwaukee, Las Vegas, Cleveland, and Orlando outlets on July 28, following a surprise announcement 4 weeks earlier that it was going out of business after 59 years as a ham radio equipment supplier. A couple of weeks later, HRO announced plans to make over the Milwaukee outlet and reopen it as its “superstore” — now HRO’s largest. Several former AES Milwaukee employees now are working for HRO, which undertook a rapid remodeling project to make the store over in its own brand. Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS, visited the HRO Milwaukee location on opening day, camera in hand, and he posted video of his brief tour on YouTube.

“One of the first things that caught my eye was the radio demo area,” Vanevenhoven says in his video. “They’ve actually got radios that you can try out.” A row of eight carrels, each with a different piece of gear ready to use, stretches along part of one wall in the store.

The Milwaukee store in 5000 square feet of Amateur Radio equipment, antennas, books, and accessories.

A family-owned business, HRO is the world’s largest Amateur Radio dealership, with 14 locations from New England to the West Coast. It opened a new outlet in Plano, Texas, in early 2015 and relocated and expanded its Portland, Oregon, store, which opened in late July.

HRO has planned the weekends of September 10, 17, 24 and October 1 for the grand opening of its Portland store, and October 1, 8, 15, and 22 for the grand opening of the new Milwaukee outlet.

Source:
ARRL News



 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just goto my Subscribe Page!

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH033 - Echolink

Aug 30, 2016 54:08

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Echolink.

What is Echolink?

Echolink is a piece of free Windows software that allows you to connect to repeaters, other users or conference servers all over the world. Below is what the official description is:

EchoLink® software allows licensed Amateur Radio stations to communicate with one another over the Internet, using streaming-audio technology.  The program allows worldwide connections to be made between stations, or from computer to station, greatly enhancing Amateur Radio's communications capabilities.  There are more than 200,000 validated users worldwide — in 151 of the world's 193 nations — with about 5,200 online at any given time.

After you download the software, you will need to validate your call sign. This is done to make sure that those that are using the software do indeed have an amateur radio license. There are a couple ways that this can be done. You can upload or fax a copy of your license, which you can find complete instructions on how to do this on the Validation Pages. The second way to do it is by using a digital certificate through Logbook of the World. If you live in the US, you also validate your license via the telephone or credit-card-based verification.

Download Echolink

Running Echolink Locally

After you have installed Echolink and you have validated your license, you can start using Echolink. If you are using it locally, all you need is your computer, a microphone and speakers. If you are operating on a laptop, the built in mic and speakers will work, all be it your audio quality will probably stink.

Once you start up the program, you can pull up the list of all the users or nodes that are currently logged on. You can connect to someone directly, or to a link or repeater and your connection will be sent out over the air from the repeater that you are connected to. Anyone that you end up talking to will be sent back across the internet to you computer.

You can also use echolink on your IPhone or Android device. Both types of phone has an app that you can use that will basically do the same thing that you can on your desktop. The biggest difference is that you will typically go through a relay on your phone by default. When you do no one else can connect to you. However, you can go into the settings of the app and set it to direct and you others will be able to connect to you. However, when you have it set to direct, you will have to be on Wifi to use it. If you are on your cellular data, you will need to set it to Relay again.

Running Echolink Remotely

If you are planning on running an echolink node is “sysop” mode or remote mode, you will need some type of interface between your computer and your radio. What this piece of hardware does is it allows your computer to key up your radio and in some cases accepts and processes DTMF commands from the receiver.

This type of setup is generally used for simplex operation or when you are setting up a link that will service a repeater. If you are not the repeater owner/trustee, make sure that you get their permission before you setup your echolink interface.

Below is a list of some of the interfaces that you can purchase

 

Kenwood TM-V71 and TM-D710 Transceivers

The Kenwood TM-V71 and TM-D710 dual-band FM transceivers are the only commercially-available rigs with EchoLink capabilities built in. With these rigs, no special interface is required; you can use the optional PG-5H cable (or a homebrew cable) to connect the rig directly to your PC. For answers to frequently-asked questions about using EchoLink with the TM-V71 and TM-D710, please click here.

 

WB2REM & G4CDY'S Linking Interfaces

These interfaces are available fully-assembled, or in kit form.  The original circuit was described in QST for March, 2002.  The newer ULI and AMI models have additional features.

 

W5TXR Electronic Labs Interface

The W5TXR Electronic Labs EchoLink/Multimode interface is available as a kit or completely assembled and tested (serial or USB models). Large prototyping area. FCC Part 15 compliance is pending.

 

USB and Serial Port EchoLink Interfaces

Advanced Repeater Systems offers several EchoLink Interfaces: a low-cost Serial Port PCB device, a USB device with speaker/microphone plugs for most portable radios and a USB Universal device that can interfaced to virtually any transceiver or repeater.

 

RIGblaster from West Mountain Radio

Several models of these general-purpose digital-mode interfaces are available, all of which are compatible with EchoLink.  Use EchoLink's internal DTMF decoder when using a RIGblaster and set it to VOX in the Sysop mode.  (If you wish to use a RIGblaster and join the EchoLink QSO using the linked radio's microphone, the RIGblaster Pro model is required.)

 

G3VFP iLINK / EchoLink Interface Controller

Fully assembled and enclosed, fully isolated interface designed expressly for iLINK/EchoLink.  Can be used with other digital-mode software such as PSK31.

 

Tigertronics SignaLink USB

This is a USB device that functions as an external sound card, with VOX-controlled PTT, so no connections to your computer's sound card or serial port are required. Pre-wired cables are available for popular transceivers. Can also be used with digital modes such as PSK31.

Other Interfaces

Here are some other interface options for EchoLink.

PY2JF Interface (from Brazil) DL5MGD Controller (diagrams and PIC source code) AB6CQ's PC to Radio Interface Fox Delta EchoLink Interface Conferences

Any installation of Echolink can be used as a conference server for up to 99 people, if your internet speed can handle it. Each connection requires 17 kbps of upload speed, so if your upload speed is 128kbps, then you would only be able to support seven or eight connections before users started experiencing chopping issues.

If you are interested in setting up an echolink server full time, you can setup a dedicated server by using a program called theBridge. The server should be installed on a fast, reliable dedicated server with plenty of bandwidth. Remember, 17kbps is required per user, so the more users, the faster the upload/download speed has to be. theBridge is a program that is developed seperately from Echolink, but as of version 1.06 if can be used to host a conference. The program can also be used for other VoIP amteur radio systems as well, like IRLP or ILink.

If you want to do  dedicated server, the server name has to be approved by Echolink and it will be surrounded by stars(*). It will also be listed separately from other users on the Echolink system. One of the other requirements with a server is that is can not be linked with another VoIP system link IRLP or ILink and must be used for amateur radio use only with no commercial advertisements or services.

For more information on Echolink or to look up users online or links near you, goto the Echolink website

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Sierra Nevada Amateur Radio Society

Website: http://snars.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/snars.w7ta

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SNARS_W7TA

 

The Sierra Nevada Amateur Radio Society started in April of 1968 by Larry Oakley, K7UGT, then a 23 year old man from Los Angeles, CA. After basically being told that his opinion didn't matter to the club he was in at the time, he decided to start a new club. So with the help of six other hams, the SNARS club was formed.

From then on it has thrived! They have put up repeaters, have several nets, do a lot of other functions and has since became northern Nevada’s largest amateur radio organization and possibly presently one of the largest in the state of Nevada.

Repeaters - All repeaters are linked

147.150 + PL 123.0 147.210 + PL 100.0 147.030 + PL 123.0 146.925 - PL 123.0 146.670 - PL 123.0 444.875 + PL 100.0 444.125 + PL 123.0 (Coming Soon)

Nets

Daily @ 12PM - SNARS Noon Net - Entire Linked Repeater System Sunday @ 6 PM - Red Cross Net & Disaster Nets - 147.300 IRLP: 9257 Mon-Fri @ 10 AM - The Morning Net - 147.300 IRLP: 9109 Monday @ 10 AM - Hospital Net - 147.300 IRLP: 9258 Monday @9:15 PM - Bishop’s Storehoouse Net - Entire Linked Repeater System Monday @ 7:30 PM - Northwest Nevada District AREA Net - Entire Linked Repeater System Tuesday @ 8 PM - Nevada State SATERN Net - 147.300 & 441.650 IRLP 9258 Tuesday @ 7 PM - Nevada DMR Net - SNARS DMR System / SNARS (RenoTahoe) Talk Group Wednesday @ 7 PM - Nevada State Skywarn Net - 147.300 & 441.650 IRLP 9258 Wednesday @ 7 PM - Winnemucca Net - 146.670, 146.925 & 443.075 Wednesday @ 8 PM - Northern Nevada Preppers Net - Entire Linked Repeater System Thursday @ 7 PM - Nevada State ARES Net - 147.300 & 441.650 IRLP 9258 Friday @ 5PM - Open Forum Net - 147.300 IRLP 9668 Saturday @ 7 PM - Ranchers Net - Entire Linked Repeater System

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH032 - What is Going on Lately?!

Aug 23, 2016 35:22

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about some things that have been happening lately. We are going to learn what the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES) is and talk about the Hellgate Amateur Radio club in the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight.

 

LA Flood

 

Brad Kieserman, the Vice President of Disaster Services Operations and Logistics for the American Red Cross, called the flooding disaster “the worst to hit the United States since Superstorm Sandy, and we anticipate it will cost at least $30 million – a number which may grow as we learn more about the scope and magnitude of the devastation.”

According to estimates, more than 40,000 homes were damaged or destroyed, leaving tens of thousands of residents displaced. The flooding also left 13 people dead. As of early today, August 20, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was reporting that about 3100 evacuees remained in Red Cross shelters. The Louisiana Emergency Operations Center remains at full activation, and more than p2800 National Guard personnel have been conducting flood relief operations around the clock.

In an August 20 (2116 UTC) status update on Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) operations in Louisiana, Assistant Section Manager Matt Anderson, KD5KNZ, said that Louisiana ARES is in the process of deactivating from the recent flood response, and the need for volunteers has ended

“All ARES personnel should preleased by this evening,” said Anderson, who has been currently serving as the Incident Point of Contact in Baton Rouge.

Amateur Radio volunteers from Alabama, Arkansas, and Mississippi volunteered to serve at multiple Red Cross chapters and shelters throughout the affected area.

The calamity struck quickly and ferociously. In one part of Livingston Parish, more than 31 inches of rain fell in 15 hours. 6,900,000,000,000 (6.9 trillion) gallons of rain in one week

 

California RACES and CERT Volunteers Team Up to Assist Seniors during Blackout

08/18/2016

When the power went out on June 4 at both the Huntington Gardens and Five Points senior residences in Huntington Beach, California, Huntington Beach RACES (HBRACES) and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) volunteers promptly activated to help. Each residential structure stands 14 stories tall. At Huntington Gardens, a generator supplied power to the hallways and elevators, but not to individual living units or telephones; residents had no way of calling 911 if an emergency occurred. At Five Points, which has no back-up generator, the facility was left in complete darkness.

RACES Radio Officer Dr Steve Graboff, W6GOS, and his assistant, Steve Albert, KE6OCE, started a 2 meter net and logged in available communicators. Operators checked into the net were advised to proceed to the staging at Huntington Beach City Hall.

“[T]he response to the call to activation by HBRACES was impressive,” Graboff said. “The professional communications skills displayed by the operators were outstanding. The quality of HBRACES training was clearly evident in all of our responders, including those deployed in the field and others who were assigned to the incident command post.”

HBRACES communicators paired with a Huntington Beach CERT responder, and each team assigned to a floor of the two facilities to cover communication and emergency calls. This marked the first time Huntington Beach RACES and CERT members were deployed in pairs.

The volunteers patrolled the floors of the buildings in the dark, looking and listening for people in need of help, or for anyone who might take advantage of the situation. Residents thus had direct communication with the Huntington Beach Fire and Police departments. Graboff said that having both organizations working together created a safer environment for the volunteers, since they were not alone. The Red Cross dispatched a canteen vehicle to support the volunteers with snacks and coffee.

“RACES and CERT worked well together, and I believe this is a response model we will use again in the future,” Graboff said.Some 60 volunteers turned out, and several residents of the affected facilities thanked the RACES and CERT volunteers for being there. One resident said afterward that knowing the volunteers were in the hallway was the only thing that allowed her to sleep that night. The cause of the power failure was traced to a chain reaction fire/explosion in area underground utility vaults. — Thanks to Bob Zamalin, WA6VIP, via the ARRL ARES E-Letter

Source: The ARRL News

 

What is the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)?

ARES is an organization started by the ARRL that consists of licensed amateurs who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty when disaster strikes. Every licensed amateur is eligible to apply for ARES membership.

There or four levels to the ARES organization: national, section, district, and local. The national level is handled by the ARRL membership and volunteer program manager. At the section level the section manager is the elected by members in his or her section. They, in turn, appoint a section emergency coordinator who is responsible for all ARES activities in his or her section. The section emergency coordinator also appoints district and local emergency coordinators. At the district level, the district emergency coordinators can be appointed to handle a large area such as several counties or a portion of the section emergency coordinators area. The local level is the most organized of all the levels, in most cases. The local level is the level that has the most interactions with the ARES mepmbership in the area and also with the local emergency management personnel. Assistant emergency coordinators can also be assigned to assist the section, district, for local emergency coordinator. They can be assigned specific tasks or just assist the emergency coordinator.

Local ARES operations usually take the form of nets –HF, VHF/UHF repeater nets, RTTY, packet, were other special mode nets. If you are a member of your local ARES organization, make sure that you let your leadership know what your interest are so that they can better utilized your assistance. If you are great with working with computers, then you could be of use at the EOC. If you were well under pressure, then you could be a net control operator.

Traffic handling is a very important part of our job as communicators. During an ARES operation, messages are passed using the RadioGram format of the National Traffic System. It is important to use this format when passing traffic because it keeps a record of the message, it is more concise which makes its faster when done correctly, and it’s easier to copy because the receiving station knows the order of the information that they are receiving therefore resulting in fewer errors and less repeats. Traffic handling is required training for all ARES members.

Pre-disaster planning is also an important part of the ARES organization. Planning before a disaster happens allows the organization to identifying those who may need amateur radio communications. After they are identified, you need to find out what the nature of the information they will need to communicate and who they will need to communicate with. Once all this information is obtained, drills should be done to make sure that everything is done correctly before a disaster happens.

 

 

NPOTA

 

The 100th anniversary of the National Park Service -- known as Founders Day -- is August 25. NPS units across the country have planned special activities on that day. Many units also will include Amateur Radio and NPOTA https://npota.arrl.org/ activity during all of next week. One of these will be Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont, where some ARRL staffers will team up with members of the West River Radio Club on Saturday, August 27, to help showcase the NPS unit and Amateur Radio to the general public. Unless you're visiting an NPS unit next week as part of the official Centennial celebration, stay close to your radio and see how many NPOTA units you can work!

There are 39 Activations slated for the week of August 18-24, including Fort Frederica National Monument in Georgia, and the Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site in Virginia.

Details https://npota.arrl.org/nps-events.php about these and other upcoming activations can be found on the NPOTA Activations calendar.

Keep up with the latest NPOTA news on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/NPOTA/. Follow NPOTA on Twitterhttp://www.twitter.com/ (@ARRL_NPOTA).

 

Source:

The ARRL Letter

 

 

FEMA Teaming with Amateur Radio Clubs to Present Preparedness Information:

 

September is National Preparedness Month. As part of its focus on educating and getting prepared, FEMA is offering a "Family Emergency Communications Plan," which helps families work out their communication strategies in the event of an emergency. ARRL is partnering with FEMA to offer this material to interested Amateur Radio clubs that are willing to present it in their localities during National Preparedness Month.

While the FEMA http://www.fema.gov/ presentation focuses on the Family Communications Plan and doesn't specifically mention ham radio, the material offers Amateur Radio clubs a great opportunity to raise their visibility in their communities.

A webinar with FEMA Region 1 Preparedness Liaison Sara Varela will take place on Tuesday, August 23, at 8 PM EDT (Wednesday, August 24, at 0000 UTC), to offer background and training for any club wishing to present FEMA's Family Emergency Communications Plan material in September. Registration https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9074175282463403523 is requested.

Presentation of the FEMA material to local communities should take approximately 1 hour. It will include a PowerPoint presentation and links to worksheets that families can discuss and fill out together.

Clubs are free to offer additional presentations on their activities following the program covering the FEMA material.

Source: The ARRL Letter

 

 

 

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

 

 

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Hellgate Amateur Radio Club

Website: http://www.w7px.org/

History

This club has a very interesting history. It started in 1930 as the Missoula Amateur Radio Club with 19 charter members. They have one member, Bob Williams W7IPB, that has been an active member of the club since 1957!! That is a long time!

The club call sign was the call sign of a long outstanding member of the club, Phil Coulter. After he became a silent key, the club approached his daughter requesting that she allow the club to apply for it as the club call sign as a way to honor his memory. She agreed and the FCC granted the club the license in mid 1986. It has been the the club call sign ever since.

In December 1983, WA1JXN/7 (now W7GJ) , Lance Collister became the first amateur radio operator in the world to communicate with an astronaut in space.  Lance communicated with W5LFL , Dr. Owen Garriot while the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-9, orbited the earth 250 nautical miles above the western Pacific.  The antenna, a home brew "moon bounce" two-meter array of 12 yagis.

Meetings: Meetings are held on the second Monday of every month at the Missoula Fire House #4 at 3011 Latimer Street (near Murdoch's - the old Quality Supply) at 7 p.m. Testing starts at 5:30 p.m. The December meeting is a Christmas dinner at the Eagles Lodge on South Avenue. Saturday Breakfast - Saturday morning finds area hams jawing over coffee, eggs, pancakes and toast at the a local Restaurant. We will now meet at Paradise Falls at 7:00 a.m., 3621 Brooks Street in Missoula.

 

Repeaters and Nets

Monthly Newsletters

 

Activities The Grizzly Triathlon The Riverbank Run Tour of the Swan River Valley (TOSRV) Field Day July 4 at the Fort - W7PX Special Event Missoula Marathon July Scouts Jamboree On The Air SKYWARN Recognition Day

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

[yikes-mailchimp form="2"]

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH031 - A YL's View of Amateur Radio

Aug 16, 2016 01:01:29

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talking with Allison Hollier, KG5BHY.

Allison is a fellow ham blogger that I learned about last year. She has a weekly YL net that she started last year and during each of the nets she has a technical portion of the net. She writes a blog post that corresponds with the technical topic of the net.

The Weekly North Texas YL Net is every Monday evening at 8pm on the 442.325 (127.3 tone) repeater which is linked to the 442.225 (110.9 tone) repeater. Even though this is a YL net, OM’s are allowed to check in as well. However, the first part of the net is dedicated to YL’s only. The net starts with YL checking, followed by the technical topic of the day. After the technical topic, the net is opened to anyone that wants to check in. Third party traffic is also allowed for the net to possible get non-ham females involved in the net as well.

Allison introduced me to something that I didn't know existed during this interview which I thought was pretty neat. She introduced me to the YL Radio League. The YLRL is dedicated to all the YL’s out there. Check out the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight for more information about the YL Radio League.

 

Gigaparts

 

Are you looking to buy a new radio, or maybe a new laptop or tablet? Maybe you are just looking for some connectors or batteries. Whatever you are looking for, amateur radio gear, computer equipment, battery chargers, or whatever, check out Gigaparts.

As an added bonus just for yall, my faithful readers/listeners, Gigaparts has allowed me to share a $10 off coupon with you on any purchases over $150! All you have to do is enter the coupon code below at checked out to get the discount.

EHR07

This coupon code is only good for a limited time(exp: 8/18/2016), so don’t waste any time. Head over to Gigaparts.com right now and check them out, find something you want and buy it.

Gigaparts has graciously donated a GREENIVATIVE Magic GMAG 6 to be raffled off in the next episode so tune in next week to find out how to enter.


More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Young Lady(YL) Radio League

Website: http://www.ylrl.org

 

In today’s amateur radio club spotlight we are going to be doing something a little bit different than what I normally do. I have been looking at the website for the YLRL and there is a lot of great things on the website and that the YLRL does for the YL’s of the hobby. I don't know how many YL’s I have that listen to my podcast, but I thought I would spread the word about it some so that the OM that listen could tell the YL’s in there area about it.

The YLRL was officially started in 1939 with 10 founding members. It has since grown to over 1100 members, 200 of those are from outside of the United States.

It started with a simple add in the May 1939 issue of QST magazine with a lace like border asking for YLs to buy a book called “Two Hundred Meters and Down: The Story of Amateur Radio”. The article stated that this book, written by a man, was about what a men did what, when and how to make amateur radio what it was then.

What the article was suppose to be doing is getting YL’s to speak up and make themselves known to each other. That is exactly what some of them did too. 10 women came together, and after a lot of hard work made the Young Lady Relay League.

All of the founding members are unfortunately SKs now, but there are other good YL’s out there that have stepped forward to continue the work that the YLRL is doing. There is one member that has been a member of the YLRL for 60+ years continuously.

On top of the great comradery that comes along with have an organization that is for YL’s only, there is lots of stuff that they support as well.

Scholarship - They give away two $1500 scholarships every year to a deserving young YL. Nets - There are several nets that they have, please check out their website for more information Certificates - Worked All States YL (WAS-YL) Worked All Continents YL (WAC-YL) YL Century Club (YLCC) DX YL YL-DXCC YL-Digital Modes, Grandmother and Great-Grandmother Awards, Several DX awards, and this year they had an Favorite Movie Award for their Annual Certificate Award. Conventions

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH030 - Look Back Over the Past Two Years

Aug 9, 2016 54:30

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to do something a little bit different than what we have been doing. I had planned on doing an interview for this episode but I had a hard time getting a schedule nailed down. So since I was one a time crunch and didn't have time to actually research a topic, record it, edit it and get it up in time, I had to figure out something else to do.

So seeing that this is episode 30, I figured it was a good time to do a little look back on this podcast and my blog as a whole. I even went a little further back and talked about my life as a ham, especially what has changed over the past 6-7 years since I have been married. The reason that I did that is because in the next episode, my guest is going to be my lovely wife. We are going to be talking about her perspective at being a non-man being married to a ham.

Let’s take a look back at all the podcast episodes so far:

ETH000 - About Me ETH001 - DStar ETH002 - Yaesu System Fusion ETH003 - Project 25 ETH004 - Digital Mode Radio ETH005 - VHF/UHF Packet ETH006 - Automatic Packet Reporting System(APRS) ETH007 - Computers In Your Shack ETH008 - Small Computers ETH009 - Emergency Training ETH010 - Emergency Preparedness ETH011 - Go-Packs ETH012 - Nets ETH013 - National Traffic System(NTS) ETH014 - High Frequency(HF) ETH015 - DXing ETH016 - National Parks on the Air(NPOTA) ETH017 - Summits on the Air ETH018 - Special Event Stations ETH019 - Awards ETH020 - Contesting ETH021 - Field Day ETH022 - Emergency Power ETH023 - Portable Stations ETH024 - Field Day 2016 Recap ETH025 - Fox Hunting ETH026 - Youth In Amateur Radio ETH027 - Hams With Disabilities ETH028 - Mobile Radio Installation ETH029 - Broadband Hamnet

 

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just go to my subscribe page and fill out the form and click the Sign Me Up button. Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

 

 

ETH029 - Hamnet Mesh Networks

Aug 2, 2016 01:25:01

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talking with David Ericson, KB5UGF about Hamnet Mesh networks.

 

OpenWRT DD-WRT Mesh Technologies Broadband hamnet(BBHN) Amateu Radio Emergency Data Network(AREDN) Equipment Brands Linksys Router - WRT54G Ubiquiti Area Mesh Networks Orange County, CA mesh Heart of Texas ARC mesh

 

Emcomm driven - when all else fails, amateur radio is there

 

Tools Ubiquiti RF Link Calculator Google Map of Mesh Nodes

 

Gigaparts

 

Are you looking to buy a new radio, or maybe a new laptop or tablet? Maybe you are just looking for some connectors or batteries. Whatever you are looking for, amateur radio gear, computer equipment, battery chargers, or whatever, check out Gigaparts.

As an added bonus just for yall, my faithful readers/listeners, Gigaparts has allowed me to share a $10 off coupon with you on any purchases over $150! All you have to do is enter the coupon code below at checked out to get the discount.

EHR07

This coupon code is only good for a limited time(exp: 8/18/2016), so don’t waste any time. Head over to Gigaparts.com right now and check them out, find something you want and buy it.

Gigaparts has graciously donated a GREENIVATIVE Magic GMAG 6 to be raffled off in the next episode so tune in next week to find out how to enter.

 

More Than Safe Blog

 

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

 

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

 

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Lake of the Ozarks Amateur Radio Club (LOARC)

 

Website:http://www.loarc.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@hamloarc

 

Meetings: Second Wednesday of the month on the second floor of the Mid County Fire Protection District Headquarters, located on Old Highway 5 in Camdenton at 7 PM. Each Friday at 11:30 AM, an informal meeting is held at an area restaurant for two consecutive Fridays Nets: 2 Meters every Saturday Morning at 9:00 AM CT on 146.730 Mhz 10 Meters every Tuesday evening at 9:00 PM CT on 28.410 Mhz USB From November to April we hold a Snow Bird Net on 20 meters at 10:00 AM at 14.255 +/- a few MHz depending on how busy the band is. Along with the two weekly nets LOARC also run The Camden County Emergency Net once a month. This net is held at 10:00 AM every 2nd Wednesday of the month on 146.73 Repeater. The alternate frequency is 146.58 Mhz if necessary. All hams are strongly encouraged to check in. Repeaters 2 Meters 146.730 Mhz (-600) No Tone located in Laurie. 70cm 442.200 Mhz 100 (+5) located in Osage Beach (Under Construction) Activities Field Day Eagle Day Ham Testing

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

[yikes-mailchimp form="2"]

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook, follow me on Twitter or on Youtube. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH028 - Mobile Installations

Jul 26, 2016 01:25:35

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to with Alan Applegate, K0BG about Mobile Radio Installations. Alan has been a ham since 1976(I believe he said) and has a major passion for operating mobile. His website is a massive repository of information on everything dealing with Mobile Operations, so head on over there and check it out!

 

Greenivative Magic GMAG 6 Give-a-way!

 

Gigaparts has graciously donated a GREENIVATIVE Magic GMAG 6 to be raffled off! I would like to say thank you to Gigaparts and especially Jeff Sinclar, KJ4YIO, for the donation for this raffle!

 

So How Do I Enter?

 

Entering the raffle is super easy! All you have to do is send me an email to k5clm at everythinghamradio.com. In the subject line put “Green Power”. This raffle is going to go for two episodes, so you will have two chances to enter. The deadline for the raffle will be August 5, 2016 at 11:59 PM Central Time. Each episode will have a different subject word, so you will have to listen to both to get the proper codes.

 

How it Works?

 

What I am going to do is just like I did our Packtenna giveaway a few episodes ago. I have a spreadsheet that I will add your name and email address to in the order that I receive them. Each entry will be given a number in the order that they were received. At the end of the raffle time period, I will use a random number generator to pick a number randomly between 1 and the total number of entries that I receive. The winner will be announced on episode number 30 and I will contact them via email.

 

Gigapart Discount

 

Are you looking to buy a new radio, or maybe a new laptop or tablet? Maybe you are just looking for some connectors or batteries. Whatever you are looking for, amateur radio gear, computer equipment, battery chargers, or whatever, check out Gigaparts.

As an added bonus just for yall, my faithful readers/listeners, Gigaparts has allowed me to share a $10 off coupon with you on any purchases over $150! All you have to do is enter the coupon code below at checked out to get the discount.

EHR07

This coupon code is only good for a limited time(exp: 8/18/2016), so don’t waste any time. Head over toGigaparts.com right now and check them out, find something you want and buy it. 

 

More Than Safe Blog

 

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

 

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

 

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.  

 

 

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Central Mississippi Amateur Radio Association

 

Website: http://www.cmsara.org/wp/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CMSARA/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CentralMSARA

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy_9Bhaqf2mzsx9LaSRjPZg/feed

 

In this amateur Radio Club spotlight we are talking Mike McKay, N5DU, Past President.

 

Meetings:

Second Tuesday at 7 pm at the Rankin County E911 (also called EOC) Building at 601 Marquette Road, Brandon MS 39042.

 

Nets:

ARES Net - Thursday at 8:30 147.345 + Central MS Nets

 

Repeaters

147.345 + Analog 444.900 + PL 100 System Fusion

 

Activities

Community Service MS Bike Ride City of Ridgland Bike Ride 100 Mile Course Susan Coleman Walk Field Day HamFest - Capital City Hamfest - Last Friday and Saturday of January State Fairgrounds Trade Center

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below:

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Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time...

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH027 - Hams With Disabilities

Jul 21, 2016 57:29

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking with Christopher LaRue, W4ADL about Hams with Disabilities. Chris is a visually impaired amateur radio operator just recently passed his Extra Class test. We talk about some of the challenges that he has and about some ideas that can be done by all of us

Check out the IRLP website for information about IRLP.

IRLP 9251 – *World* – world net on echolink. Gives questions from questions pools 8-9 est Paranormal net 9-10 est John -W2JLD – Net Manager Ham Test Prep – Android App Nellis Amateur Radio Club – Las Vegas

 

Are you looking to buy a new radio, or maybe a new laptop or tablet? Maybe you are just looking for some connectors or batteries. Whatever you are looking for, amateur radio gear, computer equipment, battery chargers, or whatever, check out Gigaparts.

As an added bonus just for yall, my faithful readers/listeners, Gigaparts has allowed me to share a $10 off coupon with you on any purchases over $150! All you have to do is enter the coupon code below at checked out to get the discount.

EHR07

This coupon code is only good for a limited time(exp: 8/18/2016), so don’t waste any time. Head over toGigaparts.com right now and check them out, find something you want and buy it.

Gigaparts has graciously donated a GREENIVATIVE Magic GMAG 6 to be raffled off in the next episode so tune in next week to find out how to enter.

 

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Courage Kenny Handiham Program

 

Website: http://www.handiham.org/

 

The Courage Kenny Handiham Program provides tools for people with disabilities to learn Amateur Radio and technology skills, and to earn their Amateur Radio licenses.

Nets: Daily net at 11am Central Time Wed at 1900 Central Time

Check out their nets page to learn more about how to participate in the nets. There is a lot of different ways that you can!!

Activities Blind-Hams Mailing List Weekly Newsletter Radio Camp Two Remote HF Base stations that can be accessed over the internet that members can use if they can’t get their own antenna up on their station Amateur Radio programs designed especially for those with disabilities that want to either become hams, further their license, or just further their knowledge of the hobby. Handiham Podcast – there is a podcast that is associated with this club, but I do know believe that it is active, however there are 25 episodes that are still listed to it

ETH024 - Field Day 2016 Recap

Jul 21, 2016 40:16

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to recap my experience with Field Day 2016, we are going to talk with a couple local hams during Field Day and with a few hours left of Field Day talk about how it is going so far.

My local Field Day station is sponsored by the Johnson County ARES team and is hosted at the Johnson County Emergency Operation Center. We ran a 3F station and ran under the call sign of KY5O. At the time of this recording(about 7am on Sunday morning) we had approximately 150 contacts. We had a GOTA station as well and made several contacts on it as well.

For our first interview we talk with Ken Bush, KB5YBI. Ken has been an amateur radio operator for a little over 23 years. He is the Johnson County EC for the ARRL and is one of the major volunteers for the Johnson County, whether is it during a storm or emergency or just helping taking down a tower.

In my second interview, we talk with Keith Beucler, KE5AWF. I have known Keith since he was born. Our parents grew up together. I gave Keith his amateur radio test, if memory serves me correctly, and have watched him grow so much since then. Keith has done so much and has such a great foundation in his life that he is going to go far; it makes me proud and jealous all at the same time.

 

  More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

Do you like what you hear on my podcast and/or read on my blog? Would you like to be able to help financially? There are a few ways that you can do just that. Head over to my Support page and it will explain the different ways that you can help.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Johnson County ARES

Website: http://www.aresjctx.org/

Meetings: 4th Tuesday of the month at 7pm at the Johnson County Emergency Operations Center located at 810 E Kilpatrick, Cleburne, TX Nets: Weekly Training Net – Sundays at 7:30pm on 145.490 PL 88.5 Repeaters: N/A Activities: N/A

ETH023 - Portable Stations

Jul 21, 2016 31:46

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Portable Stations. While the episodes this quarter have been about “Things to do on HF”, this topic is more of a general ham radio topic and ties into our mini theme of Field Day which is coming up this weekend. For more information about Field Day check out episode 20, and check out episode 11 where we talked about Go-Packs.

When you think about a portable station, or really any stations, there are three main components that you must have, a radio, an antenna and a source of power. Depending on the size of your portable station determines the size of equipment that you will need or want. If you are looking for something to use for SOTA or for a go pack, you will probably want smaller antennas, smaller low power radios and a lighter power source. If you are talking a setup for things like Field Day or a QSO party or even some public service event, you might want something a little bigger. We are going to talk about several different options for each part of a station.

Radios

The first part of the station trifecta that we are going to talk about is the Radio. Without the radio, it is pointless to have an antenna or power source. The first thing that you need to figure out when you are setting up your portable station is what you are planning to use it on. If you are talking about something like SOTA, where weight and power consumption plays a big factor, you would go with a radio that puts out less power, therefore uses less power. If power consumption or output isn’t a factor in your setup, then you would just go with personal performance

If you are looking for the lighter side of things for things like a SOTA activation, probably one of the best radios on the market right now is the Elecraft K3. It is a full 6M to 160M HF portable radio that transmits up to 10 watts PEP and only draws up to 150 milliamps!! One of the other things that makes this radio so good for portable use is that it only weighs 1.5 pounds(0.7 kilograms)! It can do all modes, CW, SSB, Data, AM, FM. You can also buy a plug-in module that allows you to talk on 2 meters as well.

On the flip side of this though, if you are working on a portable station to use in things like Field Day, QSO Parties or emergency events, you may want a radio or set of radios with more output power and where power consumption isn’t a big deal. This portable station may be like a Go-Pack like we talked about in episode 11 or maybe a communications trailer where you can have several radios, a generator, and several antennas ready to go at a moment’s notice. The choice of radio for this type of portable station if more of a personal choice, or maybe a club choice or maybe you just got a great deal on a radio and that is what you use.

Antennas

For the next part of the station trifecta, let’s talk a little about antennas. Without an antenna, a radio is pretty much useless. Antennas come in all shapes and sizes, little ones, big ones, verticals, beams, inverted V, End fed dipoles, etc. Much like with the radios, depending on what you are looking to do will direct your decision on what antenna you are going to use. Another thing that you need to think about is what you are going to put your antennas on? Is it going to be a tower, a push up pole, or maybe just drape it over a tree branch. The answer to that question will also direct what your portable station will look like.

First off, let’s talk about stations like you would use for SOTA. With things like SOTA, you
need something that is small and light because you have to carry it wherever you are going to operate; and by carry I mean, more than likely on your back and in only one trip. This is where my friends over at PackTenna comes in. The PackTenna Mini is an awesome little
antenna that is literally the size of your hand. Don’t believe me? Check out the picture to the right. Told ya! Anyway, this little antenna can go anywhere with you and can do pretty much whatever you want it to do.

If you are looking for something with a littlemore umph to it for your communications trailer or Field Day setup then you might have to take it a step further and get a dipole, vertical, long wire or something of that nature. On my clubs old communications van we had two 20’ push up poles that mounted in holders on the bumper. On top of the pole we put a dual band(2m/440) vertical and a 20 meter verticals and an inverted v on a pulley.

Power Source

The third and final part of the station trifecta is power; without it, nothing will work. Whether you are going to be using commercial power, a generator, or batteries with solar or wind power to charge them, this is something that you need to figure out before you go to set up your station. If you are using solar power for example and you radios end up drawing more power than thesolar panels will put out, then you might be in the middle of a QSO when you batteries drop below minimum level and you will not be able to operate anymore. So you always want to make sure that if you are using something other than commercial power, that you figure out how long you battery charge will last, or how long your fuel tank will last before you get to a point where you need power and don’t have it.

For more information on Emergency Power, check out my last episode, episode #22.

 

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.  You can also make a one time donation through Paypal at this bottom of this page. 

Another way that you can help support my blog and podcast is to buy your things from Amazon through my affiliate store or link. If you go to my Support page, you will see my Amazon store. If there is something that you want that you don’t see in my store, you can click on the Powered by Amazon picture in the top right and it will take you Amazon where you can search for anything. If you don’t want to do that, but you still want to help, if you have a bookmark to Amazon add this to the end of the URL:

?tag=everythamrad-20

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Kent Amateur Radio Society

 

Website: http://www.k3ars.org/

 

Meetings: The club holds regular meetings on the first Wednesday of every month at 7:00 PM at Heron Point of Chestertown, 501 East Campus Avenue, Chestertown, MD 21620-1682, in the conference room. Nets: Every Tuesday at 8:00 PM there is a club net held on our 147.375 Mhz (+) PL 156.7 repeater.

 

Repeaters 147.375 + PL 156.7 Autopatch –  Located on the tower of Kent County High School with links in Rock Hall, Galena, Chestertown and Betterton, it offers handheld coverage to all of Kent County. This main machine consists of a Motorola MTR2000 and DB products antenna with an effective radiated power (ERP) of 200 watts. The link controller is an Arcomm RC210 with an LDG RJS-8 voter. The machine uses a PL of 156.7 in and out. 449.175 + PL 156.7 – Located on a tower adjacent to Chester River Hospital, this UHF repeater offers handheld coverage for the Chestertown area. The machine is a Motorola MTR2000 and DB Products antenna with an effective radiated power (ERP) of 200 watts.

 

Activities Field Day Bike Races, Walk-A-Thons, and other type events VE Testing APRS

ETH022 - Emergency Power

Jul 21, 2016 35:07

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Emergency Power. While the episodes this quarter have been about “Things to do on HF”, this topic is more of a general ham radio topic and ties into our mini theme of Field Day which is coming up in a couple of weeks.

Emergency power comes in all shapes and sizes. You can have a gas generator or a solar panel with batteries. It really on depends on what you want and how much you want to spend. There are some repeaters that run solely on “backup power”. This type of setup will generally have a whole bank of batteries and a solar panel to charge them.

Gas Generators

 

Gas generators are probably the most typical type of backup power that is used. They can range from a small 1000 watt generator that you buy from like a home improvement store or department store all the way up to a 20+kW generator that would be used to power like an Emergency Operations Center. For the typical end-user, I wouldn’t think that you would need anymore than like 2000-3000 watts, if you just want one to power a radio or two, you could probably get away with just a 1000 watt generator

  Solar Power

Solar power uses solar cell or solar panels to collect energy from the sun and converts it to electricity to be stored and/or used by electronics. You can have a small solar panel that you can buy for less than $100 at a department store to charge up a small power to power your phone or other small device.

If you take it to the next step and go with a medium-sized panel, you could hook it to a deep cycle battery or two and run your station off of it. If you connect multiple batteries together in parallel, you can get longer use out of the batteries, but it will also take longer to charge them depending on how much wattage and current the panel put out.

If you really want to go all in on solar power, you can even line your roof with solar panels and have a large bank of batteries and power you whole house. As I was looking for the Club Spotlight club for this episode I ran across a club that recently changed their web host to someone who ran entirely off of solar power. Check out this status page for their host’s power information on his house. His entire house is powered by solar and he even has excess power and is able to sell it back to the electric company.

This is a really neat video that I saw on Facebook several months ago about a new type of solar panel setup that would be awesome for Field Day or any other contest

Wind Power

 

Although it more rare than solar, wind power is also an option for emergency power. I do see wind power to be more of a whole house type thing though, but I guess if you really wanted to you could make a smaller wind turbine that could be used on a smaller basis. Like with the solar, the wind turbines would charge a battery or set of batteries and your equipment would run off the batteries.

 

The biggest issues I see with wind power is there has to be some wind before you will generate electricity so unlike solar you would be more at the whim of mother nature. At least with solar, as long as it is during the day, you will get at least some electricity generation.

 

Human Power

So here is an alternative that will work anytime day or night, whether it is windy or not. Not only that, but you would also get exercise while you’re at it. I saw a video on Facebook not to long ago about a stationary bicycle that was hooked to a generator and would power a lot of stuff to a long amount of time. How true the video actually was, I’m not sure and I have my doubts. However, i have heard stories about people using some kind of stationary bike to generate the power to run radios using QRP. So there ya go, the best of both worlds. You get to talk on the radio and ride a bike…or maybe have someone else riding the bike while you are talking on the radio, yea, that sounds better. Click on the image to the left to check out how the found of K-TOR, KB1YAO, takes his K-TOR generator to a field day event in 2012 and tests it out.

    More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Wireless Society of Southern Maine

Website: http://www.qsl.net/ws1sm/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ws1sm

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ws1sm

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Mainehamradio/posts?gmbpt=true&hl=en

Meetings:

(From September-May) We meet the second Thursday of each month, from 7PM-9PM at the Gorham Recreation Department, located at the Municipal Center, in Gorham, ME. (From June-August) We meet each Thursday from 7PM-9PM at the Banquet Hall at Wassamki Springs Campground, located at 56 Saco Street in Scarborough, ME.

Nets:

No formal nets that are hosted by the club. However they do participate in local area nets.

Repeaters

None

Activities

Field Day Lighthouse Activations MS Walk Maine QSO Parties

This club offers several awards for this like Worked All Maine(make a contact in all 16 counties in Maine), Maine Lighthouses Award(make contacts with at least 10 Maine Lighthouses, and one called the Upside Down Award(make contact with five stations where their call sign is the same upside down or reversed.

There are several amateur radio projects on their site as well. Things ranging from a Modulated CW circuit to a band pass filter to Direction Finding Transmitter. Each project has a nice write-up about the project as well as instructions how to do it.

The club has trading at their meetings. Looking through the past topics they all look to be interesting topics. On top of the meeting training they also have something that I think I’m going to present to my local club to maybe do. They randomly choose a member to make a message that no one knows what it will be about. Then they set a certain frequency and time. At that time the operator will deliver the message and people who are listening will copy it. At the next club meeting they will talk about it and see who got a correct copy on it. They do it on a simplex frequency which I don’t think would work well for my club since the county I live in is like 35 miles across and 30 miles up and down.

ETH021 - Field Day

Jul 21, 2016 33:04

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to Field Day!!!

Objective

To work as many stations as possible on any and all amateur bands (excluding the 60, 30, 17, and 12-meter bands) and to learn to operate in abnormal situations in less than optimal conditions. Field Day is open to all amateurs in the areas covered by the ARRL/RAC Field Organizations and countries within IARU Region 2. DX stations residing in other regions may be contacted for credit, but are not eligible to submit entries.

Dates

Field Day is always the fourth full weekend of June, beginning at 1800 UTC Saturday and running through 2059 UTC Sunday. Field Day 2016 is June 25-26.

3.1. Class A and B (see below) stations that do not begin setting up until 1800 UTC on Saturday may operate the entire 27-hour Field Day period.

3.2. Stations who begin setting up before 1800 UTC Saturday may work only 24 consecutive hours, commencing when on-the-air operations begin.

3.3. No class A or B station may begin its set-up earlier than 0000 UTC on the Friday (Thursday afternoon or evening local time) preceding the Field Day period. Cumulative set-up time shall not exceed a total of 24 hours.

Log Submission Deadline

Entries must be postmarked, emailed or submitted by Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Late entries cannot be accepted.

Classes

4.1. (Class A) Club / non-club portable:

4.2.  (Class A – Battery) Club / non-club portable:

4.3.  (Class B) One or two person portable:

4.4.  (Class B – Battery) One or two person portable

4.5. (Class C) Mobile:

4.6.  (Class D) Home stations:

4.7.  (Class E) Home stations – Emergency power:

4.8. (Class F) Emergency Operations Centers (EOC)

Bonus Points

7.3.1. 100% Emergency Power: 100 points per transmitter classification if all contacts are made only using an emergency power source up to a total of 20 transmitters (maximum 2,000 points.)   GOTA station and free VHF Station for Class A and F entries do not qualify for bonus point credit and should not be included in the club’s transmitter total.  All transmitting equipment at the site must operate from a power source completely independent of the commercial power mains to qualify. (Example: a club operating 3 transmitters plus a GOTA station and using 100% emergency power receives 300 bonus points.) Available to Classes A, B, C, E, and F.

7.3.2. Media Publicity: 100 bonus points may be earned for attempting to obtain publicity from the local media.  A copy of the press release, or a copy of the actual media publicity received (newspaper article, etc.) must be submitted to claim the points.  Available to all Classes.

7.3.3. Public Location: 100 bonus points for physically locating the Field Day operation in a public place (i.e. shopping center, park, school campus, etc).  The intent is for amateur radio to be on display to the public. Available to Classes A, B and F.

7.3.4. Public Information Table: 100 bonus points for a Public Information Table at the Field Day site.  The purpose is to make appropriate handouts and information available to the visiting public at the site.  A copy of a visitor’s log, copies of club handouts or photos is sufficient evidence for claiming this bonus. Available to Classes A, B and F.

7.3.5. Message Origination to Section Manager: 100 bonus points for origination of a formal message to the ARRL Section Manager or Section Emergency Coordinator by your group from its site.  You should include the club name, number of participants, Field Day location, and number of ARES operators involved with your station.  The message must be transmitted during the Field Day period and a copy of it must be included in your submission in standard ARRL radiogram or no credit will be given.  The message must leave or enter the Field Day operation via amateur radio RF. The Section Manager message is separate from the messages handled in Rule 7.3.6. and may not be claimed for bonus points under that rule. Available to all Classes.

7.3.6. Message Handling: 10 points for each formal message originated, relayed or received and delivered during the Field Day period, up to a maximum of 100 points (ten messages). Copies of each message must be included with the Field Day report. The message to the ARRL SM or SEC under Rule 7.3.5. does not count towards the total of 10 for this bonus.  Available to all Classes. All messages claimed for bonus points must leave or enter the Field Day operation via amateur radio RF.

7.3.7. Satellite QSO: 100 bonus points for successfully completing at least one QSO via an amateur radio satellite during the Field Day period.  “General Rules for All ARRL Contests” (Rule 3.7.2.), (the no-repeater QSO stipulation) is waived for satellite QSOs. Groups are allowed one dedicated satellite transmitter station without increasing their entry category.  Satellite QSOs also count for regular QSO credit.  Show them listed separately on the summary sheet as a separate “band.” You do not receive an additional bonus for contacting different satellites, though the additional QSOs may be counted for QSO credit unless prohibited under Rule

7.3.8. Alternate Power: 100 bonus points for Field Day groups making a minimum of five QSOs without using power from commercial mains or petroleum driven generator.  This means an “alternate” energy source of power, such as solar, wind, methane or water.  This includes batteries charged by natural means (not dry cells).  The natural power transmitter counts as an additional transmitter.  If you do not wish to increase your operating category, you should take one of your other transmitters off the air while the natural power transmitter is in operation.  A separate list of natural power QSOs should be submitted with your entry. Available to Classes A, B, E, and F.

7.3.9. W1AW Bulletin: 100 bonus points for copying the special Field Day bulletin transmitted by W1AW (or K6KPH) during its operating schedule during the Field Day weekend (listed in this rules announcement).  An accurate copy of the message is required to be included in your Field Day submission. (Note:  The Field Day bulletin must be copied via amateur radio.  It will not be included in Internet bulletins sent out from Headquarters and will not be posted to Internet BBS sites.) Available to all Classes.

7.3.10. Educational activity bonus: One (1) 100-point bonus may be claimed if your Field Day operation includes a specific educational-related activity.  The activity can be diverse and must be

related to amateur radio. It must be some type of formal activity.  It can be repeated during the Field Day period but only one bonus is earned.   For more information consult the FAQ in the complete Field Day packet. Available to Classes A & F entries and available clubs or groups operating from a club station in class D and E with 3 or more participants.

7.3.11. Site Visitation by an elected governmental official:  One (1) 100-point bonus may be claimed if your Field Day site is visited by an elected government official as the result of an invitation issued by your group. Available to all Classes.

7.3.12. Site Visitation by a representative of an agency: One (1) 100-point bonus may be claimed if your Field Day site is visited by a representative of an agency served by ARES in your local community (American Red Cross, Salvation Army, local Emergency Management, law enforcement, etc.) as the result of an invitation issued by your group. ARRL officials (SM, SEC, DEC, EC, etc) do not qualify for this bonus. Available to all Classes.

7.3.13. GOTA Bonus.  Get On The Air Station – Up To 500 bonus Points

7.3.14. Web submission:  A 50-point bonus may be claimed by a group submitting their Field Day entry via the www.b4h.net/cabforms web site. Available to all Classes.

7.3.15. Field Day Youth Participation:

7.3.15.1. A 20-point bonus (maximum of 100) may be earned by any Class A, C, D, E, or F group for each participant age 18 or younger at your Field Day operation that completes at least one QSO.

7.3.15.2. For a 1-person Class B station, a 20-point bonus is earned if the operator is age 18 or younger.  For a 2-person Class B station, a 20-point bonus is earned for each operator age 18 or younger (maximum of 40 points.)  Keep in mind that Class B is only a 1 or 2 person operation.  This bonus does not allow the total number of participants in Class B to exceed 1 or 2.

7.3.16 Social Media: 100 points for promoting your Field Day activation to the general public via an active, recognized and utilized social media platform (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc). This bonus is available to bona fide Amateur Radio clubs and Field Day groups that welcome visitors to their operation. Individual participants do not qualify for this bonus. Club websites do not qualify for this bonus. Available to all classes.

7.3.17 Safety Officer Bonus: A 100-point bonus may be earned by having a person serving as a Safety Officer for those groups setting up Class A stations. This person must verify that all safety concerns on the Safety Check List (found in the ARRL Field Day Packet) have been adequately met. This is an active bonus – simply designating someone as Safety Officer does not automatically earn this bonus.  A statement verifying the completion of the Safety Check List must be included in the supporting documentation sent to ARRL HQ in order to claim this bonus.

Rules, Entry Forms and Information Packets

2016 Field Day Packet (complete) 2016 Field Day Rules 2016 Field Day Summary Sheet 2016 W1AW / K6KPH Bulletin Schedule 2016 Field Day Public Relations Packet 2016 Field Day Information Flier 2016 Field Day VHF/UHF Information 2016 Field Day Log Sheet 2016 ARRL/RAC Section List More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club

Website: http://www.clarc.us

 

Meetings: First Tuesday of the month at the Community Center of Kees Park. Meetings start at 7pm. Doors open at 6pm for fellowship. Testing begins at 5:30 Nets: ARES/RACES Training Net – Sundays at 8:15PM on the 147.330 repeater Prayer Net immediately following the ARES Net Tech Net – Fridays at 8pm on the 444.975 repeater Repeaters 145.150 – PL 173.8 DStar with Open Gateway 145.470 – PL 173.8 Salt Grass System 147.330 + PL 173.8 Used for nets, daily use, Echolink 147.375 + PL 173.8 Daily use 443.300 + PL 173.8 444.975 + PL 173.8 La. Link System 144.390  APRS Activities Hamfest – Alexandria Hamfest – Sep 23 and 24, 2016. Assists local agencies with communications

ETH020 - Contesting

Jul 20, 2016 30:03

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to Contesting

Kids Day

Twice a year, ARRL offers an event designed to promote Amateur Radio to our youth.Kids Day is designed to give on-the-air experience to young people and hopefully foster interest in getting a license of their own. It is also intended to give older hams a chance to share their station and love for Amateur Radio with their children.

When: Saturday, June 18 1800 UTC through 2359 UTC

Suggested Exchange: Name, age, location and favorite color. Be sure to work the same station again if an operator has changed. To draw attention, call “CQ Kids Day.”

Suggested Frequencies–

10 Meters: 28.350 to 28.400 MHz 12 Meters: 24.960 to 24.980 MHz 15 Meters: 21.360 to 21.400 MHz 17 Meters: 18.140 to 18.145 MHz 20 Meters: 14.270 to 14.300 MHz 40 Meters: 7.270 to 7.290 MHz 80 Meters: 3.740 to 3.940 MHz

You can also use your favorite repeater (with permission of the repeater’s sponsor).

Be sure to observe third-party restrictions when making DX QSOs.

Jamboree On The Air

http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/09/jamboree-on-the-airjotajoti/

Field Day

Objective:

To work as many stations as possible on any and all amateur bands (excluding the 60, 30, 17, and 12-meter bands) and to learn to operate in abnormal situations in less than optimal conditions. Field Day is open to all amateurs in the areas covered by the ARRL/RAC Field Organizations and countries within IARU Region 2. DX stations residing in other regions may be contacted for credit, but are not eligible to submit entries.

Field Day is always the fourth full weekend of June, beginning at 1800 UTC Saturday and running through 2059 UTC Sunday. Field Day 2016 is June 25-26.

Log Submission Deadline:

Entries must be postmarked, emailed or submitted by Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Late entries cannot be accepted.

Rookie Round Up

Mission & Objective:

Mission: To encourage newly licensed operators (“Rookies”) in North America (including territories and possessions) to operate on the HF bands and experience competitive Amateur Radio operating. Experienced operators (“Non-Rookies”) are strongly encouraged to participate and help new operators – either on the air or in person.

Objective: Rookies exchange information with as many other stations as possible on the 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meter HF bands.  Rookie entrants are encouraged to read “HF Contesting – Good Practices, Interpretations and Suggestions.”

Dates:

The third Sunday of April, August and December from 1800 UTC through 2359 UTC.

2016: 17 April (SSB), 21 August (RTTY), 18 December (CW)

Awards:

Electronic certificates will be emailed to the top five scoring Rookies in each US call area, Canadian province, Mexican call area and DX.  No national winners will be recognized. A commemorative participation certificate will be available for download to every Rookie operator submitting a score. Non-rookies submitting a check log will be recognized by call in the final results.

How is A Rookie Defined?

In the Rookie Roundup, a Rookie is defined has having been first licensed in the current calendar year or the previous two calendar years, regardless of license class.

Modes

April – SSB, August – RTTY, December – CW.

QSO Parties

QSO parties can range from anywhere from a couple of hours in length to a year-long contests. In 2014, the ARRL hosted a Centennial QSO party that went from Jan 1, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014. Some, like the Alabama QSO party which is June 4 1600Z  to June 5th 0400Z are just a couple of hours long.

During the event, stations in that area whether it be state-wide, call sign number wide, country-wide or world-wide, will try to get as many contacts as possible from that area. Points will be tallied at the end of the event and generally the top five stations will get a certificate.

Check out WA7BNM Contest Calendar for a listing of all the upcoming QSO parties and other contests.

ARRL Contest Calendar for the remainder of the year.

JUNE

June VHF QSO Party: Second full weekend in June, 1800 UTC Saturday through 0259 UTC Monday. Kids Day: Third Saturday in June, 1800 UTC through 2359 UTC Field Day: Fourth full weekend in June, 1800 UTC Saturday through 2059 UTC Sunday.

JULY

IARU HF World Championships: The second full weekend of July, 1200 UTC Saturday through 1159 UTC Sunday.

AUGUST

10 GHz & Up Contest – Leg 1: Third full weekend of August, 6:00AM local time Saturday through 11:59pm local time Sunday. Rookie Roundup: Third Sunday, 1800 UTC through 2359 UTC.

SEPTEMBER

September VHF QSO Party: Second full weekend of September, 1800 UTC Saturday through 0259 UTC Monday 10 GHz & Up Contest – Leg 2: Third full weekend of August, 6:00AM local time Saturday through 11:59pm local time Sunday.

OCTOBER

School Club Roundup: Third full school week of October

NOVEMBER

November Sweepstakes – CW: First full weekend in November, 2100 UTC Saturday through 0259 UTC Monday. November Sweepstakes – Phone: Third full weekend in November, 2100 UTC Saturday through 0259 UTC Monday.

DECEMBER

ARRL 160 Meter Contest: First full weekend in December, 2200 UTC Friday through 1559 UTC Sunday. ARRL 10 Meter Contest: Second full weekend in December, 0000 UTC Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday. Rookie Roundup: Third Sunday, 1800 UTC through 2359 UTC.

NOTES: EME Contest dates are determined year to year based on optimium EME conditions. See the EME Contest Rules for this year’s specific dates.

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.   

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Cumberland Plateau Amateur Radio Club (CPARC)

Website: http://www.cparc.net/

This Spotlight was submitted by Joel Case, KM4TPF, Thanks for listening Joel!

Meetings:

2nd Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Central at the Cumberland County High School

Nets: Sun.-Fri., 7:30 p.m.*, CPARC ARES Nets 146.865- 118.8 Tone Repeaters 146.865- Tone 118.8 (solar mixed Fusion) 146.895- Tone 118.8 443.850+ Tone 118.8 (normal mode Fusion)

CPARC owned: 146.865 & 443.850

Activities Field Day Contesting ARES Training at club meetings And daily hang out sessions at the local DQ between 9a and noon weekdays

ETH019 - Awards

Jul 20, 2016 32:03

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Awards.

Amateur Radio Relay League Awards DXCC

 

 

The first award that we are going to be talking about is the DXCC award. This award is probably one of the hardest to get with the exception of the Five Band DXCC award. With this award you have to make 100 confirmed contacts with 100 different countries. For this award you can use 70 cm, 2m, 6m, 10m, 12m, 15m, 17m, 20m, 30m, 40m, 80m and 160m! At the time of this post, you can not use 60m.

Mixed DXCC – This award is the easier one of this award because you can use any band, except 60 meters, and any mode. Phone DXCC – This award requires 100 contacts on voice mode on any of the bands above. CW DXCC – This award requires 100 contacts on CW on any of the bands above Digital DXCC – This award requires 100 contacts using any digital mode on any of the bands above Satellite DXCC – This awards requires 100 contacts using only satellites. This mode also does not apply to the Mixed DXCC away

With the exception of Satellite, any of the awards above you can mix and match what band you want to use. You might make a contact with Canada on 80m and Brazil on 20m and it would count towards the award.

The second part of the DXCC award that is even harder to get is the Five Band DXCC. With this award you have to make 100 contacts in 100 different countries on each of the following bands: 10m, 15m, 20m , 40m and 80m. Once you have these five bands down and you get your five band DXCC award you can get endorsements for 2m, 6m, 12m, 17m, 20m and 160m, but you must have the first five bands already.

Both the regular DXCC, the individual mode DXCC and the five band DXCC awards are the hardest to obtain and will probably take you longer than any other award. It could and probably would take you years to get these.

Are you working towards you DXCC award? How long have you been working on it and how many confirmed contacts do you have towards it? Please share in the comments below, I personally, would love to hear about it and I’m sure that all the rest of my listeners would as well

Worked All States(WAS)

 

The next award that we are going be talking about is probably up there in difficulty as well. It is the Worked All States or WAS Award. The requirements for this award is to have one confirmed contact in each state of the United States on any band except 60 meters. Amateurs that reside in the US are required to be a member of the ARRL to apply for this award. If the amateur resides outside the US this requirement is waived

All contact must be made from the same location. By same location, the rules state that all contacts must be made within a 50 miles(80 kilometer) radius. So it isn’t so much of “the same location” but more of “the same geographic area”.

Just like with the DXCC, there are several types of this award as well.

Mixed – This type allows you to use any mode to go towards your WAS award Phone – This type requires you to use voice communications only to count towards your WAS award CW – This type requires you to use CW only to count towards your WAS award Digital – This type allows you to use any and all types of digital communications to count towards your WAS award. You can use RTTY, PSK31, etc at it all counts RTTY – Even though you can use RTTY in the digital type, if you make all your contacts using RTTY you can get this WAS award Satellite – Contacts made through satellites count towards this type of award.

 

Just like with the five band DXCC award, there is a five band WAS award as well. Just like it’s DXCC counterpart, the five band WAS award must be earned by making contact with all 50 states on 10m, 15m, 20m, 40m, and 80m. Once you have this award, you can get endorsements on it for 23cm, 70cm, 1.5m, 2m, 6m and 160m

 

Worked All Continents(WAC)

Worked All Continents or WAC is probably the easiest of the ARRL awards to get. This award is for making contacts on all six continents.  These are North America, South America, Oceania, Asia, Europe and Africa. No where that I read does it say that all contact must be made on one band alone to get the award. There is a five bad WAC as well and you can apply for it when you have made contact with each of these continents on the five major amateur radio bands, 10m, 15m, 20m, 40m, and 80m.

Other Awards

There are a few other awards that are given by the ARRL, like the VHF/UHF Century Club(VUCC), which is a VHF/UHF only award and you have to make a certain number of contacts with people in different Maidenhead grid squares. Check out the ARRL Website for more information.

How about the Fred Fish Memorial Award that you can earn by making contacts in all 488 Maidenhead grid squares in the continental United States on 6 meters. The award was named after Fred Fish, W5FF(sk), who was the first ham to accomplish this feat.

How about the First Contact Award. If you are someone first contact, how awesome do you think it would be to open their mailbox and get a nice certificate that commemorates their first contact?

These are just some of the awards offered by the ARRL, for a complete list of them as well as full rules and other information, check out the ARRL Awards website.

What Other Awards Can You Get?

Now that we have talked about some of the awards that the ARRL provides, what other kind of awards can you get? Last week we talked about SOTA and two awards that you can get with it, the Mountain Goat award and the Shack Slough award. We have also talked about the NPOTA, which I think there will be awards given out as well.

What about your local club? Does your club give any awards away? One of the club’s that I belong to give a Ham of the Year award. Maybe your club gives an Elmer award or a New Ham of the Year. The options are endless and awards can do a great deal when it comes to showing your members that what they do is being noticed. Everybody like a pat on the back every now and then.

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

First off, I wanted to thank Mark Wardell for being my first pledger on Patreon! Thank you for the $5 pledge! If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

River Cities Amateur Radio Club

Website: http://www.rcara.net/index.html

Meeting

Meetings are held on the first Tuesday of the month at 7pm at the Salvation Army Building located at 2212 Carter Avenue, Ashland, Ky

Nets Weeknight Net – Every weeknight at 7:30pm on the 146.940 repeater. Repeaters 146.940 – PL 107.2 – Located on Tarpon Ridge in Boyd County, KY Activities Hamfest – The RCARC hamfest is this coming Saturday, May 28, 2016 from 8a-1p. It will be located in the PNC Bank rear parking lot at 1000 Carter Ave, Ashland, KY.

ETH018 - Special Event Stations

Jul 20, 2016 29:43

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to continue with our HF series by talking about Special Event Stations.

What Is A Special Event Station?

A special event station is basically the amateur radio version of an anniversary party. A lot of times, this is something like the anniversary of forming your club, or a certain battle in a war or even the anniversary of a major disaster. At the time of this episode, there are 130 special event stations registered with the ARRL until the end of 2016.

Typically a special event will have a special call sign as well. You can apply for a special 1X1 call sign and be granted one for a short-term. These call signs are typically only good for about a month. Sometimes clubs will have a special vanity call sign for the event instead of a 1X1. On the short Wikipedia article for what a special event station was, they mentioned this:

The National World War One Museum,at the Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, Missouri, for instance will be having a special event station over the next six years in observance of the centennial of the Great War, under the call sign WW1USA.

We recently had a special event station here where I live celebrating the 180 year of Texas Independance. I unfortunately wasn’t able to participate in it because of moving, but hopefully I will be able to in the future special events that we have planned.

I have participated in a couple special events, and have talked to a few as well. Unfortunately, every time I talk to a special event station, I am using someone else’s call sign so I never get the QSL cards. I think the one that I wish I would’ve been able to get the most happened to me about 16 years ago or so when the Olympics were in Australia. The local hams there had a special event station going and we happened to be at a club camp out on one of the weekends of the Olympics. We had a HF rig setup and somehow managed to talk from Texas to Australia on 10 meters. It was in the peak of the sunspot cycle and it’s was one of the hardest contacts I have ever made, but I got it!

If you would like to find out when a special event station is going on to try to make contact with them, check out theARRL Special Event Station page.

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Packtenna Giveaway

A couple of weeks ago, I reached out to George with Packtenna to talk to him about this episode. I was trying to see about getting a coupon code, or an affiliate link with them. He instead has agreed to donate one of their new PackTenna Mini’s(an $89 value) to one lucky listener of this podcast.

George came through for me and all of you and I got the PackTenna Mini in the mail on Wednesday! I got a surprise as well, not only did he send me one to give away to one lucky listener, but he sent me a second one for me as well! Thanks George! I will be putting it to good use in the near future. I will also be doing a write-up on it this weekend as to my initial impression on it and later on how it work.

Now the moment you have all been waiting for! The winner of the PackTenna Mini giveaway is…

KF5RHI – Richard Slusher!!! Supporting Everything Ham Radio

Over the past couple episode I have told about a service that I was told about called Patreon. This service allows you, my wonderful listeners, to make a totally voluntary and monthly donation to me to help keep my blog and podcast going. You can make a monthly donation of $1, $5, $10 or $25 and you can cancel it anytime. Each level has different things that you will get in return for you contribution and I will be adding more things a little bit later. I am working on getting T-Shirts and a cap and possible some other things as well. If you sign up for a level that I will be adding to now, you will still get the item when I add it to the rewards for that level.

If you don’t want to do a monthly contribution but would rather do just a one time donation, you can go through my paypal link that you can find at the bottom of this post. I would like to thank Cody Williamson for his third donation.

If you are like me and can’t afford to give anything, I totally understand. I wish that I could help support some other people who I listen to, but unfortunately, I this time I can not. One day!

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Website: http://ks0lnk.net/
Twitter: @ks0lnk

This club spotlight is not going to be a typical club spotlight because it is not a club per say but a group of amateur radio repeater owners and control operators in state of Kansas. This club was recommended by Todd, KE0HRB who is a new amateur radio operator in Plainville, KS.

According to their website the K-Link Repeater Network is a network of 31 full-time and 11 part-time linked FM analog repeaters in the Amateur Radio Service that provide coverage across most of the state of Kansas and southeast Nebraska

Normally I would list all the repeaters that are owned but the club however, seeing how there is 31 of them plus some others that can be temporarily linked to the network, I am just going to give yall the link to their repeater page.

If you live in or are planning to be in Kansas, check out this repeater system. I really think it is a great idea to be able to talk in most of the state to anywhere else in the state. The only thing that could possible make it better was if you were able to stay on one frequency and talk anywhere.

ETH017 - Summits on the Air(SOTA)

Jul 20, 2016 37:09

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be continuing our series on HF by talking about Summits On The Air(SOTA).

What is Summits On The Air(SOTA)?

SOTA is an awards program for amateur radio that was started in Great Britain back in 2002 and has since gone world-wide. It is a program that is designed to encourage amateur radio operators to operate from a temporary location on top of a mountain.The operation must be done from a location that can not be reached in a motorized vehicle and can not be powered by commercial power.

There are three types of people who are eligible for this award.

Activators – Activators are those that will go to the summit and set up a temporary station and make contacts Chasers – Chasers are those that are at home or vehicle or others that make contact with those operators that have “activated” a summit. Short Wave Listeners – Are non-amateur radio operators that are able to hear a QSO exchange between two amateur radio operators. If they can copy the exchange, the can submit a log of the QSO and get points for hearing it in the SWL category of SOTA.

Click here to check out the General Rules for SOTA

Summit Values

Different summits have different point values depending a number of thing but mainly it is their height. The higher the summit the more points you can get. There are exceptions to this rule though. If you have two summits that are both at say 10k above sea level and one of them has a park or something at the top where you can drive 90% or the way up the mountain, its point value will be less than one where you actually have to work to get there on foot.

Another thing that will set the point value of a summit is the time of year. If you activate the same summit in summer and winter, you could get more points in the winter time because of the difficulty to climb it if there is typically snow on it.

Awards

As an activator, when you reach 1000 points you will receive the “Mountain Goat” award. As a chaser, when you reach 1000 points you will receive the “Shack Sloth” Award. There isn’t an award for the Short-wave Listener category, however, there is Honor Roll lists for each category.

Equipment Radio – First and foremost, you must have a radio. Duh! The question is, what kind of radio or which radio should you use? Here is a couple of options that I have found that other people have recommended, or that they use themselves. Please note, that I have never done this myself, nor have I used any of these radios. Elecraft KX3 Yaesu FT-817ND QRP  Transceivers List Power – What good is a radio, if you don’t have any power right? So the second thing on your priority list is some kind of battery pack. Most radios that you will probably be using is going to require 12v DC. The thing that you really need to look at when selecting a battery is the amp hours. The more Amp Hours the battery has, the longer it will hold a change. That being said, you have to balance the amp hour rating with the weight of the battery, because you will be carrying this battery in a backpack, along with all your other gear, you need it to be as light as possible. Antenna – The third in the must have trifecta is the antenna. You really need to balance the size or the antenna against the weight of it again because you will be carrying it in or on your backpack. I recommend thePackTenna Mini for this exact reason. It is very small and weighs next to nothing but still gets great performance on the air. PackTenna even has package deals What Else Should I Bring?

Now that we have the three top things out-of-the-way, what else is good to bring.

Something to Log with – Pen, pencil, paper, computer, iPhone, iPad, tablet, etc Navigation – Paper map, GPS, Phone First Aid Kit – In case you or someone else gets hurt. Flash light Sunscreen Extra food and water Emergency Shelter and signal device(mirror, radio, etc) If you plan on operating for an extended period of time, you might need a solar panel or something that is a natural source of energy to charge your battery.

Here is a couple of links to some people who I found while researching for this article that have a pretty comprehensive list of things that they have in their SOTA packs.

G4ISJ SOTA Gear KD0BIK SOTA Gear SOTA What I Bring (Youtube) Further Reading: SOTA – http://www.sota.org.uk/ North America SOTA – http://na-sota.org/ SOTA Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summits_on_the_Air SOTA Watch – http://www.sotawatch.org/ SOTA Mapping Project – http://www.sotamaps.org/

 

More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Packtenna Giveaway

A couple of weeks ago, I reached out to George with Packtenna to talk to him about this episode. I was trying to see about getting a coupon code, or an affiliate link with them. He instead has agreed to donate one of their new PackTenna Mini’s(an $89 value) to one lucky listener of this podcast.

So here is how it is going to work. Over this episode and next week’s episode I will give you a phrase that you will need to put in the subject line of an email. I am not going to put that phrase on the show notes, you will have to listen to the episode to get that. Send an email tok5clm@everythinghamradio.com with that phrase in the subject line and your name and call sign in the body of the message. As I receive those emails, I will put them on a number list in the order that I got them. On April 15, 2016, I will use a random number generator to randomly select a number. The person with the corresponding number will be the winner. Since this drawing is going over two weeks, you will have two chances to win this drawing.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

I first off want to thank Cody Williamson, KG5CEW for another $10 donation that he sent me this past week. It is greatly appreciated! Secondly, I wanted to let yall know of something else that I was made aware of from one of yall. I received an email from one of my listeners who suggested I sign up for a service call Patreon. This service allows creators, like me, to set up an account with them and allows the people who enjoy the content to help support them, either on a monthly basis or per episode basis.

I have set up the account and have it live now. You can find it at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Cedar Valley Amateur Radio Club

Website:  http://w0gq.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CVARC/

Meetings:

Second Thursday of the month at 7:30 pm, Kenwood Park United Methodist Church, 175 34th St NE, Cedar Rapids, IA 52402

Nets: New Ham Net – Every Sunday at 6pm on 146.745 ARES Net – Every Sunday at 7pm on 146.745 Repeaters 146.745MHz – 145.150MHz – 192.8 PL 147.090MHz + 192.8 PL Echolink W0WSV-R 224.940MHz – 192.8 PL 443.600MHz + 192.8 PL Activities Marathons (full and half, and sometimes simultaneously) Smaller runs or fundraising walks Emergency Management Agency drills (primarily pertaining to our local nuclear power plant) Triathlons (typically two per  year) Holiday events with city officials Field Day – CVARC had the largest Field Day Station Rating in 2015 – 19 transmitters plus a GOTA station. Hamfest – Aug 7, 2016 8a-1p Junk in the Truck Mini-fest – May 14, 2016, 8:00 am – 1:00pm – 855 35th St NE, Cedar Rapids (Rockwell Collins Main Plant) And others

ETH016 - NPOTA

Jul 20, 2016 34:58

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to continue our series dealing with things to do on HF with National Parks On The Air(NPOTA).

 

The NPOTA is a year-long event that is celebrating the National Parks systems Centennial. As an amateur radio operator you can either activate a national park or make contact with someone who has activated a national park or both. ‘

NPOTA Activators Guide – This guide has a lot of information in it about “activating” a national park, how to work with the park rangers, bonuses that you can get and much more. NPOTA for NPS Staff – This is a tri-fold flyer that you can print to give to the National Park staff in order to help you explain what you plan on doing in the park, if they have never heard of amateur radio. If the staff is “on the fence” about letting you set up in the park, this flyer could put them over to the yes column NPOTA/SOTA Map – This is a map of all the eligible National Parks and Summits that are available for activation. ARRL NPOTA – Check out this page for all the rules, FAQ, List of all the NPOTA sites, and lots of other stuff Official NPOTA Website – Official NPOTA website with the leaderboard, Honor Roll and other things. This site you can log into with your LOTW login and see where you stand in the rankings Equipment PackTenna – A great little antenna that fits great in a backpack or small bag Go Kits – Check out my previous podcast episode #11 for information about go packs K0MOS SOTA kit – Check out this write-up about his SOTA setup. Remember you can also activate a National pack from your vehicle or any radio that you may have available as long as you can get power to it. More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Packtenna Giveaway

A couple of weeks ago, I reached out to George with Packtenna to talk to him about this episode. I was trying to see about getting a coupon code, or an affiliate link with them. He instead has agreed to donate one of their new PackTenna Mini’s(an $89 value) to one lucky listener of this podcast.

So here is how it is going to work. Over this episode and next weeks episode I will give you a phrase that you will need to put in the subject line of an email. I am not going to put that phrase on the show notes, you will have to listen to the episode to get that. Send an email to k5lm@everythinghamradio.com with that phrase in the subject line and your name and call sign in the body of the message. As I receive those emails, I will put them on a number list in the order that I got them. On April 15, 2016, I will use a random number generator to randomly select a number. The person with the corresponding number will be the winner. Since this drawing is going over two weeks, you will have two chances to win this drawing.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

I first off want to thank Cody Williamson, KG5CEW for the $10 donation that he sent me this past week. It is greatly appreciated! Secondly, I wanted to let yall know of something else that I was made aware of from one of yall. I received an email from one of my listeners who suggested I sign up for a service call Patreon. This service allows creators, like me, to set up an account with them and allows the people who enjoy the content to help support them, either on a monthly basis or per episode basis.

I have set up the account and have it live now. You can find it at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Fort Wayne Radio Club

Website: http://www.fwrc.info

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FortWayneRadioClub

Meetings:

3rd Friday of the Month at 7:00pm at the Good Shepherd United Methodist Church; 4700 Vance Ave, 46815

Nets: 6m AM Net – Thursdays at 8pm on 50.580 MHz 6m SSB Net – Tuesdays at 8pm on 50.580 MHz Allen County ARES Digital Operations Team Training Net – Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. ET, 145.51 MHz simplex. Net starts using BPSK-31 and switches to BPSK-250 after roll call to pass traffic etc. NBEMS suite of software (FLDIGI, FLMSG, and FLAMP) is preferred. Allen County ARES Training Net – Tuesdays, 9 p.m. ET, 146.94 MHz Fort Wayne-Area Student Net – Wednesdays, 9 p.m. ET, 146.91 MHz FW224 Net – 224.78 MHz repeater every Monday at 8 p.m. FWRC 6 Meter Net – Tuesdays, 8 p.m. ET, 50.580 MHz USB FWRC YL Net – Wednesdays, 7 p.m. ET, 146.76 MHz Help and Swap Net – Wednesdays, 9 p.m. ET, 146.94 MHz IMO Traffic Net – Daily, 6:30 p.m. ET, 146.88 MHz (or 146.76 MHz if the 146.88 MHz repeater is unavailable). Local net of the ARRL National Traffic System. “No-Name” Net – Sundays and Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m. ET, 1.965 MHz or via cross-band link on 146.91 MHz Repeaters 146.760 – 141.3 Optional Tone – Northern Fort Wayne 146.940 – 141.3 Optional tone – Northeast Fort Wayne – ARES – Autopatch 146.910 – 141.3 Optional Tone – Northeast Fort Wayne – Echolink Node 519521 442.99375 + No Tone – Downtown Fort Wayne – DStar Repeater 444.875 + 141.3 Tone – Northern Fort Wayne Activities Monthly Fox Hunts Field Day Mastodon Stomp Juvenile Walk for Diabetes Heart Walk March of Dimes

ETH015 - DXing

Jul 20, 2016 31:26

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! Last week we started off this series covering several topics dealing with HF. If you missed last week’s episode, click here to go back and listen to it. In today’s episode we are going to be talking about DXing.

What is DXing?

According to Wikipedia:

DXing is the hobby of receiving and identifying distant radio or television signals, or making two-way radio contact with distant stations in amateur radio, citizens’ band radio or other two-way radio communications.   

DXing is a fun way to get on the air and talk to people in places that you may have never thought you would. You don’t need any special equipment, you don’t have to really know what you are doing. As long as you have an HF radio, an antenna that will work on whatever frequency you are going to be talking on and your license says that you can talk on that frequency, the only thing you need to know how to do, is turn on your radio and tune it to a frequency you can use, key up your microphone and say your call sign. That is basically it!

All of this being said, if you are sitting in your house in Ft. Worth, TX and you say you call sign on HF, it may take a while for you to get someone to answer you back because there is a lot of frequencies out there that people talk on so they have to find you. In order find you, you have to be talking or someone talking on your frequency anyway.

The other thing that you can do is to tune your radio up and down the band and try to find someone who is talking, or that is working a “pile-up”. If you are lucky to find one of those, that’s great! Listen for a few minutes and get the hang of what the person is asking for, then when they get done working someone, throw your call sign out there. If you are lucky enough, they will hear you and you just made a contact!

There are some things that can work in your favor when trying to make DX contacts, whether you are the one that is calling CQ or one of the many that are hunting for a contact. Unfortunately, these things, except for one, won’t last you forever.

Age – Being young and especially if you are a new ham, will get you through most pileups or cause them if you are calling CQ. The amateur radio community loves it when they hear young operators on the radio and will typically accommodate the young operator so they can get the contact. Being a YL – What’s a YL and how do I become one, you might ask if you don’t know what YL stands for. Unfortunately, you are going to be a YL from birth or spend A LOT of money to make yourself one. YL stands for Young Lady. Young Lady does not refered to being young per say, it only refers to being a female. In the amateur radio community, women are referred to as young ladies and men are referred to as old men. Yea guys, I know, it’s not fair. Being a new ham – If you have just gotten your license, you are probably pretty likely to get a contact. Often when we are new hams, we have hesitation in our voices or they sound unsteady. Other hams will often pick up on this and it will cause a flashback to when they were new. Not only does it give them a happy memory but it also causes them to remember how they felt the first time they got on HF. This tends to turn on the Elmer mode that most hams will have after they have been a ham for a while. QSL Cards

The QSL card collection and gear of amateur radio operator call sign KCORSX

One of the other fun things about DXing is collecting QSL cards. A QSL card is normally about a 3×5 post card style card that has your call sign, name, normally like a picture of your shack or antenna or something and a bunch of boxes that you fill out with things like what frequency you made a contact one, what their signal report was, what mode you were operating, date and time.

When you make a contact with someone, you fill out the boxes on one of your QSL card and drop it in the mail to whoever you contacted. If you want a better chance of getting a QSL back from them, include a postage paid self-addressed envelope for them to send one back to you, this is especially true if the contact that you made is in another country.

Nowadays, however, the paper QSL cards are starting to become more of a novelty piece to collect than proof of contact like it use to be. Several years ago, the only way that you could prove that you made contact with some DX station was by receiving a QSL card from them. What if they didn’t send you a QSL card? What if it takes a long time to get it? What if they can’t afford postage for it? All these questions and I’m sure more have gone through the heads of ham all over the globe when chasing a contest or award.

Enter the Internet Age

Rather than having to wait on a paper QSL card and then making copies of them to send to the ARRL to prove that you talked to this person to complete your Worked all States, or DXCC awards, now you have to jump online and log it into the Logbook of the World that the ARRL made. This is an extreme hassle to sign up for from what I understand. I have started the process of registering, but so far I am still waiting on some kind of code.

You have to use Logbook of the World for all awards that are given by the ARRL, I believe. There another online QSL site that is used a lot called E-QSL. It is a whole lot easier to register for and it is the second major player in the online QSL business – So to speak.

Further Reading DX Zone DX News Wikipedia Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Fox River Relay League

 

Website: http://www.frrl.org/
Facebook:

Meetings

Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30PM at the Bethany Lutheran Church, 8 S Lincoln st, Batavia, IL

Nets FRRL 2-meter Net: Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. (except second Tuesday meeting nights), on 147.21 (+600kHz, PL: 103.5). PSK Net: Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. on 144.9 (start on FM phone and switch to PSK). Ten-Ten City of Lights Net: Mondays at 8 p.m. (CW Net) on 28.150 and 8:30 p.m. (phone net) on 28.720 Kane County ARES/Skywarn Net: Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. on the KC9OEM 2m repeater at 145.47 (-600kHz, PL: 103.5). License/Testing

If you want to get your license, the FRRL offers several free multi-week courses to help people get their amateur radio license or to upgrade. The also co-sponsor a VE Testing Session 6 times a year, January, March, May, July, September, and November. All except for the session in July, the test will be given at the Messenger Library, 113 Oak St,  North Aurora.The July testing session is be given at their annual hamfest.

Events Hamfest – July 10, 2016 from 8am til 1pm at the Aurora Central Catholic High School 1255 N. Edglawn,  Aurora, IL Field Day MS Walk

ETH014 - HF

Jul 20, 2016 30:49

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to Everything Ham Radio. Whether you are reading this on my blog as a blog post, or listening to it on my podcast, I hope you enjoy it. This episode/post is going to be a starting point of our general topic for this quarter, High Frequency(HF). We have talked quite a bit about things that you do on VHF and UHF and have touched on a couple of things about HF, but this quarter we are going to dive deeper into HF. We are going to be talking about DXing, Contesting, Awards, Special Event Stations, SOTA, NPOTA, and eventually about mid-June talk about Field Day, Emergency Power and Portable Setups.

There is so much to do in this hobby, it amazes me every time I start to research a topic for the week, just what I’m about to learn. Things that even though I have been a Ham now for over 20 years, I have never done for one reason or another. Maybe one day soon, I can get back on HF, if I ever get my station at home put back up.

As you know if you have been following my blog for a couple of months, I recently moved into a new and bigger house. Unfortunately, we still haven’t gotten totally unpacked, and all my off days are busy building stuff, or working on something or another.  Once I do get everything set up at my new house though, look out HF, here I come!

OK, enough about me, On to the topic of day, HF:

What is HF?

High Frequency(HF) is a portion of the radio spectrum that amateur radio operators have access to use according to the FCC and the ITU. In the US, the frequency allocations for amateur radio operators is coordinated by the Federal Communications Commission and more specifically in Part 97 of the FCC Rules and Regulations. These allocations may be different in other countries and different parts of the world.

There are three regions of the ITU or the International Telecommunications Union.

 Region 1 – Europe, Russia, Africa and the Middle East – Band Plan Region 2 – North and South America, including Greenland – Band Plan Region 3 – Australia, Indonesia, Japan, New Zealand, the South Pacific, and Asia south of Siberia – Band Plan

Once every 4-6 years delegates from each region meet and discuss different topics dealing with, among other things, frequency allocations.

What Frequencies Are avail for me to use as an amateur extra class operator in the US? 80 meters – 3.5-4 MHz (3500–4000 kHz) – Best at night, with significant daytime signal absorption. Works best in winter due to atmospheric noise in summer. Only countries in the Americas and few others have access to all of this band, in other parts of the world amateurs are limited to the bottom 300 kHz or less. In the US and Canada the upper end of the sub-band from 3600–4000 kHz, permits use of single-sideband voice as well as amplitude modulation, voice; often referred to as 75 meters.

 

60 meters – 5 MHz region – A relatively new allocation and originally only available in a small number of countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland,Norway, Denmark, and Iceland, but now continuing to expand. In most ( but not all ) countries, the allocation is channelized and may require special application. Voice operation is generally in upper sideband mode and in the USA it is mandatory.

 

40 meters – 7.0–7.3 MHz – Considered the most reliable all-season DX band. Popular for DX at night, 40 meters is also reliable for medium distance (1500 km) contacts during the day. Much of this band was shared with broadcasters, and in most countries the bottom 100 kHz or 200 kHz are available to amateurs. However, due to the high cost of running high power commercial broadcasting facilities; decreased listener-ship and increasing competition from net based international broadcast services, many ‘short wave’ services are being shut down leaving the 40 meter band free of other users for amateur radio use.

 

30 meters – 10.1–10.15 MHz – a very narrow band, which is shared with non-amateur services. It is recommended that only Morse Code and data transmissions be used here, and in some countries amateur voice transmission is actually prohibited. For example, in the US, data, RTTY and CW are the only modes allowed at a maximum 200w peak envelope power (PEP) output. Not released for amateur use in a small number of countries. Due to its location in the centre of the shortwave spectrum, this band provides significant opportunities for long-distance communication at all points of the solar cycle. 30 meters is a WARC band. “WARC” bands are so-called due to the special World Administrative Radio Conference allocation of these newer bands to amateur radio use. Amateur radio contests are not run on the WARC bands.

 

20 meters – 14.0–14.35 MHz – Considered the most popularDX band; usually most popular during daytime. QRP operators recognize 14.060 MHz as their primary calling frequency in that band. Users of the PSK31 data mode tend to congregate around 14.071 MHz. Analog SSTV activity is centered around 14.230 MHz.

 

17 meters – 18.068–18.168 MHz – Similar to 20m, but more sensitive to solar propagation minima and maxima. 17 meters is a WARC band.

 

15 meters – 21–21.45 MHz – Most useful during solar maximum, and generally a daytime band. Daytime sporadic-E propagation (1500 km) occasionally occurs on this band.

 

 

12 meters – 24.89–24.99 MHz – Mostly useful during daytime, but opens up for DXactivity at night during solar maximum. 12 meters is one of the new WARC bands.

 

10 meters – 28–29.7 MHz – Best long distance (e.g., across oceans) activity is during solar maximum; during periods of moderate solar activity the best activity is found at low latitudes. The band offers useful short to medium range groundwave propagation, day or night. During the late spring and most of the summer, regardless of sunspot numbers, afternoon short band openings into small geographic areas of up to 1500 km occur due to Sporadic-E propagation. “Sporadic-E” is caused by areas of intense ionization in the E layer of the ionosphere. The causes of Sporadic-E are not fully understood, but these “clouds” of ionization can provide short-term propagation from 17 meters all the way up to occasional 2 meter openings. FM operations are normally found at the high-end of the band (Also repeaters are in the 29.5 – 29.7 MHz segment in a lot of countries).

*The frequencies that you are eligible to use may differ due to license class or location. See you local Frequency Coordinator Guidelines for further information, or click on the corresponding Band Plan link next to your region above. Graphics are for Region 2.

Propagation

Most of the topics that we have covered so far in this podcast has been mainly on VHF and UHF. With VHF and UHF, where you are limited in distance by line of sight, with HF you talk use ionospheric Modes or skywave propagation. So what is the difference? The difference is that rather than you signals traveling line of sight from one station to another, your signal will bounce off the ionosphere and head back to earth. The frequency that you decide to talk on determines which layer of the ionosphere that it bounces off of and how far your signal travels.

When you use frequencies in the HF area, you signals will bounce of different layers of the atmosphere and bounce back to earth. The higher the frequency the less of a chance for it to bounce back because of the refractive index of the frequency. Different frequencies bounce off of different layers of the atmosphere.

 

If you have ever participated in an HF net, whether it was a ragchew or an emergency net, in the evening, you may have noticed the band condition might have changed on you. This is especially true on the 20 meter band. During the daytime hours, the 20 meter band is a good choice for long distance communications because the F layer of the ionosphere splits because of solar radiation into the F1 and F2 layers. Once the solar radiation dissipates when night falls, the F1 and F2 layers will combine again into just the F layer and your transmission on 20 will start to falter. This is the reason that on emergency nets, the 20 meter band will be used during the day and the 40 meter band will be used at night.

One of the major emergency nets in the US is the Hurricane Watch Net. The Hurricane Watch Net activates for all hurricanes that are a threat to land in the Atlantic and as needed in the Eastern Pacific. Normally, the net will go into full activation whenever a storm is within 300 statute miles from land and moving towards that land. On occasion, the net may activate for tropical storms or hurricanes before they reach the 300 mile zone if requested by the National Hurricane Center.

Modes

Unlike on VHF/UHF where you use the FM mode to communication most of the time, on HF it is just the opposite, most of the time you will be using AM or amplitude modulation. In AM mode, you have three parts of a wave, you have the carrier and the upper and lower sidebands. With AM signals the carrier is constantly sent whether you are saying something or not, the two sidebands are basically mirror images of each other both containing the same information or audio.

After years of using AM mode in radio communications, it was discovered that you could use only one sideband of the signal and improve the signal quality while using less bandwidth. Thus the use of a single sideband was born and is still used today.

So which sideband should you be on one a certain band? It has been agreed upon worldwide to use a specific sideband band on a certain band.  Use LSB on 160 meters through 75 meters, USB on 60 meters, back to LSB on 40 meters and then all bands above 40 meters use USB.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   Voice of Idaho Amateur Radio Club

 

Website: http://www.voiceofidaho.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VoiceOfIdaho

Meetings

Monthly meetings on the second Wednesday of the month except August at 7pm at the Idaho Pizza Company, 405 E Fairview Rd, Meridian, ID

Nets VOI General Purpose Net – Thursdays at 8pm – All but their analog repeater in Treasure Valley are linked nets Over the Hill Commute Group Net – Every week day at 7:10am on 147.240 Repeaters 147.240 + PL 100 – Cinnabar Mountain – Solar Powered 443.600 + PL 100 – Cinnabar Mountain – Solar Powered 146.840 – PL 100 – Shafer Butte 444.600 + PL 100 – Shafer Butte – Out of Service at this time of this Episode 146.620 – PL 100 – Snowbank Mountain 145.290 + PL 100 – Treasure Valley 145.500 – PL 100  – DStar – Treasure Valley 443.350 + PL 100 – DStar – Treasure Valley 444.800 + PL 100 – DStar – Jerome 2 APRS Digipeaters – One on Cinnabar Mountain and one on Snowbank Mountain – Solar Powered Testing Sessions

Test are given on the first Saturday of every month at Food 2 Store, 3055  Fairview Ave #130, Meridian, ID

This club sponsors the Idaho State Convention which is this coming weekend, April 22-24, 2016. The Convention will be at the Wyndham Garden Hotel at 3300 S Vista Ave, Boise, ID. For more information about the Idaho State convention, check out their website.

ETH013 - NTS

Jul 20, 2016 32:20

Description:

The National Traffic System (NTS) is a structure that allows for rapid movement of traffic from origin to destination and training amateur operators to handle written traffic and participate in directed nets.

 

The national traffic system works from the local to national and back to local levels. As an example, let’s say that I want to send a message to my friend Cale with the FoTime Podcast. My message would start with my local area net. From there, an operator would in turn check in to the NTX Section net and pass the traffic. An operator in the NTX section net would then check in on the Fifth Region net and pass the message onto someone else. They would take the message and check into the Central Area net and pass the message again. At this point the message would be passed from the Central Area net to the Eastern Area net via the designated TCC, or Transcontinental Corps, operators. From there the Eastern Area operator to pass it down to the Fourth Region net, then someone else would pass it to the South Carolina Section net and finally someone would pass it to a local net in his area and finally to him. This whole process could take a day or it could, and probably would take at least two. If Cale were to send a message back to me, it might only take one day because of the time difference.

 

Radio Gram

Now that we have an idea about how it works, let’s talk about the format of a message a little bit.

 

This is what the radiogram itself looks like. The fields on this form are pretty self-explanatory. However, if you would like to know more about what each section is, and what goes in each box, check out this post.

The National Traffic System is used mainly during major events, like natural or man-made disasters but it is also used other times as well. However, there has been a downward trend on the use of it. It has been noticed that there are times when there is only one or two messages passed during a net that use to have a lot more. In the National Traffic System controller community it has been suggested that areas have some kind of outdoor event or booth or something to help gather National Traffic System messages to be sent.

During a disaster, National Traffic System nets are flooded with traffic, the majority of which and Health and Welfare traffic. People trying to find out if their loved ones in the affected areas are OK, because they can not make contact with them by other means or the other way around, those in the affected areas trying to get a message out to let their loved ones know that they are OK.

While I have never personally sent or received a message through the National Traffic System system, I have heard first hand how this system works. A friend of the family had a family member that worked in the World Trade Center during 9/11/01. They were unable to make contact with them as the phone system and internet were down for obvious reasons. It was mentioned to my father one evening so he suggested that we use the National Traffic System to try to get a message to them. Long story short, we sent a message through the National Traffic System and about a week later, we got a response back that they were OK.

Much like everything else with amateur radio, when all else fails, Amateur Radio will prevail! It is one of the many things that I LOVE about the hobby. Have you ever sent a message through the National Traffic System before? Please leave a comment below and tell us about an experience you have had with sending or receiving messages through the National Traffic System.

CHALLENGE!

Seeing that there is a call for more messages to be sent through the National Traffic System to help in training of the system, I am issuing this challenge to each of you. Send me an Radiogram. Tell me what you think of my podcast and/or blog and please include ETH013 in the message. Remember you only have 25 words for the entire message, so make them count. My information is correct on QRZ/ULS.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Emergency Amateur Radio Club(EARC)

Website: http://www.earchi.org/

Meetings

Club Meetings are on the third Tuesday of each month, except June and December at 7pm at the Fleet Reserve Association Branch 46, 891 Valkenburgh Street Honolulu, HI

Repeaters 146.880 – Diamond Head 146.800 – Maunakapu 146.660 – PL 103.5 – Olomana 146.640 – PL 103.5 – Laie 444.500 + Diamond Head 444.100 + pl 151.4 Maunakapu 449.150 + PL 103.5 Nets UHF Nets Emergency Amateur Radio Club Monday-Saturday, except Major Holidays and 3rd Tuesday of each month…1930W…444.500+ …Linked to 146.880- Swap and Shop Every Tuesday…2000W…444.500+…Linked to 146.880- Health Comm First Business Day of the Month…1145W…444.775+, 443.775+, 442.925+, 442.775+, all with PL 123.0, make sure you use high power FLdigi Tech Net 4th Tuesday…2000W…State RACES UHF…444.325+ & 444.350+, all with PL 103.5 FLdigi Tech Net 4th Thursday…2000W…State RACES UHF…444.325+ & 444.350+, all with PL 103.5 VHF Nets Emergency Amateur Radio Club Monday-Saturday, except Major Holidays and 3rd Tuesday of each month…1930W…146.880- …Linked to 444.500+ Swap and Shop Every Tuesday…2000W…146.880-…Linked to 444.500+ LDS Group Net Wednesday and Thursday nights at 2100 local on 146.620- PL 103.5 Health Comm FLdigi Net First Business Day of the Month…1215W…147.220+ Kauai Amateur Radio Club Every Monday…2000W…146.920-…Linked to 147.160+ Maui Emergency and Hawaii State RACES Every Monday…1900W…147.060+…147.020+ on Maui…147.040+ on Kauai FLdigi Tech Net 4th Tuesday…2000W…State RACES 2M…147.020+,147.040+,147.060+,all PL 103.5, 146.760- & 146.980-, PL 88.5 FLdigi Tech Net 4th Thursday…2000W…State RACES 2M…147.020+,147.040+,147.060+,all PL 103.5, 146.760- & 146.980-, PL 88.5 HF Nets Hawaii State HealthComm Net First Sat of month…0900W…7.088…and 3.888 and 5.377 Alternate California / Hawaii Daily…0700W…14.340 California / Hawaii Daily…1600W…14.305 Aloha Net Daily…0900W…7.088…7.080…3.888 Alternate Hawaii Afternoon Net Daily…1600W…7.088…3.888 Alternate Swap and Shop Every Wednesday…1700W…7.088 LSB…40 meters FLdigi 2nd Tuesday…2000W…7.090 USB…40 meters Training Technician and General classes taught several times a year. Currently a technician class started on yesterday, Monday Apr 11, 2016.

ETH012 - Nets

Jul 20, 2016 27:27

Description:

In this episode we talk about Nets

Kinds of Nets

Formal or Direct Net – This type of net is used in any large disaster or event, typically used in public service events like Parades, Races, Walk-a-thons, etc. This type of net is controlled by normally one person, the net control. Anyone that is participating in the net must ask permission before they talk on the net. Informal or Indirect Net – This type of net is used as a standby type net. A lot of times this type of net is used as an early Skywarn net. the bad weather hasn’t made it to your county yet but you still want spotters to be aware of whats going on, and maybe even moving towards where they normally spot from. This type of net has a net control, but you don’t have to ask permission to talk to someone. They are there in case the net needs to change gears into a formal net and still keep some kind of log as to whats going on.

There are nets on pretty much any frequency or band. The major difference between HF and VHF/UHF nets are that HF nets are more wide spread. You might have people from around the world checking into the net. Another thing about HF nets is that with HF sometimes, you can hear the net but the net control might not be able to hear you. In this instance you would have to go through someone else to relay your traffic to net control. Maybe there is a back up net control that can hear you but the main one can’t so you can talk to the back up to pass your traffic.

Types of Nets

Ragcheck nets – These can be both formal and informal nets. It is basically a group of people getting together sharing information whether it is a club information net, a swap net or other things like that. Skywarn Net – This net is used during stormy weather. Often times a Skywarn net uses both a formal and informal net. It may start out as an informal net, trying to get everyone in place or aware of whats going one. Then turn into a formal net when the weather gets to your county. Then back to an informal net as your do your damage assessment afterwards. ARES nets – In ARES, you use nets normally in the aftermath of a disaster or major event. This type of net can also be used during Public Service Events. RACES Nets – In RACES, you generally work DURING an actual event or emergency. you work under the Emergency Management Office or FEMA. A RACES net can and is normally activated by your local Emergency Manager. This type of net is normally a formal or directed net. You can also have sub nets of the main net for things like a Resource Net or a Command Net or other things like this. RACES works under the NIMS system. Traffic Nets – This type of net is used a lot in conjunction with other nets like a Ragchew net or possibly even an ARES nets. This type of net is used to pass traffic from one person or entity to another. The system that is used in this type of net works under the National Traffic System. Check back in the future podcast episode for more information about the NTS.

Things You Should During a Net

Listen – While you are participating in a net, always pay attention to whats going on so that you don’t ask a question about something that has already been answers. Listen for announcements or other instructions that are given by net control on what they are looking for at the time. Use Tactical Call Signs – Tactical Call Signs are things like Shelter 1, Hospital or EOC. Multiple operators may be working this location. So rather that the net control operator needing to remember exactly who is at the radio at those locations at any given minute, the net control can just call the location.

Unfortunately, due to time limitations and a HUGE honey-do list at home, as well as a lack of drive this past week, I will not be having a Amateur Radio Club Spotlight.

If you would like to have your amateur radio club highlighted on my podcast, please send an email tok5clm@everythinghamradio.com. In that email please give me the name of your club, your club’s website address and tell me a little about your club.

ETH011 - Go Packs

Jul 20, 2016 30:42

Description:

Hello everyone and welcome back to another episode of the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. This will be episode 11! In today’s episode we are going to be concluding our Emergency Preparedness mini-series by talking about something that I touched on in the last episode, Go-Packs!

So what exactly is a Go Pack? Well, there isn’t a standard or generic answer to this question. Some would answer this question very simply, other would have a very complex answer. I put out a question to all of yall in the last episode. The question was, “What’s in your go pack?” I got a few responses back from yall and will be sharing some of them a little later in the post.

I’ve told yall before that I have been a ham now for over 20 years now(wow!), and at one point in time(before I started this blog), I thought that I was pretty up-to-date on things that happen in the community or new things that come out or whatever. The more that I work on this blog and now podcast, the more that I learn, that I don’t know as much as I thought I did because I pretty much learn something EVERY SINGLE EPISODE/ARTICLE!

Go-Packs

I am going to say that the are two different types of Go-Kits. On one side of things, you have what I am going to call a go pack. This is the kind of go kit that I use. In my go pack, I have things like different ends for power and coax, extra batteries, a map, soldering iron, solder, different hand tools, etc. I have had this thing for pretty much since I’ve been a ham, without changing it much. Basically this pack is like a ham radio tool box. I have everything in it that I may need to fix an antenna, connect my radios to whatever for power, and all the tools to get it done.

My Go-kit, is contained in a duffle bag, pretty much any duffle bag or backpack will do as long as it is big enough to hold what you need it to.

This is what I have in it:

I also have a fishing lure box like this one that I have things like connectors, alligator clips, adaptors, coax ends, and other things in. A Soldering Iron, solder, solder wick and a suction tool. Multimeter Hand Tools – Crimpers, screwdrivers, cutters, etc. Extra batteries for my handheld, charger and speaker mic. I also have a AA battery pack for my radio as well as enough AA batteries to fill the pack up twice in case my regular batteries die before they can be recharged. A power cord with alligator clips on one end and Anderson Power Pole connectors on the other. The cord is long enough to run from the battery of a vehicle into the cab, so about 15-20 feet long. I have Mapsco of my county. Pocket notepad, pen, pencil, & eraser in a Ziploc bag

I am sure that I probably have some other things in my go-pack but I can not remember anything else off the top of my head. I’m sure that you can think of something else that you might want to put in there if you build you a go-pack like this.

Go-Boxes

Now if you want something a little…OK, a lot more…extravagant you can go the Go-Box route. So what is the difference between a go-pack and a go-box? A go-box is an all-in-one station so to speak. It has a mobile radio, some kind of power source, be it a battery or a power supply, antenna, coax, and anything else that you can cram into whatever you are making it out of.

I have seen some people that have made a go-box that has all their radio equipment in it, plus some type of computer, a cell phone, built in APRS, 12 volt plugs, AC plugs, USB plugs, and a light to see it all with. I believe that the person made it in a sound system rack case, kind of like this one.

I am not really going to go into great detail on these, because there is so much variety that you can do depending on your needs and there are so many pictures and YouTube videos out there one what people have done that it would just be better if I gave you links on some things that I have found as well as some of the links that yall have sent in.

Mark I – Light — Richard Slusher, KF5RHI. Richard is a fellow Texan, actually lives just about 30 miles north of me. The picture to the right is his second project, the Mark II – Heavy that has HF capabilities. He has also made an off-the-grid power source for it, and a way to keep it charged. He is currently working on a Mark III – Medium as he calls it that will be the big brother to the Mark I, but with have a Raspberry PI computer in it as well. Our good friend Cale from the Fo-Time Podcast sent me this link. I has several links to projects that people have done. Some of them have pictures, some of them unfortunately do not but the text is still there. Another pretty neat looking Go-Box that I found was made by W1WMJ. This one, by WB4SON, has a laptop that is setup in the Go-Box. I don’t know if it is permanently mounted in the box or just has a place for it though.

These boxes come in all shapes and sizes! You can put VHF/UHF, HF, APRS, Packet, Phones, whatever you want to. The biggest draw back or issue that I have read about on these go-boxes is supplying enough power to the components in the box, especially if you have it running off a battery and not commercial power.

So whether you decide to make a go-pack or a go-box or somewhere in between, if you plan on helping out during an incident or major disaster, I highly recommend that you have at least something that you can grab and go. When time is of the essence, seconds matter and if you are running around you shack and/or house like a chicken with your head cut off trying to find everything that you might need, one it is going to take you longer to get going and two you will probably forget something.

If one of these links doesn’t “suit your fancy”, just do a search on google for Amateur Radio Go Boxes and you will find a plethora of links and pictures of boxes that people have done.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Gwinnett Amateur Radio Society

Club Call Sign: W4GR

Website: http://www.gars.org/w4gr/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/315255321681/

Meetings:

Meeting is on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 7pm

Briscoe Field, Lawrenceville, GA

Repeaters: 147.075+ 82.5 Tone – Snellville – Primary Club Repeater – Echolink W4GR-R 147.255 + 107.2 Tone – Snellville 444.525 + 82.5 Tone – Snellville – Yaesu System Fusion Repeater 442.100 + 100.0 Tone – Norcross 53.110 + No Tone – Snellville Nets: Monday Night Net – Mondays @ 1930 – swap, sale and information net Know It All Net – Wednesday @ 2030 – Radio updates and information

This club has a very interesting history. One of their founding members was the founded and was the CEO of Scientific Atlanta. If you don’t know what Scientific Atlanta is, it is a company that makes antenna equipement and probably most rememberable for making tv top cable satellite boxes. Their equipment was used in the first ever satellite-delivered cable event in 1975, the “Thrilla in Manila”! Thrilla in Manila was the heavyweight championship bout between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier.

They have training at each meeting and it seems to be a pretty interesting schedule at that. I would definitely join this club if I lived in GA near Lawrenceville.

ETH010 - Emergency Preparedness

Jul 20, 2016 31:51

Description:

In this episode we continue our emergency preparedness series. Last week we talked about different types of training that you should learn in order to prepare yourself for if or when you are ever involved in a major incident, today we are going to talk about things that you should do.

We also talk about the Davie/Cooper City Amateur Radio Club in the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight a little later on.

Show notes and further reading for this episode can be found at http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/10/

Know Your Equipment

Probably one of the most important, if not the most important, things that you need to do is have your equipment ready and know how to use it. I have seen many times where someone that was on a scene of an incident that didn’t know how to use their radio, or change the frequencies or tones. I have seen many times where people will get a new radio and someone in the club they are in will program it will several frequencies and all they will do is just turn the knob from one channel to the next. If they happen to bump a key or something and turn off the tone and it stops working on a repeater, then you will not be able to reach them or at least you won’t be able to hear them when they answer you. Whether you are using your own equipment or using one that is provided by your local club or RACES group, you should always know or at least have an idea, on how to use the equipment.

Go Pack

One way to do this is to have what we in the amateur community call a “Go Pack”. A go pack can be several different things. Some people have made very elaborate go packs with built in batteries, a mobile radio, and other things, some, like me, just have a duffle bag with all kinds of parts and stuff that I may need while I’m out in the field. We will talk more about go pack in next week’s episode so please tune in next week to learn more about those.

Training Nets

One thing that is consistent with all incidents is a net, whether it be formal or informal. Probably 95% of the time it will be a formal net, so you should know how a formal net works. With a formal net, the frequency that you are using is controlled by one person, the net control operator. This person has ultimate say as to who talks when. Much like an air traffic controller does with airplanes. If you want to talk to someone other than net control, you have to ask permission to. In order to speak, you have to ask permission. The best way to learn about directed nets, it to participate in training nets. Most clubs have a weekly net of some kind. This allows you to practice listening to what is said during the net and how to talk on one.

Get Involved!

Probably the second most important thing that you should do if you plan on helping out in a time of disaster is to get involved with your local RACES team. Most teams have other training that you can take. Because the RACES team is affiliated with the Office of Emergency Management for the county, there are generally large scale drills or table-top exercises that you can participate in as well.

Practice! Practice! Practice! Practice Patience

As I say those three words above, I really have several things that I am talking about. We need to practice how to talk. By this I mean, talkings clearly and concise, press the transmit button and count to one or two before you start talking, and think before you speak. I think one of the things that people have the hardest time at is remembering to wait before they talk. Many time you will hear people talking and you won’t hear the first half of the word or even the entire first word of what they are saying because they either start talking before they put the button, or start talking as they are bringing the mic up to their mouth. This isn’t as much of an issue when you are talking on simplex but when you are talking on a repeater it is a whole different animal.

With a repeater, there is a second or so delay between the time that the repeater receives the signal to the time that it transmits it. So let’s go through the whole process from start to finish. You key up your radio, this turns on the transmitter and starts to send out a signal. The antenna on the repeater receives that signal and transfers it to the coax with could be 100’ long or 1000’ long. The signal travels down the coax to the duplexer, which then hands it off to the receiver. The receiver processes the signal and works with the controller to make sure that it has the correct tones, if needed, and if so, engages the transmitter and passes the signal off to it with an increase in power. The signal is then sent back through the coax and back up to the antenna and transmitted out. Then the person that you are talking to receives the signal on their radio, their receiver converts it to audio and sends it out their speaker.

All this happens in a matter of a second because all this travels at the speed of light, but still there is a lot of different components that have to work together to get it done and each of those components takes time to do the things that it needs to do. Even though it does happen so fast, there is still a half to full second lag between the time that the button is pressed and the repeater is keyed up to retransmit. If the repeater doesn’t have a tone, it is slightly less, but still it is good practice to key up and wait at least a one count before you start talking. Probably the easiest way that I have learned to allow for this one count is to press the mic button before I even raise the mic up to my mouth. The time that it takes for me to press the button and raise the mic up to my mouth and start talking is generally long enough.

One other thing to consider in all this is if the repeater you are talking on is linked to another computer or it is linked to the internet like on a DStar or System Fusion repeater. If this is the case, not only does one repeater have to do it’s thing, but also whatever repeater it is linked to has to as well.

Practice Talking

The second thing that comes to mind in the three words above is practicing on how to talk. You should alway speak clearly and at a speed that is at a smooth clip. People tend to talk at a higher pitch and faster when they are excited. It doesn’t matter how experienced you are or how old you are or pretty much anything. It is human nature. Unfortunately, this often makes it hard to understand what you are trying to say on the other end of the radio. The only way to counteract this natural response is to be aware of it, take a breath before you talk and control yourself while you are talking.

Practice Thinking

This brings us to the third practice. Thinking! When you are fixing to key up you should always know what you are going to say before you key up your transmitter There are many times throughout my both professional and amateur career where someone has keyed up and was telling me something and then they say “umm” or “uhh” and then dead air for a second or two and then say something else, and “umm” again. They will do something like, “Umm….Its raining about….uhh…an inch an hour and umm…winds are blowing…umm…about oh say 15-20 mph and i’m getting a little bit of hail…”

During this entire transmission, there could be someone on the other side of the county that had a funnel cloud forming and was nearly to the ground. They couldn’t get into the net because the other person didn’t think before they keyed up. If the person would have looked at what his conditions were and thought about what he was going to say, he could have just keyed up and said, “I am getting about an inch an hour rainfall, I have about 15-20 mph winds and a little bit of hail,” and then signed off.

Thinking about what you are going to say will also allow you to think about how you are going to say it and will help you to stay calm and speak in an even tone so that you are able to be understood on the other end.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

DCARC Logo

Davie/Cooper City Amateur Radio Club

Call sign: NA4DC
Website: http://www.dcarc.club/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/108265879216491/#_=_
The Davie/Cooper City Amateur Radio Club (DCARC), established on May 1, 2010. We arrange monthly outings to make HF contacts, host a bi-weekly 2m net, participate in the Amateur Radio Relay League’s annual “Field Day,” and occasionally operate special events.
Our mission is to further the exchange of information and cooperation between members, promote radio knowledge, fraternalism and operating efficiency.

Our annual dues are only $10

Meetings and Activities Bi Weekly nets: First and third Thursdays at 7:30pm. 147.210 + 131.8 Tone Monthly Meetings: First Monday at 7:30 pm at the Moose Lodge in Davie, FL. Testing is done at every meeting at 6:00pm before the meeting. Weekly Lunches: Every Friday at 12:30pm at “Ye Olde Falcon Pub” in Davie, Fl. HF Outings: Usually on the Third Sunday starting at 07:30 and lasting until everyone decides to go home. Setup in the Vista View Park in west Davie.

The club has a pretty massive library with a bunch of books that members can check out for a month.

 

If you would like to have your amateur radio club highlighted on my podcast, please send an email tok5clm@everythinghamradio.com. In that email please give me the name of your club, your club’s website address and tell me a little about your club.

Please subscribe to my website to receive emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode by going tohttp://www.everythinghamradio.com/subscribe/. Fill out the form on the page and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Check you email and you should receive an email from me with a link that you will have to click on in order to confirm your subscription. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me.

Don’t forget to rate and review my podcast. Go to http://www.everythinghamradio.com/itunes/ to be taken to my podcast on ITunes. Please give me an honest star rating and review. This helps greatly in my standings in ITunes and will help others find my podcast other than searching for it directly.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH006 - Automatic Packet Reporting System(APRS)

Jul 20, 2016 37:37

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to Everything Ham Radio! In this episode we are talking about the  Automatic Packet Reporting System or APRS for short. Last week we talked about Packet. APRS is alike in some ways, but different in others. While you can not talk keyboard-to-keyboard on APRS, you can send short message. You can even send a short email using APRS, which we will talk about a little later.

HISTORY

Over the years since APRS came about, I have heard different stories about how it came into being. One video that I watched that someone put on at a ham radio convention somewhere, was very adamant that the P in APRS stands for and also has stood for Packet, not Position like he heard a lot of people saying. When I first learned about APRS, I was always told that the P stood for Position, and to me it made a lot of sense that that is what it stood for because the general purpose of it that I saw, or maybe the commonly used purpose of it, was for “asset tracking”. By assets I mean things like, storm spotters during a Skywarn event or Sag-wagons during a bike race.

As I was doing research for this article and podcast episode, I still found somewhat conflicting reports. In the article onWikipedia, it said that during the early 1990’s, the P stood for Position, not Packet, but was later changed to Packet when GPS technology became more readily available.

So What Is The Truth?

As the saying goes, “If you want the truth, take it straight from the horse’s mouth.” So that is exactly what I did. I went to the official APRS website that is maintained by the creator of APRS and looked at his history page.

Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, created the first incarnation of APRS in 1984. At the time he was working with the Amateur Radio Research And Development(AMRAD) group. The first real use of it was to report the position and status of a 100 mile cross country endurance horse race. At this time, however, the system was called Connectionless Emergency Traffic System(CETS).

On his history page, he says that in 1992, he realized that he could use his callsign to change the name to reflect it and changed it to Automatic Packet Reporting System. He says that he published a paper talking about it at the ARRL 11th Computer Networking Conference that year. However, if you look at the references, in 1992, the paper that he wrote was called Automatic AX.25 Position Reporting System. So I’m still not entirely sure if he ever intended for the P to stand for Position or not.

According to Wikipedia, he did name it Automatic Position Reporting System then later changed the P to Packet once GPS technology became more readily available and more information could be put out in the packets of information that was sent out.

NETWORK APRS World Frequency Map

APRS World Frequency Map

Earlier I said that APRS was similar to Packet. The way that APRS and packet are similar is that they both use TNC’s as digipeaters to extend the reach of the user. However, that is pretty much where it ends. APRS uses basically the same infrastructure as packet did, but on a different frequency. Also, instead of using a connection to extend the reach of the user, the signal is just transmitted, then each station that hears it will retransmit it, if there is still room left in the PATH.

What is the PATH?

The PATH is what is used to determine how many times a packet is retransmitted by digipeaters. The standard setting for the PATH is WIDE1-1,WIDE2-1 for mobile or portable stations. Each time the packet is retransmitted, the number after the hyphen(-) is subtracted by 1. So for the above settings, station A is the mobile units. It transmits a packet with the WIDE1-1, WIDE2-1 settings. The first station to receive this packet will reduce the WIDE1-1 to WIDE1-0 and retransmit it. The next station will take the WIDE1-0,WIDE2-1 and reduce it down to WIDE1-0,WIDE2-0 and retransmit it. Then finally the third station will receive it and will not retransmit it because both the WIDEn-N settings are at -0.

If you have used packet before this would be the equivalent to doing a via k5clm,kc5pwq when you are connecting to someone. The difference is that because you are connecting or sending your packet via a set station, it will only go in one direction. With APRS, the first digipeater to retransmit the signal may be four different stations in four different directions. Think of this as using a beam or directional antenna vs using an omni directional antenna.

USES Position Reporting APRS Traffic

APRS Traffic Snapshot on June 08

The primary, or should I say the most common, use for APRS is position reporting. Of course, you will have to normal every day position tracking. As a matter of fact, you can go tohttp://www.aprs.fi and look at APRS from anywhere in the world. The author of this page has written an integrate APRS with Google Maps. Seeing people moving about every day can be interesting at times, but there are other uses for it to.

If you club does communications for a Bike of Foot race, you could put a tracker in the Sag-wagons, or bike repair vehicle and always know where they are if you need them. You could have a tracker in the lead and trail vehicles in a parade, so you will always know where the parade is along it’s route. How about during storms? If all of the spotters had a tracker with them, the net control or the National Weather Service, would always know where the report is coming from. There are so many uses for this feature that it really makes me wonder why more people don’t have it. But in all honesty, I don’t use APRS either because I can’t or haven’t boughten the equipment to do it. Here is one more use that I can think of before we move on. If you APRS tracker is installed to automatically turn on when you turn on your vehicle, then if the worst happens and your car gets stolen. You can go to you local law enforcement and report it stolen but say “Hey, I have a tracker in my car and this is where it is.”

BULLETINS/EVENTS

Another thing that you can do with APRS is to set a bulletin message to display for your local area. For example, let’s say that you have a club meeting that is coming up. You can set an BEACON text to transmit the date, time and gps coordinates of your monthly meeting, weekly net, or a local hamfest.

LOCAL REPEATERS/VOICE FREQUENCIES

Along the same lines as above, local repeaters also can broadcast their information, if it is setup to do so. This way, when someone that is not from the area, can look at their radio and get local repeater information, frequency, tone, average range, etc.

One of the good things that came out of Hurricane Katrina, was the FREQUENCY field was added to APRS packets. This allowed people to set up what frequency they were on in order for people to contact them via voice. During Katrina is was recommended from the ARRL that this field be put in and for all amateurs in the area set this up in their stations so that it was known where all amateurs were during the clean up.

There are so many other uses for APRS that would take a long time to write about it. Check out the APRS official website for more information.

EQUIPMENT

There are several radios now available that have a built in TNC for APRS use. Several Kenwood Radios, both mobile and hand held, an Alinco mobile, and I believe the Icom DStar and Yaesu System Fusions radios all have built in TNC’s that can be used for APRS.

DTMF Kenwood TM-D700A Kenwood TM-D710A Alinco DR-135TPMKIII FTM-400DR Dual Band Mobile Radio Icom ID-5100A Kenwood TH-D72A Kenwood TM-D700A Kenwood TM-D710A Alinco DR-135TPMKIII Yaesu FTM-400DR Icom ID-5100A

 

If you don’t want to buy a higher priced radio, or you already have an extra radio lying around that isn’t being used, you can buy just a TNC like a Kantronics KPC-3+ or Bridgecomm I believe has a TNC. You can also use the soundcard on your computer with a APRS program.

If neither of these options tickle you fancy, you can buy a TinyTracker product. I believe I have heard of another thing that is basically the same thingthat you can buy, but for the life of me I can’t think of where I heard of it atTiny Tracker APRS

LINKS Oficial APRS Website aprs.fi Wikipedia TAPR Byonics

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Cabot Small Town Amateur Radio Service

Club call sign: W5STR

Website: http://www.w5str.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/844368612323782/?hc_location=ufi

Repeaters 145.410 – PL 85.4 442.475 + PL 114.8 Echolink Node: W5STR-R Node Number 507018 Club Simplex: 147.570 Meetings

Meetings are held on the second Sunday of the month at 1:30pm. Members will normally meet at a local restaurant at about 11:30 on the day of the meeting to have lunch

Meetings are held at the Criswell-Robinson American Legion Post 71 115 North First St, Cabot, AR 72023.

They offer testing sessions after every meeting. Preregistration is not required unless you are upgrading to General or Extra.

That about wraps up this episode/post for the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. I would like to thank each of yall for listening to my podcast and/or reading this post. We are already on episode 6, barely a month after I started this podcast and I already have over 1200 downloads. Please continue to listen, like, share and subscribe. If you enjoyed this episode or any of the others, please go to ITunes and give me an honest Star rating and Review.

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Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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ETH003 - Project 25

Jul 20, 2016 30:18

Description:

Hey everybody and welcome back to the Everything Hamradio Podcast. This episode we talked about Project 25, the Mecklenburg Amateur Radio Society and some news about changes in the ARRL leadership and the massive snow storm in the northeast US. Below you will find the show notes for this episode.

Project 25 Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Mecklenburg Amateur Radio Society  History Organized on March 25, 1949, started with 13 charter members, 12 hams 1 non ham, all SK as of 4/6/2013 Lots of club activities Public service, Parades, races, Skywarn, Charlotte Hamfest, Daily nets VE Testing – Quarterly scheduled testing Monthly Newsletters Contests  Repeaters 145.230 PL 118.8 – On Spencer Mountain, 1574′ above sea level 145.290 PL 118.8 – Uptown Charlotte, 1333′ above sea level 146.940 PL 118.8 – Orr Rd, NE Charlotte, 908′ above sea level – Main Repeater 224.400 PL 118.8 – Orr Rd, NE Charlotte, 908′ above sea level 444.600 PL 118.8 – Mecklenburg, Unk height Packet Radio 9 operational nodes including one full service BBS. Have nodes on 4 different frequencies: 145.010, 145.090, 223.400, & 446.500 Have several backbone connections to HF links and the Internet Have a packet terminal on their website that hams can use Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MecklenburgAmateurRadioSociety/timeline Twitter: @MecklenburgARS Website: http://www.w4bfb.org News Hams Turn Out to Help as Massive Snowfall Stuns Several States Former Colorado Section Manager Jeff Ryan, K0RM, Appointed as Rocky Mountain Division Vice Director Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, Will Succeed David Sumner, K1ZZ as ARRL CEO

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How Am I Doing?

So how am I doing on my podcast? Please leave a comment below and let me know. Also, in this episode I mentioned that I might be going to a weekly podcast instead of a bi-weekly one. I have noticed with just 4 episodes under my belt that my episodes have lasted longer than I had originally wanted them to by almost double. This episode I had planned on talking about both P25 and Digital Mode Radio. When I finished talking about them, I was already at 33 minutes or so. So I rerecorded it with just P25. I will do DMR in my next episode, that I’m leaning towards next Tuesday. Anyway, leave a comment below and let me know what yall think.

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You can also find me on Facebook and Twitter as well as several other social media platforms. Links to all of them can be found on the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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ETH002 - System Fusion

Jul 20, 2016 30:01

Description:

Hey everybody and welcome to another episode of the Everything Hamradio Podcast. This is episode 3 and today we are talking about the Yaesu System Fusion system.

First off, what is Yaesu System Fusion? It is a Digital Communications System that works on both digital and analog voice communications It has automatic mode selection between Digital Voice, Digital Data, Digital Voice and Data and Analog FM It uses a narrower bandwidth at just 12.5 kHz Digital Voice Communications Clearer and crisper audio It is about the same range as Analog FM, but rather than gradually getting more noisy until you just noise, you are either there or you are not with digital It uses the full 12.5 kHz bandwidth Digital Only Can send and receive pictures, text message or files Uses a full 9600 baud to transfer data It uses the full 12.5 kHz bandwidth Voice and Digital Bandwidth is split between voice and data, 7.25 kHz each Voice audio not as clear, but still as good as Analog Group Monitor Function Up to 24 stations can be added to a group Radio will show distance and direction of each member of the group Smart Navigation/Backtrack Function Set a start point. Whether you do this manually or by the gps coordinates  attached to a picture. Get constant distance and direction from that starting point Great for camping or hiking, storm spotting and much more. Analog FM Can talk to people with radios that are not System Fusion compatible. Radios Hand held transceivers FT1DR FT2DR Mobile Radios FTM-100DR FTM-400DR HF/VHF/UHF Base radios FT-991 Ham Radio Club Spotlight – Bay-Net Amateur Radio Club and Repeater Network News ARRL President Kay Craigie, N3KN, Concluding Nearly 3 Decades as a League Official New Section Manager Appointed in Missouri Amateur Radio Parity Act HR 1301 to Get House Subcommittee Airing “Cows Over the World” CW DXpeditions Planned

 

Thanks for listening to the episode of the Everything Hamradio Podcast. Please subscribe to my website to get emails when I publish a new post of podcast as well as subscribing to my podcast on ITunes. Please Like me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to all my social media pages can be found on the menu at the top of the page under Social. Please like and share my podcasts and if you could take a minute to rate my podcast and write a review, that would be awesome!!

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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ETH001 - DSTAR

Jul 20, 2016 32:37

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome to the first “normal” episode of the Everything Hamradio Podcast. In this episode we are talking about DStar

DStar

Some of the questions that we talk about in this episode are:

What is DStar? What are the differences between Digital and Analog Pros Quality of Audio Other information beside just your voice being transmitted. You Call sign, location and possible other things go out every time you transmit as well. Can download all the repeaters in the US and put into your radio. Radio can find repeaters that are close to you Repeaters often connected to the internet Cons From the outside looking in, DStar seems to have a steep learning curve Analog radios can not talk on DStar repeaters DStar can easily cover a large area because you can link together multiple repeaters in the area over the internet or if installed over a 1.2 or 2.4 GHz link. Original cost of radios were high but has recently come down and is nearly in line with other radios.

We talk about the different radios that are available for use with DStar as well as some accessories that you can use. Check out this post and this post for more information about DStar and the DStar radios and accessories.

Ham Radio Club Spotlight

In this episode we talk about the Mansfield-Johnson Amateur Radio Service club in Mansfield, Texas. This club is another club that is local for me and that is a fast growing club. The have about 49 members and growing. They have two radios, one on 1.25 meters and one on 70 cm. They also have access to a 2 meter repeater that they use as well. You can find more information about this club at here.

News

Below you will find links to each of the stories below:

Ramsey Kits Calls it Quits Redesigned FCC Website Makes it Easy for Hams to File Interference Complaints National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) Event Gets Off to a Strong Start!

That about wraps it up for this episode. If you like what you heard on the podcast or what you have read here, please subscribe to my site in order to get emails sent to you when I publish a new post or podcast. Also, please like me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to all my social media pages can be found on the menu at the top of the page under Social. Also I ask that you go onto ITunes and subscribe to the podcast and rate it and please give me a honest review. Each of these things really helps me out to spread the word about my podcast.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

* Music provide by Bensound.com Further Reading DStar DStar Radio and Accessories Icom Website for DStar

ETH009 - Emergency Training

Jul 20, 2016 30:18

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! This is Episode #9, we have past the infamous 7th episode that is the normal stumbling step for podcast and we are one away from double digits! Over the past 8 episodes, we have been talking about all things digital, but this week are going to change gears and start a short series about emergency communications. In part one of this series, this episode, we will be talking about Emergency Training, in part two, Emergency Preparedness and in the last episode in this series we will be talking about Go-packs.

Training is probably the most important part about emergency communications. Many years ago, I had heard that when a disaster happens, everything goes out the window. This couldn’t be farther from the truth. Things appear to be extremely chaotic at the beginning of a disaster, and in some instances it is, especially if the people that are on the scene at first, decide not to use the NIMS system from the get go. Being a dispatcher now for nearly twelve years, I have seen incidents that are pure chaos and I have seen incidents that are very structured and run smoothly.

Those that actually worked right, especially from the beginning, were those incidents that were started with the correct command structure in place and everybody knew or was told what they needed to do. Training is the key to having a well organized incident. Now I know that us, as amateur radio operators, will probably never been in command of an incident, but you still should know how one works.

Several years ago, after 9/11, the whole emergency response system has had a complete overhaul. Before 9/11, first responders were encouraged to have formal training on command but it was not a required training unless it was at the local level. Since 9/11 and the conception of Homeland Security, a new system was put into place called the National Incident Management System or NIMS for short. This system was put into place by Homeland Security and is required training to anyone that is going to be assisting in a disaster area. For the First Responder level, which is what Amateur Radio Operators are classified as, there is two courses that you have to take. Links to both of these courses can be found below. The courses are free and you take them online.

IS-100 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/IS100b.asp IS-700.a NIMS: An Introduction http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is700a.asp

These two courses are the two courses that you are required to take if you are going to be helping on an incident. There are some other courses that many agencies recommend that you take as well but are only required on the local level. However, if you are part of the command team for you county, the supervisor level of training that is required is the IS-200.b and the IS-800.b courses. Below are direct links to those and a couple others that some agencies require. I am also including a link to the main course directory in case you want to look and see if there is anything else that you might want to take.

IS-200.b ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/IS200b.asp IS-250 Emergency Support Function 15 (ESF 15) External Affairs http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is250.asp IS-288 The Role of Voluntary Agencies in Emergency Management http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is288.asp IS-800.b National Response Framework, An Introduction http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/IS800b.asp IS-317 Introduction to CERT http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/IS317/index.htm

Main Course List

FEMA EMI Independent Study Program http://training.fema.gov/IS/

The ARRL also has an Emergency Communication Training course that is a good thing to take and has a lot of good information. Some agencies also require this course.

Arrl emergency communications training http://www.arrl.org/online-course-catalog

One thing that I have learned over my career as a dispatcher and to a certain extent my experience in emergency services  with both amateur radio and as a volunteer firefighter, is that you can never have too much training. When crap hits the fan, your body will automatically fall into a mode that we have all heard of, Fight or Flight(now it is Fight, Flight or Freeze). As emergency responders we train so that we know what to do in the event that we are needed.

If, for example, you are called upon to go to a shelter and set up a station there. If you have never really trained or practiced setting up a station on emergency power or in a temporary location, then you are going to be wasting valuable time trying to get your station setup. Now I’m not saying that if you practice and/or train on how to set up a temporary station somewhere then you won’t have issues setting it up, but the more you train to do things, the easier it is to problem solve and figure out how to get over those hurdles.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   HacDC Amateur Radio Club

Club Call Sign: W3HAC

Website: http://www.w3hac.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hamradiodc/

HacDC ARC is a loosely organized group of Washington DC Hams.

Meetings:

Their regular meetings are on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30pm and they have a irregular unorganized meeting on the 4th Wednesday of the month, probably at the same time, but I’m not sure since it doesn’t say on their website.

They meet on the third floor of the St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church, 1525 Newton St. NW, at the intersection of 16th and Newton Streets, NW in the Mount Pleasant/Columbia Heights area of Washington, DC.

Nets

They hold a weekly net on Mondays at 9pm. Currently they are using the 145.110 repeater there in DC.

Activities

The club appears to be very active in on the air events. They have several posts about different QSO parties, or other contests that they have participated in. They also have said that they are going to do several National Park activations. They made one of the first, if not the first, NPOTA contact at 0000 UTC on Jan 1, 2015 with AE5DW, the host for the Amateur Radio Newsline Podcast.

I would like to thank all of yall for listening to my podcast and coming to my site. It is because of all of you, my readers, that I enjoy doing this so much. If you haven’t listened to the podcast episode yet, this podcast and blog post is dedicated to a good friend of mine that became an SK last Friday, 3/11/2016, Tim Hagale, KE5EZM. I have known Tim for about 25 years. He was always one of the first people to volunteer to help you if you needed it. On top of being a ham, he was also a volunteer Fire Fighter for about 10 years. About a year ago, he was diagnosed with Colon cancer and although he was fighting it, he went down hill very fast. Unfortunately, he lost his battle with it on the day of his birth, surrounded by friends and adopted family. Tim you will be greatly missed!!

If you have not subscribed to my site yet, please do. This will allow you to receive emails from me on when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It’s super easy! Just click on Subscribe and you will be taken to my subscribe page, once there, fill out the form with your information and click on the “Sign Me Up!” button. Shortly after that you will receive the very first email from me with a link that you will need to click on. If you don’t click on that link, you will never receive another email from me, so please click on it and confirm your subscription.

Please like me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter as well! Links to these and all of my social media pages can be found on the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH008 - Small Computers

Jul 20, 2016 34:59

Description:

HeEverything Hamradio Podcastllo everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. In the last episode we talked about Computers in your Shack. In this episode we are going to talk about another aspect of this topic, but we are going to be talking about the types of computers that have been dubbed Small Computers. By Small Computers, I am talking about things like a Raspberry Pi, an Aurdino and a Beagle Bone.

Before we actually dive into these three, I first should point out that each of these can be setup to use as a computer in your shack or in your emergency Go Kit or SOTA operating setup. If you have a small 7” screen, a “small computer” and a wireless keyboard and mouse, you can use this for logging, or what have you while you are operating. This could be a cheap way of getting you a computer in your shack.

Raspberry Pi

First off, what exactly is a Raspberry PI? According to the Raspberry Pi website, when asked what a Raspberry Pi is, their answer was

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It is a capable little computer which can be used in electronics projects, and for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing, browsing the internet and games. It also plays high-definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming.

Prices for the Raspberry Pi’s range anywhere from $5 for the Raspberry Zero to $35 for the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B. So much can be done with these little computers that it blows my mind. I had heard back with the original Nintendo Gameboys came out that they had more computing power than the computer that was used to land on the Moon! Now looking at these little things, that probably 100x the computing power of the Gameboys. It just amazes me sometimes when I think of how far we have come as a society.

But we are getting off track here. So what can you do with a Raspberry Pi? You can do pretty much anything. It is basically a mini computer, it has a built in wired ethernet, several USB ports, video out, sound out, and numerous i/o ports. There is a good size following for it as well and tons of information on projects and how-to articles and videos on different uses for it.

As far as what it can do with amateur radio, there is quite a bit of projects that can be found on it as well. One of the websites that I found for it, it has links for a an Echolink Project, a DStar project, a Software Defined Radio Project, and an APRS project. The site that I found these on has these and more and can be found here

Another project that I found was the Open Repeater Project. The Open Repeater Project is basically a project where the creator is using a Raspberry Pi as a repeater controller connected to two radios to be used as a emergency or backup repeater.

How about a weather station? I know that I would love to have a weather station at my house and not have to shell out the hundreds of dollars to have a commercial weather station that would connect to my computer and maybe to the APRS network. I found this little project that is a total DIY Raspberry Pi weather station.

Want to learn CW? I found a project that shows you how to make a CW practice keyer. It will even decode what you are sending and display it on a screen.

UPDATE: As of 3/1/2016, the latest version of the Raspberry Pi has been released. The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B has an upgrade processor now running on a 1.2 GHz Quad Core BCM2837 ARMv8 64bit Processor and has a built-in WiFi (802.11B/G/N) and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) on board! The on board Wifi and Bluetooth is a huge advantage over the other small computers in this article. The price of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B is still just $35 and the will fit any case that the Pi 2 would fit in, however, the status LED’s were changed so you if you want to upgrade in an old case, you will need to drill new holes to see the LED’s.

Arduino

The Arduino has been around a little longer than the Raspberry Pi has, so it has a bigger following, therefore it has better user support and more projects out there that are available for you to find.

There are several book that have been written that you can buy talking about using an arduino in an amateur radio project.

Arduino for Ham Radio, by Glen Popiel, KW5P Ham Radio for Arduino and PICAXE, Edited by Leigh L. Klotz, Jr, WA5ZNU Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio (McGraw Hill), BY Jack Purdum, Dennis Kidder Arduino for Dummies (Wiley), By John Nussey

Check out the W5DOR Amateur Radio Station. This page that has quite a few links on it to Arduino projects.

Beaglebone Black

I really couldn’t find a lot about the Beaglebone Black as far as amateur radio project go. However I am sure that once it is up and running on some version of Linux, it is going to be pretty much the same on how to set it up as a SDR or TNC or whatever. I did find a nice article that was written by a ham named Bernhard Wolf. I don’t know his call sign cause he doesn’t have it listed on his page. In this post, he talks about how he used the Raspberry Pi in his ham shack and then decided to try a Beaglebone black and was pleasantly surprised at the results.

If you want to give the Beaglebone Black a shot, here is their website. The Beaglebone does have a higher price tag than the Raspberry Pi does. It comes at a price of $55.

Comparison

As I was reading through several different posts while researching for this podcast, everyone had a different opinion on which was best. I really can’t give my opinion as far as actually using them and testing them out myself and seeing what kind of performance each of them has but I can look at the stats of each.

The Raspberry Pi 2 Model B has the best specs out of the three with a 900 MHz quad-core ARM A7 processor, 1G of Ram, 4 USB ports, 40 GPIO pins, Full HDMI port, Ethernet port, a combined video and audio 3.5mm jack, camera interface, display interface, a microSD card slot and a VideoCore IV 3D graphics Core.

The Beaglebone Black is the next best according to the specs with a AM335X 1GHz ARM Cortex-A8 Processor, 512MB Ram, 4G On board flash memory, 3D Graphics Accelerator, Ethernet, HDMI, 2 46 pin Headers, and what appears to just be ONE USB port. I read several comparison articles between the above two devices and one said the Pi was better and the other said the Bone was better. The one that said the Bone was better said that it was faster, more stable and he had less interference in his ham radio gear. Looking at these stats, I am guessing he probably wasn’t talking about the Pi 2 Model B in that article because I can’t see something that only has 100 MHz difference in the CPU and half the ram being twice as fast.

Last on my list is the Arduino, which really surprised me. I have heard a lot of good things about the Arduino, granted it has fallen to the wayside as of late with the Pi. As I was looking at the specs of these three things, the best Arduino that I could find on had a clock speed of 32 kHz and like 32Kb of ram! Really?! It really looks like to me that the Arduino is suited more for a set it once and forget it at some remote location type thing. It doesn’t have the I/O that the other two have and it certainly doesn’t have the power or memory of the other two.

Surprisingly enough the Pi is the cheapest of the three coming in at about $33, the Arduino is about $45 and the Bone is about $55. I will probably end up getting the Raspberry Pi for my upcoming projects, might get the Bone for one because of the higher number of I/O ports. Which do you use? Please let me know in the comments below and please let us know what kind of projects you have built with either of these three.

I guess that about wraps up this episode, thanks for stopping by and please, subscribe to my site and my podcast. To get emails from when when I publish a new post or podcast episode, Click on the subscribe button at the top of the page, fill out the form that comes up and then click the confirmation link in the email that you will receive from me. Once all that is done, you will start getting emails from me. Also please give me an honest star rating and review on ITunes to help me move up in the rankings so that others can find me easier on ITunes if they are not searching for my podcast specifically.

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Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Eastern Connecticut Amateur Radio Association

Website: http://www.ecara.net/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/k1muj/

Meetings

The ECARA hosts a general meeting the second Monday of every month at Day Kimball Hospital in Putnam CT. The meeting starts at 7:00 pm and takes place in one of the conference rooms located in the back of the hospital.

Repeaters 2 Meters — 147.225 MHz pl 156.7 == K1MUJ — East Killingly, CT 70 cm DMR — 444.800 MHz pl 156.7 — KZ1M — East Killingly, CT Flea Market

When: Saturday, March 19, 2016 From 8am to 12pm

Where: St. Joseph’s Church Hall, 350 Hartford Pike (Rt 101), Dayville, CT

Admission Price: $3 Donation

Door Prizes, VE Testing Session, Radio Raffle

Coffee and Donuts Available

Public Service

Every year the Eastern Connecticut Amateur Radio Association provides radio communication for many public service events.  These include:

Jog with Judy in Woodstock, Connecticut– May Woodstock Road Race in Woodstock Connecticut — Memorial Day. Deary Road Race in Putnam, Connecticut– August The VJ Day parade in Moosup, Connecticut — August The Brooklyn Fair in Brooklyn, Connecticut — August Thompson Community Day — Thompson, CT– September
Monthly Newsletter – SinePost

The newsletter is put out regularly and for the couple that I read, seem to have some really good information in them. Kudos to the Editor and anyone that helps them, I know how much work goes into a newsletter.

ETH007 - Computers In Your Shack

Jul 20, 2016 31:56

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In today’s episode we are going to be talking about different types of computers and their uses in your shack. In the world that we live in now, our lives are so intertwined with technology that it would only make sense that the amateur community would use computers in their shacks. Years ago, the hobby was more of just ragchew, two or more people talking, type hobby. Now, when I say that I mean it in the utmost respect, because those people that were talking, more than likely built their radios themselves instead of buying them from some dealer like we do now.

So with the commercially available radios, comes more people into the hobby and different ideas and things to do. More people also means, more people working on projects that they then share with the rest of us. With the advent of computers, people found uses for them in the shack and now is an integral part of the setup of pretty much everyone’s shack.

Computer Uses In The Shack Logging

So first off, probably the most obvious uses for a computer in our shack is for logging your contacts. There are many ways that you can use your computer to log your contacts. The most basic way is to use like a spreadsheet or word document to list them out. This is probably the first step up from logging contacts by hand. Then again, if you really know what you are doing, a spreadsheet can do a lot of stuff automagically.

The next step up is to use a logging program.  There are a BUNCH of logging programs out there. If you go to Google and type in “Amateur Radio Logging Software” you will get a massive list of them. On top of that, if you head on over to eham.net, you can find a big list of them all on one page or your can goto the W1WC website and get a log list there as well. Each link on that list will give you a description of the program, a link to the actual program website and any reviews that have been posted on the eham website.

Logging programs can be either online or offline. With an always on internet connection being so “in the norm” these days, more people are writing online log programs. One of the most common of the online logs is the ARRL’s Logbook of the World(LOTW). Another one is EQSL.net. With some contests though, especially those that are sponsored by the ARRL, you will have to use the LOTW in order to get credit for your contacts. Sometimes, I have heard/read, that you can use EQSL. If you are participating in the National Parks on the Air here in the US, you will need to us LOTW.

LOTW is internet based, I believe, but there is logging programs that will log for you and then automatically upload your log to LOTW. Because I rarely have the privilege of spreading my Extra Class wings on HF, I can’t really advise yall on what a good program is, or which is the easiest to use, etc. I have read in several places though that registering for the LOTW was a beast and a pain. Maybe I will do a how-to post on how to register on it in the near future.

Digital Communications

Over the past couple months, we have been talking about Digital Communications, so if you have been following me for a little while, maybe this is the part that jumped into our mind first. With modes like RTTY, Packet, Olivia, the TOR family, a computer of some kind is pretty much a must. If you want to learn more about these modes check out my previous posts on the topics:

What Are Those Pesky Modems Sounds I Hear On HF? ETH005 – VHF/UHF Packet Rig Control

Another use of computers in your ham shack is for rig control. Twenty or so years ago, this was probably unheard of! With the modern radios that we have now, and mainly HF radios, you can hook your radio to your computer and your computer will display a front panel digital image on your computer screen. From there you can do any of the functions that you can do on the front panel of the radio. You can change the frequency, apply a filter, adjust your gain, anything…

This also comes into play when you are using certain logging programs. Those programs can actually grab information, like frequency, mode, etc, from the radio and automatically fill in the fields on the log entry.

Rig control can be done locally with a radio that is sitting on the desk next to you or a radio that is sitting at your repeater site, or if you have access, on the other side of the world. This really comes in handy when you have a radio in a hard to reach location, like at some repeater sites. You can sit in the comfort of your own home and change settings on it in your PJ’s.

On a similar topic of rig control, you can control your antennas from your computer. Let’s say that you are trying to work a satellite and you have a beam setup on your tower with both horizontal and azimuth rotors on it. You can load up a satellite tracking program, set which satellite you want to use, and your computer will automatically move your beam so that it is always pointing to the satellite. How cool is that?!

General Purpose Uses

Other than specific amateur radio uses, how about some other things. Let’s say that you hear a station on the air and you want to know where they are from. You can use your computer to look up their call sign and see where they live. What about wanting to know where a certain country is from the contact you just made, you can look that up on Google.

In amateur radio, we often use the UTC time when making contacts so that any contact you log will have the same time as you do when the contacts are compared. Rather than having to figure out how many time zones you are away from UTC time, the adding/subtracting from your time, you can have a handy dandy little program that displays your local time and UTC time on your computer screen so you will always know what time it is at a glance.

Can’t remember if the frequency that someone is calling CQ on is one that you can talk on? Rather than having a band plan on your wall taking up space, why not just look on your computer screen at your digital copy of one. On my desktop for my computer when I had my shack set up, I made a image that had the band plan on it but was blown up some and only had the bands that I commonly used.  

Conclusion

Using computers in your shack can save you a whole bunch of time whether you are looking for information, logging a contact, or controlling your antenna to make that contact. Back before the use of computers were the “norm”, when you were working field day or other contest, you wouldn’t know until after field day if you already worked that station from some small country  on the other side of the world from you. When you type in the call sign, most logging programs will tell you that you already worked them and you don’t have to waste your time trying to dig their exchange out of the mud again.

In the next episode we will be continuing our discussion on computers, but in a slightly different way. In the next episode we will be talking about the latest craze, Small Computers. Don’t know what that is? Guess you will just have to tune in next week and find out. I know, that was a little mean, but…

Thanks for stopping by and reading my blog, if you haven’t done so already, please subscribe to my site to get emails on when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It is super easy to do. Just click on Subscribe and then fill out the form on that page. Then check your email, and you should get an email from me with a link in it. It might go into your spam or Promotions tab if you are using gmail, so make sure you check there. Click on the link in the email and you will start receiving emails from me. I do this to make sure that you are the one that actually signed up to receive emails from me. I hate spam as much as you do, so believe me when I say, I don’t want you receiving any emails from me that you don’t want to.

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Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Rocky Mountain Ham Radio Logo Rocky Mountain Ham Radio

Website: http://www.rmham.org/wordpress/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rocky-Mountain-Ham-Radio-152230661536293/?fref=ts

Repeaters

Digital Repeaters – http://www.rmham.org/wordpress/mototrbo-radio-site-information

Analog Repeaters – http://www.rmham.org/wordpress/membership-and-club-information

 

Critchell Mountain – 447.500 -5 MHz Offset 88.5 tone Squaw Mountain – 448.225 -5 MHz Offset 141.3 Tone Thorodin Mountain – 449.225 -5 MHz Offset 141.3 tone Lookout Mountain – 449.625 -5 MHz Offset 141.3 Tone Lee Hill – 447.750 -5 MHz Offset 141.3 Tone

 

Rocky Mountain Ham Radio is not your traditional amateur radio club. They are more of a group of hams that help other hams. They have all kinds of equipment that can be lent to other clubs including a command trailer, a communication van with pretty much any mode of communications you might want,  portable repeaters, generator, and a lot more.

Not only does this club have an enormous amount of equipment to lend, but they also have several repeaters that they maintain or work with other clubs to maintain for them. They also have a microwave linking system already in place and growing continually so that the repeater systems that they have in place will stay online even when there isn’t an internet connection. Their network stretches from Cheyenne, WY to Albuquerque, NM

 

They also have what they call a RMHam University. From the looks of it, this is basically classes that they have put on in different places and then put the presentation on their website for all of us to see and learn from as well.

ETH025 - Fox Hunting

Jul 19, 2016 40:20

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk about Radio Direction Finding or the more fun term, Fox Hunting.

Fox hunting is the fun to do in your spare time thing that we as amateur radio operators use to train our skills in the event that we have to use those skills to track a downed airplane or harmful interference. In Radio Direction Finding or RDF for short, there are many tools that you can use to increase your chances on finding what you are looking for. You can use a directional antenna, an attenuator, or even just your body to help you determine where the signal is coming from.

Antennas Yagi Antennas

For a yagi antenna you need a minimum of three elements. The driven element, the reflector and one or more directors. The direction of the directors is going to be the direction the signal is directed towards or being received the best from. Yagi antennas can be made from a bunch of different materials – things like aluminum or copper tubing, piano wire, a tape measure. The possibilities are only limited by your imagination and the laws of conductivity.

Delta Loops

For any of you older people out there, you will probably remember using rabbit ears
on your TVs. If your rabbit ears were like mine, they had two vertical antennas that were used for the VHF channels and a round antenna for the UHF channels if memory serves me correctly. The round or ring antenna was a delta loop antenna. The signal was best received when the open part of the antenna was facing where the signal was coming from. Unlike the yagi antenna, the delta loop antenna will receive signals from two opposite directions.

Doppler Antenna Systems

The doppler antenna system is a pretty nice system, but it is geared more towards mobile use, I think. It would excel at a long-range fox hunt where you had to drive you vehicle quite a bit. Unlike using a yagi or a delta loop and having to stop every once in a while to get your bearings, or going to three different points and triangulating, you can just drive and the doppler system will constantly give you the bearing to the signal.

Parabolic Dish

The parabolic dish is something that everyone show know about even if you don’t
know that you know. The parabolic dish is what is used for satellite TV(i.e. Dish Network, Direct TV, etc). This type of antenna is generally used for the upper UHF bands, but can be used on VHF to receive on.

Other Useful Equipment Attenuator

An attenuator can be used between your antenna and receiver to cut down on the
signal that you receive. This allows you to see the difference in the signal when you are close to the transmitter.

Mapping Software

Whether you use some type of mapping program or just a paper map of the area, this is a good thing to have. If you are looking over a large area, you can take a reading from three different points and triangulate the location of the signal using the map.

APRS

On the Homing In website, I saw a link to a page that says someone wrote a program that would automatically take a reading from a doppler system and transmit your location and the bearing to the signal over the APRS network.

Fox Boxes What is a Fox Box? Homing In Micro-Fox by Byonics Events Local Club Events ARDF Local ADRF Training and Practice Serious Side Harmful interference Search and Rescue – Planes, Boats, People, etc More Than Safe Blog

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you would like to make a pledge to help support this blog and podcast, just go to  http://www.everythinghamradio.com/patreon/. I have set up subscription levels at $1, $5, $10 and $25 a month. This is a totally voluntary basis and all my content that is free will remain free. Each level has its own rewards that you will receive as well, and I will be adding rewards in the near future.   You can also make a one time donation through Paypal at this bottom of this page.

Another way that you can help support my blog and podcast is to buy your things from Amazon through my affiliate store or link. If you go to my Support page, you will see my Amazon store. If there is something that you want that you don’t see in my store, you can click on the Powered by Amazon picture in the top right and it will take you Amazon where you can search for anything. If you don’t want to do that, but you still want to help, if you have a bookmark to Amazon add this to the end of the URL:

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Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Grand Rapids Amateur Radio Association

Website: http://www.w8dc.org/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Grand-Rapids-Amateur-Radio-Association-107504635950837/

Meetings:

First Monday of the month at 7 pm at the Red Cross Building, 1050 Fuller Ave NE Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503

Nets:

No Club Nets Listed

Repeaters

147.260 + PL 94.8 444.400 + PL 94.8

Activities

Ham Fest – Sat, Sept 24 from 8 am to 1 pm. It will be located at The Home School Building, 5625 Burlingame, SW, Wyoming, MI, 49509. $6 tickets at the door. Open Radio Room – Red Cross Building, Every Wednesday Night Michigan QSO party Field Day Fox Hunting – More Info VE Testing – 2nd Friday at 6:30 pm at the Red Cross Building

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It’s super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter, links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH026 - Youth In Amateur Radio

Jul 10, 2016 53:11

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to Youth In Amateur Radio.

In today’s episode we have a special guest, for both the main topic of the episode but also during the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight. We talk with Douglas Maggs, KK4UHK, who is the student president of the Harvard Wireless Club.

Links mentioned in this Episode: ETH006 – APRS Hamradio 360 Podcast MIT Radio Society Echolink KD2GTM – Vlog 9: Sexism in Amateur Radio?

 

More Than Safe Blog

 

My wife has started her very own blog describing our journey through the foster care system and things that happen to us and how we dealt with the situation. Some things may just be foster care related but some of the stuff can be used as just general parenting. If you are a parent or are interested in learning a little bit about the foster care system, please check out her blog at MoreThanSafe.com. If you like what you see, subscribe to her email list to get notifications on when she puts up something new.

 

Supporting Everything Ham Radio

If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.

 

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight

 

Harvard Wireless Club

 

Website: http://w1af.harvard.edu/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harvard-Wireless-Club/738854549542412

 

Meetings:

Irregular meetings while the University is in session.

Nets:

None

 

Repeaters

449.725 + PL 114.8 W1XM – MIT Radio Society

 

Activities

Contesting Community Service Communications for Boston Marathon and other local events

 

Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It’s super easy! Just fill out the form below:

Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone!

Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

ETH005 - VHF/UHF Packet

Feb 15, 2016 37:44

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! Over the past few episode, I have noticed something that I thought was pretty much dead. The last couple Amateur Radio Club Spotlights that I have done, I have noticed that they have an active packet radio network with their club. It really surprised me because when I got my license back in about 1995, packet radio was pretty big and there were things like Rosenet, Texnet and several other networks that had a big span to them. People had packet bulletin boards, and keyboard to keyboard chatting was fairly common.

Suddenly, things just started dying, it seemed. Systems we not being maintained and going offline and the systems that I used quite a while just stopped working. Maybe it was just here locally that it died, I don’t know. Then with APRS getting more and more popular, people were finding other uses for their TNC’s and the BBS’s and the digipeaters were being used for APRS. Since I have done the last couple episodes, it makes me wonder, just how much packet is used now-a-days. So I thought that I would do an episode about Packet, since it follows along with my whole digital ham radio theme for this quarter.

What is Packet Radio?

First off let’s talk a little bit about what Packet radio is exactly. The basic explanation of packet radio is the amateur radio version of texting but with more features. It is like texting because you can do keyboard to keyboard communications with it, much like an instant messenger or an IRC on a computer. It also has other features though, because it can be like email as well or an FTP server, or a forum.

Packet radio uses a computer or dumb terminal, some kind of translator device that changes the digital signal into audio that can then be transmitted by the antenna and visa versa.

Packet Station Setup

So let’s break this down a little bit. Let’s start with the computer. This doesn’t have to be a top of line computer with all the bells and whistles, It can be, but it doesn’t have to be. Most of the time, the only thing that you will use the computer for in this setup is an interface between what is being sent and received and what you see with your eyes. It doesn’t have to be fancy, it can be an old computer that you have laying around in your attic or garage, it could be a dumb terminal that doesn’t have anything except for a keyboard and screen. It doesn’t really matter what you use. The only requirements is that it have a screen, a keyboard and some way to hook it to the next component in your system.

The next part of the packet home station is your translator, or to be specific your Terminal Node Controller(TNC). The TNC takes the signal from your computer over a wire and translates into an audio signal that can be transmitted over the air and received by another station.

On the receiving side of things, a station will receive the signal through the antenna, then the TNC will translate it into a digital signal that the computer or dumb terminal can handle and then send it onto the computer/dumb terminal where it will be stored on the screen for the ham to read.

All the above is done in about a second or less if you are talking directly to each other. There are some things to consider with this whole situation though. Everybody that is in your area that is using packet, use the same frequency. That means that if more than one set of hams is talking at once, then there could be a delay because the TNC’s are smart enough to listen to the frequency to make sure that nothing is being received before it transmits its own signal.

So what happens if you are too far away from someone that you want to talk to, are you out of luck? No! Not only do TNCs allow you to directly use it to communicate someone while you are sitting there, but it can also be used by other both when you are using it and when you are not. You can actually connect to someone else through a third, fourth or fifth or even more person to make a contact. Now, the more “people” that you use, the slower the conversation will be. What happens is, let’s say you have two “people” between you and the person that you are trying to talk to. You transmit your message the the first station, they check it and make sure that it received it correctly, then it transmits it to the next station and it checks it and then finally sends it to the person you are talking to.

There is a limit however, to how many stations that you can connect through if memory serves, but I don’t remember how much that is, I can I find find anywhere that says it. I think that it has something to do with the packet length though. There is a way around that though. If you were to use a large network, like RoseNet or Texnet or something like that, you could go several hundred miles in one of two jumps because the network is connected through a dedicated TCP/IP or HF link.

Network Schemes

So let’s talk a little bit about the different types of networks that are out there, or at least use to be out there. I don’t know first hand how much of a network there is left since like I said at the beginning of this article, I had thought that Packet had died out, but it seems like it is making a comeback, at the very least in some geographical areas it is anyway.

The section below is an excerpt of the different network type as written on the Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Cop(TAPR) website that can be found at http://www.tapr.org

Digipeaters

The first networking scheme with packet radio was Digipeaters. Digipeaters would simply look at a packet, and if its call was in the digipeater field, would resend the packet. Digipeaters allow the extension of range of a transmitter by retransmitting any packets addressed to the digipeater. This scheme worked well when only a few people were on the radio channel. However, as packet became more popular, digipeaters soon were clogging up the airwaves with traffic being repeated over long distances. Also, if a packet got lost by one of the digipeaters, the originator station would have to retransmit the entire packet again, forcing even more congestion.

KA-Nodes

Kantronics improved on the digipeater slightly and created KA-Nodes. As with digipeaters, KA-Nodes simply repeat AX.25 frames. However, a KA-Node acknowledges every transmission at each link (node) instead of over the entire route. Therefore, instead of an end-to-end acknowledgment, KA-Nodes allow for more reliable connections with fewer timeouts, because acknowledgments are only carried on one link. KA-Nodes therefore are more reliable than digipeaters, but are not a true network. It is similar to having to wire your own telephone network to make a phone call.

NET/ROM

NET/ROM was one of the first networking schemes to try to address the problems with digipeaters. A user connects to a NET/ROM station as if connecting to any other packet station. From there, he can issue commands to instruct the station to connect to another user locally or connect to another NET/ROM station. This connect, then connect again, means that to a user’s TNC, you are connected to a local station only and its transmissions do not have to be digipeated over the entire network and risk losing packets. This local connection proved to be more reliable.

NET/ROM doesn’t use all of the AX.25 protocol. Instead, it uses special AX.25 packets called Unnumbered Information (UI) packets and then puts its own special protocol on top of AX.25. This is again used to increase efficiency of its transmissions. NET/ROM nodes, at regular intervals, transmit to other nodes their current list of known nodes. This is good because as new nodes come on-line, they are automatically integrated in the network. However, if band conditions such as ducting occur, ordinarily unreachable nodes can be entered into node lists. This causes the NET/ROM routing software to choose routes to distant nodes that are impossible. This problem requires users to develop a route to a distant node manually defining each hop instead of using the automatic routing feature.

NET/ROM is a commercial firmware (software put on a chip) program that is used as a replacement ROM in TAPR type TNCs. Other programs are available to emulate NET/ROM. Among them are TheNet, G8BPQ node switch, MSYS, and some versions of NET.

G8BPQ

In the early 1980s John Wiseman, G8BPQ, wrote a Personal Computer (PC) to NET/ROM multi-TNC gateway to support W0RLI, F6FBB, PRMPS and other BBS. The self-named G8BPQ code could interact with a network of TNCs and act as a driver for the BBS application program.

As of 2015 John still adds to and supports that program and it is now available for most MSWindows, MacOSX, and Linux (including one for the Raspberry Pi) distributions in pre-compiled and source file downloads.

It became sufficient and even advanced in that it now serves as a TCP/IP gateway, stand-alone packet radio network node, HF multi-protocol system, and a framework to support many different kinds of fully emulated TNCs.

The TARPN organization, dedicated to Amateur Radio VHF/UHF packet, uses, and documents the use of G8BPQ on the Raspberry PI embedded platform for a purely ham-radio slow-speed network.

ROSE

ROSE is another networking protocol derived from X.25. Each ROSE node has a static list of the nodes it can reach. For a user to use a ROSE switch, he issues a connect with the destination station and in the digipeater field places the call of the local ROSE switch and the distant ROSE switch the destination station can hear. Other than that, the network is completely transparent to the user.

ROSE’s use of static routing tables ensures that ROSE nodes don’t attempt to route packets through links that aren’t reliably reachable, as NET/ROM nodes often do. However, ROSE suffers from the inability to automatically update its routing tables as new nodes come on-line. The operators must manually update the routing tables, which is why ROSE networks require more maintenance.

TCP/IP

TCP/IP stands for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. TCP/IP is commonly used over the Internet wired computer network. The TCP/IP suite contains different transmission facilities such as FTP (File Transfer Protocol), SMTP (Simple Mail Transport Protocol), Telnet (Remote terminal protocol), and NNTP (Net News Transfer Protocol) The KA9Q NOS program (also called NET) is the most commonly used version of TCP/IP in packet radio. NOS originally was written for the PC compatible. However, NOS has been ported to many different computers such as the Amiga, Macintosh, Unix, and others. Smaller computers like the Commodore 64 and the Timex-Sinclar do not currently have versions of NOS available. TCP/IP based amateur networks are becoming more common each day.

TexNet

TexNet is a 3-port switch designed to create a 9600 baud backbone with 2 local access channels. The TexNet network provides transparent network access to the user. The user simply accesses his/her local TexNet node and then either connects to a user at another node or accesses various system services. TexNet provides the stability of fixed routing, while allowing new nodes to be automatically brought into the network.

BULLETIN BOARDS

Another feature that packet radio has is Bulletin Boards. This could be an area wide bulletin board or a personal bulletin board. Some areas that have a packet system in place will have one station that serves as a bulletin board for the entire area. You can connect to this station and leave a message for someone else, or a club can leave a message for all of it’s members, or even traffic passed through the National Traffic System.

Another functionality of packet is a personal bulletin board. I think that Kantronics brand tnc’s were the only ones that had this feature, but I’m not 100% sure on that. If someone connected to your station while you were away, they could leave you a message and a little light would come on the front of your TNC that would show that you had a message waiting for you. Kind of like sending an email to your friend or something.

CONCLUSION

Now that we have talked about what Packet is, and some other features and uses of it, the only thing we have left to discuss is, is it still a feasible system to use. In some ways I could see that packet could still be a viable option to emergency communications, however, I’m not sure that the supporting backbone structure is still around to make it feasible. I see it’s main purpose really being as an emergency communication system and even then it’s iffy. With technology going the way that it is going, I see other things taking it’s place in the features that it has going for it.

Let’s take the internet out of the equation all together. If the networks that we talked about before are still operational, how many of those nodes use the internet as a connection median. Will those connections still be operational in the event of an emergency? If the links are over HF, then it could still be operational but would be dependant on band conditions.

Getting passed the distance factor and let’s focus on just smallish scale, like city wide or something. What options do you have with packet, basically text messaging only. You can’t send pictures, you can’t use voice. So you are severely limited, but that may be ok. If you have other avenues for voice comms, then great, you can use packet.

I honestly don’t see packet making a comeback. There is so much more out that that we as hams have access to, like Hamnet mesh networking for example. With hamnet, nodes are self discovering and self connecting so you don’t have to manually connect somewhere to do what you need to do. You can do voice communications, picture and/or file transferring, keyboard-to-keyboard communications, video, and so much more. All this being said, it does have a downside over packet in that it transmits on 2.4 or 5GHz so it has less of a range so you will need more “nodes” in the network to cover the same geographical area, but I think it is a small price to pay.

I personally think that Packet is a dying system and really the only reason it is still around is because APRS uses packet protocols. If you are reading this and you live in an area where packet is still alive and kicking, please leave a comment below and let us know how it is used in your area.

Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Motorola Amateur Radio Club of Arizona (MARCA)

Website: http://www.w7mot.org

Some of our activities include maintaining & operating about 2 dozen repeaters located on Arizona mountain tops and the Phoenix area; expanding our experiences into new types of repeaters, such as Dstar & Fusion; Participating in ARRL Field Day typically held in the mountains near Forest Lakes, Az. (this is a very active activity) ; ARRL FMT contests; and Antenna construction, including mountain top tower climbing. Many members are, individually or in groups, active in HF activities such as Voice, Digital, CW, DXing, Digital HF modes, MESH, and EOC operations around the valley, including contesting,. Meeting are held the 3rd Tuesday of each Month. Meetings start at 6:30pm and are typically 2 hours duration. The agenda typically is a business meeting, lasting about an hour, followed by a Presentation of interest by a guest speaker or club member.Meetings are held at the Denny’s on Broadway, south side of street, just east of Priest Rd., in Tempe.Denny’s, 1343 W. Broadway Rd., Tempe, Az. 85282. Next meeting is the day this podcast releases, Feb 16, 2016 at 6:30pm at the above location. List of repeaters: http://www.w7mot.org/index.php/repeaters/repeater-list Map of Repeater Locations: http://www.w7mot.org/index.php/repeaters/repeater-map On their website you can find a very extensive file depository of a variety of information. While looking through their site, and actually one of the reasons that I chose this club to do the spotlight on this episode was their hammet mesh network presentation. Hamnet is something that I am extremely interested in and have been trying to learn more about it since I first did a post about it a few months ago. Those posts can be found here and here. The experiment that they documented in this presentation makes me hopeful that I can do what I am wanting to try and do here locally. The have presentations on things from hamnet to APRS to NTS to Software Defined Radios. The also have a very active newsletter which appears to be a combined newsletter with a bunch of other ham clubs in the area.

That brings us to the end of this post. I hope that you enjoyed this blog post as well as the accompanying podcast episode. Please leave a comment below and let me know what you thought about this episode. Also, please head on over to ITunesand give me an honest star rating and review. This will really help me in the rankings of my podcast and help other people find it.

If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site to get an email when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It is super easy to do, just click on subscribe on the menu at the top of the page, fill out the form. Then check your email, you will get a confirmation email with a link that you will have to click on to complete your subscription. Once that is all done, you will start getting emails from me. Please like me on Facebook and follow me Twitter. You can find the links to all my social media pages on the menu at the top of the page under social.

ETH004 - DMR

Feb 9, 2016 28:06

Description:

Hey everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio podcast! In today’s episode we are are talking about Digital Mode Radios.

Digital Mode Radio Amateur Radio Club Spotligh Montgomery Amateur Radio Club , Montgomery, AL Started in 1938 Club Call sign – W4AP Website: http://www.w4ap.org Meetings – Third Monday @ 7pm, except December @ American Red Cross building, 5015 Woods Crossing Drive, Montgomery, AL 36106 Repeaters 146.840 – Wetumpka 146.920 – NE Montgomery – Dstar – Internet Gateway 147.180 – 123.0 tone – S MGM County 444.500 – 100 tone – Wetumpka 443.975 – NE Montgomery – Dstar – Internet Gateway 2M Digital 145.690 – Wetumpka – W4AP-1 Packet BBS, W4AP-2 Digipeater 144.390 – E Montgomery – W4AP-1 APRS Digipeater AL EOC Clanton – W4AP-3 APRS Digipeater Baptist South Hospital – W4AP-5 APRS Digipeaters and Igate Events Hamfest Saturday, November 19, 2016 starting at 9am Hosting the Alabama State Convention Offering VE Testing Forums Lots of Door Prizes Both indoor and outdoor areas Field Day Public Service Skywarn and ARES Several walkathons and bike races

This episode I decided not to put any news in it. I am still trying to figure out what works the best for my episodes and what I like the best. The problem with having the news in my episodes is that I have to wait until almost the release date to have up to date news articles. In episode 3 I recorded it on the Sunday before it was released. This may be an issue down the road when I may not have the time to record it with such a short lead time. Perfect example is coming up in a few weeks when we will be moving. I will probably be out of pocket for a couple weeks.

I have decided to go to a weekly podcast instead of a biweekly one as well, starting with this episode. I have noticed that over the past few weeks that I have been doing this podcast, I am finding it harder and harder to sit down and write a blog post that normally takes me a few hours over recording a podcast that I can do in about an hour. We are going to try it, I might end up going back to a bi-weekly one, but for now we are going to strive forward with weekly and I will be dropping one of my normal blog posts so I will just be doing one blog post and one podcast a week.

Please subscribe to my podcast on ITunes and for all of you android users out there, I have already submitted my podcast to Google Play and it has been accepted. So once they release the podcast functionality, you will be able to listen to my podcast on Google Play. Also please subscribe to my site to get emails on when I publish a new post or podcast. Don’t forget to like me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter as well. Links to all my social media pages can be found on the menu at the top of the page under Social.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis,  K5CLM

ETH000 - About Me

Jan 19, 2016 12:17

Description:

Hello everybody and welcome to the very first episode of the Everything Hamradio podcast. In this episode we talk about…well…me. We also talk about how this podcast is going to work and do our very first Ham Radio Club Spotlight about my club, Texas Adventist Emergency Communications.

About Me

My name is Curtis and my call sign is K5CLM. I have been a hamradio operator for about 20 years, since 1995. I currently hold an Amateur Extra class license. I am currently serving as Vice President for the Texas Adventist Emergency Communications (http://www.k5aec.net) and work with my county SKYWARN and ARES team. I am happily married to the love of my life and we are foster parents for currently 4 beautiful girls ages 14 months to 11 years.

I am a 911 telecommunicator and have been for about 11 years now. I have dispatched for police, fire and EMS. I have been a shift supervisor and a training officer. I love what I do and have learned a lot from it that I use in amateur radio and visa versa

Ham Radio Club Spotlight

In this episode we cover a club that is very near and dear to my heart. The club is focused on community service and disaster response. I helped start the club in 1995 and have been an officer in it since it started. Our primary purpose is to help Adventist Community Services in times of disaster by providing communication between different distribution centers. However, we also assist the local police department with parades and missing people as well as the local university with any major event that they have (i.e. Graduation).

For more information about the club, check out the website at http://www.k5aec.net or our Facebook page athttp://www.facebook.com/txaec/

Plans for Podcast

My plan for the third segment of my podcast will be talking a little bit about the recent news, however in this episode we talk about my plans for the podcast.

The podcast will be broken into three segments.

The first segment will be a teaching segment where we will talk about a brief summary of the previous two weeks blog posts on my blog or maybe a preview of the upcoming ones. The second segment will be a Ham Radio Club Spotlight. In this segment I am going to be picking clubs at random and talking about them. Giving information about the club, website address, locations, meeting times, repeaters, etc. The third segment will be talking about recent news articles and my thoughts on them.

I plan on trying to keep the podcast about 25-30 minutes in length. The podcast will be released every two weeks starting January 19, 2016.

Thanks for stopping by and reading the notes for this episode of the Everything Hamradio Podcast. If you liked what you heard on this podcast and/or you like what you see here, please subscribe to my website to get notifications on when I publish a new post or podcast. Also, please like me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to all my social media pages can be found on the menu at the top under Social. Also, I would like to ask that you head on over to ITunes and subscribe to my podcast if you have not done so already and please rate it and give me an honest review. This helps other to find my podcast.

Until next time…

73 de Curtis, K5CLM

* Music provide by Bensound.com